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Boone County
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LEWIS SHELNUTT. John G. and Rachel Shelnutt, the parents of Lewis, were natives of Georgia. They came to Boone county, Missouri, in 1847. Lewis was born in Georgia, December 12, 1844. He is the second son and sixth child of a family of four boys and three girls, of whom two sons and three daughters are now living. He was reared in Cedar township, and educated at the district schools of the neighborhood and at Columbia. In 1863 he enlisted under Capt. Cook, in Company F, Ninth M. S. M. In February, 1865, he was transferred to Capt. James B. Decker's company, of same regiment, in which he served until the 13th of July following; took part in several engagements, in one of which he had a horse shot under him. After his discharge he engaged in business at Columbia; in 1868 went to farming, and in 1874 moved to the farm which he now occupies, three miles northwest of Ashland. Mr. Shelnutt was married April 2, 1869, to Miss Susan F., daughter of William Blackburn, of Boone county. They have four sons and three daughters. ,
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


ALFRED SIMS.
Alfred Sims, farmer and miller, was born in Madison county, Kentucky, February 4, 1832. He is the son of Abram and Grade (Robards) Sims, natives of Kentucky, who came to Boone county, Missouri, when the subject of this sketch was but two years old. He was raised on a farm and has followed fanning ever since he was old enough to work, except seven or eight years spent in a saw mill. He owns a farm of 260 acres. Was married, March 16, 1855, to Miss Nancy Jane, daughter of J. W. and Polly Barnes. They have six children, named as follows: Abram L., Nancy Elizabeth, John Davis Beauregard, James Anderson, Sidney Daniels, and Polly Thomas. Mr. Sims has been a hard-working man and has accumulated all his property by his own individual exertions, having inherited nothing but a horse and saddle from his father. He has spent his life in Bourbon township, and is well and favorably known in that section.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


THOMAS G. SIMS; Thomas G. Sims was born near New Castle, Henry county, Kentucky, July 20, 1823. He is the son of Thomas A. and Elizabeth (Morris) Sims, natives of Virginia. The subject of this sketch came to Boone county in 1836, and has resided here ever since. He has devoted his time to farming and bricklaying. Was married December 17, 1853 to Miss Margaret A., daughter of James M Hicks. They have eight children living, and one dead. Their names are Thomas A., Jeannette D., James M., Lizzie J., Lenora, Walter B., Flora T., Elmer T., and Betta. The last named is dead. Mr. Sims is a member of the Masonic order, also a member of the orders of United Workmen and Knights of Honor. He is an officer in the two first named lodges. Was imprisoned by the Union authorities during the war on account of his Southern politics. Mr. Sims is a self-educated man, having never attended school but three months in his life. He was appointed a justice of the peace during the war. He is an excellent workman. He superintended the erection of Hardin College and the opera house at Mexico, Missouri, and assisted in building the addition to the Christian College, Columbia. He is a good natured jovial man and is universally esteemed by all who know him. Mrs. Sims is a member of the Christian church.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


FELIX GRUNDY SITTON, M. D. Dr. Sitton is the son of J. T. and Priscilla (May) Sitton, and was born on a farm two miles from Fulton, Callaway county, Missouri, March 8, 1822. His father was a native of Tennessee, and his mother of Kentucky, though they came to Missouri in an early day, where they became acquainted and were married. Dr. Felix G. was the eldest of a family of four sons and one daughter, the latter being deceased. One of the brothers resides at Ashland, in this county, and the other, Albert G. Sitton, is in the medical practice at Claysville. The subject of this sketch attended the common schools of his native county, and acquired a knowledge of algebra, natural philosophy, etc., at the school of Mr. Woodsworth, near Williamsburg. At that time he was eighteen years old. For the next two years he engaged in teaching, also continuing his studies in private. In the spring of 1845 he commenced the stud)' of medicine under Dr. E. Rackliffe, of Portland, Callaway county, at the same time earning the means to prosecute his studies by his own industry. Two years later he went to St. Louis, where he finished his medical course and received his diploma from the St. Louis Medical College. He began the practice four miles north of Ashland in 1849, boarding first in the family of Mr. Strode, and practicing in that part of the county. In 1855 he moved to Ashland, where he has since resided and practiced his profession. June 14, 184(5, he enlisted in Capt. Rogers' company of Col. Doniphan's regiment, and served in the Mexican war in the "Army of the West," under Gen. Kearney. On account of failing health, however, he was discharged from service, and returned home in August. In the following May, his health being recovered, he went to St. Louis to continue his studies in the hospitals. Dr Sitton was first married January 4, 1853, to Miss Susan Strode, daughter of Jacob S. and Frances Strode. She died September 14, 1871, having borne four sons and two daughters, all living but one son. The doctor was again married February 4, 1877, to Miss Clara J. Roberts, daughter of John S. and Sallie Roberts, and granddaughter of the Roberts who owned the land on which part of Ashland now stands. By the last marriage he had two girls. Dr. Sitton has been a member of the New Salem Baptist church since 1852, and twenty-two years of that time he has served as moderator. He is an active temperance man and a strong prohibitionist. The historians of this work are much indebted to Dr. Sitton for a detailed history of New Salem church, of which he has been so long a member.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


ALFRED SLACK. John Slack, the father of Alfred, was a native of Pennsylvania. He emigrated to Kentucky in 1810 and to Boone County, Missouri, in 1819. His mother, Mary (Caldwell) Slack, was a native of Kentucky. Alfred was born February 21, 1821. He was the fourth son and fifth child of a family of six sons and two daughters, two sons and one daughter of whom are now living. Gen. William Y. Slack, of the Confederate army, killed at the battle of Pea Ridge, was an older brother. Alfred was a student of the State University from the opening session of that institution until he completed his studies. After leaving the University, he spent two years in Columbia, clerking in a store. In 1843, the elder Slack having been appointed tobacco inspector by Governor Reynolds, which necessitated his removal to St. Louis, Alfred took charge of his farm and managed it for him during his absence. In the spring of 1850 he crossed the plains to California where he remained for two years devoting his attention to mining.
Returning in 1852, he located at Boonville, where he engaged in the mercantile business until 1881, when he came to Boone County, where he now resides. He is living nine, miles southeast of Columbia upon a farm of 350 acres. He was first married in Cooper County to Miss Nannie O'Brien, who died in 1855. Afterwards he married Miss Mary A. Stark, a native of Boone county, and sister to Newman B. Stark. Has had three children, two daughters and one son, of whom one son and one daughter are living.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


Joseph Slocum, of England, settled in North Carolina, where he married Mary Riley, and they had—Riley, Nancy, Robert, and Cynthia. Riley married the widow Potts, whose maiden name was Nancy Crockett, of Tennessee, and settled in Boone Co., Mo., in 1819. They had—Nancy, Robert and Cynthia. Nancy, daughter of Riley Slocum, married Joseph M. Gray, and they had two children. Cynthia married Elliott P. Cunningham. Robert is a bachelor, and lives in Audrain county. Riley Slocum was married the second time to Annie Herring, by whom he had— William, Alfred, Joseph, Susan, John C., and Amanda J. The first four died young. Amanda J. was married first to Charles V. McWilliams, and second to Oliver C. Cunningham. She had two children by her second husband, Charles and Price.
(Source: A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches, by William Smith Bryan, publ. 1876. Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack)


FRANCIS M. SMITH. Francis Marion Smith is the son of William Smith, a native of Mercer County, Kentucky. He came to St. Louis at an early day and to Boone county in 1818 with Peter Ellis, whose daughter he married. He settled on a farm in the vicinity of Ashland, which he finally improved. Upon this farm the subject of this sketch was born February 18, 1840. Was raised on the farm and educated in the common schools of the neighborhood. Has had charge of the farm upon which he now lives since 1854. Has always followed the occupation of a farmer and a dealer in stock, principally cattle and mules. Mr. Smith was married in Audrain County, September 14, 1854, to Miss Hattie J. Pearson, daughter of Richmond Pearson. They have two sons.
He has been a justice of the peace since 1880. He is a member of Dry Fork Baptist church: also of the Ancient Order United Workmen.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


HIRAM SMITH. The subject of this sketch is the son of William and Nancy (Ellis) Smith. He is entitled to the distinction of being the first white child born in Boone county of parents who were married in this county. He was born on the old Peter Ellis farm, August 18th, 1819. He is the eldest of a family of seven boys and three girls. Remained with his parents until 1845, when he removed to the farm upon which he now resides, consisting of 300 acres, adjoining the old homestead.
Was married December 19th, 1844, to Miss Mary A Hubbard, a native of Boone county, and daughter of Daniel Hubbard, one of the early pioneers. By this marriage they have had four sons and two laughters, of whom three sons are now living. Mr. Smith is a member of the New Salem Baptist church. He is largely interested in stock raising and has some choice high-grade cattle. His farm is finely improved. His three sons are all married. David H. is a merchant at Mexico, Missouri; Dr. William It. is located at Carrington station, Callaway county, and Thomas B. is a farmer and resides in this county.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JOHN E. SMITH. John Ellis Smith is the son of William and Nancy (Ellis) Smith, who were among the first settlers of Boone County. The subject of this sketch was born on the old Smith farm, in Boone county, October 15th, 1830. He was the fifth son and sixth child of a family of seven sons and three daughters. He was reared on the farm and educated at the common schools of the neighborhood. He lived on the home place until 1859, when he bought the farm, where he now lives, which contains 320 acres and is situated six miles northeast of Ashland. He is largely interested in agriculture and is an extensive dealer in stock. He was married in Callaway county, October 9th, 1856, to Miss Mary J. Boyd, daughter of Thomas Boyd, now a citizen of Benton comity, Missouri. They had four sons, three of whom are living. Mr. Smith is a member of the Methodist church.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


PETER E. SMITH, DECEASED. Peter Ellis Smith was one among the oldest native born citizens of Boone County. His father, William Smith, came to Boone county in 1818. He married Nancy, eldest daughter of Peter Ellis, Sr., the progenitor of the Ellis family of Boone county. The subject of this sketch was born March 28th, 1821. He was the second son and second child of a family of seven sons and three daughters, five of whom are now living, all but one in Boone County. When five or six years old, his father moved to the farm now occupied by F. M. Smith.
He remained on this farm until his marriage. His first wife was Miss Nancy Moseley, daughter of William Moseley, of Boone county. Mr. Smith had a fine farm of 500 acres, situated seven miles northeast of Ashland and twelve miles southeast of Columbia. He was a successful breeder of thoroughbred cattle. Was a member of the Methodist church. Had four children, two sons and two daughters, of whom only one daughter is now living.
The first wife having died in 1872, he was again married, July 26th, 1874, to Mrs. Lorinda J. Wheeler, daughter of John Crobarger, of St. Louis.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


WILLIAM SMITH, DECEASED. William Smith was the son of George W. Smith, of Kentucky. He was born on his father's farm, in Mercer county, Kentucky, April 24, 1797. He was the oldest of three sons and four daughters. Of these one son and three daughters are now living: Washington in Arkansas, Mrs. Shoults in Boone county, Mrs. Piatt in St. Louis county, Mrs. Graves in Texas. William came with his father to St. Louis County, Missouri, in 1815, where the elder Smith lived until his death. In 1818 William came to Boone county in company with Peter Ellis, Sr., whose eldest daughter he married October 29, 1818. This was the first marriage ever celebrated within the bounds of what now constitutes Boone County, then part of Howard County. Ten children were born of this marriage, seven sons and three daughters. They lived to see all their children grown, married and settled, most of them within a few miles of the old home.
After his marriage Mr. Smith moved to Callaway County, where he remained seven years. In 1827 he returned to Boone, county and settled on the land now owned and occupied by his son, F. W. Smith. In 1842 he built a large brick dwelling in which he lived and died, his death occurring May 24, 1872. Mrs. Smith died May 1, 1876. Mr. Smith was a zealous member of the Methodist church. For twenty-five years his large mansion was used as a place for holding religious services. He was an enterprising, thrifty, public-spirited citizen, doing all in his power to promote every enterprise that was calculated to benefit his people. He was an active, zealous worker in the cause of education and gave liberal support to every scheme looking to a higher and better system of public education. He subscribed largely to the State University and lived to see and realize the fruits of his generosity. Although his life was spent in retirement, he left a name and reputation that will ever survive him. He was a good man and a useful citizen.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


WILLIAM ENOCH SMITH; The subject of this sketch is the son of Benjamin F. and Polly A. {nee Wilson) Smith, and was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, September 6th, 1835. He lived in Kentucky until he was twenty-two years old, when he removed to Boone county, Missouri, in 1857. He landed at Providence on the Missouri river, April 16th, and remained in that vicinity for two years, when he moved north of Columbia, near Middleton, ten miles south of Sturgeon, where he remained for eight years. Leaving that neighborhood, he removed to a place six miles northwest of Columbia, where he remained for thirteen or fourteen years. His next move was to Sturgeon. His occupation, up to this time, had been farming, shipping of stock and trading. Coming to Sturgeon, he bought the Commercial hotel, opening house October 15th, 1880. Mr. Smith was educated in Kentucky, partly at common schools and partly by private tutors. He took no part in the war. He was never married. Is a member of the Christian church, but belongs to none of the lodges. He never held an office and has no political aspirations whatever. His paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia, but one among the first to emigrate to Kentucky. He was a surveyor. He settled where Mt. Sterling now stands, but before there was a white settler within sixty miles of his place. At one time he donated one hundred acres of land to a preacher as an inducement to the minister to settle in his locality and preach for the settlement. He had previously located one thousand acres for himself, for in those days, according to a special law of Virginia, the surveyor was "monarch of all he surveyed"—almost. Kentucky was then a portion of the Old Dominion, and to induce surveyors to go to the wilderness and run off the lands, large grants were allowed them, with the privilege of locating their lands wherever they liked best. This law induced a large number of young men to learn surveying, and a practical knowledge of the art enabled many of them to lay the foundation of a princely fortune in the wilds of Kentucky.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


GILPIN SPENCER. Is the son of Perry and Eliza Jane (Wiseman) Spencer; was born on the farm where he now lives on the 5th day of February, 1835. His father was born in Talbot county, Maryland, and was engaged in business in Baltimore for several years. Financial reverses overtook him and he came West and engaged in farming, which he continued until his death in 1802. His son Gilpin is living upon the old home place, attending strictly to business, handling stock and raising grain, of which wheat is his specialty. He was married, December 10th, 1802, to Miss Sarah C. Hubbard, daughter of George and Patsy Hill (Gibbs) Hubbard. They have three children living and one dead, Albert B.. Sallie Carrie (deceased), George Perry and Susannah. Himself, wife and oldest son are members of the Methodist church at Burlington, which church he was instrumental in building and is now one of the leading members. His is a fine farm containing over six hundred acres of choice land.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JOSEPH I. STERNE. The son of Thomas and Nancy (Ingles) Sterne was born in Harrison County, Kentucky, May 2nd, 1828. His father was a native of Virginia, and his mother of Kentucky. His mother's parents were Joseph and Mary (Bryant) Ingles. His grandmother on his mother's side was a niece of Daniel Boone. He was married October 28th, 1852 to Miss Emma Coleman, daughter of Whitehead and Elizabeth (Powell) Coleman. By this union they have had seven children, six of whom are living, Thomas W., James G., Frank, Mary B., Dixie, Kate and Lizzie, deceased. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and his wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist church. He has been engaged in farming pretty much all his life, and is a good citizen and clever gentleman.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


THOMAS W. STERNE. Mr. Sterne is the son of Joseph and Emma (Coleman) Sterne, and was born in Harrison County, Kentucky, January 20th, 1854. His father moved from Kentucky to Boone county, Missouri, when Thomas was about three years old, where the young man was reared. He was married, October 9th, 1881, to Miss Annie L. Wright, a daughter of Hale T. Wright. Mr. Sterne has a good common school education and is regarded as one of the most worthy young men of his section, He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Ashland and his wife is a member of the Baptist church.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JOHN F. SWOPE; farmer, stock raiser and feeder, section 16, post office Plattsburg. Among the prominent and successful farmers of Clinton County, is the subject of this sketch. He is a native of Boone County, Missouri, and was born on the 8th day of February, 1832. At the age of five years he, with his parents, moved to Platte County, Missouri, remaining there until 1849, when he went to California. In 1853, he returned to his former home in Platte County, and resumed the life of a farmer. On the third day of February, 1853, he was united in marriage to Miss L. A. Mun, a native of Buckingham County, Virginia. She came to Missouri with her parents in 1844. Mr. and Mrs. S. came to this county in 1855, and settled near their present residence, which now consists of 440 acres of improved land, surrounded and subdivided by osage hedge fences. They have a family of seven children: J. L., C. T., William H., Alice G., James A., Annie E., Francis H. They are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

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