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WILLIAM BALDRIDGE. Robert Baldridge, the father of William, was a native of Kentucky, but left that state with his parents when but five years old. They came to St. Charles county in 1795. The father of William was married in 1809 to Miss Margaret Rybalt, a native of Kentucky. Robert Baldridge was a soldier in the war of 1812. He died December 3d, 1865. Mrs. Baldridge died in Boone county, May 16th, 1878. William was the sixth son and eighth child of a family of seven boys and five girls, of whom three sons and two daughters are now living. One sister, Mrs. O'Neil, lives in Boone county. William Baldridge was born in St. Charles county, Missouri, February 26th, 1827. He remained on his father's farm until he was eighteen years old, when he came to Boone county. He farmed for two years, then entered the shop of John Batterton, where he learned the carpenter's trade. After three years' apprenticeship, he commenced work for himself, and continued the business until 1854. In 1855 he bought a farm on Dry Ridge, which he cultivated until 1865.
He sold the place in 1868 and removed to the farm where he now lives, seven miles northwest of Ashland. Mr. Baldridge was married, November 30th, 1854, to Miss Louisa J. Dickey, a native of Kentucky, but a resident of Boone county. They have five sons and four daughters, all of whom, except one son, arc living. In the winter of 1862, the subject of this sketch enlisted in the Confederate service, but did not go South until the summer of 1863. He was a member of Capt. Twist's company, Dorsey's battalion and Hindman's division. On the retreat from the Prairie Grove battle, Mr. Baldridge was captured by the enemy and taken to Springfield and from there to Gratiot street prison, St. Louis. He was afterwards sent to City Point, Virginia, for exchange, which was effected June 7th, 1863. Mr. Baldridge at once reported to his battalion at Arkadelphia. He was detailed to remain at this post with the sick. Having been transferred to Young's battalion, he was sent by Gen. Shelby to Boone county, for the purpose of recruiting a company. He afterwards joined Mitchell's brigade, becoming a member of Searcy's battalion of sharp-shooters. He remained with this command until the close of the war. He is a member of the Nashville Baptist church, also of the Nashville grange.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JOHN GASPER BARGER. Henry Brown Barger, the father of John, was born near Sparta, West Tennessee, June 12, 1803, and came to Boone County, Missouri, in 1819. He was married, February 26,1826, to Phoebe Wilfley. He died January, 1872. The subject of this sketch was born October 2, 1828. Moved from Callaway county, Missouri, to Atchison county in 1858, where he lived for seven years, moving next to Moniteau county where he staid for two years, then to Boone where he has lived ever since. He was raised on the farm, but learned the carpenter's trade. Farming is now his chief occupation.
Was married December 25, 1855 to Miss Harriet daughter of Philip and Sarah Barger. One child was born of this marriage, Sarah Jane, now dead. Was married the second time, March 28, 1858, to Miss P. A. Roads, daughter of Thomas and Nancy Roads. She died April 23, 1864. Three children were born of this marriage, two of whom are now living, Harriet Ann, and John William. Mr. Barger was married the third time, March 11, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth S., daughter of Jesse and Jane (Wilfley) Nichols. They have no children by this marriage.
Mr. and Mrs. Barger are both members of the Baptist church at Mt. Pleasant. They are also members of the grange, of which he was master for two years. Mr. Barger is a member of the Masonic lodge at Ashland. He makes a specialty of growing all kinds of fruits. He was first to introduce the English gooseberry, and has paid as high as three dollars for a single pear tree. He has about two hundred apple trees, and four hundred peach trees, and small fruits almost without number. His farm is situated in the northeast quarter section 33, township 46, range 12. He possesses a relic of the last century, a die and bolt for cutting wooden screws, which his father brought from Tennessee in 1819.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


ELIAS BARNES. The subject of this sketch is the son of Benjamin Barnes, a native of Kentucky, and, with one exception, the only citizen of Boone, now living, who came to this county in 1817. He is now eighty-five years old. The mother of Elias Barnes was Lucretia Simms, who came to Missouri when a child. Elias was born June 15, 1839. He was the seventh son and tenth child of his father's family. He was raised on the farm entered by his father soon after his arrival in Boone County, and was educated at the common schools of his neighborhood. He remained with his father until 18(14 when he enlisted in the Confederate army, joining Captain Strode's company, of Searcy's regiment, in which he served until the close of the war. He was in Price's raid and took part in all the battles fought on the retreat from Independence to Cane Hill. After the close of the war he was a member of the home guard at Columbia for several months. In the fall of 1865 he went to work on the farm owned by Mrs. K. Fortney. July 29, 1867, he was married to Miss Lou, daughter of Mrs. K. Fortney, who is still living at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. In the winter of 1870 he came to the farm where he now lives, in sections 6 and 7, township 47, range 12. He has always followed the occupation of a farmer. They have one daughter, Cannabel.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


John Barnett, of England, had a son named Hutchins, who married Polly Matthews, of Virginia, and settled in Boone county, Mo., in 1820. Their children were—John W., Thomas M., Jane W., Mildred A., and Sarah R. John W. married Arretta Willingham in 1822, and settle a. in Audrain county in 1831. They had—Sarah J., Mary M., Mildred A., Martha E., William J., Napoleon B., Sanders, Hutchins, Athanasis, John W., Thomas, &and Jesse E. Thomas, son of Hutchins Barnett, Sr., settled in Audrain county in 1831. He never married. He possesses a remarkable memory, and can relate past events with great accuracy. Sarah R., daughter of Hutchins Barnett, Sr., married Daniel Ellington, of Boone county, Mo.
(Source: A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches, by William Smith Bryan, publ. 1876. Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack)


LAWRENCE BASS. The subject of this biographical sketch is the son of George P. and Susan (Wiseman) Bass. He was born on the old Wiseman place, January 22, 1830. He is one of a family of eleven children — nine sons and two daughters — of whom five sons and two daughters are now living. When a small boy his parents removed from the old home, in the vicinity of Ashland, to a farm in Howard county, where Lawrence lived and labored until seventeen years of age. The next three years were spent in learning the saddlery business, but not liking the trade, he has never followed it. In the spring of 1850 Mr. Bass started for California by the overland route, reaching his destination in the month of July following. He remained in California and Nevada until 1875, making several business trips East, at onetime bringing with him from Colorado a herd of 2,000 cattle. While in the West he was actively engaged in freighting, mining, and trading in stock. In the spring of 1876 he moved to the A. E. Ellis farm, where he now resides. He is a member of the firm of Bass, Johnston, Brooks & Harris, Ashland. The firm is known as the Trade Centre. They have a branch store at Guthrie, in Callaway county. Mr. Bass is also a member of the Ashland Mill Company; also a stockholder in the Ashland Bank, and one of the directors. He was one of the originators of the Boone county stock sales. He has been an extensive sheep-raiser, having large flocks in Texas. His experience in business is of wider range perhaps than that of any other capitalist or trader in his locality. Mr. Bass was married November 17, 1870, to Miss Sallie Ellis, only daughter of A. E. Ellis, of Boone county. They have had three children — two sons and one daughter — of whom only one, the youngest son, is living. Mr. Bass has had many adventures during his extensive travels, the most thrilling of which perhaps was a shipwreck off the coast of British Columbia in 1858. The vessel was a total wreck. Mr. Bass and several others escaped in an open boat. He is an affable gentleman, kind and courteous in his manners, and is justly honored and esteemed by all who know him.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


GEORGE W. BATTERTON; George W. Batterton, Democratic nominee for the legislature, was born in Boone County, about seven miles north of Columbia, December 9, 1837, and grew to manhood on his father's farm. His grandfather, Moses Batterton, emigrated from Kentucky to Missouri about the year 1820, and settled on Callaham's creek, about seven miles west of Columbia. His father, Lemuel B. Batterton, was born in 1801, and learned the cabinet-maker's trade in Kentucky. He came with his father to Boone County in 1820. About four years after his marriage he bought the place where George W. was born, upon which he lived and died, his death occurring in 1869. He married Mary Lynch, a native of Kentucky. Her ancestors came from near Lynchburg, Virginia, which city was named after a member of her family Mr. and Mrs. Batterton raised eight sons and two daughters to manhood and womanhood. The subject of this sketch left home when about eighteen years of age and labored for wages which he spent in educating himself. When about twenty years of age he commenced teaching in the public schools and continued in this business, with slight intervals, for about six years. Was a soldier in the Confederate army for about nine months. Belonged to McKinney's company, known as the Blackfoot Rangers, was in the battle of Wilson Creek, Lexington, and Dry wood. Went to Nebraska in 1864 where he worked on a farm and taught school until the close of the war. Came back in 1866 and went to farming in Audrain County. After raising one crop he removed to the Two-mile Prairie, in Boone County, where he farmed, taught school and bought and shipped stock until 1870. He then removed to Vernon County, Missouri, where he farmed for eighteen months. Sold his farm in 1872 and removed to Montana where he followed mining until 1876, when he returned to Audrain county and resumed farming which he has followed ever since. His farm is situated one-half mile from Sturgeon in Audrain County. Was elected a justice of the peace in 1878 and has held the office ever since. He is an earnest, conscientious Democrat, having never voted any other ticket. His first vote was for John C. Breckenridge for president. Mr. Batterton was first married in 1863 to Sophia E., daughter of Robert and Sophia (Barnes) Gillaspie. First wife died January 26, 1872. There were no children by this marriage. He remarried on April 8, 1873, to Lizzie, daughter of Judge B. P. Ritchie. They have three children living and two dead. The living are Annie Sue, James Ritchie and Mary Lula. First wife was a member of the Christian church. Mr. Batterton is a member of the A. O. U. W. He is of Irish, German and French origin.
{Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


BISHOP, John Edmond, lawyer; born, Rocheport, (boone co) Mo., Aug. 6, 1869; son of David and Ann Eliza (Stice) Bishop; educated in California (Mo.) High School, class of 1889; academic course, Missouri State University, and Yale Law School, class of 1895; unmarried. Assistant superintendent of public schools, California, Mo., 1892-93, and 1893-94; located in St. Louis, September, 1895, and practiced law alone until Jan. 1, 1901, when formed partnership with Thomas H. Cobbs in present law firm of Bishop & Cobbs. Was city attorney, California, Mo., 1892-94. Democrat. Member Christian Church. Clubs: Noonday, St. Louis (secretary), Racquet, Glen Echo (vice president). Recreations: golf, motoring. Office: Third National Bank Bldg. Residence: St. Louis Club.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


ELIJAH BOOTHE. Elijah Boothe is the son of Elijah and Sarah (Woods) Boothe, and was born about 1839, near Lexington, Kentucky. His parents came to Missouri and settled near Harrisburg, Boone county, Missouri, when Elijah was about one year old. His mother died in 1847, and his father in 1849. When Elijah was twelve or thirteen years of age he started with two mules, one to ride and one for a pack animal, for California, and with the exception of a few days made the trip alone. He had two brothers there and went out in search of them. He worked in the mines and freighted {roads from Los Angeles to Texas. He was poisoned while working in the mines by striking a spring containing corrosive sublimate. His hair came out three times, and the last time it grew it was perfectly white. He appears to be at least sixty years of age, but is young yet and vigorous. When out in the " diggings" he says he only saw a white man once a year, during his long stay in the West. He took passage on a vessel for some island belonging to some English colonists, and prospected for about six months. Then he went to Australia and was there for about four months, being gone, in all, a little over a year. He states that when he first reached Sacramento he was so small that he could not procure work, and almost starved to death. At last, after a four years' search, he found his brothers. He came home about five years ago.
 His oldest brother, David H. Boothe, was a farmer in the Western part of Boone County, and died recently. One brother, William, is living in Columbia. Elijah came back to Missouri over the old overland stage route with five horses. He has had a world of ups and downs in life, and his descriptions of places and things he has seen is truly wonderful. He has a chair factory and blacksmith shop on the southwest quarter of section 20, township 45 and range —, established in 1879. He makes good, substantial chairs, which he sells to all the neighboring towns. He is an Odd Fellow, but is not at present connected with any lodge. He was a charter member of five lodges in California.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


D. A. BRADFORD. Daniel Alexander Bradford is the son of Austin Bradford, a native of Virginia, who came to Boone County in 183G, and to the farm upon which Alexander now lives in 1837. His mother was Lavinia Hume, also a native of Virginia. The elder Bradford was married in Kentucky. The subject of this sketch was born on the farm upon which he now resides, April 21st, 1842. He is the third son and seventh child of a family of three boys and five girls, all of whom are living. With the exception of a few years he has spent his life on the old home place. He was educated at Bonne Femme Academy and at the State University. He is a farmer, and is largely interested in the breeding of thoroughbred cattle.
He was married in Boone county November 24th, 1863, to Miss Harriet E., daughter of Rollin Lyman. They have had two sons and four daughters, all living except one daughter. Mr. Bradford is a member of the Columbia lodge of I. O. O. F.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


FRANK E. BRUTON; Frank E. Bruton, salesman for Rucker & Turner, Sturgeon, Mo., is the son of Dr. F. J. and Nettie B. (Fenwick) Bruton. He was born and raised in Boone County, Missouri. His father and mother are natives of Kentucky. Mr. Bruton commenced active business at the early age of fourteen, and has continued without intermission ever since. He is at this writing engaged as a salesman in the store of Messrs. Rucker & Turner, and has given eminent satisfaction to his employers and won the esteem and confidence of all his patrons. He was married April 19, 1882, to Ida, daughter of Joseph B. Harris. He is a member of the Christian church, also of the Masonic and Knights of Honor lodges.
{Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


MAJOR WM. W. BRYAN. The venerable subject of this sketch is a native of Bryan's Station, Kentucky, and was brought by his widowed mother from that State to Missouri in the fall of 1827, and has lived in Boone county most of his life. In early times he attended school at the now defunct, but then famous "Bonne Femme" Academy. In 1832 he was sent by Capt. Hickman on a business trip to Northwest Missouri, on which he was gone six months. When not engaged in handling stock, Major Bryan worked on the farm, and in his time has done much of that kind of invigorating labor. His title was acquired during the Mormon war, he being a Major in Col. Gilmore's regiment in the campaign against the "Latter-day Saints." In 1848 Major Bryan was clerk in Lamme & Bryan's store at Nashville. He also did business for John H. Bryan & Co.'s paper-mill, distillery and pork packing establishments throughout the Southern States. He became captain of the steamer "Warsaw" in '41, and in '47 was principal clerk in D. S. Lamme's commission house, on Water street, St. Louis. He became agent for the United States bank in 1849, attending to the affairs of that concern in three States, being constantly immersed in a sea of business for twenty years, during which he obtained one judgment for the bank of $369,000. The manuscript of the concern was sold to the paper-mill when its affairs were wound up, and weighed eighty four tons. He has spent five winters on his land in Dallas, Texas. At this writing he resides on the Peter Bass mill tract, in Cedar township. He is quite robust in health, and even yet can do any kind of hard labor. During the civil war, he was a Washington Union man, but never a Lincoln man. Major Bryan was never married. He has never asked an office of the people, never engaged in a lawsuit of his own, and all through his useful and eventful life never asked anything but even-handed justice from any man, nor would he ever have less. He has done a great deal of business for others, and his record is one of which he is not ashamed, but on the contrary, is as justly proud as are his many friends.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


E. C. BURNETT. Edward Camplin Burnett was born in Boone County, October 13th, 1838. He is the son of Dabney and Elizabeth (Ramsey) Burnett, natives of Kentucky. Mrs. Burnett was the daughter of Capt. Ramsey, an associate of Daniel Boone's in the early settling of Kentucky. The parents of Edward Burnett first settled in St. Charles county. In 1825 they came to Boone and settled on a farm one and one-half miles north of Ashland, where the elder Burnett died in 1845. On this farm the subject of this sketch was born. He was the fourth son and ninth child of a family of seven boys and four girls. Was educated at the district schools of his own neighborhood. In the spring of 1859 went to Colorado, and the year following to New Mexico, remaining three months in Santa Fe. He remained in the West until the fall of 1868, visiting Montana, Arizona, Utah, Idaho and Oregon. Returned to the old farm, where he has since lived, except during the year 1871, which was spent on another farm. He is an official member of the New Salem Baptist church, also of the Ashland Lodge of A. F. & A. M.
He was married October 13th, 1870, to Miss Sarah E. Rice, a native of Boone County, the daughter of David Rice, who emigrated from Kentucky to this county in 1819. They have had four children, one son and three daughters, of whom only the three daughters are living.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


R. V. BURNETT. Robert V. Burnett is the son of Joseph Burnett, a native of Virginia. He removed to Kentucky and from thence to Ohio, finally coming to Missouri in 1820. He settled first in Howard County, but soon removed to the place known as Burnett's ford, on Cedar creek, where he remained until his death in 1853.
His wife was Mary Ann Leopard, a native of Kentucky and pioneer settler of Missouri. He built one of the first mills ever erected in Boone county. Robert V. was born December 6, 1837. He was the second son and second child of a family of four boys and one girl, of whom only Robert and one brother are now living. He remained on the farm until the spring of 1854, when he commenced working at his trade, that of stone mason. He entered the Confederate service August 14, 1831, under Captain John M. Robinson. In December, 1851, he was transferred to a company of 1st Missouri Infantry under Colonel Burbridge. Was re-organized and put under Colonel Cockcrill as the 2nd regiment after battle of Shiloh. Mr. Burnett belonged to this command until he left the service, January 2, 1865. He took part in the battles of Lexington, Baker's Creek, Champion Hills, Big Black River and Vicksburg. During the siege he threw a thirty-two pound shell among a party of Federal soldiers who were undermining the Confederate works, being the first man to throw by hand a shell with lighted fuse attached.
After the surrender and while on the way to the place where they were to be paroled, he left the line to get something to eat and was captured by the enemy and held a prisoner of war. Was kept two weeks at St. Louis and from there sent to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, where he remained until near the close of the war when he was released and allowed to return home. In the fall of 1873 he bought and moved to the farm upon which he now lives, one-half mile north of Ashland. He was married in Boone county, April 25, 1865, to Miss Martha Martin, daughter of John P. Martin. Has had four sons and two daughters, of whom the three oldest, two sons and one daughter, died within the space of fifteen days of diphtheria. Mr. Burnett is a member of the Baptist church, and of the grange. He was delegate to the State grange in 1881-2.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JOHN BUTLER; John Butler, the subject of this sketch, was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, September 10, 1825. He is the son of John and Mary Butler. The elder Butler left Ireland when his son was but two years old, corning first to New York City. The family finally settled near Albany, where Mr. Butler took a contract on the first railroad ever built in the United States. This road connected Albany and Schenectady. John Butler owned a hotel on this line, called the Half-way House, where the trains stopped for dinner. He took his son with him on the first train of cars that ever passed over the road. The first package of freight ever sent over the road was consigned to the elder Butler, who preserved the receipt, signed by John Hampson, the first engineer on the road. It is dated either in 1831 or 1832, and was given in acknowledgment of fourteen shillings paid by John Butler on the package delivered to him from the train on its first business trip over the road. Mr. Butler, having received the contract for building a turnpike from Troy, New York, ft> Bennington, Vermont, removed to Oneida county, where he died. Mrs. Butler is still living in Oneida County, New York. The subject of this sketch remained at home until 1852. In the fall of that year he went to California, where he remained for three years, returning to New York in 1855, and from there he came to Boone County, by way of Jefferson City, crossing the country on foot. Mr. Butler was first married October 16, 1847, to Miss-Jane, daughter of Henry and Jane McGrah, of Hoosick, New York. Had five children by this marriage, two of whom, William and Annie, are now living. The former married Zelo Hawkins, the latter Thornton Stewart. The first wife having died in 1862, Mr. Butler was married to his second wife, January 2, 1875. He is now living with his third wife, whose maiden name was Leticia Hill, daughter of Eli Hill, of Sturgeon. Have had three children, two of whom are living, Martin and Mary. Mr. Butler is a mechanic, and as such entered the army in 1862. He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Sturgeon. His wife is a member of the Christian church. He has done as much, perhaps more, to advance the interest and prosperity of Sturgeon than any other individual of the place. He has built a great many houses, and by this means contributed largely to the size of the town as well as to the number of its inhabitants. He is a man of considerable means, all of which he earned by his own labor and prudent management. He has engaged in many enterprises, and has prospered in all his undertakings. He is a carpenter, and his skill as such has served him to the best advantage in improving his own lands. He owns, in addition to his town property, about seven hundred acres of land, much of which he has redeemed from a howling wilderness. He started the Sturgeon broom factory, now owned by S. A. Fretwell. He also made the Commercial Hotel a profitable business before selling out to its present proprietor, W. E. Smith.
{Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}

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