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Barton County
Missouri

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Edward G. Ward, an early settler of Barton County, Mo., is a son of George E. and Charity H. (Greene) Ward, who were born in Lynchburg, Va., and Harrodsburg, Ky., April 1, 1811, and March 30, 1811, respectively. They were married in the mother's native town, and about 1840 moved to Independence, Mo., and subsequently to Johnson County, moving to Sabine Parish, La. in 1844, where Mr. Ward was chosen assessor, and where he had all the mail contracts in Louisiana and Texas. In 1852 he started to California, but only got as far as Barton County, Mo,, and located where Lamar now stands, the county at that time going by the name of Jasper. He built a little log storehouse near where M. N. Wills now resides, and in 1857 built a two story frame storehouse on the southwest corner of the pub lic square, which was burned during the war. During that time he served in Talbot's regiment until the battle of Pea Ridge, in which engagement he was wounded, dying the following October 2, 1862. He named Barton County, and when it was laid off he secured the first Lamar post office and called it Lamar, which be came the present town. He served as judge when it was part of Jasper County, and filled the office of treasurer after it became Barton County. He was a Democrat, and was an Episcopalian in faith, his wife being a member of the Christian Church. His wife is still living, having borne five children, three of whom sur vive. The great grandfather, Thomas Ward, was a Scotchman, and was a colonel in the Revolutionary War. The grandfather, Seth Ward, was an 1812 soldier. The maternal great grandfather was also a Revolutionary soldier. Edward G. Ward, the imme diate subject of this biography, was born in Barren County, Ky., January 28, 1839, and in youth attended the old subscription schools of Barton County, Mo. In June, 1861, he enlisted in the Missouri State Militia, C. S. A., and after serving about six months he joined the regular Confederate army, serving under Shelby until the close of the war. He surrendered at Shreveport, La., having been in the battles of Pea Ridge, Wilson's Creek, Lexington, Lone Jack, Helena, Shelby's Raid, Price's Raid, Little Rock, Prairie De Hand, Newtonia and others; at the last named battle a grape shot passing through his abdomen from front to rear. He now carries a 44-caliber revolver ball in his left lung, and a buckshot in his scalp. In 1863 he was elected captain of a select company for advance service. After the war he joined his mother and sisters in Illinois, and in 1868 came back to Barton County, where he has since been engaged in farming and mer chandising. January 28, 1869, Mr. Ward married Mary, a daughter of Dr. John Logan, who was a cousin of General John A. Logan, and a colonel of the Thirty second Illinois, Federal Army. She was born in Illinois, July 8, 1844, and is the mother of six children: Edward L., Annie, William B., George E., Lillian and John R. Mrs. Ward is a member of the Methodist Church, and Mr. Ward is a Royal Arch Mason.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Judge Allen Warden, public administrator for Barton County, was born in Auburn, New York, April 8, 1821, and is the son of Bucklin and Anna (Francisco) Warden, natives of Vermont and New Jersey, respectively. They were married in New York, and here the father followed farming and blacksmithing. He was a lieutenant in the War of 1812, and was of Scotch descent. He passed his last days in New York, as did also the mother, who was of Spanish origin. They were the parents of five children, two sons and three daughters. The paternal grandfather was one of the immortal eighty three who captured Ticonderoga under Ethan Allen, hence the name Allen is a favorite in the Warden family. While growing to manhood Judge Allen Warden acquired an academic education, and, after finishing the same (1842), he went to Lafayette County, Wis., where he opened a farm, but soon turned his attention to merchandising and milling. In 1846 he married Miss Lucinda Miller, a native of Indiana, and to them were born seven children, five sons and two daughters. Mr. Warden was the first presiding judge of Lafay ette County, and that before he was twenty four years of age. He was a member of the constitutional convention of Wiscon sin, in 1848, was presidential elector in 1864, and again in 1868, and, when the late war broke out, he used all his eloquence and influence for the Union cause. He raised two companies, and was elected captain of each, but, his family not consenting to his going, another led them to the field. In recognition of the serv ices rendered by him, Governor J. T. Lewis tendered him the colonelcy of the Thirty first Wisconsin Infantry, but the con sideration that deterred him from becoming captain, also influenced him in this matter. To induce young men to enlist that a draft might not come on the county, he got the county to offer $300 bounty to those who would enlist, and, being presiding judge of the court, he issued county warrants that soon dropped to a few cents on the dollar, thus foreboding financial ruin to the county. Seeing how the government credit was strengthened by issuing United States bonds, he made a per sonal appeal to the Wisconsin Legislature to permit him to issue county bonds and exchange them for warrants. The result was that the bonds kept almost at par, and thus saved the county. In 1875 Judge Warden came to Barton County. Mo., and in 1882 was chosen presiding judge of Barton County Court. Two years later he was made probate judge. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a Knight Templar in Masonry.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Crawford H. Warford, a butcher of Lamar, Mo., was born in Howard County, of this State, October 8, 1853, and is one of twelve children, who lived to be grown, in a family of thirteen, born to John and Mary (Baxter) Warford, who were born, reared and married in Kentucky. They were among the early settlers of Missouri, and, on coming to this State, had all their worldly goods in a wagon, and, when he died, having been a tiller of the soil through life, he owned a fine farm of 400 acres. He was a Democrat, and, at the time of his death, was seventy six years of age. His wife was seventy seven. They were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Crawford H. Warford, the thir teenth of his parents' children, was reared on a farm, and, in order to receive his education, was obliged to walk three miles to school. When nineteen years of age he began farming for himself, and, on the 19th of February, 1874, was married to Parthenia E. Humphrey, a Virginian, by whom he became the father of seven children, two sons and five daughters. They resided in Howard County, Mo., until they came to Barton County, and Mr. War ford has since been engaged in his present business in Lamar, being with L. Mouser the first five or six years. He is a Demo crat, a member of the A. O. U. W., and he and wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


H. T. Wells, D. D. S., was born in Dade County, Mo., July 6, 1852, and received his literary education in the public schools. In 1875 he graduated from the Pennsylvania Dental College, practiced for some time in Philadelphia, and then came to Green field, Mo., where he practiced his profession until 1881, after which he came to Lamar, Mo. Here he has practiced contin uously ever since. He is secretary of the Southwestern Dental Association, and is an active member of the Masonic order, being eminent commander of Mt. Olive Commandery; past master of Lamar Lodge; past high priest of Lamar Chapter; past commander of Constantine Commandery, Greenfield, Mo. Polit ically he is a Democrat. October 5, 1874, he married Miss Ella M. Bennett, a native of New York, and the fruits of his union are three children, two sons and one daughter. For seventeen years Dr. Wells has practiced his profession, and is accounted one of the leading dentists of Lamar, or, in fact, in this portion of the State. He is one of nine children, two now living, born to his parents, John and Harriet M. (Taylor) Wells. The father was born in Otsego County, N. Y., in 1810, and the mother in Phila delphia, Penn., in 1820. In early days the father came to St. Louis, where he engaged in commercial merchandising, and to that city the mother came on a visit. Here they met and were married. Soon after they moved to Dade County, Mo., and here the father was engaged in merchandising, farming and stock dealing. He died in 1857. After returning to Philadelphia, the mother died in 1867.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John W. Werts, a blacksmith of Milford, Mo., was born in New Jersey, February 17, 1842, and is a son of Nicholas and Sophia (Winghardt) Werts, who were born in Germany, the former's birth occurring in 1795, and the latter's in 1805. Nicholas Werts came to America in 1822, and followed the occupation of blacksmithing throughout life. He and wife became the parents of the following children: Joseph, who died in Illinois; Cath erine, the deceased wife of George Parks; Anthony, who died in New Jersey; Mary (deceased); Jacob, living in Texas; Maria, the deceased wife of P. Montgomery; William, living in New Jersey; Margaret, wife of William Bower, of Kansas; Mary, wife of William Gilmore, of Kansas; Nicholas, a farmer of Kansas; Christian (deceased); George, also a farmer of Kansas; and J. W. The latter began doing for himself at the age of twenty, and enlisted in August, 1862, in Battery A, Third Illinois, and served three years, participating in the following combats: Little Rock, Saline River, besides numerous minor engagements. He lost his right eye in the fight at Prairie De Hand, and was dis charged July 2, at Springfield, ILL. He was unable to do any thing the first three years after the war, and the following two years was engaged in building fence. In the fall of 1869 he came to Barton County, and worked at the blacksmith's trade for a number of years, then bought a farm in Dade County, which he was engaged in tilling in connection with his trade. In 1885 he sold out and moved to Newport, where he tilled the soil for two years, after which he rented his land and came to Milford, where he has since been working at his trade. He was married in August, 1870, to Elizabeth Aldred, who was born on the 3rd of February, 1853, and to them have been born these children: Alva Oscar (deceased); Laura Louisa, born in March, 1873; De Witt C, Le Roy, Clarence, Noara and Pearl. Mr. Werts and his wife are members of the United Brethren Church, and he is a Republican, and takes an active interest in political affairs. He is a patron of education, and contributes liberally of his means to churches, schools, and other enterprises tending to benefit the county, and is now president of Milford Township Sabbath school Convention. He was licensed to preach the gospel in 1877 by Elder Joslin, but most of his time is devoted to Sabbath school work.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Merida N. Wills, banker and real estate dealer, was born in Macoupin County, ILL., June 15, 1828, and is the son of Elijah and Drusilla (Solomon) Wills, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and North Carolina. When about ten years of age, the mother moved with her parents from North Carolina to Kentucky, was married there to Mr. Wills, and in 1825 they moved to Jackson ville, ILL., when only two cabins marked the town. Later they moved to Macoupin County, ILL. Mr. Wills was an honest, hard working farmer, and a staunch Democrat in politics. He and wife were members of the Regular Baptist Church. He died in this county at the age of seventy four, and later the mother visited her son in California, where she too passed away at the age of seventy six years. In their family were eleven children, of whom six are now living. Merida N. Wills resided in Macoupin County, ILL., received his education in the old time schoolhouse, and further advanced his knowledge by self study at home. In 1858 he married Miss Susanna L. Lamarr, a native of the same county as himself. Having farmed until 1860, he was elected sheriff of his native county, and re-elected in 1864. Two years later he came to Barton County, Mo., and two years after built perhaps the first steam gristmill in the county, to which settlers would come for thirty miles. He has been inter ested in farming since he first came to the county, and for some time he was also associated with Mr. C. H. Brown in the bank ing business, but in 1881 he opened a bank, of which he is sole proprietor. Owing to dissatisfaction in the management of county affairs, he consented to run on the Greenback ticket for county treasurer, though he is not a man whose attention is given much to politics, and he with most of the ticket was elected, to the great surprise of the old parties. He has taken the Encampment degree in the Odd Fellow's fraternity, and has been deputy grand master. Both he and wife have been mem bers of the Missionary Baptist Church for over forty years. Six children were born to their union, three sons and three daughters. When first married, Mr. Wills was not worth twenty dollars all told, and cradled oats at fifty cents a day to buy his furniture. Early in the battle of life he lost his right hand, but he uses the remaining one to the best advantage. Now he is accounted one of the wealthy men of Barton County. His eldest son, Don P., is a merchant of Lamar. Another son, William M. Wills, is treasurer of Barton County, and was born in Carlinville, ILL., April 22, 1863. When three years of age he moved with his parents to Barton County, where he has resided ever since. He attained his growth on the farm, attending the public schools, and at the age of sixteen entered the Southwest Baptist College, Bolivar, Mo., where he attended three years. In 1882 he began clerking in his father's bank, which he con tinued until 1888, when he was chosen treasurer of the county. He is a staunch Democrat, and a Knight of Pythias. He is a competent businessman, and the youngest one holding a county office. Another son of Merida N. Wills, T. L. Wills, is an attorney at Lamar. He was born in Carlinville, ILL., July 8, 1865, received his education in the Southwest Baptist College, and at William Jewell. He completed his law course at the State University, Columbia, in 1887, and, having practiced in California a year, he returned and opened an office in Lamar. Politically he is a Republican.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James Hill Wilson, president of the First National Bank of Lamar, is a native of Lincoln County, N. C., born December 11, 1831, being a son of James and Mary (Campbell) Wilson, who were also born in the "Old North Stateā€ in 1786 and 1795, respect ively; they were married in 1812, and resided in that State until 1834, when they moved to Owen County, Ind., where the father was engaged in farming and school teaching, and died at the age of seventy two years, and his wife at the age of seventy eight. He was a Whig politically. He and wife were members of the Methodist Church, and the pioneer preachers made their house their home, and, as church houses were few, often preached in their old home. James H. Wilson received his education in the old log schoolhouse, where school was taught three months in the year. At the age of twenty years he went to work at the car penter's trade at ten dollars per month, but soon had his wages advanced, and in two years was getting one dollar and a half per day, which was the highest price paid to carpenters in that day. On November 27, 1855, he was married to Ann M. Miller, a daughter of Honorable James F. Miller. She was born in Kentucky, and was raised in Indiana, and her union with Mr. Wilson resulted in the birth of ten children, eight sons and two daughters, five sons and two daughters now living: E. Stanley, Laura B., Lizzie E., James F., Joseph C, Lovel B. and Scott H. In 1864 he moved to Douglas County, ILL., and engaged in farming and buying and shipping grain, and in April, 1882, moved to Lamar, Mo., and embarked in the real estate and loan business. He is treasurer of Lamar school district, and president of the First National Bank. Politically he is a Prohibitionist, believing that the saloon is the greatest evil of the day.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James M. Wilson, stockman and farmer, of Barton County, Mo., was born in Morgan County, Ind., in 1844, and is a son of Alexander and Mary (Maxwell) Wilson, who were born, reared and married in Kentucky, and about 1830 removed to Indiana, where Mr. Wilson was killed in 1862, while running a saw mill. His widow died in Kansas in 1874, both having been earnest members of the Christian Church. Mr. Wilson was a farmer by occupation, and served as constable sixteen years, and as assessor quite a number of years. His father, John, was of Irish birth, was one of the early settlers of Kentucky, and died in Indiana. James M. Wilson is the seventh of nine children, and received his education in the old log school houses of Indiana. On the 4th of July, 1863, he joined Company G, One Hundred and Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was on duty in East Tennessee for about six months. After about eight months service he returned home, but soon after joined Company B, First Heavy Artillery, and operated in Louisiana and Alabama. In July, 1865, he returned home, and the following year was married to Miss Sarah, a daughter of Andrew and Susanna Baker, who were natives of the "Old North State." When Mrs. Wilson was about four years old, her parents removed to Indiana, where her mother died. Mr. Baker died in Jackson County, Mo., in October, 1885. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson four sons and one daughter have been born. In 1867 they removed to Crawford County, Kan., and in 1879 to Barton County, Mo., their present finely cultivated farm of 200 acres being then raw prairie land. He is a Republican, and his first presidential vote was cast for U. S. Grant in 1868. While in Kansas he served eight years as constable. He and his wife are members of the Church of God.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Isaac Wimmer, a farmer of Lamar Township, and the owner of 240 acres of fertile land, has been a resident of Barton County since 1882. He was born in Union County, Ind., in 1827, and is a son of William and Sarah (Templeton) Wimmer, both Vir ginians, who emigrated to Indiana in 1818, being among the early settlers of Union County. Later they went to Miami County, where the father died in June, 1888, at the advanced age of ninety four years, having been a soldier in the War of 1812. He took an active interest in politics, and was first a Whig, and then became a Republican. He and wife were members of the Dunkard Church. After the death of his wife, which occurred in 1858, he married again, his second wife being Nancy Carr, who died in 1881. He reared a family of eight children by his first wife, all of whom are now living: Fleming, who is a farmer of Adair County, Iowa; James, a farmer of Miami County, Ind.; Hannah, wife of Lewis Phillips, of Miami County, Ind.; John, a carpenter of Somerset, Ind.; Sarah, now Mrs. Keller, of Wabash, Ind.; Isaac ; William P., who resides in Grant County, Ind.; and Mary, wife of Morris Chris, of Miami County, Ind. Isaac Wimmer was reared on a farm, and at the age of twenty one years went to Somerset, Ind., and began working at the carpenter's trade, which he followed until 1855, when he bought a farm of 160 acres in Miami County, which he improved, and there made his home till 1859, when he sold it and bought 160 acres in Grant County, which he also sold in 1882. Since that time he has resided in Barton County on his present farm. He is a Republican in his political opinions, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. Miss Malinda Minnick became his wife in 1852. She was born in Wayne County, Ind., and by Mr. Wimmer became the mother of seven children: James M., who is now a clerk in the War Department at Washington, D. C.; Frances Adaline, wife of William M. McGrew, M. D., of La Fontaine, Ind.; William, in Colorado; Winfield Scott, a merchant of Neosho Rapids, Kan.; Isaac Newton, a farmer of the county; Oliver P., and George Glenn.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


M. G. Witter, M. D., a well known physician of the county, was born in Chariton County, Mo, on the 23rd of February, 1840, his parents being Marshall B. and Martha C. (Baker) Witter, who were born in Franklin County, Vt., in 1802 and 1808, and were married in their native State sixty years ago. About 1840 they moved to Cleveland, Ohio, coming soon after to Brunswick, Mo., where they resided five years, after which they became residents of Milan, Sullivan County. The father is a graduate of a law school in Vermont, and has actively practiced his profession throughout life. He surveyed the lands of Sullivan County, and helped lay out and name the town of Milan, of which he has served as mayor for years. He and wife have been members of the Methodist Church for at least sixty years, and he has always been a Republican in his political views. They now reside at Milan, Mo., aged eighty seven and eighty one, respectively, well preserved in years. The following are their seven children now living: Mariah; Marshall, a farmer of Washington Territory; Martha C.; M. G.; Martin R. H., who has for the past twenty five years been connected with the Globe Democrat, of St. Louis; Melissa; and William S. M., a practicing physician of Milan. Mary is deceased. M. G. Witter, our subject, was educated in the Milan Academy, and, at the age of twenty years, left home, and went to Washington Territory, Oregon and California, and resided for some time in San Francisco. Having previously read medicine, he further prosecuted his studies, and was graduated from the Toland Medical College in 1868, locating in Middlebury, Mercer County, Mo., where he practiced one year, and came to Appleton City, where he remained until 1882. In 1887 he came to Barton County, locating in Irwin, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, a beautiful village six miles north of Lamar, where he has since practiced his profession, and is the only druggist in the place. He is a physician of the regular school, a successful practitioner, and enjoys the full confidence of those among whom he labors. From 1886 to 1888 he was coroner of Barton County. He is a Knight Templar in the Masonic order, and he and wife, whom he married in 1869, are consistent members of the Presbyterian Church. She was Mary E. Kelley, a daughter of John Kelley, and was born in Sullivan County, Mo. Their children are: Zeruah, Charles M., Cora D. and George R.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


W. O. Woody, a farmer of Newport Township, Barton County, Mo., is the owner of 160 acres of good land. He was born in Dade County, Mo., and is a son of J. C. and Elizabeth (Alexander) Woody, both of whom were born in Tennessee. They emigrated to Dade County, Mo., in 1849, and settled near Green field, where the father died in 1881, at the age of fifty years, still survived by his widow, who is residing in Dade County. Mr. Woody was for many years an elder in the Cumberland Pres byterian Church, and during the late war was a soldier in the Home Guards. W. O. Woody, our subject, was reared on a farm in Dade County, and received his early education in the com mon schools. In 1875 he married Miss Mary M. Kessler, a native of Virginia, and a daughter of Lewis and Elizabeth (Denton) Kessler, who were also Virginians, the father dying in his native State. The mother came to Dade County in 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Woody have two children: Leeverne and Maud. Mr. Woody is a staunch Republican in his political views, and he and wife have been members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church for a number of years. He is one of the substantial citizens of the county, and is always ready and willing to support worthy enterprises.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Anderson J. Wray, attorney at Lamar, was born in Shelby County, Ind., in February, 1842, and is the son of Dr. Hardy and Belinda (Fox) Wray, who were natives respectively of Virginia and North Carolina. When but children, both removed to Shelby County, Ind., where they were married, and where they still live. In their family were eleven children, three sons and eight daughters. The second son, A. K. Wray, is a Congregational minister, and the youngest a physician. Anderson J. Wray, the eldest son, and the subject of this sketch, was educated in the common schools, and at Hartsville University, Hartsville, Ind. When within three months of graduating, a disturbance arose in the school, and he ceased attendance there. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served in that regiment about a year, participating in the battles of Greenbrier and Winchester. At the former battle a flying missile struck him on the head, and disabled him for several months, although he has never fully recovered from the injury. Having again joined his regiment, he took the measles, on account of which he was discharged. After being in the recruit ing service a time, he joined Company E, One Hundred and Thirty second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served as first sergeant. When only sixteen years of age he began teaching school, which occupation he continued for several years, to enable him to pursue his chosen profession. In 1868 he com menced a course of law studies with Williams & Hill, of Columbus, Ind., and the following year came to Barton County, Mo., com pleting his course with Robinson & Brown. He was subsequently admitted to the bar in 1872. Previous to this, in 1870, he was elected school commissioner of Barton County, and held this position almost continuously for sixteen years. That, and the position of justice of the peace, and alderman of Lamar, are the only offices he has held. Politically he is a Republican. He has practiced his profession for nineteen years, and is recognized as an able counselor, and judge of law in its varied branches.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John T. Wyatt, one of the oldest and most prominent citi zens of Golden City Township, came here in April, 1868, and is a native of the State of Delaware. He is the son of Moses and Sarah (Thomas) Wyatt, and was left fatherless at the age of twelve years. He remained with his mother until twenty one years of age, and received very limited educational advantages, from the fact that he was the eldest son, and the support of the family fell upon his shoulders. At the age of twenty one he left home, and, in 1841, went to Bureau County, ILL., settling near Princeton, and was the first man to break land on the present site of the town of Wyanet; this land being the property, not of him self, but of other parties. After several years on this farm, he purchased eighty acres of raw land, with no improvements, and gradually increased this until he had 160 acres. He then sold out and moved to Barton County, Mo., where he purchased 210 acres of land in Golden City Township, which now adjoins the city. This he still owns, and has added to it, until now he owns 1,200 acres near the town, and is the owner of 2,696 acres alto gether. He was married in 1849, to Miss Matilda Park, a native of New Jersey, who died in 1865. He was married again in the fall of 1866, to Miss Carrie M. Park, a native of Bureau County, ILL., who bore him three living children: Lucy Belle, wife of Dr. Hankins, of Golden City, Mo.; Jessie, at home; and Alma, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt are members of the Methodist Epis copal Church, and he is a member of the A. F. & A. M. He has held the office of township assessor, and other township offices, with credit and honor, and is a respected and much esteemed citizen. Politically he affiliates with the Republican Party. Although starting life with limited means, Mr. Wyatt has made a success of life, and is today one of the substantial men of the county. He makes a specialty of rearing stock.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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