Buchanan County, Missouri
Military Newspaper Articles
 

 


Colorado, Fort Massachusetts; Tragedy on the Plains.
A few months since two soldiers deserted from Fort Massachusetts, wandered about for days on their return to the States, in fear at any moment of falling into the hands either of hostile Indians or the troops in pursuit. They met with another deserter, and the three were overtaken by a party of trading Delawares, consisting of the squaw of a trader, her brother and some nine or ten mules. The Delawares fed the fellows, and agreed that they should travel with them to the frontier, giving them mules to ride on.---With all this kindness the villains conceived the destardly design of murdering the squaw and the man for the money which they learned she had about her, and taking the mules to the States for sale. The trader had died somewhere near Salt Lake, and they were returning to pay his debts, and commence trade on their own account. One day at noon the party stopped to dine and water the mules and the butchery was commenced. They followed the Delaware down the water course, and soon dispatched him. They then returned to the woman, cut her throat and threw her body into a gully, through which---as if Providence had ordained it for the particular purpose---the water flowed. The villians divided the money and made their way to the States, sold the mules, and went to St. Louis. The woman afterwards managed to crawl out of the gully, and was at length picked up by a tribe of Indians, who brought her to the frontier, and then gave such information as led to the arrest of the three scoundrels in St. Louis, by an offcier, who took them up the country, where they were recognized by the squaw, and fully committed for trial by the magistrates there. Their trial was to take place before the U. S. Court, at Jefferson, Mo., on the 1st of April.
[Jeffersonian Republican (Stroudsburg, Pa.) Thursday, April 14, 1853 Submitted by Kathy McDaniel]
 
Taney Beaumont, William Colt and Paul Wheeler
left Wednesday for Jefferson Barracks, where they go to take up army services.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo, April 6,1918

Bear
In a letter to his mother Mrs. Mary Ratcliff, 1309 Twelfth street, this city, her son, Sergt. Roy W. Bear, who was wounded in France in action July 26, says he is improving, but that his wound which was a shot through the hip will prevent him from further service in the army and he will in consequence be discharged.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., Oct. 5, 1918

Beasley
Nate P. Beasley, a well known young laundryman, will soon be in France, in charge of a U.S. laundry.  He left Wednesday for Kansas City for assignment at Camp Mills, New York.
Source: St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo. Sept. 7, 1918

J.H. Blackwell
a seaman who was aboard the ill-fated President Lincoln when it was torpedoed, was a St. Joseph visitor Tuesday.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., June 29, 1918

Leo V. Blankenship
of Co. L. Fiftieth Infantry, died at East Potomac Park, Washington, D.C., Monday as the result of an accidental gunshot  The body was brought here to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Blankenship, 2401 South Ninth, for burial.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, MO, July 20, 1918

Benjamin Buzard, Charles B. Mills and Milton S. Rosenfield
of this city were recommended for commissions as second lieutenants by the military training camps this week.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph Mo, May 4, 1918

A.P. Clayton, Jr.
son of the late Mayor Clayton, enlisted in the regular army this week and was sent to Jefferson Barracks.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., April 13, 1918

Marion A. Deakin
quartermaster left Tuesday for Philadelphia to report for sea duty.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, MO. January 5, 1918

George N. Draine
now in France where he was a sergeant, has been promoted to a first lieutenancy.  He was wounded at Vera Cruz in April, 1914, when United States Marines landed there.
St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, MO. August 10, 1918

Capt. Donald Duncan
A letter received by Mrs. J.A. Duncan Tuesday from Major General George Barnett, commandant of the marines, stated that Capt. Donald Duncan and his men took the town of Bouresche on the night of June 6th, at which time Capt. Duncan was killed.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo. July 20, 1918

Donald Fitch
Commissioner C.C. Colt was made happy Wednesday by receipt of the news that his grandson, Donald C. Fitch, of Kansas City, had been recommended for a commission as second lieutenant.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph MO, May 4, 1918

Corporal Elmer E. Geiwitz
son of Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Geiwitz, is home on a short furlough.  He is looking well and doing fine.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo, June 22, 1918

Eugene Hummer
Bugler, of Co. F. 306th Engineers, is home from Greenville, S.C. for a short visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Hummer.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., June 29, 1918

Virgil R. Jackson
According to advices received from Virgil R. Jackson, the eighty-ninth division is now billetted back of the fighting lines in France.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, MO. August 10, 1918

Calvin H. Jones
a son of Oscar Jones of 2927 Gardner avenue, was among those listed as severely wounded in Gen. Pershing's report of Tuesday.  He was prior to his enlistment employed by the Mueller-Kellar Candy Co.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph Mo., August 10, 1918
 
James P. Kelly
of St. Joseph is reported in the casualty list by the Canadian government, as ill in France.
Source: St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., April 6,1918

Pvt. Edward B. Kemmerling
Word was received here Monday that Private Edward B. Kemmerling of 5311 Halsey street was severely wounded in France.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., August 24, 1918

Wilbur LaHire
aged 24 years and a former resident in South St. Joseph at 15 Thompson was severely wounded in action over in France July 19th, according to a message received by relatives here Tuesday.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph Mo, August 31, 1918

Private George E. Lawhon
has reached England safely, according to advices received her.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., April 13,1918

Rev. Raymond C. Lippard
Pastor of the 2nd Presbyterian church, left Monday for a visit with his family at Higginsville, Mo., after which he will go to Camp Pike, Ark., to take up his duties as a first lieutenant chaplain.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., August 31, 1918

Capt. Thomas J. Lynch
from the base hospital at Fort Sill, is here on a ten day furlough
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., June 29, 1918

Col. John McNeely
has again resumed command of the 139th Infantry at Camp Funston after several weeks training at an officers school in Texas.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., April 13, 1918

Corporal Harry Miller
formerly of this city, was killed in action in France recently, according to the news received by Harry Niedorf, Thursday.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo. Aug. 31, 1918
 
George Noland
a private in the 110th Regular Engineers, has returned home, having been discharged for disability.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo. April 6,1918

Lieut. LeRoy J. Prinz
son of Prof. E.A. Prinz, is in St. Joseph on a six day furlough, after which he will leave for New York for overseas service in the aviation corps.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, MO. January 5, 1918

David Raffelock
has been notified that he is eligible for the officers training camp at Camp Pike.  He left for Camp Funston Tuesday and will be transferred from there to the school.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph MO, Aug. 31, 1918

Scheetz and Brand
The casualty lists of Thursday contained the names of Corp. Raymond J. Scheetz of this city.  It is believed that Raymond J. Schultz a telegraph lineman who enlisted last fall, is maeant.  Oscar William Brand, a young farmer near Helena is also listed among the wounded.
 
George Smith and W.H. Griffin
left Thursday for Camp Funston where they will enter the army.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo, April 6,1918

Capt. A.J.S. Smith
is home on a few days furlough
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo.June 29, 1918
L.C. Smith
a deserter from Fort Leavenworth, was arrested here Sunday and sent back.  Monday Fred Promwell was arrested here for being absent without leave from Camp Funston and was also sent back.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., April 6,1918

Pvt. William G. Snowden
Dr. W. E. Pentz was called to a rooming house at 217 1/2 North Sixth street early Weddnesday morning, where he found a young soldier supposed to be Private William G. Snowden, of Co. G. 29th infantry, in a dying condition from cerebral hemmorhage.  The soldier died a few momnets later.  The body was taken to Meierhoffer's.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., Nov. 1, 1919

Lieut. Floyd Sprague
son of Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Sprague, is visiting here and on completing same will report for duty at Camp Jackson, South Carolina.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo, August 24, 1918

Capt. W.F. St. John,
who is now stationed at Spartansburg, S.C., is here on furlough, acompanied by his wife.

Corporal B.W. Starmer
has arrived safely overseas, according to word received Thursday by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Starmer of 2824 South Seventeenth.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo, June 22, 1918.


Scott Steiner
son of Dr. and Mrs. M.W. Steiner, who is with the 140th Infantry at Camp Doniphan, has been promoted from private to corporal.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, MO, January 12, 1918

G.F. Thompson
Information reached here Tuesday that Lieut. G. F. Thompson of Craig, Mo., who is in the flying squadron in France, has been missing for several days.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., June 22, 1918

L.H. Williams
of 1203 Penn street received a letter this week from Lyle Williams, a relative who is in the navy, which gives an account of the torpedoing of a merchant cruiser off the Spanish coast on which he was a gunner.  He escapted without injury.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo., Feb. 2, 1918

 

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