Welcome to
Barton County
Missouri

County History

History of Barton County.

TOPOGRAPHICAL AND GEOLOGICAL.

Location and Boundaries. — One of the most fortunately located of the 114 divisions which enter into the composition of Missouri, Barton is in the western tier of counties, bordering on Kansas, about 120 miles south of Kansas City, between the thirty-seventh and thirty-eighth degrees of north latitude, and the seventeenth and eighteenth degrees of longitude west from Washington, fairly in the center of a splendid farming, grazing, fruit and mineral region that at the present time is attracting as much popular interest as any district in the Southwest. It has an area of 580 square miles, or 375,000 acres. It is bounded north by Vernon County, east by Cedar and Dade Counties, south by Jasper County, and west by Crawford County, Kansas, and comprises all of Townships 31, 32 and 33, and the northern two tiers of sections of Township 30, Ranges 29, 30, 31, 32 and 33 west of the fifth principal meridian, which extends north and south across the States of Arkansas and Missouri, passing about thirty-six miles west of St. Louis. These townships also He north of the base line, which runs east and west across the State of Arkansas, passing about five miles south of Little Rock.

The Ozark Divide—Drainage.— Extending through this county east and west, a few miles north of Lamar, is the famous Ozark Divide. The water on the north flows into Drywood Creek, through its two branches, and thence into the Osage, and thence into the Missouri River. Here, too, are the headwaters of one of the tributaries forming the Sac River.   Only a few feet from the source of the stream that is a feeder to the Missouri, is that of another rivulet, which, in wet weather, flows into one of the forks of Spring River, known familiarly as 11 Muddy," thence south into White River, and into this flows Coon Creek. In the northeast part of the county is Horse Creek; in the north center, Little Drywood; while the east and middle forks of Big Drywood wind their course through beautiful vales in the northwest corner. Turning thence southward are the waters of Duval Creek. Along the south line of the east half of the county is Coon Creek, forming an almost dividing line between Jasper and Barton. In the center are West Fork and Pettis Creeks, while Muddy Creek enters the south-east corner of the county, taking its course north, northwest, west, thence south, southwest, leaving the county in the south-western portion, forming a semi-circle, and giving thirty-five miles of water line, which is of incalculable benefit to fanners and stock-raisers.

Geology.— The stratified rocks of this section of country belong to the following divisions, mentioned in their order from the top down: (i) Quaternary, (2) Tertiary, (3) Cretaceous, (4) Carboniferous, (5) Devonian, (6) Silurian and (7) Azoic. The first or Post-Tertiary system comprises the drift and all deposits above it. Within it are four distinct formations: alluvium, bottom prairie, bluff and drift. The second is made up of clays, shales, iron ores, sandstones and sands. The third embraces sandstones and clays. The fourth embraces the coal measures of this section. That division of the coal measures to which the rocks in this county belong is the lower part of the lower coal measures, and lies below all known coal formations of North Missouri. It includes belts of sandstones, shales, ochre, soft hematite and bituminous coal.    The sandstones are generally coarse grained, micaceous and often ferruginous, being deep and bright brown and red in color. The lower beds are very coarse, sometimes partaking of the character of a conglomerate, and are particularly ferruginous. The equivalent of the Clear Creek sandstone of Vernon County often occupies the highest ridges, and is generally even bedded, forming a good building stone, and a pretty good material for grindstones.   Mud cracks, fucoids and ripple marks are often characteristic of this formation. In a mineralogical point of view, the coal in this county may be considered about the most valuable product. The iron ore in the coal measures is generally soft and light, occurring as a red, yellow and brown ochre, and as a soft, porous limonite. The fifth or Devonian system contains the different groups of limestone and sandstone, and its rocks are, in this section, found in narrow belts along the Carboniferous strata. The Chemung group includes Chouteau limestone, vermicular sandstone and shales and lithographic limestone. The Upper and Lower Silurian series comprise the numerous sandstones and limestones of the sixth system, which contain many remains of organic life. No such remains are found in the series of siliceous and other slates, below the Silurian rocks, which are referred to the Azoic age.

Coal Interests — Building Stone.— Barton County's coal interests are of more than secondary importance. Coal veins of minable thickness and commercial value are found in Ozark, Barton City, North Fork, Milford, Newport, Lamar, Southwest and other townships, though, practically speaking, commercial mining is restricted to Ozark and Southwest Townships, with latterly some minor operations in Lamar, the industry being yet in its infancy. A large scope of Eastern Barton, as well as Barton City Township, abounds in excellent coal, but the absence of railway transportation facilities has prevented a development of these rich fields, just enough mining being done to supply local demands. The mine inspector has reported that 22,000 acres of county lands are underlaid with coal of minable thickness, but this is only an estimate, and the figures will doubtless be doubled under the stimulus the industry is expected to receive. Of superior qualities for all purposes, this coal is in demand in every market, and, when the mining industry has reached a little more advanced stage, the annual revenue from the mines will foot up into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The quarries throughout the county constitute not its least important prospective source of revenue. They contain sand-stone of every shade up to brown, which rivals the famous stone which adds so much to the beauty of metropolitan architecture, and is of such excellence for building purposes that of all the stone in the Southwest it was selected for the large depot buildings of the Gulf road, in Springfield. Only recently, attracted by the fame of this stone, several Kansas City gentlemen invested largely in quarry lands in this county, and it is reasonably certain that at no remote period this excellent stone will be a most potent auxiliary of coal in swelling the revenue in this county. The Gulf road has drawn extensively on the Lamar quarries for construction work, and has obtained a large supply of stone from the quarries at Liberal for bridges along the system. The new court house is being largely constructed of native stone.

Farming, Fruit Culture and Stock Raising.— Corn is the great staple product of the soil. With such cultivation as the Eastern farmer gives his corn, a failure in the crop would seldom occur. As the methods of primitive farming are disappearing, crops of all kinds are improving. As corn is king, so grass is queen, the two combined being the great wealth-producing crops of the county, and the farmer who would prosper must cultivate corn and grow grass and feed them to stock of approved kinds. It is now established beyond controversy that timothy, clover, bluegrass and other grasses recognize this soil as their native heath, and produce wonderful crops. Thousands of tons of hay are shipped to the Southern markets annually, and so prolific is the grass crop that, though grasses are practically in their infancy, a large and increasing surplus product is shipped away from the county every year.

Barton County is in the great fruit belt, and, possessing innumerable fine orchards, its luscious fruitage finds its way in great quantities to Kansas, Colorado, Texas, Alabama and Tennessee. Consequently fruit growing, which demands very little care and expense, proves amply remunerative to those who engage in it. Vegetables of all kinds produce well, and the older the land the better the crop. It is doubtful if there is any section in the United States where vegetables are more abundant or cheaper in season.

While to the farmer Barton County offers a rich and productive soil, a healthful climate and abundant crops, yet to the stock-raiser are presented greater inducements than to all other claims combined.   As evidence that these advantages have long attracted attention, the following extract is given from the " History of Missouri," published in 1876 :

While the agricultural advantages of this county are surpassed by few in the State, yet to stock-raisers it presents extraordinary inducements. With a mild climate that renders little shelter necessary during any portion of the year; with her broad, rolling prairies, covered with a luxuriant growth of grass that furnishes free pasturage during the summer months, and which, upon the bottoms, remains fresh and green all winter, and from which large quantities can be annually cut for a winter's supply ; with a soil capable of producing in abundance the grain needed co fatten the stock in winter that feed on the prairies in summer—Barton County is destined to be one of the great stock-producing counties of the West

A few years ago cattle were driven here to " winter" from North Missouri, Arkansas, Texas and the Indian Territory. The climate is so mild that it was not necessary to furnish other shelter than was afforded by the belts of timber along the various streams flowing through the county. To-day there are not so many cat-tle; but the stock is finer and better cared for. The day of free pasturage in Barton County is past, but wherever grasses grow abundantly it will pay to handle stock, and many far-seeing stockmen have come to Barton and occupy large farms for the purposes of stock raising.

Timber.—There is abundance of timber to supply all needful demands. From one-tenth to one-sixth of the land is covered with fine groves, embracing hickory, walnut, elm, sycamore, maple, backberry and all the different kinds of oak, with other valuable varieties of timber. These groves are scattered throughout the different portions of the county, principally along the streams.

Climate.—The climate of Barton County is a benediction. It has the mildness of Middle Virginia and Central Kentucky, without their humidity.   The winters are generally dry and open, with little snow. Young stock of all kinds run at large in the bottoms all winter. The summer is long and warm, with cool, refreshing nights. While the rainfall is ample, the climate is naturally dry, and the west winds dissipate whatever malaria may be generated by decaying vegetation; and there are no swamps or marshes to breed fever in this region.

RESOURCES AND STATISTICS.

Assessments of 1880 and 1888.— No more graphic illustration of the wonderful growth of Barton County can be produced than is found in the assessment books for the years 1880 and 1888. The tables are given below, the figures they contain carrying their own explanation. At the former period county organization prevailed and one official assessed the entire county, but the township system of government is now in force, thus necessitating an enumeration of each township:


1880
Horses, 4,990.................................................. $ 102,904
Jacks and jennets, 10.............................................. 295
Mules, 1,044........................................................ 31,569
Cattle, 19,836..................................................... 169,636
Sheep, 10,134...................................................... 10,134
Hogs, 13,914....................................................... 14,942
All other livestock............................................... .134
Money, notes, etc.............................................. 79,900
All other personal property...........................117,506
Acres, 370,837................................................ 1,104,135
Town lots, 514....................................................87,325
Merchants' tax, estimated.............................. 60,000
Total............................................................. $1,778476

1888.
Acres, 394,704........................................ $2,772,220
Town lots, 2,993........................................ 585.085
Horses......................................................... 253,831
Asses.............................................................. 2,433
Mules........................................................... 63,207
Cattle......................................................... 960,289
Sheep............................................................ 1,802
Hogs............................................................. 27,995
Money, notes and bonds.............................. 326,189
All other personal property.......................... 191,496
Insurance companies, merchants, railroad and telegraph
property.................................................... 713,999
Total........................................................ 5.907.546

The Common School Fund.—Following is a statement of Barton County's common school fund, interest and principal, for 1888:

SCHOOL FUND.—PRINCIPAL.
Balance in treasury at last settlement................. $ 1,158.28
Amount from bonds maturing............................. 13,628.12
Amount from shows...................................................... 25.00
Amount from fines................................................... 1,265.00
Amount from estrays.................................................... 45.85
 $16,122.25

CREDIT
By loans made...................................... $15,191.00
By balance................................................... 931.25
$16,122.25

SCHOOL FUND INTEREST.
To balance on hand................................. $3,443.72
To interest collected................................. 8,289,31
$11,733.03

CREDIT.
By apportionment................................. $10,815.76
By balance in treasury................................ 917.27
$11,733.03

AMOUNT OF FUND OUTSTANDING AND IN TREASURY.
To school fund bonds................................ $80,978.13
To interest delinquent............................... 13,590.71
To cash............................................................... 931.25
$95,500.09

CREDIT.
By bonds and mortgages on real estate................. $94,568.84
By cash in treasury.......................................................... 931. 25
$95,500.09

The court house fund for 1888 is represented by these figures

DEBIT.
Cash on hand at settlement............................. $ 407.40
Collected on bonds and taxes......................... 17,455.76
Bonds outstanding............................................. 3,434.90
$21,298.06

CREDIT.
By warrants paid on work and labor...................$ 7.072.05
Bonds outstanding.................................................... 3,434.90
Cash on hand........................................................... 10,791.11
$21,298.06
Total amount of court house fund on hand......... 14,226.01

WARRANTS AND SCRIP OUTSTANDING JANUARY 1, 18S9.
Warrants of 1883.................................... $ 138.45
Warrants of 18S4.................................... 94.45
Warrants of 1885................................... 244.48
Warrants of 1886.................................. 6,766.99
Warrants of 1887................................... 6,693.67
Warrants of 1888................................... 15,111.01
$29,049.05

Scrip for 1883. ..................................... 500
Scrip for 1884....................................... 6.10
Scrip for 1885....................................... 3.50
Scrip for 1886..................................... 517.95
Scrip for 1887....................................... 1,203.85
Scrip for 1888..................................... 1.934.50
$3,670.90

Expenditures of a Year.—These figures constitute a summary of Barton County's expenditures in 1888:

Assessor's fees................................................. $ 640.00
School commissioner's salary........................... 87.60
Sheriff's fees....................................................... 830.30
Circuit clerk's fees.............................................. 47.00
Stenographer's fees.......................................... 450.00
Prosecuting attorney's salary.......................... 610.00
County justice's fee.s...................................... 1,07085
Poor commissioner's salary............................ 150. 00
County physician's salary.............................. 270.00
County clerk's fees........................................ 2,111.30
Treasurer's salary............................................. 833.35
Stationery for circuit clerk............................. 159.35
Stationery for recorder.................................... 128.65
Stationery for probate judge........................... 128.40
Stationery for county clerk and townships
and postage and expense.......................................... 306.70
Public printing...................................................... 506.35
Abstracts from Lamar Abstract Co..................... 558.50
Merchandise for county officials........................ 106.45
Rent of court-room and offices........................ 680.00
Cost of elections................................................. 257.50
Pauper accounts...................................... ...... 2,708.76
Coal for county.................................................. 123.50
Insane expenses............................................... 874.25
Road and bridge work................................. 1723.05
Criminal costs........................................ .......11075.58
Grand jurors' fees............................................ 336.45
Petit jurors' fees.................................................. 1,509.45
Witnesses before grand jurors.......................... 150.40
Incidental expenditures....................................345.90
Court house construction..............................6,050.85
Common school fund loans........................14,030.00
Township school loans.................................6,647.70
Total $45,507.84
 
Population and Valuation.— In 1860 Barton County had 1,817 inhabitants. In 1870 its population had advanced to 5,087. In 1876 it was 6,900. In 1880 it was 10,340. In 1889 it is estimated at 25,000. The assessed valuation of property in the county in 1880 was nearly $2,000,000. It is estimated that it will reach $6,000,000 in 1889.

SETTLEMENT.

Early Settlers.— The first settler within the limits of Barton County of whom any knowledge is obtainable was Allen Petty. He occupied the position of county commissioner and county seat commissioner, and in the latter capacity was aided by Mr. Fisher, who, prior to 1857, had been a resident of Jasper County. It is said of Allen Petty that he lived in five different counties and never changed his location.

Among the old residents of the county, many of whom were here before the war, were George E. Ward and his two sons, Ed. G. Ward and J. T. Ward, Elisha Peters, J. C. Parry, George Oldham, Mr. Minor, John Apperson, Morris Baker, Philip Matthews, Irwin Brown, Joseph H. Brown, J. A. Creamer, Felix Bonse, J. H. Zevely, James Smith, " Al." Pinnock, David Norris, Frank Lease, Dr. L. M. Timmonds, Dr. Charles Van Pelt, A. Cochran, Jesse Kelley, Thomas Seal and Doctor Blacker. As will be seen by reference to the county civil lists, some of these were among the early county officials.

Prior to the war, the citizens of Barton County were few indeed, and a good deal of the land was owned by non-residents, and valued at $1.25 per acre. The war prostrated all enterprise and retarded all material progress. Most of the pioneers have passed away, and their places are filled by their children and their children's children, who, with the large number of Eastern people here, make up the county's population.

Pioneer History.— For some years after the earliest settlement, bands of Osage and Sac Indians hunted over this territory, for the most part maintaining friendly relations with the whites. One resident of the county, " Gil." Roup by name, was an inveterate Indian hater, and lost no opportunity to kill an Indian on sight. At a later date, accompanied by his family, he started for California, and had not proceeded far on his journey when his party were attacked, and every one in it killed, by a considerable body of Indians. The early settlers about Lamar had to go to Spring River to mill, twenty-five miles distant, and for years the nearest trading-point was Carthage. The first store in Lamar was George E. Ward's, near his residence (on the present site of M. N. Wills' residence). The earliest postoffices were: At Lamar (J. C. Parry, postmaster); Drywood, or Baker's Green (Morris C. Baker, postmaster); and on Coon Creek (" Bob " Stanley, postmaster). The mail was brought weekly on horseback from Independence, by way of Papinsville. The first religious services held in Barton County were in the old court house, which, during late years, has, in a different locality, done service as a restaurant. The first school was taught about 1854, about two miles south of Lamar, by William Seals.

Land Entries.— A list of names is here given of individuals who entered United States lands in Barton County: Thomas Dunford, Martin Braden, Joseph S. McBride, John Weir, Jr.; Samuel M. Baker, Homer F. Fellows, Royal A. B. Mills, Joseph Neely, David Ward, George Andrews, William H. Denmead, Martha Abernathy, William Stewart, Charles A. Davis, Benjamin Curver, George Arnold, John Blackburn, Mason Crabtree, Tilman H. Lea, Joseph Stone, Spencer Thompson, David Norris, William H. Norton, Harrison Zimmermann, William M. Thompson, Nicholas Wood, Henry Garner, Frederick Garver, Anselm Clarkson, George S. Park, William Smith, Henry Baker, Thomas J. Toler, William H. Smith, Sarnia Worthington, John P. Grisham, Samuel W. Duprey, David P. Bethel, Thomas F. Bugbee, Francis M. Overby, James F. Winter, Abner and George W. Embry, James L. Nicholls, Harrison Shrader, George Kimmell, Isaac Zimerly, Allen L. Pierson, Joseph Hooper, James F. Long, Nicholas F. and James T. Jones, Robert S. Rutledge, Jacob Vankin, Stephen H. Thompson, Urial F. Murray, John F. Smith, Jesse Kelley, Robert G. Coleman, John Tarleton, John Wyson, David H. Super, Levi T. Davis, Albert Pearce, Absalom R. Roads, Israel Miller, James W. Webb, Charles C. Fordes, Theron Barnum, James D. Webb, John H. Wyman, Leonard Gilson, Samuel B. Wright, Fanny M. Chadwick, Theodore B. Webb, James S. Easley, Charles O. Lockhard, Amelia Jenks, Florella Nurse, William W. Bennett, Alexander M. Tucker, Joel B. Buttles, Joshua Dial, Samuel H. Shelley, John M. Becker, Frederick Krecker, Conrad Bowman, C. Free, Benjamin Ezekiel, Samuel Sheek, Edgar Ames, Moses W. Carter, Samuel Starkey, Edgar S. Taney, Solomon Sturges, David K. Bush, Alpheus D. Hagans, Conrad C. Stuntz, William Dugan, James S. Wilderman, Amos Thompson, Albert L, Lee, Isaac Francis, John H. D. Jarnett, Chester D. Knox, Rufus Maloney, Thomas H. Mong, M. Heyman, Jacob Blickensderfer, Percy M. Hirst, S. Newell Dodd, Oliver H. Smith, Alonzo Thompson, Reuben B. Royer, David Fleming, Samuel A. Gillibrand, Edward J. Johnson, Cornelius D. Freeland, Albert C. Widdicombe, Washington Moseley, Anthony McBride, Gilbert M. Venable, Milton Cooley, Christian Stoner, Davidson Smith, Charles F. Hill, Jonathan J. Philbrick, David Steel, Anderson S. Jones, Washington Farmer, James H. Zevely, William C. Wells, Alexander Henry, Jonathan D. D. K. Carter, James W. Bass, Joshua Waggoner, Isaac Darnelle, Samuel Fish, Dexter Otey, Isaac Gearhart, John T. Smith, John Blackburn, James A. Beal, John L. Waters, Jacob Lawrence, Allen L. Pinson, William Stewart, William Y. Moore, Charles P. Gage, Ward P. Lay, T. W. Wintzel, William Neocker, Charles W. James, John Johnston, James M. Stewart, Charles V. Culver, Joseph W. Petty, Albert W. Tipton, Orange J. Scott, Nathan Ball, Nelson Monroe, John Tarleton, Jacob Shamberger, Benjamin Curver, Alfred Branham, Andrew Hall, Christian C. Bren-nerman, Joseph C. Parry, William Parry, Sanders Jones, Timothy Moshier, Francis G. Adams, James S. Easley, George Madison, Chester C. Ford, Bryan P. Scolly, Charles C. Orr, Edgar Ames, Harriet Voorhees, John Postlethwaite, Timothy Baldwin, James Glynn, Abraham T. Hay, Silas Bent, Francis M. Gregory, Alexander Hall, Benjamin Curver, John A. Davenport, William C. Davis, William H. Parker, Henry S. Wharton, Samuel Clough, Robert Maddox, William Forman, John Kirkpatrick, William Adams, Richard Carter, Steward S. Johnson, R. H. Craig and William C. Vance, Benjamin T. Ristine, Thompson Davis, Nancy Carr, Joseph C. Webster, Samuel Russel^ Thomas S. Atkin, Gurdon Thompson, Robert G. Pasley, Alonzo Thompson, Orrin W. Jones, Daniel Hamaker, Moses W. Carter, George W. Wilderman, Simon Hostetter, Fanny Cooper, Andrew Baker, Thomas Capehart, Charles A. Davis, John L. Milligan, Hollaway Collie, George Spears, John B. Earle, Robert Poindexter, James H. Birch, Thomas Lindley, Theodore Thompson, Linville Bradley, Robert Canara, Caleb B. Seaton, Charles L. Stephens, James W. Bass, Thomas S. Watthall, Sanford M. Rowlett, Nicholas F. Jones, William R. Rector, Hayden Wyatt, IraD. Broyles, Joseph G. Hutton, Thomas Lane, Jr., Amundas W. Schmoldt, Joseph Burghill, I. Shipley, Francis Hull, Thomas I. Evans, Henry Shadle, Clifton H. Moore, Theodore W. Talmadge, John A. Creamer, Ebenezer Stephenson, Jonathan Harris, Elisha Brener, John Gilfillan, Mina Marsh, William A. Creamer, James L. Brown, Samuel M. Coleman, Singleton P. Waters, Henry H. Brown, Marquis Burns, Almon J. Spofford, William H. Burns, James Phillips, ThomasCarr, William W. McNide, Elisha Garnts, Thomas Campbell, Sherman Webster, Francis Brown, Elizabeth M. Richards, Elisha G. English, H. W. Witherell, John Grenendyke, Levi T. Davis, David M. Cockley, John M. Stephens, Ebenezer Smith, Sally B. Child, Samuel Lane, John F. Lane, Benjamin F. Graves, Joseph N. Johnson, Thomas H. Majors, Joseph Nichols, Richard Carter, Jeremiah B. Fusen, William McDonald, John C. Richardson, Melvin L. Gray, John R. Edwards, David Cronie, Moses Lyon, Abigail C. G. Davidson, Sally M. Graham, George Girty, George Kimmell, William E. Culver and James Guthrie, Barnard F. Schermerhorn, Nathaniel Block, John L. Dimmitt, James N. Laird.

Swamp, School and Other Lands.— The above list comprises the name of every individual who was a grantee of land from the United States in Barton County. Some of these persons were early and permanent settlers, and some were non-residents. Some of them took up many claims, some several, some a few, and some only one each. It has been the aim not to weary the reader with a needless repetition of names. The Government grant comprised, besides these, the swamp lands and lands granted to the State of Missouri and to Barton County for educational and other purposes. The original list of entries, in the recorder's office, is thus certified to:

United States Land Office, }
Springfield, Mo. }

I, William J. Teed, Register of the United States Land Office at Springfield, Missouri, do hereby certify that the above and foregoing are true and correct copies of all the original entries and memoranda of public lands in the present limits of Barton County, Missouri, as shown by the tract books of said office. Witness my hand, at office, this first day of August, A. D. 1871.
William J. Teed, Register.

A few of the entries above mentioned were made prior to 1857. Most of them were made in that year, and some have been made since. Through the misrepresentation of interested parties, a very large part of the public lands in this county were declared swamp lands, and these were granted by the United States to the State of Missouri, under an act of Congress entitled " An act to enable the State of Arkansas and other States to reclaim the swamp lands within their limits," approved September 28, 1850. The selection was made under said act and approved March 2, 1857. The patent was issued to the State April 16, 1857. By an act of Legislature entitled " An act donating the swamp and over-flowed lands to the counties in which they lie," approved March 3, 1851, and amendatory acts, approved December 13, 1855, and November 4, 1857, such lands were granted by the State of Missouri to Barton County. In 1868 the Legislature passed an act entitled 11 An act to perfect the title to lands known as swamp lands," approved March 21, 1868. That act provided that " all deeds executed by the county for any swamp lands shall be deemed and held to be legal and valid, whether issued by the county court or a commissioner appointed by said court for that purpose, and such deed or patent shall vest in the purchaser of any such lands all right, title or interest of said counties in said lands as fully as if said patents or deeds had been granted by the Governor of the State and countersigned by the Secretary of State, as is now provided by the General Statutes."   Such lands have mostly passed to individual ownership, the last general sales of them having closed about twenty years ago. Since then school lands have been about the only available lands for the purposes of settlers, and these are nearly all taken up and under improvement, eighty acres only having been sold in 1887, and 56oacresin 1888. From these facts it may be seen that the settlement and development of Barton County has been marvelously rapid, only a little more than thirty years intervening between the advanced civiliza-tion of to-day and the beginning of general settlement and improvements; and this progress was for a time impeded by the Civil War.

COUNTY AND TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATION.

County Organisation and Boundary.—Barton County was organized in 1857, and its boundaries are thus defined: Beginning at the northeast corner of Section 14, Township 30 (north), Range 29; thence west, on the line dividing Sections 11 and 14, to the western boundary line of the State; thence north, with said State line, to the line dividing Townships 33 and 34; thence east, on said line, to the northwest corner of Section 1, Township 33 (north), Range 29; thence south, on the subdivisional line, to the place of beginning.

Organization of Townships. — One of the first acts of the County Court was to divide the county into a convenient number of municipal townships. There were seven when local government was resumed at the close of the war. These were named Newton, Union, Mineral, Nashville, Lamar, North Fork and Golden Grove. By successive divisions the number has been doubled.

On Wednesday, February 7, 1866, it was ordered by the court that the municipal townships in Barton County should be bounded and named as follows:

Newton Township, commencing at the northeast corner of Section 2, Township 33, Range 29; west to the northwest corner of Section 6, Township 33, Range 30; south to the southwest corner of Township 33, Range 30; east to the southeast corner of Township 33, Range 30; south to the southwest corner of Section 18, Township 32, Range 29; east to the southeast corner of Section 14, Township 32, Range 29; thence north to the place of beginning.

This embraced what is now known as all of Milford Township, all of Doylesport Township, and the north half of Newport Township.

Union Township, commencing at the northeast corner of Township 33, Range 31; west to the northwest corner of Section 3, Township 33, Range 32; south to the southwest corner of of Section 34, Township 33, Range 32; east to the southeast corner Township 33, Range 31; thence north to the place of beginning.

This includes all of Union Township as it now stands, and nearly one-half of Barton City Township.

Mineral Township, commencing at the northeast corner of Section 4, Township 33, Range 32; west to the State line; south to the southwest corner of Section 18, Township 32, Range 33; east to the southeast corner of Section 16, Township 32, Range 32; thence north to place of beginning.

This included the west half of Barton City Township, all of Leroy Township as it is to-day, and the north half of Ozark Township, and a portion of the northwest fourth of Central.

Nashville Township, commencing at the northeast corner of Section 21, Township 32, Range 32; west to the State line; south to the southwest corner of Barton County; east to the southeast corner of Section 12, Township 30, Range 32; north to the northeast corner of Section 24, Township 32, Range 32; west to the place of beginning.

This included the south half of Ozark as it is to-day, all of Southwest Township as it now stands, all of Nashville Township and a portion of the south half of Central.

Lamar Township, commencing at the northeast corner Township 32, Range 30; thence west to the northwest corner of Section 3, Township 32, Range 32; south to the southwest corner of Section 15, Township 32, Range 32; east to the southeast corner of Section 13, Township 32, Range 32; south to the southwest corner Section 18, Township 31, Range 31; thence east to the southeast corner of Section 13, Township 31, Range 30; thence north to the place of beginning.

This was composed of the following townships as they stand to-day: all of Lamar Township, east half of Central, and the north half of North Fork and a part of Richland Township.

North Fork Township, commencing at the northeast corner of Section 24, Township 31, Range 30; west to the northwest corner of Section 19, Township 31, Range 31; south to the county line; east to the southeast corner of Section 12, Township 30, Range 30; north to place of beginning.

These boundaries then comprised all of Richland Township as it is to-day, and the south half of North Fork Township.

Golden Grove Township, commencing at the northeast corner of Section 23, Township 32, Range 29; west to the northwest corner Section 19, Township 32, Range 29; south to the county line; east to the southeast corner Section 11, Township 31, Range 29; north to the place of beginning.

This embraces all of Golden City Township as it is, and the south half of Newport Township.

On the 8th of April, 1872, the county court made the following order:

All of Township 33, Range 29, shall constitute Milford Township.

All of Township 33, Range 30, shall constitute Doylesport Township.

All of Township 33, Range 31, shall constitute Union Township.

All of Township 33, Range 32, shall constitute Barton City Township.

All of Township 33, Range 33, shall constitute Leroy Township.

All of Township 32, Range 33, shall constitute Washington Township, changed February 8, 1873, to Ozark Township.

All of Township 32, Range 32, and the west half of Township 32, Range 31, shall constitute Central Township.

All of Township 32, Range 30, and the east half of Township 32, Range 31, and Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 in Township 31 of Range 30, and Sections 1, 2, 3, io, 11, 12, 14, all west of river in 13, in Township 31, Range 31, shall constitute Lamar Township.

All of Township 32, Range 29, in this county, shall con-stitute Newport Township.

All of Township 31, Range 29, in this county, and all of Township 30, Range 29, in this county, shall constitute Golden City Township.

All of Sections 7 to 36, inclusive, in Township 31, Range 30, and all of Township 30, Range 30, in this county, and all of

Township 31, Range 31, east of Muddy Creek, and all of Town-ship 30, Range 31, east of Muddy Creek, shall constitute Rich-land Township.

All the remainder of Townships 30 and 31 of Range 31, shall constitute North Fork Township.

All of Township 31, Range 32, and all of Township 30, Range 32, in this county, shall constitute Nashville Township.

On the 16th of November, 1874, Southwest Township was formed as follows: all of Township 30, Range 33, as is in the county, and all of Township 31, Range 33.

Barton County's Promoter and Name.—George E. Ward was instrumental in the division of Jasper County, and the organization of Barton, which he named in honor of David Barton.

STATUTORY AFFAIRS.

County Court.— The county court organized in 1857, with William H. Brown as presiding justice, and James Guest and J. G. Hutton as associate justice. Branch T. Morgan was appointed clerk, and Joseph H. Brown, sheriff. The court met at the house of George E. Ward (often referred to as " the father of the county"), which was a primitive building on the site of the present residence of M. N. Wills, and proceeded to the erection of townships, the appointment of justices and constables, the establishment of roads, and other necessary business. Its present justices and officers are as follows: Charles A. Morrow, presiding justice; Simeon Isenhouse and Robert Perkins, associate justices; John E. Rundell, county clerk; George W. B. Garrett, sheriff.

Circuit Court.—The Barton circuit court was organized in 18$7» with John R. Chenault as judge, and also first met at the residence of George E. Ward. No records are extant from which its proceedings, or any part of them, may be learned. No court was held during the war. According to an act of the State Legislature of 1865, defining the several judicial circuits of the State of Missouri, Barton formed a part of the thirteenth circuit, with Dade, Lawrence, Jasper, Newton, Barry, Stone and McDonald Counties. At the session of the Legislature of 1871-72, it was attached to the twenty-fifth circuit, which comprises the counties of St. Clair, Cedar, Barton, Dade and Vernon. Owing to the destruction of most of the buildings in Lamar during the war, there was not, in 1866, when the first post-bellum circuit court was held, a convenient place for its sessions, and it is said to have been held in the open air, and the grand jury to have deliberated under a tree. The justice who held this court was John C. Price, Branch T. Morgan being the clerk. There have never been any legal executions of the death sentence in Barton County. Murder trials have occurred, resulting in the imprisonment for varying times of the persons convicted, but in every case mitigating circumstances have developed to render the erection of the gallows uncalled for. In no part of the Union is peace better preserved or the laws better administered.

Attorneys.— Among the attorneys of more or less note who have practiced at the Barton County bar, may be mentioned the following: C. H. Brown, member of the State Legislature, representing this district, 1874-76, now a prominent banker; James F. Hardin, an eccentric man, and, in his time, one of the noted criminal lawyers in Southern Missouri; John S. Phelps, member of Congress and governor of Missouri; S. A. Wight, State senator representing this district; G. H. Walser, who represented Barton County in the Legislature, 1868-70; William H. Avery, first superintendent of the public schools of Barton County; C. B. McAfee, who was once candidate for Congress in this district; John Q. Page, once circuit-attorney in the judicial circuit; W. F. Cloud, administrator of the Chenault estate, and once deputy-collector of United States Internal Revenue; C. H. Morgan, who was county attorney, member of the Legislature, and three terms member of Congress; Edward Buler, who represented the county in the Legislature; D. A. Harrison, once county attorney of Jasper County, now attorney for the Missouri Pacific Railway Company; T. A. Sherwood, judge of the supreme court of Missouri; R. F. Buler, who represented Cedar County in the State Legislature; E. O. Brown, once judge of the court of common pleas, in Jasper County; Lee Chiswell, three times elected prosecuting attorney, and now editor of the Lamar Democrat; A. J. Wray, many years school commissioner of Barton County, also public administrator; Volney Moon, once a Democrat editor at Lamar; A. H. Dale, once the nominee of his party for Congress; M. E. Benton, United States attorney under Cleveland's administration; C. W. Thrasher, once a candidate for Congress; Daniel P. Stratton, judge of the twenty-fifth judicial circuit of the State of Missouri; T. B. Haughawout, a (Republican elector in 1888; T. H. Cannon, formerly editor of the Lamar Rustler, now editor of the Sedalia Bazoo; H. C. Timmonds, formerly a journalist of Cedar County, who represented Barton County in the Legislature, and was prosecuting attorney; John B. Cole, present representative of Barton County in the Legislature; R. T. Railey, once editor of the Lamar Leader; John H. Flanegan, member of Legislature from Jasper County; A. C. Burnett, prosecuting attorney for Barton County; C. S. Essex, formerly probate judge in Hickory County; and N. Gibbs, J. C. Cravens, J. H. Harkless, H. H. Harding, R. B. Robinson, Robert W. Crawford and J. P. Ellis.

The following named attorneys have registered in this court at the dates mentioned: 1866 — C. H. Brown, Lamar; James F. Hardin, Neosho, Newton County; John S. Phelps, Springfield, Greene County; C. W. Randolph, Neosho, Newton County; Nathan Bray; R. C. Anderson, Nevada, Vernon County; S. A. Wight, Nevada, Vernon County; G. H. Walser, Lamar; William H. Avery, Lamar; J. Thomas Bridgens, Fort Scott, Kansas; C. B. McAfee, Springfield, Greene County. 1867 — John Q. Page, Greenfield, Dade County; L. W. Shaffer, Greenfield, Dade County; E. M. Hulett, Fort Scott, Kansas; W. W. Martin, Fort Scott, Kansas; John F. Birdseye, Nevada, Vernon County; T. H. B. Lawrence, Springfield, Greene County; W. F. Cloud, Leavenworth,  Kansas.   1868 —James E. Wickerly, Neosho, Newton County; George W. Bradfield, Lebanon, Missouri; C. H. Morgan, Lamar; John I. Reed, Lamar. 1869—J. M. White, Lamar; Edward Buler, Lamar; J. D. Bicknell, Greenfield, Dade County; D. A. Harrison, Lamar; R. P. Smith, Lamar; J. P. Ellis, Springfield, Greene County; James L. Brown, Kansas City; Robert W. Crawford, Springfield, Greene County; T. A. Sherwood, Springfield, Greene County; Ben. U. Massey, Springfield, Greene County; Joseph F. Duckwall, Greenfield, Dade County; S. C. Jayred, Lamar. 1870—D. C. Hunter, Nevada, Vernon County; A. A. Pitcher, Nevada, Vernon County; Daniel M. Leet, Sedalia, Pettis County; R. F. Buler, Stockton, Cedar County; R. B. Robinson, Lamar; E. O. Brown, Lamar. 1871—Lee Chiswell, Lamar; R. J.. Tucker, Lamar. 1872 — W. H. Phelps, Carthage, Jasper County; E. J. Montague, Carthage, Jasper County; James M. Allen, Carthage, Jasper County; Amos Sanford, Columbus, Kansas; A. J. Wray, Lamar; W. T. O'Connor, Lamar. 1873—J. M. Kennedy, Greenfield, Dade County; J. W. Sennett, Carthage, Jasper County; J. F. Johns, Callaway County; Volney Moon, Lamar; James E. Lincoln, Liberty, Clay County. 1874—Paul N. Rupert, Greenfield, Dade County. 1875—J. B. Johnson, Nevada, Vernon County; H. H. Harding, Carthage, Jasper County; O. A. Tonslay, Joplin, Jasper County; W. C. Robinson, Carthage, Jasper County; A. H. Dunlavy, Carthage, Jasper County; R. W. Cloud, Carthage, Jasper County; A. H. Dale, Newton County; George Hubbert, Neosho, Newton County; O. H. Picher, Carthage, Jasper County. 1876 — William H. McCown, Carthage, Jasper County; F. S. Yager, Carthage, Jasper County; M. E. Benton, Neosho, Newton County; J. L. Jones, Fayette, Howard County; C. W. Thrasher, Springfield, Greene County; George F. P. Griffin, Lamar; Josiah Lane, Carthage, Jasper County; John B. Logan, Lamar; G. D. Jackson, Joplin, Jasper County; M. A. Pinkerton, Montevallo, Vernon County. 1877—J. H. Harkless, Lamar. 1878—D. P. Stratton, Stockton, Cedar County; Frank Craycroft, Joplin, Jasper County; Galen Spencer, Joplin, Jasper County. 1879—L. W. Cremeens, Lamar; J. C. Cravens, Springfield, Greene County; T. B. Haughawout, Carthage, Jasper County; Samuel McReynolds, Carthage, Jasper County; W. H. Martin, Stockton, Cedar County; J. R. Shields, Carthage, Jasper County; W C. Sloan, Lamar. 1880 — George E. Bowling, Lamar; Thomas M. Brown, Stockton, Cedar County; T. H. Cannon, Greenfield, Dade County; H. C. Timmonds, Stockton, Cedar County; N. Gibbs, Mt. Vernon, Lawrence County. 1881—E. E. Kimball, Nevada, Vernon County; O. H. Barker, Springfield, Greene County, John B. Cole, Lamar; S. C. Woodson, Platte County; J. T. Gealy, Golden City; D. O. Turner, Greenfield, Dade County; Mason Talbutt, Greenfield, Dade County; I. W. Watthrall, Lamar; Clem. Hall, Stockton, Cedar County; C. H. Ingelow, Lamar. 1882 — R. T. Railey, Harrisonville, Cass County; George F. Parry, Carthage, Jasper County; Walter J. Miller, Barton; H. C. Cartmell, Lamar; H. Harry, Golden City; Chauncey B. Stickney, Carthage, Jasper County; A. J. Pyburn, Lamar. 1883 — William W. Bennett, Lamar; A.J. Harbison, Neosho, Newton County; C. B. Adams, Liberal; John Alexander, Sheldon, Vernon County; George H. English, Kansas City; L. M. Lloyd, Neosho, Newton County; J. B. Harris, Sheldon, Vernon County. 1884—W. F. Seaver, Golden City; Samuel E. Davis, Lamar; John H. Flanegan, Carthage, Jasper County; Mark Walser, Lamar; A. C. Betz, Butler, Bates County; R. W. Burr, Lamar; A. C. Burnett, Lamar; J. M. West, Minden; Edgar P. Mann, Greenfield, Dade County. 1885—J. Q. Work, Lamar. 1886 — W. M. Williams, Boonville, Cooper County; L. S. Wright, Golden City; W. B. M. Austin, Joplin, Jasper County; C. Cheney, Clinton, Henry County; J. M. Dye, Lamar. 1887—J. H. Krimminger, Lamar; John B. Bivert, Gentry County; C. S. Essex, Lamar; Thomas Hackney, Carthage. 1888—William Mack, Lamar; H. M. Stephens, Lamar; John R. Walker, Boonville, Cooper County; T. L. Wills, Lamar;  William A. Wood, Kingston, Caldwell County. 1889 — W. E. Boulton, Lamar; E. C. McAfee, Springfield, Greene County.

These have begun serving as justice of the Barton Circuit Court, as follows: 1866, John C. Price; 1869, B. L. Hendrick; 1872, John D. Parkinson; 1881, Charles G. Burton; 1887, D. P. Stratton.

Probate Court.— All probate business was attended to by the county court previous to the war. William B. Smedley was probate judge from 1866 to 1872. Marion Dale, the present incumbent, was elected in 1886.

COUNTY INTERESTS.

Court Houses, Jail and County Offices.— The first court house of Barton County was a small, temporary wooden structure erected on the north side of the public square in 1858. Its site was about where the St. Louis grocery store now is. The first court house designed for permanent use was erected in 1860. It was a brick building, and was located in the square. It was destroyed by fire during the war.

In 1868 a frame court house, costing between $5,000 and $6,000, was erected on the site of James Burnett's store on the west side of the square. It was subsequently sold, moved and diverted to other uses.

In the fall of 1888 work was begun upon the erection of a new court house, which will be completed during the present year. It is being constructed of Barton County's native building stone and fine St. Louis pressed brick, and will be one of the largest, handsomest, best-appointed and most conveniently arranged buildings in Southwest Missouri. Its contract cost is $32,500. The contractors are Morrison Brothers, of Lamar. It is beautifully located in the center of the public square, and will constitute a goodly monument to Barton County's thrift, enterprise and progressive spirit.

Previous to 1871, Barton County sent her prisoners to confinement in the jails of neighboring counties, chiefly to that of Vernon County. In the year mentioned, a brick jail building was erected in Lamar, at a cost of $7,600, which has since proved adequate to the demands upon it. I. N. De Long was the commissioner appointed by the county court to superintend its erection.

Until 1871 the county officers were in the old court house. During that year the brick building known as the recorder's office was erected in the public square, and the county clerk's, •circuit clerk's and recorder's offices were located therein. In 1880 the county clerk's office was removed to a front room on the second floor of the Smith building In 1881 it took up its quarters in a rear room of the same building, and the office of the circuit clerk took its place in the front room. A large room between these two offices is used for the sessions of the county and circuit courts. The recorder's office has remained in the brick building in the square. The office of the probate judge has been variously located from time to time, and is now on the second floor of Adams & Co.'s building. When the new court house is completed, the several county offices will be removed to it.

The County Poor Farm.— Barton County has never possessed a " poor farm" in the ordinary meaning of the term, but this designation has come to be popularly applied to the farm of the keeper of the poor, where paupers are kept temporarily, pending their location with farmers and others who board them at an expense to the county of $2.25 per week. The present keeper of the poor is M. Trace, who lives a mile and a half east of Lamar.

County Civil List.—The incompleteness of the records of the county court renders it impossible to make this list as exact as may seem desirable. Such records as there are of the election and service of different officials have been supplemented by reference to private documents, and by the memories of old citizens, and the following is the result, there having been no elections during the war period:

The successive sheriffs of Barton County have been: Joseph H. Brown, 1857; James H. Zevely, 1858, i860; W. A. Norris, 1866; F. H. Harrington, 1868, 1870; Morris B. Earll, 1872, 1874; John Q. A. Jackson, 1876; Dennis Springer, 1878, 1880; S. P. Findley, 1882, 1884; Dennis Springer, 1886; George W. B. Garrett, the present sheriff, 1888.

Branch T. Morgan was county and circuit clerk and recorder from 1857 until the war. The county clerks elected since the war have been: Emery Q. Condict, 1866-74; W. E. Condict, 1874-78; R- A. Ford, 1878-82; C. C. Daubin, 1882-86; and John E. Rundell, who  has  served  continuously since 1886. L. M. Timmonds was made circuit clerk in 1866; Godfrey F. Burkhart served 1868-78; the present circuit clerk, W. L. Mack, was first elected in 1878. The office of recorder is now inde-pendent of any other in this county. Godfrey F. Burkhart, who had long been recorder and circuit clerk, was elected in 1880, and re-elected in 1882 and 1884. William Dye, the present recorder, was elected in 1886.

Previous to the war, all probate business was attended to by the county court. William B. Smedley was probate judge 1866-72. The following have been elected at the dates given, and served until the qualification of their successors: Joseph C. Parry, 1872; Robert Brown, 1874; John V. Elder, 1876; E. C. Morlan, 1878; William Dye, 1882; Marion Dale (now serving), 1886.

George E. Ward and Thomas Graves were county treasurers before the war. One of them was appointed in 1857, and the other was elected in 1858, and re-elected in i860. C. R. Logan was the first treasurer elected after the war (1866). James H. Neal was elected in 1868, and served until succeeded by Morris B. Earll, who was elected in 1876. The subsequent treasurers have been: R. P. Smith, 1878-82; M. N. Wills, 1882-86; William A. Leech, 1886-88; William M. Wills, 1888 (present incumbent).

The county judges appointed in 1857 were William H. Brown, James Guest and J. G. Hutton. The first mentioned was president of the board. Philip Matthews, William H. Brown and L. M. Timmonds were elected in i860, Matthews being presiding judge. The first judges elected after the war (in 1866) were William H. Grier, Elijah Buffington and John R. Main, the first being president of the board. Lorenzo Baily was the next presiding justice, and his associates were James H. Morris and Dr. John Jones.   They were elected in 1869.   The presiding justices since that time have been as follows, the year beside each name being that in which his only or his first election occurred: Charles H. Fink, 1873; John Bates, 1878; A. Warder (appointed), 1883; Owen Blacker (elected at large), 1884; Charles A. Morrow (elected at large), 1886, and now serving. The associate justices prior to 1884, when the county was divided into the Eastern and Western Judicial Districts, were as follows: E. R. Chase, 1872; D. W. Morehouse, 1872; J. J. Bryning, 1873; CM. Wood, 1873; W. H. Waters, 1873; Joseph Ash, 1873; George G. Ryan, 1874; Robert Brown, 1874; John V. Elder, 1876; M. Girdner, 1878; A. B. Conrad, 1878; Thomas Seal, 1880; D. T. McGown, 1880; W. R. Harbour, 1882; J. S. Halloway, 1882. The judges elected from the Eastern District have been: W. R. Harbour, 1884; Simeon Isenhouse, 1886 and 1888, and now serving. Those from the Western District have been: Anthony Gilmartin, elected in 1884 and 1886; Robert Perkins, 1888, and now serving.

Members of the State Legislature have been elected as follows: David Norris, 1858 (representing Jasper and Barton Counties); John B. Dale, i860 (representing Jasper and Barton Counties); and the following since the war, representing Barton County alone: R. T. Cartmell, 1866; G. H. Walser, 1868; Michael Girdner, 1870; Charles H. Morgan, 1872; Charles H. Brown, 1874; Edward Buler, 187/5; George Andrews, 1878; Robert Brown, 1882; Jerry Poor, 1884; H. C. Timmonds, 1886; John B. Cole, 1888 (now serving).

The following named have been commissioned public admin-istrators in the years mentioned: William B. Ryan, 1872; John F. Hall, 1876; A. J. Wray, 1877 and 1880; Allen Warden, 1884 (present incumbent).

Lee Chiswell was elected prosecuting attorney in 1872, and served ten years. In 1882, H. C. Timmonds was elected. He was succeeded by Andrew C. Burnett, who was elected in 1886, and is still in office.

The Seat of Justice.— Lamar was chosen as the permanent seat of justice of Barton County in 1857. Allen Petty was county commissioner and county seat commissioner, and in the latter capacity was aided by Mr. Fisher, who, prior to 1857, had been a resident of Jasper County. Lamar was laid outasatown, and made satisfactory progress until all local enterprise was checked by the outbreak of the Civil War. Its subsequent history is outlined elsewhere in this volume.

The Barton County Agricultural and Mechanical Society was incorporated July 1, 1871, by the following order of the county court:

Now at this day came Charles H. Brown, L. M. Timmonds and R. B. Robinson, and presented to the court a petition signed by the following named freeholders of this State, to wit: J. M. Lindley, G. W. Fink, W. H. De Long, I. N. De Long, Charles Van Pelt, C. H. Fink, T. C. Brock, William Tennis, William I. Stimmitt, J. Orrahood, J. C. Parry, T. P. Fondray, Charles H. Morgan, A. A. Dye, J. W. Dunn, Fred Richards, Arnold Little, J. A. Albright, M. Huddleston, W. H. Catlin, J. T. Wyatt, O. F. Botkin, R. B. Robinson, Henry Murphy, John Jackson, E. G. Ward, John Jones, R. T. Cartmell, James Cromwell, J. T. Cartmell, James Harkless, C. C. Finley, S. Hilton, George W. Shawen, Joseph Little, A. W. McCutchen, J. P. Bailey, E. R. Wilcox, C. B. Lake, John Campbell, A. H. Joyce, S. L. P. Washburn, John Elsea, Charles H. Brown, H. F. Harrington, David Norris, C. H. Shapley, Lorenzo Bailey, S. G. Woodfill, R. E. Whitney, William Haslam, James Ainscough, R. Scott, Peter Watts, M. L. Burr, W. E. Morris, James Zook, James H. Roberts, C. R. Carr, A. McCallister, S. G. Avery, James H. Neal, Isaac C. Reed, Joseph Alkire, M. N. Wills, L. M. Timmonds, Morris C. Baker and James Morris stating that said petitioners desire to organize and be incorporated for the purpose of promoting improvements in agriculture, manufactures and the raising of stock, and praying that said petitioners may be, by order of this court, incorporated under and by the name of the Barton County Agricultural and Mechanical Society; and, it appearing to the court that said petitioners are freeholders of the State of Missouri, and a majority of them residents of Barton County, and that it would be for the advantage of the citizens of this county that the prayers of the petitioners should be granted, it is therefore ordered by the court that said petitioners be, and they are hereby, incorporated under the name of the Barton County Agricultural and Mechanical Society.

The association organized under the name of the Barton County Stock and Agricultural Association. Its objects, as set forth in its constitution, were the promotion of improvements in the various departments of agriculture, fruits, vegetables and ornamental gardening; the promotion of the mechanical arts in all their various branches; the improvement of the race of all useful and domestic animals; the general advancement of all rural and household manufactures, and the dissemination of useful knowledge upon these subjects. The entire management of the affairs of the association was vested in a board of thirteen directors, each of whom must be a stockholder.

The first officers and directors were Charles G. Van Pelt, president; S. G. Avery, vice-president; F. B. Robinson, secretary; Allen Cockrell, treasurer, and Fred Richards, W. H. De Long, J. J. Fast, Joseph Parry, Charles H. Brown, R. D. Carpenter, E. G. Ward, Lewis Nigh and George Fink.

The capital stock of the association was divided into 100 shares, and originally owned by 100 shareholders. The number of shareholders has decreased to twenty-seven, whose shares, also twenty-seven in number, are correspondingly larger than were the original shares. The first fair of the association was held October 15, 16 and 17, 1872, in the grounds of the associa-tion, near Lamar. Its eighteenth annual exhibition will be held in the fall of 1889.

The present officers, directors and stockholders of the association, are as follows: William Allen, president; A. H. Snyder, vice-president; F. D. W. Arnold, treasurer; W. J. Miller, secretary; W. T. Craycroft, H. C. Brandon, William Dye, directors; and L. B. Smith, R. P. Smith, C. H. Brown, A. A. Dye, C. H. Morgan, S. G. Avery, John Main, John T. Wyatt, Charles Van Pelt, Tom Seals, E. G. Ward, C. H. Fink, Finley & Matthews, Steele & McDonald, E. S. Casner, W. L. Mack, M. L. Barth, C. M. Robinson, C. O. Brown, Patrick & Horton.

The Barton Medical Society was organized at the office of Dr. A. A. Dye, in Lamar, in 1881, with Dr. J. W. Dunn as president, Dr. A. A. Dye as vice-president, and Dr. T. Hodge Jones as secretary and treasurer. Its objects are the establishment of more perfect unity in the medical profession, the suppression of quackery, and the advancement of true medical science and skill. Its constitution provides that its members shall consist of physicians residing in Barton, Jasper, Vernon and Dade Counties. Its meetings were held for a time in Grand Army Hall, Lamar, and for several years past they have been held at the office of Dr. A. Van Meter, of Lamar. The successive presidents have been Dr. J. W. Dunn, 1881-83; Dr. A. A. Dye, 1884-86; Dr. A. Van Meter, 1887-88; Dr. A. B. Stone, 1889. The present officers are: Dr. A. B. Stone, president; Dr. J. W. Speece, secretary; R. F. Johnson, treasurer. The following named physicians have been members of the society at different periods since its organization, and many of them are members at the present time:   A. A. Dye, J. W. Keithly, William Terry, Milford; B. F. Crumrine, Dr. McGavran, A. B. Stone, Iantha; Dr. Gish, Pedro; R. F. Johnson, Nashville; A. C. Davis, Lockwood; M. G. Witter, Irwin; J. L. McComb, Kenoma; J. W. Speece, Beloit.

Railroads.— Barton County has within its borders about 100 miles of railway, with a good prospect of soon having fifty miles more. The Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis Railroad, which was not long since extended to Birmingham, Alabama, has obtained connection from Birmingham to the Atlantic Ocean. Liberal, Iantha, Lamar, Kenoma and Golden City are stations on this road in Barton County. The Arcadia and Cherryvale branch of the same road passes through Ozark and Southwest Township, with a station at Minden. The Missouri Pacific road, from Kansas City to Joplin, passes through the county near the center from north to south, with Irwin, Lamar, Beloit and Dublin stations within the county limits, while the cut-off of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway, from Nevada, Mo., to Chetopa, Kas., cuts four townships in the western part of the county, with stations at Ellsworth, Liberal and Minden. Other lines are projected with assurances of construction. The Kansas City & Sabine Pass road, designed to extend from Kansas City to Sabine Pass, has already passed the inceptive part of incubation, and the building of the road is assured. The Chicago, Jefferson City, Girard & Pacific road, an east-and-west-line, has also received much attention, the route having been located from Jefferson City to Stockton, Cedar County. A third line which the county is reasonably sure to have is the extension of the Gulf road from Minden, near the western line, to Carthage. In addition, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe company designs gridironing Western Missouri with eight branches, one of which, extending from a point on the main road in Miller County, is destined to span Barton County, and pass through Lamar.

History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties by Horace O'Donoghue

 

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