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Boone County
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NATHAN G. HAGANS. Is the son of Levi and Charlotte (Graham) Hagans and was born in Kentucky. His father moved to Missouri in 1842 and settled in Lafayette county where he lived a year, when he moved to Boone county, where he died in 1854. Nathan, the subject of our sketch went to California in 185- and was gone about thirteen months. He lived in California seven months, having made the trip in a wagon drawn by oxen. He came back by sea via New Orleans. He has been married twice. The first time to Miss Rebecca Wilcoxen by whom he had six children, four of whom are alive. His second wife was the widow of Samuel Wilcoxen, and the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Peak. Mr. Hagans is of Irish origin upon his father's side and inherits their good qualities of head and heart. He keeps the lauding upon the river known as Hagans' landing and handles and ships about 12,000 ties per year. He is one of the very best citizens in a county noted for her number of men of sterling worth.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


THOMAS G. HAGANS. Is the son of Levi and Charlotte (Graham) Hagans; was born August 27, 1846. His father came to this county from Allen county, Kentucky, in 1843, and settled in Boone county, near Burlington. His father died in 1854, after farming in this county for eleven years. Thomas is a bachelor living alone on his farm. He devotes his time to farming and gardening, making the cultivation of watermelons a specialty. He lived four years in Buchanan county, four in Callaway and one year in Miller county, thence back to his present home where he has since lived. He is one of the yeomen of the country, such men as are relied upon by all governments to make them strong at home and respected abroad.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


MARSHALL H. HARRIS; The life of Marshall H. Harris, postmaster and druggist, Sturgeon, Missouri, is one of the very best illustrations of the self-made man. His energy and will-power can hardly be surpassed, and all his efforts have been made in an honorable, manly direction. He is the son of Overton G. and Nancy (nee Ellington) Harris. His father was almost entirely raised in Boone County, his grandfather, Tyre Harris, having come to Boone along with the very first emigrants. He was one of the first representatives in the legislature from Boone County, having been elected for several terms. A more extended review of his services in this capacity may be found elsewhere in this volume. The subject of this sketch attended school in one of the primitive log cabins which in the early day were made to answer the purpose of school-houses. After he was grown, however, he attended Lathrop Academy, an excellent high school, for two years. He read medical books by firelight, substituting, from enforced economy, hickory bark for candles. He graduated in a brown jeans suit made by one of his sisters. He was married March 1st, 1855, to Miss Mary J., daughter of Dr. A. S. Dinwiddie, of Boone County. They have three children, Carrie, Walter and Mattie. Mr. Harris was a member of Company F, of General Guitar's regiment of M. S. M., enlisted in March, 1862, and was mustered out in April, 1865. He served under Capt. Cook, who was detached from his company much of the time, leaving it in charge of Mr. Harris. He was in most of the fights and skirmishes in which his regiment took part, from the date of his enlistment to the close of the war. He had charge of the garrison at Columbia for some time. During the war he made hosts of friends among Confederates and Southern sympathizers by his many acts of kindness and generous sympathy for the unfortunate. He is thoroughly identified with the community in which he lives. He was appointed postmaster, April, 1869, and has held the office continuously ever since. He has been president of the Sturgeon bank, but is not connected with that business at present. He built the building now occupied by the Sturgeon bank. He is a member of the order of A. O. U. W. He and his wife are both members of the Missionary Baptist church. In politics Mr. Harris is a stalwart Republican.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


A. J. HAWKINS; A. J. Hawkins is the son of John and Rebecca (Skinner) Hawkins, and was born in Madison County, Kentucky, July 14, 1828. His father came to Boone County in 1829 and settled on Thrall's Prairie, near the Model Farm. The subject of this sketch was brought up on the farm and has followed that occupation principally all his life. He has also worked considerably at the blacksmith's trade, and has taught school. Was married, November 11, 1852, to Sarah, daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Hicks) Fountain. They have three children: Barsco Zelo, Laura Bell, and Ezekiel John. Barsco Zelo married William M. Butler and Laura Bell married John C. Via. Butler is living in Chicago; Via in Dallas, Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins ate both members of the Baptist church. Mr. Hawkins, though possessing only the educational advantages offered by the common schools of the county, is a well educated man and has been quite successful as a teacher of common schools. He is of German and English origin, his mother being of German descent, his father English. He is an affable, pleasant gentleman, faithful in all the duties and responsibilities of life.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


ELIJAH S. HAWKINS; Elijah S. Hawkins, carpenter, was born in Howard county. Michigan, March 30, 1832. He is the son of Weeden and Elizabeth (Lanham) Hawkins. The family removed to Illinois in 1834, and settled in Adams County, near Quincy, where they remained until 1851, when they came to Boone County, Missouri, and settled about three-fourths of a mile southwest of Sturgeon. Mr. Hawkins has followed the occupation of carpenter during most of his life. For a short time he sold goods in Sturgeon with Napoleon Burks, under the firm name of Burks & Hawkins. Theirs was perhaps the second dry-goods establishment ever started in that place. He has farmed considerably in connection with his trade. He was first married, September 27, 1857, to Julia, daughter of Jesse and Mary A. Copher. Was afterward married to Miss Sallie, daughter of Simon Engleman. They have one child by this marriage, named Sallie. Mr. Hawkins is a member of the United Workmen. He has, since coming to Missouri, lived continuously in Boone County, except two years spent in Montana, mining and working at his trade.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


JOHN HAZELRIGG; John Hazelrigg is the son of Dillard and Sallie (nee Renick) Hazelrigg, and was born in Clark County, Kentucky, July 17, 1828. His mother was the daughter of George and Mary Magdalen Renick, and sister of Abraham Renick, one of the noted stock men of Clark County. John Hazelrigg left Kentucky in 1856 and settled in Bath, Mason County, Illinois. He enlisted in the 85th Illinois Infantry in 1802. He was chief musician of his regiment. Was at the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and in Sherman's famous march to the sea. He was married, February 14, 1854, to Mildred, daughter of J. V. Kemper, Sr., of Montgomery County, Kentucky. Have one daughter, Mary Dillard. Mr. Hazelrigg is now a member of the firm of Hazelrigg & Kemper, Sturgeon, Missouri, dealers in drugs, groceries, etc. He belongs to the Knights of Honor and was formerly a member of the Odd Fellows lodge, but has not affiliated with the order since coining to Sturgeon. He is a member of the Christian church, and has been since he was seventeen years old. Mrs. Hazelrigg is also a member of the same church. He has been councilman of the city for several years, and has been city clerk for two years. He is of Scotch and Welsh origin on his father's side and German on the mother's side.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


JAMES S. HICKAM. The subject of this sketch is the son of John and Lucinda (Collier) Hickam and was born in Boone County, September 18, 1835. His father was a native of Virginia and emigrated to Cole County, Missouri. In 1834 he came to Boone where James was born. At the age of nine, his father moved to Henry county, and then to Barry county. From Barry he moved back to Henry and from thence he moved to Cass county. From Cass he moved to Bates county and finally back to Cole county again where he died ill 1856. At his father's death James went to Maries County, where the three counties of Maries, Osage and Miller corner upon each other. He lived there 12 or 13 years engaged in farming. From there he moved to Cooper county and lived there about four years, when he moved back to Boone, the county of his birth. He has been engaged in farming all his life until the spring of 1882, when he rented out his farm and engaged in the grocery business. He married, March 13, 1856, Miss Elizabeth Barnhart, daughter of Hoover and Elizabeth Barnhart. Seven children are living, viz., Salina Frances, Minerva C, John W., Radford, Eliza Evelyn, Eleanor and Conley. Mr. Hickam was a Confederate soldier under General Parsons, 9th Missouri, company C. He was captured at Rolla and taken to St. Louis and incarcerated in McDowell's college. He was afterward sent to Alton until the war was nearly over, when he was exchanged at Vicksburg.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


THADDEUS HICKMAN. The subject of this sketch is the son of William Hickman, of Bourbon County, Kentucky. His mother was Mary Tureman, a native of Mason county, Kentucky, Thaddeus Hickman was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, February 14th, 1828, and was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood, He was one of two sons of a family of eleven children, six of whom are now living. After becoming of age he managed an estate belonging to his father and brother. Afterwards he commenced farming on his own responsibility in Pettis county, Missouri. The war having commenced, he left his farm and returned to Boone county, but did not actively engage in business until the close of the war. In 1867 he opened a store at Burlington, where he remained until the spring of 1875, when he moved to the old Tyre Martin farm, south of New Salem Church, where he now resides. He now turned his attention largely to breeding thoroughbred cattle. His stock was selected with great care from the best herds in Kentucky. By close and careful attention to business, he has attained much celebrity as a breeder of short horn cattle. His herd is one of the best in the country. One of his cows, Jenny Lind 7th, is winner of many prizes, among others a prize in Scotland; first prize as two-year old at Michigan (1872) State fair, and fine prizes subsequently. He has always purchased of the leading importers and keeps none but the best. He has cattle from the best herds of Kentucky, also from the herds of John P. Sanborn, Michigan; Ben Sumner, Connecticut, and D. S. Pratt, of Battleboro, Vermont. Mr. Hickman is a member of the Ashland grange.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


T. B. HICKMAN. Thaddeus Bryan Hickman is the son of David M. Hickman, one of the old pioneer settlers of Boone County. He visited this section of the county as early as 1817. Mr. Hickman did not return until 1822, when lie came to stay. He was married in Kentucky to Miss Cornelia Bryan. He purchased a large body of land in this county, his real estate consisting of 3,000 acres. Thaddeus was born November 22d, 1829. He was the fourth son and fourth child of a family of six sons and one daughter, all of whom, except one son, are now living — four in Boone county. He was educated at Bonne Femme Academy, completing his studies in 1849. Since 1860, Mr. Hickman has followed farming. He lives about midway between Columbia and Ashland. He has traded largely in stock. He is now engaged in raising thoroughbred stock. He was married in Louisiana, May 1st, 1860, to Miss Louisa Hickman, of Rapides parish. He is a member of the Bonne Femme Baptist church.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


GEORGE HUBBARD. George Hubbard is the son of John and Mary (Ballon) Hubbard, natives of Kentucky, where their son George was born November 17th, 1805. They emigrated to Callaway County, Missouri, in 1831, and to Boone the year following, settling the place where Mr. Hubbard now resides. The subject of this sketch is the fourth son and fourth child of a family of four boys and two girls, two sons and one daughter of whom are now living. Mr. Hubbard has been a farmer all his life. He was married in Kentucky, August 12th, 1829, to Miss Patsy H. Gibbs, daughter of Alexander Gibbs. They have three sons and six daughters, of whom two sons and four daughters are living, all in Boone. Has been a member of New Salem Baptist church since 1840. His farm consists of 400 acres, situated six miles northeast of Ashland and fifteen miles southeast of Columbia.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


C. B. HULEN; C. B. Hulen was born in Bath County, Kentucky, November 16, 1833. He is the son of John C. and Sallie (nee Bruton) Hulen. Mr. Hulen's parents were natives of Kentucky, his father of Madison, his mother of Montgomery County. He left Kentucky when ten years of age. They emigrated to Boone County, where the subject of this sketch has resided ever since. He was married, August 29, 1860, to Mary F., daughter of J. V. and Mary Kemper. They have one child named Vard. Mr. Hulen has been engaged for the last ten years in buying and selling mules and horses, making Sturgeon his shipping point. He took no part in the war, remained in Illinois until it was over. In 1865 he moved to a farm three miles south of Sturgeon where he has lived ever since. He and his wife are both members of the Christian church. Mr. Hulen is a warm-hearted, whole-souled man, universally liked by all who know him. (Since the foregoing sketch has been in type, Mr. Hulen died in St. Louis, of apoplexy. Sept. 28, 1882.)
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}

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