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JOEL PALMER, DECEASED; Joel Palmer, was one among the most enterprising farmers and stock raisers of Boone county. He was born in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1811, but removed in early life to Bourbon county, where he remained until his marriage, in 1831, to Miss Milly Fretwell of that county. He came to Missouri in 1833. He was the son of James and Elizabeth (Foster) Palmer. Landed in Boone county, Missouri, with a wagon and team and eight hundred dollars, and died worth about sixty thousand. He first settled about three miles south of Sturgeon, where he lived from 1833 to 1865. After selling his farm he moved several times, finally settling down with his son, Lancelot, where he died October 29, 1879. He left two children, Lancelot and Mary Susan Stewart. His first wife having died, he was married the second time in his old age. Lancelot Palmer was born in Boone county, three miles south of Sturgeon, at the old Palmer homestead, May 10, 1834. He was raised in Boone county where he continued to reside until 1881, when he removed to Audrain, about one-half mile north of Sturgeon, where he now lives. He is largely engaged in farming and stock raising, which he has followed all his life. Was married, June 2, 1867, to Martha Ann Cook, a native of Boone county, daughter of Robert and Ann Eliza Cook. The parents of Mrs. Palmer were formerly of Kentucky. They have four living children. Letha Ann, Robert Lee, James and Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer are not members of any church. He belongs to no secret orders. Took no part in the late civil war. He owns about two thousand acres of land, one-half in Boone, the remainder in Audrain county.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


OTWAY P. PECK. The subject of this sketch was a native of Maryland, but was reared in Virginia. After he grew to manhood, he emigrated to Mason County, Kentucky, where he was elected sheriff for two terms, discharging the duties of that office satisfactorily. He then moved to Lexington, Missouri, and was living there when the gold fever of "'49" took so many of Missouri's best citizens to California. While he was absent in California his family moved to St. Francois county, where they remained about a year, and then moved to Ste. Genevieve, where, after about a year, they were joined by Mr. Peck, who had come back from California. They then moved to Boone county in the fall of 1852, and settled in Columbia. He died in Johnson county, Missouri. He made considerable money in California, but was taken sick among strangers and his money melted away.
He was married the first time to Miss Ann DeBell, of Kentucky, who died after being married five or six years. By this marriage they had one son, who died in California.
He married the second time Miss Frances C, daughter of Edward Wood, Esq., of Fleming County, Kentucky, by whom he had eight children, only three of whom are living, E. H., born in Washington, Mason County, Ky., July 26th, 1841; F. W., born in Lexington, Ky., February 8th, 1850, and O. P., born January 1st, 1853. They were reared mostly in Boone county. E. H. and F. W. are in the drug business at Ashland under the firm name of Peck Bros., where they have been since March 19th, 1879. E. H. Peck learned the drug business in Columbia, and is considered a first-class pharmacist. He took quite a trip through Texas, Indian Territory and Kansas. After coming back to Columbia he was postmaster there, and then went into business for himself and succeeded admirably. He was educated at subscription schools and at the University. He was one of the charter members of the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Columbia, and has been city treasurer of Ashland for two years. His father and mother were strict members of the Old School Presbyterian church. The Pecks were all descendants from three brothers, who came over from Ireland, and upon the mother's side were of French and German extraction. Thomas Stone, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, was one of their mother's ancestors.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


ELI PENTER. Is the son of Martin and Nancy A. {nee Tate) Penter, and was horn on his father's farm in Independence county, Arkansas, February 7, 1836. When but thirteen years old he went to Oregon, where he attended the common schools, the Salem Institute and the Winchester Academy. From the spring of '62 till the fall of '65, he was engaged in trading in the mines of Oregon and Idaho, transferring supplies from the head of navigation to the interior mines, doing a wholesale and also a jobbing business. In the fall of '65 he sold out at Idaho City, and came via Salt Lake City and Denver to Omaha, and thence on to Quincy, Illinois, where he spent part of the succeeding winter, winding up with a visit to his old home in Arkansas.
His corning to Boone County was in April, 1866. The three years succeeding he spent in farming and in teaching in this county. In the fall of 1867 he entered the University of Columbia, in the Sophomore class, graduating with honors in the class of 1870. During his last year at the University he was an instructor in that institution. After leaving the college he became the teacher of the public school at Ashland, which position he filled for three years, engaging in the study of law at the same time. June 6th, 1873, he was admitted to the bar at the session of the circuit court at Columbia. He has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, and in attending to his duties as a notary and in the business of conveyancer and real estate agent. April 1st, 1875, in connection with J. W. Johnson, he began the publication of the Ashland Bugle, and continued the same for two years. During the troubles with the Indians in Oregon, Mr. Penter served six months in the Oregon volunteers against the savages, and was in two regular engagements and a number of skirmishes with them.
November 9th, 1881, Mr. Penter was married to Miss Maggie B. Johnston, daughter of Rev. J. T. M. Johnston, of Boone County. Mr. P. is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a Democrat; for a number of years he was a member of the county central committee, and has frequently been sent as a delegate to his party's county, senatorial and State conventions.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JOHN Y. PHILLIPS is to be classed as one of the earliest pioneers in this northwest country and a record of his travels and experiences during those days would make a very interesting volume. It is with pleasure, therefore, that we mention the salient points of the same. John Y. Phillips was born in Boone county, Missouri, on May 30, 1839, the son of John Y. and Margaret (Ward) Phillips, both of whom died in 1847. Our subject's uncle, Hiram Phillips, was the judge of Boone county and was appointed guardian of the orphans and estate of the elder Phillips, deceased. In 1853, John Y. came with his brother, Newton, who had previously been to California, across the plains with a band of cattle to California. They were ten months en route. Newton Phillips is now a wealthy land owner of Fresno, California. In 1855, our subject returned to Missouri, and four years later crossed the plains with about five hundred head of stock cattle. It was in 1862, that he came to Florence and mined there and in adjacent camps. Afterward, he passed through the Lolo trail to East Bannock, then was at Alder Gulch, where he did placer mining. In 1886, he went to Portland, Oregon, and was one of forty-five men who chartered the steamer Growler and went to Sitka, Alaska. They met with indifferent success, as regards mining, and the next trip the steamer was lost with all on board. We next see him in Seattle, whence he went to Montana; then he came to the Similkameen river, just above Oroville, in 1868, where he did placer mining, clearing about twenty-five dollars per day. The next summer, he was with William Hall at the mouth of the Pend d'Oreille. Mr. Hall afterwards discovered the famous Hall mines in British Columbia. In 1871, Mr. Phillips went to the Priest river mines, in British Columbia, then settled on a ranch in Mason valley and took up stock raising. In 1885, he moved his property to Toat's coulee creek, near Mr. Thorp's ranch, where he owns a ranch. During the winter of 1889-90 he lost one hundred and forty-three head of cattle, and the next spring he came to his present place, three miles east of Anglin, being the first settler on Bonaparte creek. Mr. Phillips married an Indian woman and has two children, Charles, and Martha, wife of J. C. Patterson of this county. Mr. Phillips is a good substantial citizen and has been very successful in handling cattle, having some fine thoroughbreds now. [Source: "An illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the state of Washington" Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904 - Tr. by Helen Coughlin]


G. B. POAGE; farmer and stock raiser, section 7, post office Plattsburg, is as popularly known as any of the early settlers of Clinton County. He is a native of Boone County, Missouri, and was born August 26, 1816. His father, Robert, was a native of Virginia, and came to Missouri in 1807. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and became a resident of Clay County in 1820. He helped to build the first warehouse at Liberty, and took an active part in the development of Northwestern Missouri. The grandfather of G. B., Abraham Grooms, was an early settler of Clinton County, having located where the subject of this sketch now resides in 1836, the same time that the Poage family came. The county at that time was in its natural condition, the hand of man having done but little towards its development. To them much credit is due for the present substantial condition of the territory in their immediate vicinity. They passed through the various inconveniences subject to the settlement of a new country, ever persevering and triumphed over all obstacles. The estate of Mr. P. consists of 255 acres. He keeps good grades of cattle, and in stock raising does a business that will compare with any in the community. He was married in 1839, to Miss Hannah Victor, a native of Lewis County, Kentucky. By this union they have ten children living: Mary Ann, Nancy Elizabeth, Robert, Sarah Ellen, William B., John S. Martha M., David S., Alfred R. and Abraham G. Lost one — James Allen.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)


CHARLES H. PRATHER; Charles H. Prather, of the livery firm of Montrief & Prather, Sturgeon, Missouri, was born in Madison county, Kentucky, October 19, 1829. He is the son of Thomas and Polly (Cowan) Prather. The elder Prather was born and raised in Kentucky. Mrs. Prather was born in Virginia. They moved to Boone county, Missouri, about the year 1830, and settled on a farm four miles north of Columbia, where Mr. Prather spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1848. The subject of this sketch was two years old when his parents came to Boone county. He was reared on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits until he engaged in the livery business two years ago. He lived in Randolph seven years, and in Audrain twelve years, his home being near Sturgeon. For the last two years Mr. Prather has been engaged in the livery business with Montrief. Was married October 19, 1849, to Eliza J., daughter of Joseph Brown, of Boone county. The following children born of this marriage are now living: Mary Ellen, Joseph, John, and Ida May. The first wife having died February 23, 1880, Mr. Prather married Miss Said, daughter of William Barnett. Served in Capt. Davenport's company, Confederate army, during the last year of the war. Served in several minor engagements while en route southward. He is a member of the Christian church. His wife is a Methodist. Mr. Prather is a member of the Knights of Honor, also of the Home Mutual Association. In addition to the livery business, Mr. Prather is largely interested in the cattle trade in partnership with his brother-in-law.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


J. M. PROCTOR; J. M. Proctor, one of the most prominent and successful business men in his section of country, was born in Macon county, Missouri, February 12th, 1842. He first came to Boone county in 1849, remaining about four years, during which time he was engaged in farming out in the "white oaks." Returning to Bloomington, Macon county, he learned the tinner's trade. He remained at Bloomington until I860, when he removed to Mexico, Missouri, where he remained during the war, except for a few weeks spent in campaigning with Col. Porter; was in the fight at Monroe Station, the first battle of the war fought on Missouri soil. He was also at Moore's Mill and Florida. Mr. Proctor is the son of Dr. William H. and Sophronia (nee Maughs) Proctor. His mother is a sister of Dr. J. M. B. Maughs, of St. Louis, and Mordecai Maughs, of Callaway county. He was married January 20th, 1864, to Miss Eila, daughter of William White, a Methodist minister, of Mexico. They have five children: Finnie, Laura Belle, Willie Patton, John Henry and Edna Clay. After his marriage he removed to Sturgeon, where he has been actively engaged in farming and trading ever since. He is a self-made man, having had no advantages save those he created for himself. He went to school in the woods, the school-house being made of unhewn timber, the fireplace occupying an entire end of the rude cabin. When he returned to Bloomington, he went one term to the High School, finishing his education while learning his trade. After working all day he usually spent about half the night studying. He labored after working hours to procure money to buy books. He read law for two years and was anxious to enter upon the duties of that profession but had not the means to do so. Mr. and Mrs. Proctor, and all their children except one, are members of the Methodist Church South. He was a candidate before the Democratic convention for the State Senate in 1880, but was beaten by Hon. James L. Stephens, of Columbia. He is of Scotch origin, on his father's side. His mother was of French extraction. He has accumulated considerable property, and is doing a profitable business. He is one of the largest dealers in railroad ties in the State. He is true to his convictions, fair in his dealings, and earnest and sincere in the discharge of duty. Mr. Proctor was nominated at the Democratic primaries in August, 1882, as a candidate for representative, defeating a strong competitor, Capt. J. W. Kneisley, in every voting precinct in the county but one.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


MICAJAH GIBSON PROCTOR. Is the son of Micajah and Nancy (Sullins) Proctor, and was born November 14th, 1819, in this county. His father and mother were both natives of Kentucky. His father died in 1819 and his mother October 26th, 1852 to Miss Sallie G. Tuttle, daughter of Gilpin Tuttle, of Boone county, Missouri. His father and mother were natives of South Carolina. Mrs. Roddy's maiden name was Lewis. They were married in South Carolina in 1824 and removed to Tennessee the year following. The elder Roddy died in 1835. Mrs. Roddy came to Boone County, Missouri, the year following, and lived here until her death in 1860, having previously married James Dunn.
She brought four children with her to Missouri, Francis T., Robert A. and James H. Robert A. was born December 5, 1831 Was reared on the farm five miles south of Providence and was educated in the common schools of the county. When about twenty-one years of age he commenced farming and continued in this business until 1868. He was also largely engaged in the tobacco, hemp, and stock trade. In the spring of 1869 he bought the interest of Mr. George Haydon in a store at Providence, thereby becoming the partner of W. P. Tuttle, the firm's name being Roddy & Tuttle.
Mr. Roddy was drowned, October the 5th, 1877, while on his way to St. Louis, on board a steamer, with hogs for that market. He was a member of the Nashville Baptist church, also of the Masonic lodge at Columbia. Seven children were born to him. James G., Robert A., Margaret A., Albert and Arthur are living. Two, Willie and Lucy, are dead, the former having been killed by a wagon, at the age of five years, the latter dying in February, 1881. The family still live at Providence. Robert is in the mercantile business with Turner S. Riggs and T. R. Courts, under the firm name of R. A. Roddy &. Co. Mr. Courts left the firm in September, 1881.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


WILLIAM PROWELL; William Prowell, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Boone county, Missouri, August 8th, 1847. His father Robert Prowell, was born in Adair county, Kentucky, as may be learned from his biography which appears elsewhere in this volume. William grew to manhood on his father's farm. He received a fair education at the district schools and State University and followed teaching in the public schools of this county for about five years. He was married, March 15th, 1870, to Mary E., daughter of Eli and Nancy Lyon, of Boone county. They have three children, all living: Lucy P., Robert E. and Carrie L. Mr. Prowell and his wife are both members of the Baptist church. He is also a member of the Order of United Workmen, at Sturgeon, and a notary public. He runs a blacksmith shop in connection with his farm, also keeps a supply of staple groceries for his farm hands. He is a well-to-do, prosperous farmer,- owning some 320 acres of good land and about 600 acres of white oak lands, besides an interest in other real estate. He uses all available machinery and keeps fully abreast with the age in which he lives. Though still a young man, he has by his individual industry and enterprise accumulated nearly all he possesses, having received only a bare start in the world from his own and his wife's parents.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}

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