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WILLIAM G. RIDGWAY; William G. Ridgway, farmer and wagon-maker, was born two and a half miles west of Columbia, December 21, 1829. His father, Enoch Ridgway, was a farmer and a native of Rowan County, North Carolina, from which he emigrated to Kentucky, thence to Missouri, arriving in Old Franklin, Howard county, about the year 1817. He next went to New Mexico, where he remained about one year. Returning from New Mexico, he settled in what is facetiously called “Terrapin Neck," situated in Boone county, Missouri, and more particularly described elsewhere. Mr. Ridgway married Ailey Barnes, a native of Frankfort, Kentucky. The subject of this sketch went to Pike county in 1848 and remained there four years, during which time he learned the wagon-maker's trade. He returned to Boone County in 1852 and has worked at his trade, and at farming, ever since, devoting most of his attention to agriculture. The elder Ridgway left his place in the river bottom on account of "milk sickness." He entered part of the land upon which William G. now resides, about the year 1834 or 1835. The subject of this sketch was married, January, 9, 1852, to Melissa, daughter of J. Fisher, of Pike county, Missouri. They have nine children living. There names are Nora, George W., James M., Martha Savannah, Eupha, William Edmund, Sophia, Bertha and Ora Glenn. Mrs. Ridgway is a member of the Christian church.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


JOSEPH B. ROBINSON; Joseph B. Robinson, farmer and blacksmith, was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, October 10th, 1832. His father, Tandy B., was a native of Virginia, where he was reared to manhood and married Elizabeth Barnes, also a native Virginian. He removed to Missouri in the fall of 1834, and settled first in Howard county, removing to Boone in 1838, where he had previously entered the farm upon which his son, Joseph, now resides. He died January 26th, 1874, and his wife October 15th, 1876. The subject of this sketch has lived in Boone county continuously ever since he was six years old, except two years spent in Illinois, during the late civil war. He worked ten years at his trade, but has made farming the chief occupation of his life. Was married May 14th, 1872, to Mary L., daughter of Joseph L. Caldwell, of Boone county, formerly of Adair county, Kentucky, where Mrs. Robinson was born. They have two children, Edward and Garl. He has an excellent farm of 300 acres. He is a member of the order of A. O. U. W.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


JOHN ROCHFORD, DECEASED; John Rochford was born at Armagh, Ireland, May 2, 1815. He received a thorough collegiate education. He came to America in early life, landing first at New York, where he received employment in connection with the United States Navy. From New York City he came to St. Louis in 1839, where he labored as an architect, planning and building some of the finest public buildings in that city. From St. Louis he came to Columbia, Missouri, where he lived until 1849, when he went to California, where he remained four years. While on the Pacific coast he engaged in the lumber business, which proved a very profitable venture. Returning to Boone county, he settled in Sturgeon and took a contract, in partnership with Col. Ruby, for building twenty miles of the North Missouri railroad. Mr. Rochford invested largely in land along the line of this road. When Sturgeon was laid off he owned most of the land included within the limits of the town, which he was mainly instrumental in locating. He gave the town its name, calling it Sturgeon, in honor of the first president of the road. It is said that he donated forty acres of land as an inducement to the railroad company to locate the depot at this point. Mr. Rochford was married in Ireland to Catherine Madden. They had four children, one son, Bernard, and three daughters. Only one of the children, Mrs. McComas, wife of Dr. J. M. McComas, is living in Boone county. Bedelier married a man named Sinclair, and Louisa R. married a Mr. Cowgill.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


DR. JOHN T. ROTHWELL.
Dr. Rothwell was born in Garrard county, Kentucky, July 11, 1840. His father, Fountain Rothwell, a native of Virginia, now resides in the above named county, where he has spent the greater part of his life, being a large farmer and stock-raiser. His mother, Jennie Rothwell, was a native of Kentucky, and a daughter of Naaman Robberts, an officer in the war of 1812. John was the fifth child and fourth son of a family of seven children. Of his brothers, Rev. W. A. Rothwell, M. D., now resides in Moberly ; James M. Rothwell was captain in the Federal army, and is now an extensive coal miner in Kentucky; Samuel D. Rothwell was a lieutenant in the Federal army; Gideon B. Rothwell is now living on the old homestead in Kentucky. His sister is the wife of Rev. W. A. Cravens, of Carthage, Missouri. The doctor received a liberal education in his native State, graduating at Danville Central College in 1857.
He commenced the study of medicine in March, 1858, with Dr. W. A. Rothwell, who then lived in Callaway County, Missouri, and continued with this gentleman until May, 1850, entering the St. Louis Medical College in the fall of the latter year. He was married in St. Louis to Miss Anna M. Cuthbert, daughter of Mrs. Cuthbert, principal of Cuthbert Academy, St. Louis, Missouri. In March, 1861, he commenced the practice of his chosen profession in Boone county, Missouri. During a part of the years 1861 and 1862 ho was surgeon in the Confederate army; he then resumed the practice in this county, and continued it until the year 1874, when he went to Colorado with his invalid wife. Returning from that State two years later, he again commenced the practice in Ashland, this county, where he still lives.
He was again married May 2, 1860, to Miss Savilla J. Ruffner, who was a daughter of Peter J. Ruffner, a large farmer and one of the early settlers of Boone County. Of this marriage one son and one daughter were born, of whom the son is still living. Dr. Rothwell is now practicing with Dr. W. T. Lemon: is a member of the Methodist church and of the town council of Ashland; an excellent physician, and an estimable citizen.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


MAJ. JOHN F. RUCKER; Maj. John F. Rucker, one of the most prominent and influential business men of Sturgeon, was born in Amherst county, Virginia, September 19th, 1838. He is the son of John D. and Lucy J. (nee Tinsley) Rucker. Maj. Rucker came to Sturgeon in 1858, where he remained until the war. He joined Company C. which was raised in that place. He was afterwards made a lieutenant in a St. Louis regiment commanded by Col. Kelly. He entered the service in 1861, at Jefferson City. He was at Boonville and Lexington, went South with the army and participated in the battles of Carthage and Wilson Creek. He was also in the battle of Drywood, and a number of other skirmishes and battles of less note. Came home after the surrender of Lexington, and was captured by the enemy and imprisoned at Macon City. He was released on parole, but was soon afterwards re-arrested on a charge of treason and conspiracy, having been indicted by the United States Court. He was taken to St. Louis and put in jail. Giving bail he was released from prison. He attended several terms of the United States Court but his case was not called up. A compromise was at last agreed upon by which Maj. Rucker, was banished to Montana during the war. While in Montana he was elected chief clerk of the legislature and also a member of the territorial constitutional convention. At the close of the war Maj. Rucker returned to Virginia, and after a short stay in the Old Dominion, he returned to Sturgeon, where he has lived ever since. He was married, August 28th, 1867, to Miss Julia, daughter of Col. William Early Rucker, of Audrain County, Missouri. Four sons were born of this marriage. Their names are Booker H., Guy Lockridge, Early D., and Ray. The first wife dying, March 30th, 1879, he was married, May 18th, 1880, to Miss Frankie D., daughter of Carter Dingle, of Mexico, Audrain county, Missouri. Maj. and Mrs. Rucker are both members of the Methodist Church South. He has been superintendent of the Sunday school for fourteen years. Has always been a Democrat in politics. Has held the office of chairman of the Congressional Central Committee for five or six years past. In 1875 he was elected to the convention to form a new State constitution representing the Ninth Senatorial District. It was a free race and there were a number of candidates, including Col. Switzler, who was also elected. The Major is, practically speaking, a self-made man. He is a public-spirited citizen in the truest sense of the term, and has been an earnest laborer in the cause of immigration. He suggested the main points in the immigration bill. He is a director of the Sturgeon bank and has been for several years. He and Mr. Sherwood W. Turner own a controlling interest in the business. He is the leading man in the firm of Rucker & Turner, a store that is doing a large business. They also have an extensive trade in railroad ties.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


RODERIC D. RUCKER;  Roderic D. Rucker, chief salesman with Goin & Lockridge, Sturgeon, Missouri, was born in Amherst county, Virginia, May 7th, 1849. He is the son of John Dabney and Lucy Rucker. Since coming to Missouri, in 1868, Mr. Rucker has lived continuously in Boone and Audrain counties, spending the first two years on a farm about one mile west of town, on what is known as the old Marney place. He entered the store of Goin & Lockridge in the spring of 1882. He was married December 22d, 1874, to Miss Lulu, daughter of Judge Henry Dusenbury. They have three children, Edward Leslie, Francis Marion and Robert Milton. Mrs. Rucker is a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Rucker belongs to the order of A. O. U. W. He owns and cultivates a nice farm over the line, in Audrain county, where he resides. The farm is three miles north of Sturgeon Mr. Rucker is a quiet, affable gentleman, well known and highly appreciated in business circles. He is a brother to Maj. John Rucker, of Sturgeon.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}

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