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CHARLES HENRY TAYLOR; Charles Henry Taylor was born in Maryland, August 4th, 1850. He is the son of Levi and Adeliza (nee Bell) Taylor. He left his native State when he was twenty years of age, coming to St. Charles, Missouri, where he remained one year, removing from there to Sturgeon, where he has remained ever since. He was depot agent and telegraph operator for ten years. In the fall of 1878 was married to Miss Kate, daughter of Christian Miller, of Audrain county. They have one child, Lloyd Stanley. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the Christian church. Mr. Taylor belongs to the order of A. O. U. W. He is a member of the city council. Has a half-interest in the property known as the Middleton & Taylor mill. A large lot of new machinery has lately been added to this mill, and the property greatly improved throughout. The estimated value of the mill, in its present improved condition, is $6,000. Mr. Taylor is a very clever, obliging young man, and stands very high in business and social circles.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


F. M. TRUBY; F. M. Truby, machinist and miller, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, April 27th, 1829. He is the son of Jacob and Catherine (nee Mechling) Truby. He lived in Pennsylvania until he came to Missouri, sometime about the year 1874. He first settled in Middle Grove, Monroe county, where he lived four years. He came to Sturgeon in 1879. He has a good education, having received special instructions in his line of business. He is a practical machinist, and has applied his knowledge and skill principally to milling purposes. He is proprietor of the Sturgeon Mills. Mr. Truby was married in 1852, to Rebecca Cooper, daughter of Ustacy and Mary Ann Cooper, of Waynesville, Ohio. They have ten living children. Their names are Katie, Celesta, Ustacy, Romeo, William, Annie, Osa, Lillie, Wilber and Franklin. Their fourth child, Isbiu, is dead.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


B. F. TUCKER; B. F. Tucker was born in Boone county, Missouri, September 23d, 1834. He is the son of W. W. Tucker, a native of Virginia. His mother was a native of Kentucky. Her maiden name was Woodruff. W. W. Tucker is the father of sixteen children, all of whom are living. They are all the children of one mother. B. F. Tucker grew up to manhood on his father's farm, in Rocky Fork township, removing to Bourbon when twenty-one years of age, where he has continuously
resided ever since. He was educated at the common schools of the county. His father was a farmer, and the son was brought up in that line of business, and has followed agricultural pursuits all his life. He was married December 12th, 1855, to Miss Jeannette H., daughter of Joseph and Hannah Fountain, of Bourbon township. They had two children by this marriage, William Warren and Joseph D. The first wife dying, Mr. Tucker was again married, June 12th, 1873, to Lucinda E., daughter of James and Tabitha Davenport, natives of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker are both members of the Christian church. He took no part in the war. His farm is pleasantly situated and quite productive. By industry, - prudence and economy, Mr. Tucker has accumulated considerable property, nearly all of which is the result of his own individual labor.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


A. J. TURNER; A. J. Turner was born in Warren county, Kentucky, September 2, 1831. He is the son of Andrew and Mary (nee Harris) Turner. He came to Missouri when seven years old. He was raised in Sailing township, Audrain county, three miles north of Sturgeon. When eighteen years old he went overland to California. He did not remain in the mines but a few months, returning by way of Panama. He was four months at sea and suffered severely from sea-sickness. He was married July 8, 1852, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Jesse and Georgia Vance, natives of Kentucky. They have four children. Their names are P. H., Dora, Mary, and Katie. Dora is the wife of Dr. J. Keith, of Sturgeon. Mr. Turner improved and sold several farms in Audrain county previous to coming to Sturgeon in 1870. Since removing to town, he has followed no particular occupation. He came to Sturgeon for the purpose of educating his children. He is an earnest advocate of popular education. He says the only time he was ever beaten for an office was when he offered for school director. It was when the law required but one director, and he was known to be in favor of an increased levy for school purposes. He has been a member of the city council for about ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Turner are both members of the Christian church. He is also a Mason. Mr. Turner is a kind-hearted, quiet, genial man. He is in comfortable circumstances and takes the world very easy.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


J. LUCAS TURNER. James Lucas Turner is the son of Major Henry Smith Turner, who was born in King George County, Virginia, April 1st, 1811. He entered West Point Military Academy in 1830, graduating in 1834. In his class were Gen. Halleck and Major John H. Lee, now living On graduating, was commissioned brevet second-lieutenant of First Dragoons. Became adjutant at regimental headquarters in July, 1836, which position he held for two years. Was commissioned first lieutenant March 3rd, 1837 and aid-de-camp to Gen. Adkinson in July, 1839. After which he was sent by the War Department, with two of his fellow-graduates, to the cavalry school of France, for the purpose of studying the system of tactics taught at that institution with a view of preparing a manual for the United States army. Spent two years in this work. Returning home in 1841, he was made adjutant of his regiment and stationed at Fort Leavenworth, where he remained until 1846. Was brevetted major for gallant service on the frontier, and resigned in 1848.
In 1850 was appointed assistant treasurer for the government at St. Louis, which position he held for three years. In 1853 engaged in the banking business with James H. Lucas and Gen. W. T. Sherman, remaining with the St. Louis firm until 1857, when he went to San Francisco, where Lucas, Turner & Co. had a branch house.
Major Turner was married to Julia Hunt, daughter of Capt. Theodore Hunt, of the U. S. A., a first cousin of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Mrs. Turner is the granddaughter of John B. C. Lucas and Ann L. Hunt, who was the daughter of John Baptiste Charles Lucas, of Normandy, France. He was educated for the bar, and emigrated to America, settling at Philadelphia. He was a member of the legislature and judge of the common pleas court of that city. In 1803-4 was a member of Congress, resigned his seat to accept the office of commissioner of titles for the province of Upper Louisiana. J. Lucas Turner was born in St. Louis, September 25th, 1854, where he remained until his family removed to Philadelphia, in 1863.
In 1866 the family returned to St. Louis, and J. Lucas went to Orleans, France, where he studied for three years. Returning to the United States, he completed his education in 1869 at Georgetown College, District of Columbia. In 1874 he went into business in St. Louis as stockholder and director of the Harrison Wire Company. He remained in this business for two years. For two years following was connected with the Lucas bank, St. Louis. His health failing, he retired from the bank and moved a short distance into the country.
In 1880 he removed to Boone County, settling on. the farm where he lives at this writing. He has a fine place of six hundred acres located twelve miles south of Columbia. Mr. Turner was married, November 15th, 1876, to Miss Bertha G. Chouteau, of St. Louis, daughter of Henry Chouteau, Jr., and granddaughter of Henry Chouteau, Sr., who was killed in the Gasconade bridge accident, while a passenger on the first train over the Missouri Pacific railroad. He has one son and one daughter. Mr. Turner is the tenth child and eighth son of a family of ten sons and seven daughters, of whom ten — five of each sex — are now living His eldest brother, Capt. Thomas T. Turner, was a member of Gen. Ewell's staff. Wilson P. H. Turner was first lieutenant in Col. Pelham's light artillery, and was killed at the second battle of Manassas. His uncle, Thomas Turner, was admiral in the United States Navy, and had command of the navy yard at Philadelphia.
Mr. Turner devotes his entire attention to breeding thoroughbred horses and Jersey cattle. His stock is not excelled on the continent for purity of blood and lineage. With a determination to excel in this business, he has spared neither time, pains nor money in stocking his excellent farm with the finest grade of horses and cattie that could be purchased. It is too soon for him to realize the bright hopes which he reasonably cherishes, but the day is not far distant when the attention of all lovers of fast and beautiful horses will be turned to this splendid collection, the nucleus of which cannot be excelled in this country of this sketch was born on his father's farm, in Boone county, July 20, 1831, where he continued to reside till 1864. His education was obtained in the schools of his neighborhood, which he attended during boyhood. The winter of 1858-59 was spent in Texas.
In January, 1862, he, being a Southern sympathizer, was arrested by order of Gen. J. B. Douglass, of the M. S. M., and confined in Gratiot street (St. Louis) prison, and was also held at Alton. He was released in the latter part of June following, but had to swear allegiance and give a bond of $4,000. Returning home he cultivated his farm till he sold it in the spring of 1864. He then engaged in the mercantile business in Providence, this county, with his brother. He was twice robbed by Anderson's men, and was also effectually cleaned out by the Federals, under Gen. Fisk.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


SHERROD W. TURNER; Sherrod W. Turner, cashier of the Sturgeon bank, and member of the firm of Rucker & Turner, was born and reared in Boone county, Missouri. He is the son of John and Virenda H. (Tucker) Turner. His early education was limited. He attended the common schools of the county, and afterwards went to the State University, at Columbia, Mo. He taught in the public schools for about five years, his first attempt at teaching being in the capacity of assistant in the Sturgeon high school. He went to the Mound City Commercial College, St. Louis, where he took a thorough course, including commercial law. He graduated from this institution in 1869. In 1870 he went to Texas and was engaged in a dry goods house as book-keeper for one year. Returned to Sturgeon in 1871, and was employed as bookkeeper and salesman by Maj. G. F. Rucker until 1876, when he became a partner in the firm. December, 1879, he became cashier of the Sturgeon bank. He was married, November 12, 1871, to Miss Katie, daughter of Nathaniel Roberts, of Boone county. They have no children. Mr. and Mrs. Turner are both members of the Christian church. He is a Knight Templar and a member of the Order of A. O. U. W. and Knights of Honor. Mr. Turner is a live business man, and has been very successful in all his undertakings.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


THOMAS GILPIN TUTTLE. Mr. Tuttle is the son of John Tuttle, a farmer, who was a native of Virginia, and born near Bull Run creek, where so much hard fighting was done during the civil war. John's wife, and Thomas' mother, was Susan Hall Elliott, a native of Kentucky. The subject in the spring of 1865, he, with two brothers, went to freighting across from Fort Leavenworth to Colorado and Montana. In December, 1865, he moved his family to Saline county, where he farmed and fed stock for two years. He bought a farm in the spring of '68, eight miles west of Columbia, where he lived ten years, until his removal to Ashland in '78. There he engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, where he still resides. He also cultivates a farm adjoining the town on the south. Mr. Tuttle was married June 19, 1855, to Gillie C, daughter of James S. Lowery, of Boone county. She died in 1872, and he was again married in '74, to Miss Georgie E. Tuttle, daughter of Judge Gilpin S. Tuttle, of Boone county. Mr. Tuttle is the father of two sons, oldest born in 1875, and younger in 1882. He is a member of Ashland lodge of A. F. & A. M., and was a charter member of Locust Grove Grange, P. of H.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JUDGE WILLIAM PORTER TUTTLE. Judge William Porter Tuttle is the son of John Tuttle, a native of Virginia, who, when a young man, went to Kentucky on horseback, and while there married Susan Elliott, a native of that State. They emigrated to Boone County, Missouri, about the year 1826, and settled five miles southwest of Columbia. They were members of the Presbyterian church, in which faith they lived and died. The subject of this sketch was born January 20th, 1834. He was the youngest of a family of three boys and three girls, all of whom are now living except one sister, Mary Jane, who died in 1841, at the age of eighteen. All of the family, except one, are living in Boone county. Porter was reared on his father's farm. At the age of sixteen he entered the Missouri State University, taking the full course as prescribed by that institution. After completing his studies he entered the store of Gilpin S. Tuttle, at Nashville, Boone County.
Two years later he was married to his cousin, Nannie P. Tuttle, daughter of his employer. He then went into partnership with his uncle at Providence, under the firm name of G. S. & W. P. Tuttle. They did business until they were obliged to close the store on account of their political opinions. This was in 1861. In the summer of that year he enlisted in Capt. Samuel Tuttle's company, of Col. McKinney's regiment, Confederate army. He took part in the battles of Drywood and Lexington.
While recruiting on this side of the river, was captured, December 15th, 1861. Was sent a prisoner to McDowell's College, St. Louis, where he was soon afterwards prostrated with a severe attack of small-pox, remaining from the 25th of December, 1861, until March, 1862, in the hospital. Recovering at last, he was released from prison on taking the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government.
On his return he resumed business at Providence under the firm name of Thomas P. & William M. Tuttle. In 1864 they were robbed three times by guerillas, and once by the Federal soldiers. He now gave up the mercantile business and went to freighting across the plains to New Mexico, and finally to Montana, the work being in the interest of the Federal Government. In 1867 he returned to Providence and resumed the mercantile business with George Haydon & Co. Two years later Mr. Haydon sold to R. A. Roddy and the business went on in the name of Roddy & Tuttle. Mr. Roddy was drowned, October 5th, 1877, and Mr. Tuttle associated in business S. J. Conley, with whom he is still doing business under the firm name of Tuttle & Conley. They do a large mercantile, grain and stock business, and are largely interested in farming.
Judge Tuttle has had three sons and five daughters born to him, four of whom — Charles T , Annie R., Marion L., and Victoria R., are dead. The living are Sallie, William M., Porter H., and Clara E. Mr. Tuttle was elected judge of the Boone county court in 1880, and is, at this writing (summer of 1882), a candidate for re-election, with a fair prospect of being his own successor.
He was commissioned postmaster at Providence in 1879, which position he resigned on being elected a judge of the county court. He has been a member of the Baptist church for twenty-seven years. Mrs. Tuttle has been a member of the same church for twenty-eight years. They united with the church at Old Nashville and were immersed in the Missouri river. Has been a member of the Ashland lodge of A. F. & A. M. since 1862.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

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