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W. I. WEBSTER; W. I. Webster, compositor in the Leader office, Sturgeon, Missouri, was born in Randolph county, May 13, 1857. He is the son of W. P. and Elizabeth (Coulter) Webster. He was born and reared on the farm, and remained on the homestead until he was eighteen years old, when he removed to Macon county, Missouri, and from there to Sturgeon, where he entered the Leader office as a compositor. Has worked at the trade about eight years. He was married, February 12, 1882, to Maggie, daughter of William J. McLoney. Mr. Webster is a good workman and a competent newspaper man. He contemplates starting a paper of his own in the near future.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


WILLIAM H. WELCH; David B. Welch, father of the subject of this sketch, was born near Harper's Ferry, Virginia. He came to Monroe county, Missouri, where he was married, afterwards removing to Boone county about the year 1835. He settled at Old Petersburg, where he was employed for several years as a teacher, was also a shoemaker. He lived at Petersburg about seven years. The subject of this sketch was born in Boone county, October 1, 1840. His mother's maiden name was Kituria Brink. Mr. Welch has been a citizen of Boone all his life, except while absent in the Confederate army and in California. He has been engaged in the mercantile business for about eighteen years. He spent four years in California. Was married, August 19, 1869, to Laura, daughter of H. H. Jamison, of Pettis county, Missouri. They have four children living and four dead. The living are Scott, Annie, Daniel W., and Serepta Evellen. Mr. Welch enlisted in the Confederate army under Capt. Ab. Hicks, of Clark's Division. He was in the battles of Boonville, Lone Jack, Carthage, Wilson's Creek, Drywood, Lexington and Pea Ridge. He also participated in the fatal assault upon Helena, Arkansas, and was in Price's raid in 1864. Mr. Welch is a member of the city council, also of the Sturgeon Masonic lodge. He is of Irish and German origin. Was left an orphan at the age of seven, and from early boyhood supported and educated himself. He has also built up a good business by his own individual, unaided exertions.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


E. R. WESTBROOK. Edwin Ruthvan Westbrook is the son of Cornelius Westbrook, a descendant of the early German settlers of Delaware, and his mother was Betsey Goodrich, a descendant of the early English settlers of the Connecticut valley, her family living near Hartford. Both families emigrated to New York and settled on the Genesee River, where Mr. and Mrs. W. became acquainted and married. They removed to Ohio in 1833, locating at Cleveland. Here Edwin Westbrook was born, March 27, 1835. Two years later his parents removed to Morgan County and settled on a farm.
In 1852 he came to Clay County, Mo., about four miles north of Kansas City. Prior to coming to Missouri, Mr. Westbrook had attended the common schools of his native State. After settling in this State his education was mainly acquired at Union School, Clay County, under the direction of George D. Hughes, completing his course in 1855, at the age of 20. After leaving school he engaged as a teacher, which profession he pursued for 24 years, or until 1879. During this period he served for two years as principal of the Ashland Public School. In the fall of 1879 he engaged as salesman in the store of Wiseman, Johnston & Bass, with whom he remained until January 1st, 1881. March 1st, following, he engaged in the business of general merchandising with John G. Wiseman, under the firm name of Wiseman, Westbrook & Co., which partnership continued until the ensuing October, when W. T. Maupin became a partner and the name was changed to Wiseman, Maupin & Jo.
Mr. Westbrook was married in Bates County, Mo. to Miss M. T. Caruth, of that county. They have had born to them nine children, of whom two boys and three girls are now living.
Early in the civil war, Mr. Westbrook espoused the cause of the South, and enlisted in Capt. Jackman's company of Gen. Rains' division of Gen. Price's army. Not long after he had enlisted, he was captured by the Federals and held a prisoner for about two weeks, when he was released upon taking the oath. He returned to Boone County and remained until in October, 1864, when he again engaged to serve the Confederate cause, and on the 5th of November, at a point 16 miles southeast of Osceola, St. Clair County, Mo., while on his way to Gen. Price, he was again made a prisoner. He was taken to St. Louis and confined two weeks in Gratiot street prison, and then sent to Alton, Ill., where he was confined until March 19th, 1865. He was then released on condition of his enlistment in the U. S. army to serve against the Indians on the plains.
He was a member of Company D 5th U. S. infantry. A few weeks after his enlistment, he accompanied Companies C and D of his regiment as an escort to Col. Sawyer's road expedition from Niobrara City to Virginia City, Montana Territory. August 13th, he was engaged in a battle with the Indians near Fort Reno, which lasted nearly all day. The Indians numbered over 200 and were commanded by Red Cloud. There were about 250 soldiers. He assisted in the building of Ft. Reno. He also took part in Col. Carrington's tight with the savages, July 1st, 1866. He returned to the States via Forts Laramie and Kearney, and was mustered out October 1st, 1866. He then returned to Boone county, where he has ever since resided.
It is worthy of note that, in 1854, Mr. Westbrook spent a few months in Mexico, and that in 1850 he made an overland trip to California, where he was engaged in farming and teaching until in December, 1859.
Mr. Westbrook has served as a justice of the peace in his township. He is a Democrat in politics and has been a member of the Democratic county committee since 1876. He is a member of the Ashland Baptist church, and belongs to the Ancient Order United Workmen and the Good Templars.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


DR. HENRY W. WHIPPLE. Dr. Henry W. Whipple is a native of Illinois, having been born in Alton, April 12th, 1842. He is the son of P. B. and Elizabeth (Williams) Whipple. Was educated at Sedgwick Institute, Great Barrington, Berkshire county, Massachusetts. Graduated in the scientific department of that institution in 1862. Came back to Alton, and, in August following, joined company G Ninety-seventh Illinois volunteers. Was at Chickasaw Bluffs, Fort Hindman, Port Gibson, Raymond, Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, Vicksburg and Jackson. Afterwards was in the hospital department, where he remained most of the time until the close of the war. Returning to Illinois, he settled on a farm which his father had given him at Montgomery. Went to farming and practicing in that vicinity, but having been wounded during the war by a piece of shell, which struck his knee, he was compelled to give up farming, as the labors incident to farm life aggravated the wound and gave him much pain. During his stay at Montgomery, he was elected a justice of the peace. He attended a course of lectures at St. Louis Medical College, but did not graduate. Moved from Illinois to Bates County, Missouri, where he went into the drug business His brother was with him in the business and practiced medicine during the four years spent in that county.
The subject of this sketch also practiced, but not steadily. Dr. Whipple next went to Madison County, Arkansas, where he practiced his profession for a few months, and from there he came to Boone, settling at Burlington, where he has remained ever since. Was married, April 12th, 1866, to Margaret L., daughter of C. F. and Catharine Powers, of Michigan. Have one son, Henry F. The doctor is a member of the Methodist church, also of the United Workmen. The Whipples trace their origin back into the remote past. One of the family signed the Declaration of Independence. The doctor has a good practice and is doing well.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


JAMES T. WHITE; James T. White, farmer, is the son of William C. White, who was born in 1812, and came to Missouri about the year 1822 and settled in Howard county, where he remained one year, finally removing to Boone county and settling on a farm near where James T. White now lives The subject of this sketch was born in Boone county, March 29th, 1838. His mother, Luvicy Lawrence, was a native of Kentucky. Mr. White was reared on the farm, and has always followed the occupation of a farmer. Was a soldier in the Confederate army, being first a member of Capt. John Bole's company, afterwards with at Stone. Was at Prairie Grove, Milliken's Bend, Gaines' Landing, and a number of smaller engagements. He served three years. He and his brother-in-law have in partnership three hundred and seventy six acres of land and devote their attention to farming and stockraising. When Mr. White returned home from the war fifty dollars comprised all that he possessed in the world. He now owns, in addition to his Boone county property, a stock farm in Vernon county, Missouri, which he manages in connection with his lands in Boone county.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


ISAAC MILTON WILCOX. The grandfather of Isaac M. Wilcox was born in Kentucky, but was one among the earliest settlers of Boone County, Missouri. His son David, father of the subject of this sketch, was born and raised in Boone. He moved to Holt county, Missouri, in 1852, but returned in 1861, and remained a citizen of this county until his death, which occurred at his home, near Claysville. Isaac M. Wilcox was born in Boone County, December 7th, 1849. His mother, Martha (Blythe) Wilcox, was born in Kentucky. The subject of this sketch was raised on the farm. In early life lie learned the trade of tobacco-rolling, but did not follow it long. "Married March 29th, 1870, Elizabeth, daughter of Shelton A. and Martha Carter. They have three children: Arthur Tarleton, Mittie Dewel and Verdia Alice. Mr. Wilcox's early education was limited, and his patrimony was even more so. All his possessions have been earned by his own exertions since commencing life on his own account. In 1873 he was engaged as a guard in the penitentiary, at Jefferson City, but had to give up the position on account of sickness. For about two years lie was engaged in the mercantile business at Claysville, with P. H. McKenna. They sold out in the spring of 1882, to Wooley & Loux, who are, at this writing, conducting the business at the old stand. Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox are members of the Baptist church.
[Source: History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


SAMUEL NEWTON WOODS; Samuel Newton Woods was born in Boone county, February 26th, 1844. He is the son of Barnabas S. and Martha C. (Copher) Woods. Was raised on the farm upon which he now resides, and which has always been his home except while absent in the army, or while crossing the plains. Was absent in the army eighteen months, and in crossing the plains fifteen months. Was sworn into the Confederate service by Col. Poindexter, and served under Col. Dorsey. Was in several engagements in Northern Arkansas. Was only seventeen years old when he joined the army. Mr. Woods was married, February 8th, 1870, to Caroline Boyd, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Seymour) Boyd. They have five children, Patrick Seymour, Wilford Watson, Lafayette Gomer, Ober Kyle and Samuel Boyd. Mr. and Mrs. Woods are members of the Baptist church.
{Source:  History of Boone County, Missouri; By Author Col. Wm. F. Switzler; Publ. 1882 by Western Historical Company; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.}


WRIGHT, GEORGE MATTHEW
The subject of this sketch was born in Boone County, Missouri, April 3d, 1839. He was the son of Wesley and Polly (Potts) Wright and was born upon the farm where he is now living. His father, Wesley Wright was born within five miles of Nashville, Tennessee, and came with his parents to Boone County, Missouri in 1819, where he lived until 1850, when he went to California. He died on his way home and was buried at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in 1852. Mrs. Wright, the mother of George M., was born in West Tennessee, in 1808, and came to Boone County, Missouri, when she was eight years of age. She died in 1879, and is buried at Hickory Grove Church (have a picture of the church taken in July 1998) George M. Wright was thrown upon his own resources when quite a child and right manfully did he fight the battle of his life. He went to school during the winter months, and in summer he worked to earn money for the next winter's schooling. He afterwards went two terms of nine months each, to Professors Hurt and M. G. Duncan, of Mexico, Audrain County, Missouri, taking a very liberal course, but declining health prevented his graduating as he had intended. He lived with and took care of his mother, more especially after the Negroes were freed. When the war broke out he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and joined Captain Nimrod Norton's company, Clark's brigade. He was in the battles of Boonville, Fulton Races, Lone Jack, Pea Ridge, Drywood, Can Hill, Helena, Independence and many skirmishes. Under Gen. Joe Shelby, he was in several days continued fighting near Little Rock, Arkansas, fighting Gen. Steel's division U.S. troops. Mr. Wright was commissioned an officer to rank as Colonel, to raise a regiment in Missouri during Shelby's last raid, but the surrender of Lee in the following spring put an end to the war, and Col. Wright was mustered out and surrendered to Captain Cook. He returned home without a dollar and went to work upon the old place. He was married September 16, 1868, to Miss Minerva, daughter of Garland Sims, Esq. By this union they have six children, Garland Sims, Lena, Elizabeth, Wesley, George Walter and Ancil. The year he was married he moved to Audrain County, and lived there until the spring of 1879, when he moved back upon the old place. His house is on the north-east quarter of seciton 16, township 49, range 11, and his farm contains two hundred and seventy acres. Mr. Wright is an energetic, active business-man enjoying the confidence of all who know him.
Col. Geo. M. Wright after distinguished service in the confederate army, most of the time outside of Boone county and outside of Missouri, returned to Boone county after the war, where he resided for some years.
(The following was taken from the "History of Boone County" by William Switzler, 1882, submitted by Peggy Thompson)


PETER WRIGHT
Peter Wright was born in Virgina, June 25, 1787 and moved with his father to Tennessee in the early settling of that State. He grew to manhood on the farm near Nashville, and was married September 20, 1810 to Jenny Edmonson. In July 1818, came to Missouri and selected a home in Boone county to which he moved with his family the following year. He settled near the head of the Two-mile Prairie, about nine miles northeast of Columbia. He was appointed county surveyor in 1821, and was also one of the judges of the county court, and was elected to represent the county in the Legislature in 1822 and 1824. He died May 28, 1847. 
(The following was taken from the "History of Boone County" by William Switzler, 1882, Page 971, submitted by Peggy Thompson)


WILLIAM E. WRIGHT
William E. Wright, the official surveyor of Boone County, is the son of Peter and Jenny Wright. He was born near Nashville, Tennessee, December 18th, 1818. His father was born in Virginia, June 25, 1787 and moved with his father to Tennessee in the early settling of that State. He grew to manhood on the farm near Nashville, and was married September 20, 1810 to Jenny Edmonson. In July 1818, came to Mssouri and selected a home in Boone County, to which he moved with his family the following year. He settled near the head of the Two-mile prairie, about nine miles northeast of Columbia. He was appointed county surveyor in 1821, and was also one of the judges of the county court, and was elected to represent the county in the Legislature in 1822 and 1824. He died May 28, 1847. The subject of this sketch was but eight months old when his parents landed in Boone county. He was educated at the Columbia Academy and at Bonne Femme Academy, under the instruction sof Summerfield, Roche and Cunningham.  Learned surveying under his father and his uncle George. Cannot remember when he couldn't give courses from the compass. Accompanied his father and uncle on government surveys when but fourteen or fifteen years old and assisted them in their labors. He has followed farming and surveying since he reached manhood. Was elected county surveyor in 1880. Had previously acted as deputy. On assuming the duties of his office, he removed to Columbia where he now resides. Had previously lived in Missouri Township. Mr. Wright was married, January 13, 1848 to Augusta C. Siedikum of Savannah, Red River county, Texas. Mrs. Wright is a native of Germany. They have had seven children, three of whom are living. Mr. Wright is a Democrat in politics, and has been all his life.  He was a union man during the war, but took no part in the struggle. He is a member of the Christian church and a Master Mason. (The following was taken from the "History of Boone County" by William Switzler, 1882, Page 971, submitted by Peggy Thompson)

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