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Boone County
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EDWARD L. DIMMITT.
Mr. Dimmitt was born at Liberty, Clay County, Missouri, June 1849. His father, St. Clair Dimmitt, was a gentleman of French descent, and a native of Virginia, and his wife, Edward's mother, was born in Ohio. Edward L. received the elementary part of his education in the public schools of Liberty, and completed his course at Watson's Seminary in Ashley, Pike county, leaving school for business life in 1867. He then engaged in the drug business in the employment of his brothers in St. Louis, remaining with them until 1873. During the first and second years of that time he attended lectures at a school of pharmacy. In 1873, he came to Columbia, in this county, and engaged in the drug business under the firm name of B. & E. L. Dimmitt. From January, 1879, until July, 1881, he was book-keeper in the Exchange National Bank. At the latter date he accepted the position of cashier of the Farmers' Bank of Ashland, to which place he removed in September of the same year, and of which he has since been a resident.
September 10, 1872, Mr. Dimmitt was married to Miss Betty R. Samuel, daughter of John M. Samuel, a well-known citizen of this county. Five children have been born to them, four of whom, two boys and two girls, are now living.
Mr. D. has been a member of the Presbyterian Church since 1865. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., the National Temperance Relief Union, and of the Good Templars. He was a delegate to the Grand Lodge of the latter order at Hannibal, in 1870, and at the session at Columbia, in 1880. He has held all of the offices in the subordinate lodge. In 1875 and 1876 he published The Golden Age, a temperance paper, at Columbia. Theodore Tilton claimed that the name of this journal was an infringement on that of his own of the same name published in New York. Mr. Dimmitt investigated the matter and, finding that Tilton had no copyright, procured one himself, and then called on the distinguished sentimentalist to discontinue the publication of his New York Golden Age.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


WILLIAM DINWIDDIE; William Dinwiddie is the son of Samuel and Patsy (McBride) Dinwiddie. He was born in Lincoln County, Kentucky, December 18, 1833. When six years old he came with his parents to Boone County, Missouri, and settled four miles east of Columbia, where he continuously resided up to the day of his death, which occurred about the close of the war. The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm, and has followed that business since attaining his majority. He was married, November 8,1855, to Sarah Ann, daughter of Cyrus and Kittie (Crockett) Lusk, natives of Kentucky. The autumn following his marriage, he left Boone County, Missouri, previously the home of both himself and wife, and went to Kansas, settling in the vicinity of Topeka. Was there when the war broke out between the Southern and Northern settlers over the slavery question. He returned to Boone County and farmed in the vicinity of Mt. Moriah church for several years; then moved to Bourbon township just previous to the war, where he has lived ever since. They have seven children, three sons and four daughters. Their names are Kittie, Mattie F., Lulie, Emma, William, Alonzo and Edwin. Mr. Dinwiddie is a well-educated man, having had, in addition to a fair common school education, the benefit of three years' study at the State University. He is a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Dinwiddie is a member of the Baptist Church. He is also a member of the Order of United Workmen. He has been a school director ever since he came to Bourbon Township. He has always voted with the Democratic Party. He is of Scotch and German origin.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


Hezekiah J. M. Doan, of Harrison county, Ky., married Matilda Berry, and removed to Boone Co., Mo., in 1827, from whence they removed to Audrain county in 1831. Mr. Doan was appointed one of the first judges of the County Court of that county, and was Justice of the Peace for many years. He died in 1865, his wife having died in 1856. They had eight children, five daughters and three sons.
(Source: A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches, by William Smith Bryan, publ. 1876. Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack)


DR. DAVID DOYLE. The subject of this sketch was one of the pioneer preachers of the "West, uniting within himself the qualifications of a minister and a physician. His opportunities for doing good were varied and extensive, and he discharged his whole duty to his fellow man in the most cheerful and acceptable manner, leaving behind a memory of good works that will ever survive him. He came to Cedar township in 1818, being among the first settlers of that portion of Boone county. He was born in Rutherford county, North Carolina, and it is said that he commenced preaching before ho was nineteen years old. He also commenced the practice of medicine at an early age. In the month of December, 1819, he with fifteen others met at the house of Anderson Woods for the purpose of founding a church, and were there and then constituted into what has since been known as the Little Bonne Femme Baptist church. He was pastor of New Salem Baptist church for twenty-nine years, having been chosen December 2d, 1828. He died of typhoid fever, July 29th, 1859. The congregation at New Salem erected a handsome monument over his grave as testimony of their great love for him as a man and their high appreciation of his services as a minister.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


HON. HENRY DUSENBURY, DECEASED; Hon. Henry Dusenbury was born on the banks of the Hudson River, New York, in which State he was reared to manhood, and married to Miss M. E. Depew. After his marriage he removed to St. Louis, Missouri, where he served as circuit court judge for thirteen years. His health having failed he removed to a farm near Oakland, St. Louis County, where he remained for about twelve years. He next moved to a farm near Sturgeon, where he and his wife died a few years afterwards. They were both members of the Methodist church. Judge Dusenbury was also a Mason. He was educated principally at home, under the instructions of a private tutor. He was a Democrat in politics and a descendant of one of the old German families of New York. He had nine children in all, six of whom are now living — three sons and three daughters. Their names are Henry, Mary E., married to G. W. Henderson, of Columbia, Missouri; Lulu V. B., married to R. D. Rucker; Fannie, Robert D. and R. M. Robert D. Dusenbury was born at Oakland, St. Louis county, February 10th, 1861, and came with his father to Boone county and lived with him until his death, in 1873. He was educated at the Missouri State University. After receiving a diploma from that institution he took a commercial course and then studied telegraphy. R. M. Dusenbury is studying medicine under Dr. Lockridge, of Sturgeon. He attended one course of lectures at the Medical College, St. Louis, in 1881-82, and will graduate at the ensuing term of that institution.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}

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