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WM. KEITH, M. D.,
The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a native of Scott County, Kentucky, born December 20th, 1806. The Keith family seems to have been of Scotch origin, George Keith, great grandfather of Dr. William, having been a native of Scotland. The Doctor's grandfather was a native of Maryland. All the paternal ancestors from the great-grandfather down, bearing the name of George. Longevity seems to have been a characteristic of this family, as most of the ancestors lived to be past eighty years old, and the primary ancestor herein mentioned is said to have reached the remarkable age of one hundred and eleven years. Dr. R. lived with his father in his native county till about fifteen years old, when they removed to Bullitt County, Kentucky, where William remained till he was 22 years of age. At the age of about 12 he was taken down with white swelling in his right leg and confined to his bed a longtime, even before he was able to go on crutches, which he subsequently did for a considerable length of time. At 15 years old, he put himself under treatment of a Scotch doctor named James H. Forester, and was soon enabled to do a little light work. At the age of 17, being desirous to be at some employment, and having a fair education, began teaching, his school being mostly composed, at first, of juvenile pupils, or "a-b-edarians." He succeeded so well as a teacher that his patrons retained him several years, at intervals, however, he would between terms go off to higher schools himself for short periods until he was about the age of 22 years. Having a desire to see the old friends and relatives and his native soil, he left his father's, and made his way back. Having a good English education he engaged in the occupation of teaching school in various places. Finally made his stand in Mortonsville, Woodford County, where he studied medicine with Dr. Wm. M. Wilson, and in the year 1837-8, at Transylvania University, completed his preparation for the practice of medicine. After this he began to practice in connection with his preceptor, Dr. W., who died during this connection, and Dr. K. remained there in the practice till 1840, coming to Missouri in that year. He first practiced for three or four years near Centralia. He was married, in 1844, to Miss Martha Jane Lampton, and moved to Chillicothe, Missouri, where he purchased a farm a few years later, and continued farming and practicing medicine in Livingston County for several years. He then moved back to Chillicothe in order that his children might enjoy the advantages of the schools of that city. When the civil war came on, Dr. Keith was forced to leave home, entrusting the care of his family to his oldest son, Clayton, then a lad of 16 years, and his mother. The Doctor went to the Confederate army and served as surgeon to Gen. Wm. Y. Slack till the latter was killed at Pea Ridge. Dr. Keith remained with the General till he expired, and then buried him in Fullbright's orchard, in order that there should be no difficulty in finding his remains. Subsequently he was employed as hospital surgeon till the fall of 1863, when he left the army, and accompanied by his family, who had joined him, repaired to Arkansas. They remained in that State from October, 1803, till April following, when they went to Kentucky and remained till the civil troubles were over. In October, 1865, the whole family returned to Missouri, locating at Sturgeon, in Boone County, where they continue to reside, Dr. K. resuming the practice of his profession and continuing till 1875. He then turned it over to his youngest son, J. Fabricius Keith, who had previously been practicing in the City Hospital. He continues the practice at Sturgeon, and is married to a Miss Turner, an amiable lady of good family, daughter of Alexander Turner, now of Sturgeon. Clayton Keith, the doctor's oldest son, obtained a good education and entered the ministry, but was forced to give it up because of failing health. He then studied medicine and having prepared himself for the practice, was soon afterwards married to Miss Mary Bernard, of Louisiana, Missouri, where he is now located and practicing his profession. Dr. Keith has good cause to be proud of his family, having reared them in that exemplary manner that fits them for the responsible duties of life.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


DR. JAMES F. KEITH; Dr. James F. Keith was born in Livingston County, Missouri, January 18, 1849. He is the son of Dr. William and Martha J. (nee Lampton) Keith. The subject of this sketch left Missouri in the fall of 1863, going first to Arkansas, thence to Tennessee and Kentucky, and from the latter State back to Missouri, stopping at Sturgeon, in 1865, whore he has lived continuously ever since, except the few years spent at the Medical College in St. Louis. He entered that institution in 1K69, graduating two years later. He was assistant surgeon at the St. Louis hospital for six months, returning to Sturgeon in the fall of 1871. He practiced medicine with his father until the hitter's health failed, when he turned his entire business over to his son. He was married October 7, 1874, to Miss Dora, daughter of Alexander J. Turner, of Sturgeon. They have one child living, William F. Dr. Keith was not in the army. He belongs to no church. Is a member of the Knights of Honor, and is medical examiner for the order. He has served a number of insurance companies in the same capacity. He has the confidence and esteem of the entire community.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


J. A. KERR, M. D. Dr. James Albert Kerr is the son of W. Kerr, a farmer and a native of Frederick County, Va., and Isabella Castlemane Kerr, born in Clark County, Va. The doctor was born on his father's farm March 6th, 1838. He was the youngest child of a family of fifteen children, nine boys and six girls. Three of the boys still survive. The doctor was educated chiefly at the Winchester (Va.) University. In the spring of 1854 he entered the drug store of David Ricketts, of Baltimore, and remained one year. The next year he served with J. B. Moore, in the same business in Washington, D. C. The next year he was with John Keeshan, Cincinnati, and the next two years with Alex. Leitch & Co., St. Louis. In the spring of 1859 he became book-keeper for Rufus Fitch & Co., stationers. He then made a trip to Texas and was absent six months. On his return, in 1861, under Dr. J. N. Edwards, of Jefferson City, he continued the study of medicine, which he had already begun while serving as a druggist. He received his diploma from the St. Louis Medical College, in 1862. In March, 1863, he began the practice of his profession at Cedar City, Callaway County.
He remained there two years, or until the spring of 1865, when, having been drafted into the Federal service as a common soldier, and not wishing to fight against the South, his sympathies being with that section, he excused himself (!) and went to Salt Lake City. Here he practiced for thirteen months. From the spring of 1866 till the ensuing fall lie was in Helena, Montana. He then came to Boone county, and settled in Ashland, and here and in the surrounding country he has ever since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession.
May 17, 1870, Dr. Kerr married Miss Sophia A. Nichols, a daughter of Robert Nichols, a farmer, and an old resident of Boone County. They have had born to them six children, three boys and three girls. Of these one boy and two girls are still living. The doctor is a member of the Ashland Baptist church and belongs to the Ancient Order United Workmen.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


CHARLES G. KING; The subject of this sketch was horn in Boone County, October 19, 1828. He is the son of James and Kissiah (Penic) King, both natives of Kentucky, but early settlers in Boone County. Mr. King was reared on the home place about two miles west of Columbia, where his father lived and died. In early manhood, the subject of this sketch crossed the plains to California where he remained for two years working in the mines. He returned home in 1852, and resumed his former occupation — fanning. Was married, December 15, 1853, to Mary, daughter of David and Cynthia Shock, of Boone County. They have nine children living; William, May, Francis, David Everly, Maggie, Mattie, Walter, Dora, and Minnie. Mr. and Mrs. King are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. King has lived a life of earnest, persistent toil, and by industry and prudent management has accumulated a handsome estate and won the esteem and confidence of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}

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