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ABNER MARTIN, M. D. Dr. Martin was born February 7, 1835. He received a good common school education in the schools of his neighborhood. In 1854 he began the study of medicine, with his uncle, Dr. Meredith Martin, of St. Louis, and graduated from the St. Louis Medical College four years later, or in 1858. After his graduation, he practiced in Boone county for about five years. He spent the winter of 1863-4 in Bellevue Medical College, New York, from which noted institution he received a diploma in the spring of 1864. He then returned to Ashland, where, and in the county generally, he practiced his profession extensively until 1881, when he became president and superintendent of the Ashland Mill Company, and this position he still holds. May 11, 1859, Dr. Martin was married at Providence, Boone county, to Miss Annie Tuttle, a daughter of Judge Gilpin S. Tuttle. Of this union two children, a son and a daughter, have been born. The doctor has been a member of North Salem Baptist church for about thirty years.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


R. H. MARTIN. Robert Hudson Martin is the son of Nathan and Mary (Hill) Martin, natives of Kentucky, who emigrated to Boone county, Missouri, in 1838. Robert was born in Todd county, Kentucky, December 27th, 1820, and was educated at home, his father being his only teacher As the elder Martin was a good scholar, the son's education was not neglected, as it might otherwise have been, for in Robert's boyhood there were no public schools in that section of country. He was the fourth son and seventh child of a family of eleven children, six sons and five daughters, of whom only five are now living. Mr. Martin crossed the plains to California in 1850, returning home in 1851. In 1852 he bought and moved to the farm where he now resides, one and one-half miles north of Ashland. He was married, December 14th, 1848, to Miss Nancy E. Harris, a native of Boone county. They have had ten children, eight daughters and two sons, of whom six daughters and one son are now living. Mr. Martin has given special attention to stock raising and has made the business quite profitable. He is a member of the New Salem Baptist church, also of the Ashland lodge, A. F. and A. M. Mrs. Martin died September 9, 1881.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


ROBERT SIDNEY MARTIN, M. D. The professional gentleman whose name heads this sketch is the son of Lincoln R. and Isabella Martin, and grandson of Wayne Martin, who came from Madison County, Kentucky, to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1816, and to Boone County in 1818. His grandfather was, therefore, one of the earliest settlers of the county and was one of the founders of the Bonne Femme Baptist church, who left it to found the New Salem church. Dr. Martin's mother was a daughter of Abner Nichols, who came to Boone county in 1825, and he (Robert Sidney) was born on a farm one-half mile from Ashland, this county, July 18, 1833. He was the second of a family of eight boys and two girls, five of the former and one of the latter still surviving, and all residing in this county. Dr. Martin attended the district schools in his boyhood, and thus acquired the elementary part of his education. In 1856, he began the study of medicine with his uncle, Meredith Martin, of St. Louis, and also attended the St. Louis Medical College, from which he graduated in 1858. In the winter of 1859-60, he took a course of lectures at the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, from which he received his diploma in the spring of 1860. He had begun the practice of medicine in Ashland, in 1858, and returning there, after finishing his course, he resumed the practice, which he has built up to be both extensive and lucrative. He had not practiced to any extent, however, when the war came on and he entered the Confederate service as surgeon of the 6th Missouri regiment of infantry, Clark's division of Gen. Price's army. He was in the battles of Boonville and Pea Ridge, and after the latter, was assigned to the hospital service until May following, when he returned home. Dr. Martin was married, October 3d, 1860, to Mary L. Blanton, of Kentucky. Three sons and four daughters have been born to bless this union, all of whom survive at this writing. The doctor is a member of the New Salem Baptist church, and also of the Ashland lodge of A. F. and A. M.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


W. T. MAUPIN. Wellington Tilman Maupin is a son of W. C. and Elizabeth Scott "Maupin, both natives of Albemarle county, Virginia. They came to St. Charles county, Missouri, in 1835, and to Warren county in 1837, where Mr. M. engaged in merchandising in addition to farming. Here Wellington T. Maupin was born January 16, 1838, being the third child and second son of a family of four sons and two daughters. In the spring of 1845 his parents removed to St. Louis, and in the fall of the same year to Boone, settling on a farm and also keeping a store at Nashville, ten miles southwest of Columbia. Here young Maupin improved the educational advantages afforded by the common schools of his neighborhood, and attended them whenever possible, his education being mainly the result of his own efforts.
In 1857 he entered the dry goods house of Stephens, Conley & Smith, at Columbia, and here remained one year, the next year becoming deputy postmaster. Afterwards he was for five years salesman for Hume & Park, dealers in general merchandise, and then became a member of the firm, which then took the name of Hume, Park & Co. In 1867 he engaged as salesman with Barth, Victor & Myer, general merchants. In 1870 he engaged in the grocery trade in partnership with Mr. Allen, the firm being Allen & Maupin. In 1875 he disposed of his interest in this business and for the next two years was a salesman, first for Riggins & Orear, and afterwards for Moss & Prewitt. In 1877 he came to Ashland, where he has since been engaged in merchandising, at first "on his own hook," and subsequently, in September, 1881, becoming a member of the firm of Wiseman, Maupin & Co.
November 5, 1863, at Kansas City, Mr. Maupin married Miss Rebecca E. Wilson, of Lexington, Kentucky, daughter of an American officer who fell in the war with Mexico. To them have been born four children, two only of whom are now living. Mr. Maupin has been a member of the M. E. church, South, since 1854. He belongs to Twilight Lodge, A. F. and A, M., of Columbia, and also to the Good Templars. He has been several times a delegate, and is now delegate elect, to the annual Methodist conference of Missouri. In 1871 he was licensed by his church as an exhorter. He was at one time superintendent of the Columbia Sabbath school, and is now superintendent of the Methodist Sunday school at Ashland.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


EMERSON D. McALLISTER; Was born in Warren, Huntingdon County, Indiana, January 31, 1852. He is the son of George and Rebecca McAllister. His father was born near Zanesville, Ohio, and his mother was born and reared in the State of Indiana. Besides Emerson, there were born four other children — William A., James Monroe, Alonzo and Lavina — of whom William A. only is now living, and is a leading physician in Centralia. Emerson lived with his parents in Warren, Indiana, until he was fifteen years old. In 1867 his father moved to Boone county and settled on a farm about four and a half miles southeast of Sturgeon, where Emerson remained, performing the usual duties required of fanners' boys for about three years and a half. He then went to Centralia and commenced learning the art of telegraphy under the supervision of the night operator. Here he remained five months, when he was placed in charge of the office at Cunningham, in Chariton County. From here he went to Ottumwa, Iowa; then successively to St. Peters, Montgomery, Martinsburg, Carrollton, St. Charles and New Florence, Missouri. On account of his wife's health, he next moved to Hillsboro, Texas, and remained a short time; from Texas he removed to Sturgeon, where he has for several months past very efficiently discharged the arduous duties of agent and operator. He has been engaged as agent and operator at various points, altogether, for a period of about twelve years. His education was acquired at the schools of Warren, in which he made very satisfactory progress up to the period of his leaving; but owing to poor health he was prevented from taking as advanced a course as he desired, until he arrived at-an age when he felt it incumbent upon him to wage his own part in the actual battle of life. On December 29, 1880, he was married to Miss Ava J. Hunter, daughter of S. P. and Esther (Sherman) Hunter. Mrs. McAllister is a native of Morrison, Gasconade County, this State. They have one child, named Elmer. In connection with Mrs. McAllister there is a hit of romantic history to which a brief allusion will here be made, and which also concerns some of the early pioneers of Boone County. Miss Hunter's mother, prior to her marriage, was a Heath. She had a brother named Robert. In 1822 Robert Heath's father emigrated from Boone county, taking with him a colony consisting of mechanics, artisans, etc., and settled upon a tract of land five leagues square, then within the borders of old Mexico, but now just within the borders of New Mexico. In consideration of establishing the colony upon it, this tract was deeded to Mr. Heath by a physician to the emperor, to whom it had been granted by royal authority for his great skill and learning. The tract is known as the Brazito claim. Owing to the turbulent times which arose, the colony was broken up, and returned to Missouri, where, not long after, Mr. Heath died. The heirs, excepting Robert Heath, knew nothing of their claim to this estate till a few years ago» when it leaked out through Robert's efforts to obtain confirmation of the title and secure the entire property himself. The required evidence has been gradually collected for the past few years, and the claim of the rightful heirs to their just proportion, it is expected, will soon be established. Mrs. McAllister's mother's share will be one-eighth in this large estate. Mr. McAllister is a member of the Masonic lodge at Sturgeon, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


JOHN TAYLOR McCAULEY; Samuel McCauley, father of John Taylor, was a native of Kentucky, having been born and raised in Montgomery County of that State. He removed to Missouri in 1819, and settled about five miles east of Columbia. He was first engaged as an overseer for Asa Stone, for whom he labored until the breaking out of the Florida war, when he enlisted under Col. Dick Gentry, and was with that gallant officer when he received his death wound. He also served in the Mexican war, and was in the battle of Buena Vista. He also crossed the plains to Santa Fe several times. The subject of this sketch was born in Boone County, October 5, 1844. His mother's maiden name was Cynthia A. Lewis. He was raised on the farm, and in early manhood went into the milling business, afterwards was a tie and timber contractor. Was also in the livery business at Sturgeon. Served as justice of the peace for ten years. Was married, January 22, 1871, to Alice, daughter of John and Millie Peacher, of Boone County. Have three children living: Walter Scott, Daisy D., Robert Bruce. Mr. McCauley's grandfather, on his father's side, was a Scotchman and a soldier of the revolutionary war under General Washington. Mr. McCauley and wife are members of the Christian church. He is also a Mason. He was left an orphan at an early age, and had not only himself to educate and support, but the
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


JAMES M. McCOMAS, M. D.; Dr. James M. McComas, a prominent physician of Sturgeon, Missouri, was born at Newton, Kentucky, February 29, 1844. He is the son of C. L. and Clara McComas, the former a native of Virginia, the latter of Morgan county, Kentucky. His life, from early youth, has been an eventful one. His parents removed to the west when he was an infant, stopping first at Burlington, Iowa, moving next to Nebraska, where they remained for a few years, thence to Illinois, where they both died, their deaths being within a short period of each other. Young McComas, being thus left an orphan, returned to his relatives in Kentucky, and remained a short time at Louisville and Covington, attending school. Ho next went to Philadelphia, and, at the early age of eleven years, embarked with his uncle on a voyage to South America, where he remained for a short time. Returning from the tropics, he spent the remainder of his youth in the States of Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Having no one to guide or counsel him, and being of an inquisitive temperament, and possessing, withal, an unusual amount of vitality, he naturally acquired a wandering disposition, and sought wider fields of observation than the immediate vicinity in which he was left a helpless orphan. While yet a mere youth, he attended a course of medicine at the Missouri medical college, St. Louis, in the class of 1830 and 1861. He took one degree at the Pennsylvania medical college, Philadelphia, and two at the medical department of Central University, Louisville, Kentucky, where he graduated in 1875 with the decree of M. D. In 1880, he took the degree of M. D. at the Kentucky school of medicine, Louisville. Dr. McComas was married, September 26, 1867, to Miss Maggie, daughter of John and Catherine Rochford, large landholders of Sturgeon, Missouri. The Doctor has two children: Arthur Rochford and Edwin Gaillard. He belongs to no church. He is a member of the Masonic order. He is of Scotch-Irish origin. He has a large medical library, consisting of standard works and a large collection of recent publications by the most eminent authors of the profession. Notwithstanding the vast amount of medical literature constantly issuing from the press, he is a liberal purchaser of all that possess the least merit, and by this means he keeps fully abreast with all the recent discoveries made, and reported by the most eminent men in the profession. He believes in progress, and cherishes every new idea, and welcomes every new discovery calculated to benefit the race by alleviating human suffering. In addition to his medical library, he has a fine collection of literary works, including a full set of the American Cyclopedia. He has also a large elective battery of recent and most approved construction, with a fine assortment of electric attachments and appliances for use in his practice. He has been at Sturgeon for fifteen years, and has built up a splendid practice. He is a member of the Linton medical association, also of the State association. He is a man of broad, liberal views, and a genial, courteous, entertaining gentleman. Mrs. McComas is a member of the Catholic Church.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


DUNCAN McDONALD; Duncan McDonald, wagon-maker and blacksmith, Sturgeon, Missouri, is a native of Stormount County, Canada, but of Scotch parentage. He is the son of Alexander and Catharine {nee Mcintosh) McDonald. His mother was a first cousin of the Confederate general, James Mcintosh, killed at Pea Ridge. The subject of this sketch was born and raised near the line between Franklin county, New York, and Canada, in the neighborhood of the Wheeler family, and knew the vice-president very well. Mr. McDonald was born February 4, 183fi, and lived in his native county until he was sixteen years old. He was brought up on the farm, but after reaching manhood learned the trade of a wagon-maker and blacksmith. Leaving Canada, he went first to Iowa, where he remained one year, coming from that state direct to Sturgeon, where he has remained ever since, working continuously at his trade. He was married in the fall of 1859, to Miss Elizabeth R., daughter of James R. Burks. They have six children living, and five dead. The names of the living are Samuel Lockridge, Catharine Lee, Martha Ellen, Duncan Bruce, Ada Eveline, and John Archibald. Mr. McDonald is a member of the Catholic church. He has been a member of the city council, and also of the school board. Mrs. McDonald is a member of the Methodist church.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


P. HENRY McKENNA. P. Henry McKenna was born in Jefferson County, New York, March 19, 1839. He is the son of James and Margaret (Bruton) McKenna. His father was a farmer, and the son was brought up in that avocation. He joined the Union army at the breaking out of the war, becoming a member of Company C, First New York light artillery, with which he served through all the most prominent battles of the Army of the Potomac. He took part in sixteen of the hardest-fought engagements of the war; participated in the battles of Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Falling Waters, Antietam, the battles of the Wilderness and around Richmond.
He was married September 15, 1870, to Miss Julia, daughter of Otis and Rosette Legate. They have four children living — Charles Edwin, Laurena Henry, Fred, and Bertha. The subject of this sketch was left an orphan at an early age, and commenced work for himself at three dollars a month. He not only had to care for himself, but for several younger members of the family. He owns about 400 acres of land near Claysville, and one of the finest views in the State. His house stands on a high bluff, back from the river about one and a half miles. He is the postmaster at Claysville. He is a genial, whole-souled man, a kind neighbor, and worthy citizen. He has by his own labor accumulated a competency, and enjoys it as a reasonable man should.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


F. W. MIDDLETON; F. W. Middleton was born in Clinton county, Illinois, November 17, 1836, and lived there until 1876, when he removed to Sturgeon, Missouri. Before leaving Illinois he was engaged in the hay business. He was married, December 29, 1855, to Miss Edna, daughter of Lacy K. and Catherine Witcher, natives of Pennsylvania, but citizens of Illinois at the time of their daughter's marriage. They have five children, whose names are Finis E., Nelson Holt, George Leonard, Walter, and Bertie. Mr. Middleton served in the Union army during the late war, being a member of Company D, 89th Illinois infantry, which operated in Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. He was in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Atlanta and Nashville. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and had belonged to the Odd Fellows before coming to Sturgeon. There being no lodge at that place he withdrew from the order. Mr. Middleton and C. H. Taylor own and operate one of the Sturgeon mills. They also have a hay press in connection with their business which is a valuable acquisition to the town.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


WILLIAM J. MONTRIEF; William J. Montrief, member of the firm of Montrief & Prather, livery, feed and sale stables Sturgeon, Missouri, is a native of Franklin County, Virginia, where he was born, November 5th, 1839. He is the son of Isaac and Francis Montrief. His father was of French origin, his mother of Irish parentage. At the beginning of the war he joined Company C, Tenth Virginia Cavalry Confederate army. In the last years of the war he served in Captain Wingfield's company. He was in the seven days battle near Richmond, and was at Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and the siege of Petersburg in the fall of 1864; was taken prisoner and carried to Washington City in July, 1865, where he took the oath and was released. He had two brothers in the regiment in which he served. He returned to his home in Franklin County, after being released from prison, a sound man, having gone through the entire war without receiving a wound. He landed in Sturgeon, Missouri, in the winter of 1868, and settled on a farm southeast of town. In 1877, moved to town and has been a citizen of the place ever since. He was married, February 14th, 1870, to Miss Penelope, daughter of James Hendrick. They have five children: J. Virgil, I. Homer, William L., Lilburn H. and Everett B. Mr. and Mrs. Montrief are both members of the Christian church. He is also a member of the Knights of Honor. He is at this writing mayor of the city. He has also held the office of constable. Since becoming a citizen of Sturgeon, he has followed the livery business in partnership with Mr. Prather. He is a man of excellent judgment and considerable culture, having received a fair education before entering the army. He is social, kind and accommodating as a neighbor and highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a Democrat in politics, but was raised a Whig care of several younger members of the family resting alone upon his industry, fidelity and prudence.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


MRS. MARY M. MURRY. The maiden name of Mrs. Murry was Glasgow. Her father, Nathan Glasgow, was one of the early pioneers of Missouri. Her mother's maiden name was Graham. Mrs. Murry was first married to Erastus King, of Callaway county, in 1848. Mr. King died in 1856, leaving three small children, all boys. In the spring of 1865 Mrs. Murry moved to the farm upon which she now resides, ten miles southeast of Columbia, containing 480 acres. Two of her sons, Nathan and John G. King, live with her. In 1874 she was married to Andrew Murry, who died in 1876. Mrs. Murry's sons were all educated at Westminster college, Fulton, Missouri. One son died in infancy.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

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