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G. T. Thomson, M. D., a prominent physician of Barton County, has been a resident of Golden City since 1882. He is a native of Christian County, Ky., and is a son of James and Cath erine Thomson, natives of Virginia, who were early settlers of Kentucky. Our subject was reared on a farm, and, his father dying when he was thirteen years old, the mother and family moved to Washington County, ILL. He was educated at the Hopkinsville High School, and in 1865 entered the Chicago Medical College, graduating from the St. Louis Medical College in 1873. He first located at New Memphis, ILL., where he was actively engaged in practice for several years, and then went to Steelville, Randolph County, ILL., where he practiced nine years. From the latter place he removed to Golden City his present home, where he has since devoted his attention to the practice of his chosen profession, and enjoys a large and lucrative patronage. The Doctor is a member of the Board of United States Pension Exam iners of his district, and is local surgeon for the Fort Scott & Memphis Railroad. He has satisfactorily served as coroner of the county, and a member of the school board, and in politics his sympathies are with the Democratic Party. He owns 160 acres of land, beside town property, and takes an active interest in all worthy public enterprises. He was married in 1868 to Nannie Ford, a native of Illinois. Their five children are: Terrill, Katie, Amos, Ruth and Charles. Dr. and Mrs. Thomson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


W. H. Thompson, general merchant at Beloit, Barton County, Mo., was born in Roodhouse, ILL., in 1859, and is one of five children born to the marriage of John P. and S. M. (Thompson) Thompson, both of whom were born, reared and married in Greene County, ILL. The father was a farmer, and died in Feb ruary, 1864, being a son of Thomas Thompson, a Kentuckian, who emigrated to Illinois at an early day, where he spent the rest of his days, in tilling the soil. W. H. Thompson, our subject, was thirteen years old when he came to Missouri with his mother. They lived first in De Kalb, then in Clinton, and finally came to Barton County in 1874, where W. H. received part of his educa tion in the public schools of Lamar. After leaving school he passed an examination for a certificate to teach, but soon after began clerking in the mercantile establishment of E. C. Morlen, with whom he remained two years, then embarking in the same business with his brother at Dublin, being thus associated one year. His brother died, and in 1881 Mr. Thompson opened his present establishment in connection with his younger brother, the style of the firm being Thompson Bros. In June, 1887, he pur chased his brother's interest, and has since been successfully managing the establishment alone, his stock being valued at about $3,000, and his annual sales amounting to $12,000. In 1883 he was elected township trustee and ex-officio treasurer, being re-elected in 1885, 1887 and 1889. Since 1881 he has filled the position of postmaster of Beloit, and in his political views is a Democrat. In October, 1884, he was married to Miss Clara Beamer, who was born in West Union, Iowa, in 1863, which union has resulted in the birth of two children: Maud and Roy Cleveland. Mrs. Thompson received her education in the graded schools of Springfield, also taking a course of music in that city.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Honorable Berry G. Thurman, attorney-at-law, and State senator from the twenty eighth district, was born in Miller County, Mo., January 25, 1851, and is one of the representative men of the county. He is the son of John B. and Jane (Allee) Thurman, and the grandson of Robert Thurman, who was a native of Vir ginia. John B. Thurman was born in Kentucky, in 1814. and in about 1832 came to St. Louis County, Mo., where he remained for some time, and then came on to Moniteau County, where he married Miss Jane Allee. He was a blacksmith by trade, but in later years he followed farming. He moved to Miller, then to Morgan County, and finally found a home in Dade County, in 1868. He died January 1, 1888, but the mother is still living in that county. Both were members of the Baptist Church, and he was a Democrat in politics. Honorable Berry G. Thurman, one of ten children — six sons and four daughters — received his literary education in the common schools, and was a student in the Mis souri State University two years. He read law under Judge D. A. De Armond, and graduated from the law department of the above university in 1873. The same year he was admitted to the bar at Lamar, though he located at Greenfield, Dade County. He was elected prosecuting attorney of Dade County in 1874, and again in 1878, being the first Democrat chosen to that office in that county after the war. In 1884 he came to Lamar, and formed a partnership with A. J. Wray, which still exists. In 1888 he was elected to the State Senate, where he received appointment on the following important committees: judiciary revision, labor, mines and mining, deaf and dumb asylums. November 12, 1879, Mr. Thurman married Miss Lula Clark, daughter of Capt. S. S. Clark, and a native of Benton County, Mo. They have two children: William H. and Bessie. Mr. Thurman is a Knight Templar in the Masonic fraternity, and stands at the head of the bar at Lamar. Mrs. Thurman belongs to the Congregational Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Hon. Henry C. Timmonds, an attorney-at-law of Lamar, Mo., was born in Knoxville, Iowa, May 12, 1853, being the eldest of three children born to the union of Dr. L. M. Timmonds and Jane M. Tichenor, who were born, reared and married in Ohio County, Ky., the former being of Irish descent, and the latter of English. The mother was a lineal descendant of John Alden, who came to America in that famous old ship, the Mayflower, and who is immortalized in Longfellow's poem, "The Courtship of Miles Standish." The parents resided in Kentucky until 1852, then moved to Iowa, and six years later took up their abode in Greene County, Mo., coming in 1859 to Lamar. The father was a graduate of Iowa Medical University, and made this profession his chief pursuit through life. Prior to the late war, he was county judge of Barton County, and in 1865 was appointed circuit clerk, county clerk, and recorder, being elected in 1866 to the same position. He was a Democrat, and in early life a member of the Christian Church, in which faith his wife died in 1861, being only twenty nine years of age. After her death, Dr. Timmonds wedded Miss Mary H. Oulds, by whom he became the father of three children. Henry C. Timmonds, the immediate subject of this sketch, received the greater part of his education in the schools of Lamar, and, having worked in his father's office till 1870, he began learning the printer's trade in the office of the Southwest Missourian, March 27, 1873, he married Miss Kate Fast, a daughter of Peter Fast. She was born in Stark County, ILL., and by Mr. Timmonds is the mother of two children: Harry and Xora. For one term Mr. Timmonds was principal of public schools of Lamar, and in the fall of 1873 moved to Stockton, Mo., where he leased the office and fixtures of the Stockton Journal, and was both editor and pressman, his wife assisting him in the office, and making a full hand. Prior to his marriage he read law for some time with Honorable Charles H. Morgan, and, while managing the Journal, spent his leisure time in pursuing this study. After reading one year under Judge D. P. Stratton, he was admitted to the Stockton bar in 1880, returning the same year to Lamar, and forming a partnership with Honorable Charles H. Morgan, which lasted until Mr. Morgan's third election to Con gress. Then Mr. Timmonds became associated with Honorable Edward Buler in the practice of his profession, and has remained thus connected up the present time. From 1882 to 1886 he was prose cuting attorney, and in the latter year was elected to represent Barton County in the State Legislature. In 1888 he was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention, and made the nominating speech for Lieutenant Governor Claycomb. Mr. Timmonds has always been a Democrat, and professionally ranks among the first lawyers of the Barton County bar. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and his wife belongs to the Congregational Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Brockholst Tyler, farmer and stockman, was born in the "Empire State" (Columbia County), October 29, 1825, being a son of Major M. and Edith (Bradford) Tyler, who were born in Columbia County, N. Y., and Windom County, Conn., in 1791 and 1793, respectively. Three Tyler brothers came to America in the "Mayflower," one settling in the New England States, one in Virginia, and the third was lost track of. The father of our subject was a cousin of President Tyler, and during the War of 1812, when two men were needed to make up a company, he was one of three to cast lots, but fortune was in his favor, and he remained at home. He was a farmer and trader, and was com missioner of Columbia County, and held minor offices. He was captain of a company of New York militia in muster days, and was a prominent man of his time. His wife, whom he married in 1810, was a descendent of Governor Bradford, of Virginia. They moved to Kansas about 1860, and the father died in 1883, in Barton County, having been a Democrat, Whig and Republican in politics, his wife dying in Massachusetts about two years later, having been a member of the Congregational Church for many years. Thirteen of their fifteen children lived to be grown, Brockhoist Tyler being the tenth child. His boyhood days were spent in Columbia County, N. Y., and his education was received in the common schools and Austerlitz Academy. When nineteen years of age he began farming for himself, and the 15th of August, 1848, he was married to Cornelia A. Baker, a native of Berkshire County, Mass., born September 3, 1829. In 1856 they moved to Anderson County, Kan., and Mr. Tyler was en gaged in merchandising for ten years. Since 1866 he has resided in Barton County, Mo., being the owner of a fertile and well tilled farm. He has been a successful financier, and is one of the well-to-do residents of the county. He has always sided with the Republican Party, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Church. Their children are: Isador J., John F., Harriet A. (deceased), Edwin C, George F., Mary E., Erastus L., Jennie (deceased), James M., Mattie (deceased), Rosa N., William G., Joseph B. and Ernest U. Usher Brothers general merchants of Minden Mines, Mo., established their business in April, 1885, and their establishment consists of two rooms, one being used for dry goods, and the other for drugs and groceries, their stock being valued at $3,500, and their average sales about fifty dollars per day. The firm consists of Francis M. and James H. Usher, who were born in Ballard, now Carlisle County, Ky., in 1861 and 1862, respect ively, their parents being James H. and Frances S. (Sanford) Usher, both of whom were born in what is now Christian County, Ky., in 1832 and 1836, respectively. They were married in their native State in 1859, and the father, who was a practicing physi cian and a graduate of the Philadelphia Medical College, died there in 1862. He had a brother, Francis M., who also gradu ated from that college, and was a very successful physician for some years, but is now a wealthy tobacconist at Fulton, Ky. Their father, Dr. James H. Usher, is still living, and was for many years a very successful medical practitioner, but is now a wealthy farmer in Christian County, Ky., in which county he was probably born. The parents of our subjects are church mem bers, and the mother is the daughter of Dr. Thomas and Rosella Sanford, who were born in Henry and Washington Counties, Ky., respectively, and died in their native State, both in the month of December, the father in 1860, and the mother in 1851. Mrs. Usher married her second husband in 1872, and since 1885 has resided at Minden Mines. Both her sons, whose names head this sketch, received their early educations in the common schools, supplemented by a number of years attendance in the Milburn High School. They were both engaged in clerking for a num ber of years, Francis M. being in a drug store. In 1885 he went West looking for a location, and finally decided to locate in Min den Mines, where he and brother are now successfully established in business. Both brothers are members in good standing in the Christian Church, and are young men of enterprise and intelli gence. In their political views Francis M. is a Republican, and James H. is a Democrat. The latter has been postmaster of Minden Mines since 1885. The former married in January, 1889, Miss Maude F., a daughter of L. P. and Catherine Letton, who were born in Bourbon County, Ky., where Mrs. Usher was also born. They came to Johnson County, Mo., when she was a child, and are now living in Barton County, near Liberal. Francis M. has been express agent for the Adams Express Com pany at Minden Mines, since September, 1885.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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