Welcome to
Cedar County
Missouri


BIOGRAPHIES

Page 2

CLINE, JOSEPH Joseph Cline, carpenter at El Dorado Springs, was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1821, and is one of the much esteemed citizens of the above mentioned city. He is the son of Philip and Anna (Arter) Cline, and the grandson of Philip Cline, who was a native of Germany, and who settled in Illinois about 1824 or 1825, and died there about 1835 or 1836. Philip and Anna (Arter) Cline were natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania, respect­ively. They were married in Ohio in 1819, and afterwards moved to Illinois, where Mr. Cline died in 1844, and Mrs. Cline in 1840. Mr. Cline was a blacksmith by trade. He was a sol­dier in the War of 1812, and was with General Hull at the time of his surrender. Joseph Cline, the eldest of two sons and three daughters, received an ordinary education in the common schools, was reared on a farm, and went with his parents to Woodford County, ILL., where he tilled the soil until about 1850, when he learned his trade, and has followed it nearly ever since. He is also the owner of some real estate in El Dorado, where he settled in 1883. He is a Democrat in politics, voting for Polk in 1844, and was formerly a member of the A. F. & A. M. His brother, Samuel Cline, married a Miss Lydia A. Sunderland, a native of Ohio, and shortly afterward they moved to Kansas, where they remained until about 1878, then moved to Cedar County, where they have since lived. Samuel was a soldier in the Union army, serving three years in Company E, One Hundred and Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He and wife are members of the Christian Church; and he has a good farm on Sac River. Mary Cline, sister of the subject of this sketch, is the wife of Jacob Barringer, a well-to-do farmer of Woodford County, ILL. Julia A., another sister, died after marriage. Sarah J., wife of Robert Campbell, is now residing in California. The parents of the above mentioned children were members of the Baptist Church for many years. Since 1884 Samuel and wife have lived in El Dorado. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

COX, RICHARD Richard N. Cox, circuit clerk of Cedar County, Mo., is a native of Knoxville, Tenn., where he was born on the 21st of May, 1841. His father, Richeson Cox, was of English descent, and was born in 1782, in Knox County, Tenn., where he spent his entire life engaged in farming. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at the advanced age of 102 years. His wife, Mary Ann Julian, was also born in Knox County, Tenn., and is yet living, and draws a pension for services rendered by her hus­band in the War of 1812. Curd Cox, the paternal grandfather, was a native of Virginia, and a farmer by occupation. At an early day he removed to Knox County, Tenn., and there he died in 1853, at the age of ninety-six years. Richard N. Cox is the third of seven children and was reared on a farm until seven­teen years of age, and from that time until 1858 was in his father's stock stable at Knoxville, Tenn. In the fall of 1858 he left Tennessee, and went to Montgomery County, Mo., and was engaged in the sawmill business until June 9, 1861, when he enlisted in Company K, Sixth Missouri Infantry, U. S. A., and was in the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Jackson's Siege of Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, and was in the Georgia Campaign. At this time his term of enlistment expired, and he returned home and organized Com­pany K, Forty-ninth Regiment, and was chosen first lieutenant and afterward brevet captain. After the war he was commis­sioned to administer the amnesty oath, and was discharged at Mobile, Ala., December 20, 1865. He then spent six years in Tennessee engaged in merchandising, and in 1871 came to Mis­souri and began merchandising at Springfield, but sold out two years later and went to Fair Play, where he remained six years. In 1879 he went to Caplinger's Mills, selling goods there three years, and the two following years was at El Dorado, being the first merchant of the place. From 1884 to 1886 he was the proprie­tor of the Palace Hotel, now the St. James, and at the latter date was elected to the office of circuit court clerk on the Repub­lican ticket by a majority of 274 votes, and entered upon the duties of his office in January, 1887. February 26, 1866, he married Miss Sarah E. Julian, a daughter of Capt. A. M. Julian, of Springfield, Mo. She was born in that city in 1845, and is now the mother of the following family: Effie Rosella, wife of Hartwell Busby; William A., Flossie Iduma, Minnie Pearl, Mamie and Robbie. Mr. Cox belongs to the G. A. R., Hub­bard Post No. 154, of Stockton. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

CRAWFORD, FERNANZO K. Feranzo K. Crawford is one of the leading farmers of Cedar County, Mo., and was born in Dade County, of the same State, April 28, 1844, his parents being John N. and K. E. (Julian) Crawford. The former was born in Kentucky on the 27th of June, 1810, and for many years followed the occupation of blacksmithing, but of late years has given his attention to farming. His wife was born in Tennessee in 1826, and his parents, James and Sarah (Newport) Crawford, were born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1782: He moved first to Kentucky, thence to Missouri in 1838, being one of the early settlers of Dade County, where they died in 1844 and 1866, respectively. The great-grandparents, John and Fariby Crawford, were Virginians, who removed to Kentucky at an early day. Feranzo K. Crawford is the first of ten children, seven now living, and resided with his parents until July 28,1862, when he enlisted in the Federal army, and served until he received his discharge at Baton Rouge, July 28, 1865, participating in a number of important engagements. In January, 1866, he was married to Miss Sarah E. Wheeler, who was born in Dade County in 1843, her parents being Calvin and Acenath Wheeler, both of whom were early settlers of Dade County. Here the former died, but the mother's death occurred in Kansas. To Mr. and Mrs. Crawford eight children have been born: Robert O., Ammi F. (deceased), Lewis F., William Calvin, Hubert (deceased), Rufus (deceased), Harry B., and Jennie M. Mr. Crawford has been a resident of Cedar County since 1867, and owns 280 acres of land, with 120 cultivated. He is a member of the G. A. R., a Republican in politics, and his first presidential vote was cast for Lincoln. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is one of the worthy citizens of the county. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

CROSS, JOHN B. John B. Cross, one of Cedar County's successful farmers and stockmen, was born in Sangamon County, ILL., November 24, 1843, and was reared in Macon County. His father, Barnard Cross, was born about 1813, and throughout life was a farmer and mechanic, and died in Sangamon County, in 1847. His wife, whose maiden was Priscilla Evans, was born in the "Old North State," in 1814, and died in Cedar County, Mo., in August, 1882. William Cross, the grandfather, was a Kentuckian, and was one of the pioneer settlers of Sangamon County, ILL., but died in DeWitt County, at an advanced age, his wife, Charlotte, dying in the same county. John B. Cross is the third of four children, and made his home with his mother until his marriage, after which she made her home with him. He received his educa­tion in the public schools of Macon County, ILL. His marriage took place in 1868, and was to Miss Utherna Ann, Cooksy, who was born and reared in Scott County, ILL., her birth occurring in 1845, her parents, Benjamin and Ann Cooksy, being among the early settlers of Scott County. In 1872 Mr. Cross emigrated with his family to Cedar County, Mo., where he now owns a fine farm of 120 acres, and is considered one of the intelligent farm­ers of the community. He supports the principles of the Dem­ocratic Party. He and wife are the parents of the following chil­dren: Sarah D., wife of David Malette; Mary P., Richard M., William T., Franklin D., John M., Iva Ann and Alma R. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

DAWSON, W.E. Dr. W. E. Dawson. Good health is a gift of nature greatly desired by all, for what enjoyment can be obtained when the health is gone and the grim destroyer, disease, is hastening one rapidly to the grave? None; and it certainly behooves us to guard carefully all that makes life enjoyable. Dr. W. E. Daw­son, one of the prominent physicians and surgeons of El Dorado, whose principal aim in life thus far has been to administer to the physical ailments of his fellowmen, was born in Monroe County, Mo., in 1844, and is the son of John W. and Mary (Welsh) Daw­son, natives of Virginia, born in 1804. They removed with their parents to Kentucky when young, were married therein 1831, and afterward removed to Monroe County, Mo., where the mother died in 1864. Mr. Dawson afterward married again, and is now living with his son, Dr. Dawson. He has followed the wool carding business nearly all his life, and was a justice of the peace in Monroe County for twenty eight years in succession, being elected seven terms in one township. He is a member of the Christian Church, and his wives were members of the same. His father, John W. Dawson, was a native of Scotland, and died in Marion County, Mo., about 1833, at the age of 104 years. Dr. W. E. Dawson, the eldest of nine children, eight sons and one daughter, received a good practical education in the common schools, and worked with his father in the factory until grown. At the age of seventeen he began the study of medicine, and, in 1864, graduated from Rush Medical College, Chicago, ILL. In 1876 he graduated from Louisville (Ky.) Medical College, but, between 1864 and 1866, he practiced in Audrain County, after which he came to Clintonville, Cedar County, and, in 1884, to El Dorado Springs. He has practiced among the same people since 1866, and is one of the prominent practitioners of the county. During the year 1888 Dr. Dawson was engaged in the drug business with his brother at Schell City, and he still has an interest in the store there. He was married in Audrain County in 1866 to Miss Frances Forbis, a native of Boone County, Mo., and the daughter of James and Minerva Forbis, natives of Ken­tucky, who died in Audrian County. To the Doctor and wife were born three children. Dr. Dawson is a Democrat in politics, his first presidential vote being for Seymour, in 1868; has been a member of the A. F. & A. M. for ten years, the I. O. O. F. for fifteen years, and of the A. O. U. W. for eight years. Mrs. Dawson is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

DIXON, ZIMRI Zimri Dixon, a substantial farmer residing about ten miles from Stockton, Mo., was born in Ross County, Ohio, June 19, 1823, and is a son of Jacob and Nancy (Darby) Dixon, who were born on Kentucky soil in 1803, and died in Cedar County, Mo. (whither they came in 1838), in 1884 and in 1869, respectively. They suffered many privations and hardships in clearing their woodland farm, but eventually became well-to-do. Zimri Dixon was the second of their ten children, and, after his mother's death, remained with his father, assisting on the home farm until man­hood, in the meantime receiving no educational advantages. In 1855 he married Miss America Hopper, who was born in Ten­nessee about 1836, and their union was blessed in the birth of ten children, seven living: William H., George L., Loransy L., Parlee, wife of James Campbell, Dennis C, Delphia and Lewis M. In the summer of 1850 Mr. Dixon crossed the plains to California, where he remained until 1854, then returning to Cedar County, Mo. He has 210 acres of good land, which is well improved. He is a Republican politically, and during the late war served in the State militia. Mrs. Dixon's parents, Jackson and Nancy Hopper, came to Cedar County, Mo., about 1850, where they spent the rest of their lives. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

DOBYNS, D.R.D. D. R. D. Dobyns, President of the Cruce Banking Company since its incorporation in 1885, and retired farmer, is now resid­ing in El Dorado Springs. He was born in Muhlenberg County, Ky., in 1814, and is the son of Dr. Lew and Ann (Anderson) Dobyns, natives of Virginia. The parents were married in Ken­tucky, and there the father died in 1845. He was a farmer in early life, but for many years was a successful physician; was justice of the peace for several years; was colonel of the militia in general muster days, and was a member of the Christian Church. His father, Batton Dobyns, was a native Virginian. Mrs. Ann (Anderson) Dobyns died when her son, D. R. D. Dobyns, was but eight or ten years of age, and the father was married the second time. Her father, Robert Anderson, was born in Vir­ginia and died in Kentucky. D. R. D. Dobyns was the second of three children, and received a limited education in the sub­scription schools of his native county. At the age of fifteen he went to Tennessee, and carried mail from Murfreesboro to Spring Place, in Georgia (then the Cherokee Nation), on horseback for four years. The distance was 150 miles. In 1836 he married, in Rutherford County, Tenn., Miss Matilda Wadley, the daughter of John and Mary Wadley, who died in Kentucky in 1845, leav­ing two children, both deceased. He was married the second time in Christian County, Ky., to M. E., the daughter of John W. and Nancy Thompson, who emigrated from South Carolina in an early day to Christian County, Ky., and married there, remaining there during their lives. Mr. Dobyns reared four children by the last marriage, but all are now deceased. In 1839 Mr. Dobyns returned to Kentucky, and in 1856 came to Cooper County, Mo., where he remained until 1858, after which he removed to Henry County, and there remained until his removal to El Dorado Springs. He has made farming and stock dealing his principal occupation during life, and has accumulated a handsome property. He has a fine farm of 115 acres four miles northeast of El Dorado Springs, and besides has considerable real estate in town. He has been a Democrat all his life, and his first presidential vote was cast for Martin Van Buren in 1836. Mrs. Dobyns has been a member of the Christian Church for many years, and Mr. Dobyns, although not a member, contributes lib­erally to the churches, and to all laudable enterprises. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

DUTTON, HARVEY J. Capt. Harvey J. Dutton, general merchant at El Dorado Springs, with a stock of goods valued at about $3,000, is a native of Woodford County, ILL., born in 1836, and is the eldest of six sons and two daughters, born to Norman and Nancy E. (Smith) Dutton. Mr. Dutton was born in Rutland County, Vt., in 1810, and Mrs. Dutton in Canada, in 1808. They moved to Illinois, were married there, and there Mrs. Dutton died in 1866. One year later, Mr. Dutton married Miss Maria Sleeper, from New Hamp­shire. He died March 18, 1889, was a member of the Congre­gational Church for forty years, was a deacon in the same, and was a successful tiller of the soil. Capt. Harvey J. Dutton was reared to farm life, received a fair education in the common schools, and later attended the State Normal at Bloomington, ILL., from which institution he graduated July 3, 1861. He then joined Company A, Thirty third Illinois Infantry, known as the Normal Regiment, and was made sergeant at once. Afterward, he was made lieutenant, etc., until August, 1863, when he was commissioned captain, and commanded his company with credit until December, 1865, when he was mustered out at Springfield, ILL. He operated in Arkansas, Missouri, Texas, Louisiana and Alabama, and was slightly wounded three times. August 21, 1867, he married Miss Louisa V., daughter of John and Louisa Brinsden, who were natives of London, England, where they were married. Mr. and Mrs. Brinsden emigrated to Canada before Mrs. Dutton was born, and there they both died, Mr. Brinsden in 1861, and Mrs. Brinsden in 1850. Mrs. Dutton came to Illinois with an uncle, and was there married to Mr. Dutton, by whom she had six children, one son and four daugh­ters now living: Florence E., Clarence A., Norma E., Bertha I., and Gertrude L. The fourth child, Colena A., is deceased. In 1869 Mr. Dutton moved to Cedar County, Mo., settling five miles south of El Dorado Springs, where he followed farming until 1889, when he moved to town, and engaged in his present busi­ness. He is a Republican in politics, voting for Lincoln in i860; is a member of Colonel Leonard Post at El Dorado Springs, and has held nearly all the offices in the same. He and Mrs. Dutton are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

EDGE, ELISHA Elisha Edge, a prominent old resident of Stockton, is a native of Warren County, Tenn., where he was born in 1817. His father, Henry Edge, was born in Maryland, in 1781, and when a young man went to Kentucky, where he met and married Miss Hannah Stockstill, who was born in North Caro­lina, in 1793, and afterward moved to Tennessee, and in 1837 to Dade County, Mo. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was a hard working tiller of the soil all his life. He died in Dade County, Mo., in 1867, preceded by his wife in 1863. They were the parents of thirteen children, Elisha being the sixth of the family. He remained with his parents until twenty one years of age, and on the 30th of January, 1839, was married to Miss Harriet Denby, who was born in Warren County, Mo., in 1820. Sophronia, wife of Charles Mitchell; Abigail, the deceased wife of Samuel Killingsworth; Eliza, wife of Giles Holman; Mary, wife of B. L. Cornwell; Henry; Susan, wife of Henry Hudson; Benjamin L., and Thomas, are the children born to their union. Mr. Edge came with his father to Missouri, and, in 1841, located in Cedar County, settling in 1866 where he now lives. On first coming to this State, he was obliged to go thirty miles to mill. He is one of the oldest residents of the county, and is the owner of 240 acres of fertile land. He supports the principles of the Democratic Party, and during the Rebellion served six months in the Stockton Grays, and afterward in Company D, Col. McDonald's Arkansas Regiment of Cavalry, participating in the battles of Wilson's Creek, Prairie Grove, Helena, and numerous skirmishes. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

FIRESTONE, JOHN A. John A. Firestone, residing on his farm of 200 acres, five miles east of Stockton, Mo., was born in Botetourt County, Va., May 22, 1842, and is a son of Michael T. and Rebecca (Brown) Firestone, who were also born in that county, January 3, 1812, and October 30,1819, respectively. They came to Cedar County, Mo., in 1853, engaged in farming, and here died in 1884. The grandfather was Absalom Firestone. John A. Firestone was the second of eleven children, and, until twenty one years old, worked on his father's farm, but only received a few months' schooling. March 1, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Eighth Missouri Cav­alry, Missouri State Militia, and received his discharge on the 9th of March, 1865. He then returned to Cedar County, and resumed farming, and, in the fall of 1865, married Miss Frances Paynter, whose birth occurred in Botetourt County, Va., March 25, 1845 (for parents' history see sketch of Judge C. W. Paynter). They have the following children: Michael C, John E. T. (was acci­dentally shot May 4, in Idaho, by Mrs. Paul), Alonzo, Labirta B., Emily R., Charles N., Lulu, Sadie, Gertie, William C. and Romie. Mr. Firestone has been a resident of Cedar County since 1853, and is one of the prosperous farmers of the county. He has 150 acres improved and under cultivation. He is a Repub­lican in politics, a member of the G. A. R., and is a man who has always commanded the respect and esteem of all who know him. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

FRITTS, NELSON Nelson Fritts, a highly respected farmer of Cedar County, Mo., was born in Loudoun County, Va., January 22,1834, his parents being John and Rebecca (Shamlin) Fritts, who were born in Vir­ginia, in 1805 and 1806, respectively. John Fritts was of German descent, a farmer and shoemaker by occupation, and died in his native county about 1868. His wife is yet living at the very ad­vanced age of ninety three years. Nelson Fritts is the third of fourteen children, and at the age of twenty three years he bade adieu to relatives and friends, and came West to seek his fortune, locating in Cooper County, Mo., where he resided until 1869.

He then resided two years in Pettis County, since which time he has lived on his farm of 200 acres, in Cedar County. Miss Sarah J. Church became his wife in 1868. She was born in Tennessee, in 1847, and is a daughter of William C. and Mazey (Petty) Church. Her union with Mr. Fritts resulted in the birth of eight children, three of whom are deceased: Cora I., born December 3, 1868, and died July 29, 1887; Minnie, born Octo­ber 7, 1871, and died October 1, 1887; and Eva J., born Febru­ary 14, 1873, and died October 3, 1887. They were bright and promising children, and their untimely deaths were deeply mourned by their relatives and friends. Those living are: Thomas J., Robert W., Alma P., Arvel E. and Charles E. Mr. Fritts is an upright and industrious citizen, and has made a fine home for his family. He is a Democrat, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

GRAHAM, THOMAS BENTON Thomas Benton Graham was born in Ray County, Mo., March 1, 1832, and almost since his birth has been a resident of Cedar County. William Graham, the grandfather, was born in Ireland in 1770, and when sixteen years old came to the United States, and located in Virginia, and previous to his marriage moved to the State of Kentucky, and about 1820 emigrated to Boone County, Mo., and to Ray County, of the same State, five years later. Here he died in 1864. His son Robert, father of our subject, was born in Kentucky in 1801, and came to Missouri with his parents, and was married in Ray County when about twenty eight years of age to Miss Ann English, and November 17, 1832, removed to Cedar County, settling on the farm now owned by John Gordon. His neighbors were Thomas English, his father-in-law, John Crisp, and a Mr. Crump. He went fifty miles to mill, and to Springfield to do his trading, making the trip about once a year. He located on the farm now owned by his son Thomas B., in 1835, and here died in 1849. His wife was born in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1809, and is a daughter of Thomas and Letitia (Campbell) English, who came to what is now Cedar County, Mo., in 1832, where they died in 1856 and 1848 respect­ively. Mrs. Graham is still living, and from choice makes her home by herself. She and Mr. Graham became the parents of twelve children: Thomas B., Martha A., wife of S. B. Edsell; Adaline, wife of T. P. Fourt; Robert M. and Mary, twins, the latter the wife of Thomas White; James J.; Malinda, wife of George W. Bayless; Bettie, wife of J. L. Powell; and Orlean, wife of Benjamin White, are living; and the following are deceased: William C, who died in Louisiana in 1885; Susan J., the wife of George W. Sally, died in August, 1888; and John M., who died in 1868. Thomas B. Graham was only an infant when his parents came to Cedar County, and made his home with his mother on the farm until he was twenty-four years old. In 1855 he went South for his health, remaining until 1859, when he went to Pike's Peak, after which he returned home. In i860 he went to California, and was engaged in herding cattle and teaming for four years, and then went to Boise City, Idaho, and did various kinds of work for two and a half years. In the spring of 1866 he went to Montana Territory, and in the fall of that year returned to Cedar County, Mo., and very shortly after returned to Louisi­ana. Since 1867 he has been engaged in farming and stock dealing in Cedar County, being the owner of 500 acres of land, on which is erected a commodious, substantial and handsome residence. He is a member of the Masonic order, and in his political views is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Buchanan in 1856. In April, 1868, he was married to Miss Orlena Baker, a daughter of John and Rura Ann (Sherrill) Baker. She was born in Cedar County, Mo., in 1848, and died the fol­lowing August after her marriage October 6,1870, Mr. Graham wedded his second wife, Miss Ann Eliza Harris, a daughter of Robert and Nancy (Berger) Harris. Mrs. Graham was born in Cooper County, Mo., in 1843, and is the mother of three children: James H., Laura and Sallie. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

GRIFFITH, WILLIAM William Griffith, postmaster at El Dorado Springs, is a native or Pike County, Mo., born in 1846, and is the third of four sons and five daughters, born to Judge Albert G. and Sallie P. (Pick­ett) Griffith, natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. The parents emigrated from Kentucky to Pike County, Mo., about 1832, and there Mr. Griffith died in 1874. Mrs. Griffith is still living. Her parents both died in Pike County, Mo. Judge Albert G. Griffith was left fatherless when but a boy, and after growing up, he was quite a prominent man in Pike County, Mo. He was a farmer by occupation, was judge of Pike County Court from 1868 to 1872, and the last two years of his life was presiding judge of that county. He was also a justice of the peace for six years. He and wife were members of the Christian Church, as were also all the children, with the exception of William Griffith. The latter received a liberal education in the country schools, assisted his father on the farm, and when eighteen years of age, or in 1865, he joined Company K, Third Illinois Cavalry, as cor­poral, and went at once to Mississippi, where he remained until the war closed. He was then sent to the northwest frontier, where he remained until the fall of 1865, when he was discharged. He then returned home, engaged in agricultural pursuits, and in 1874 was united in marriage to Miss Sallie, daughter of W. H. and Mary J. Nalley, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Nalley were early settlers of Pike County, where they lived many years. They are now residing at Appleton City, Mo. To Mr. Griffith and wife were born two children, one son (now dead) and a daughter. In 1876, Mr. Griffith came to St. Clair County, Mo., where he farmed until 1880, after which he engaged in the lumber business. In 1882 he came to El Dorado, where he engaged in the lumber business with Robinson Brothers, and continued at this until 1888, when he was made deputy postmaster. In February, 1889, he was appointed to the position of postmaster, and has had full charge of the office since. He was a member of the city council two years, and is a member of Col. Leonard Post No. 251, G. A. R. In 1888 he was adjutant of the Twelfth District Veteran Association of the Twelfth Congressional District of Missouri. Mrs. Griffith was born in 1856, and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

GRIMES, SOLOMON O. Solomon O. Grimes, one of Jefferson Township's well known farmers, is a native of the "Old North State," born May 30, 1845, and since 1857, at which time his parents, Stephen and Susan (Elrod) Grimes, came to Missouri. He has been identified with the interests of Cedar County, being now the owner of a good farm of 236 acres, with about 130 acres under cultivation. In 1873 he was married to Miss Orlena Irwin, who was born in Missouri, in 1849, and died in December, 1879. She was the daughter of Cass and Rebecca Irwin, who were among the early settlers of Cedar County, and was the mother of five children: Orlena, wife of M. Austin; Amanda, wife of H. White; Mary, wife of Wesley Hammons; Henry and Ida (deceased). Mr. Grimes took for his second wife Mrs. Narsee (Simmons) Baker, a daughter of Absalom and Loretta Jones. She was born in Cedar County, in 1849, and has borne Mr. Grimes four children: Arthur (deceased), Johnnie, Jimmie (deceased), and Joseph. In 1862 Mr. Grimes enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, and after serving in the Missouri State Militia, served twenty months in the regular army, until the close of the war. He supports the measures of the Republican Party, and cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He has shown his brotherly spirit by joining the I. O. O. F., being a member of Humansville Lodge No. 310. Mrs. Grimes is a mem­ber of the Campbellite Church. His father and mother were born in North Carolina, in 1820 and in 1830, respectively, and the former was of Dutch descent, a farmer by occupation, and died in Dade County, Mo., in i860. His wife is of Irish-German descent, and is now living in Cedar County. Her father, David Elrod, was born in the "Emerald Isle." [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

GUNIER, JEROME NAPOLEON Judge Jerome Napoleon Gunier was born in Detroit, Mich., in 1824, and there made his home until 1837, when he went to Marion County, Ohio, and began working on a farm, and after­ward learned the plasterer's trade. In 1844 he removed to Howard County, Ind., and helped to roll logs where the public square of Kokomo is now situated. The Miami Indians were very numerous at that time. In 1846 Mr. Gunier married Miss Mary Adaline Inman, who was born in Erie County, Penn., in 1830, and the following children are the result of their union: Elizabeth, wife of Alexander Younger; Charles; Abigail, wife of Samuel Street, a harnessmaker of Stockton; Viola, Stringer; Martha Jane, wife of Frank Lorton; Andrew J., Frances M., Mary Jane, Mina, and Ida, wife of Charles Wright. In 1858 Judge Gunier removed from Indiana to Cedar County, Mo., and located near Stockton, where he has since resided. He farmed and worked at his trade until 1878, then followed farming alone until 1886, when he was elected Probate Judge of Cedar County, on the Republican ticket, of which party he has been a member for many years, having been a Democrat previous to the war. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry, U. S. A., the regiment taking part in the fights at Springfield, and was with Price and Shelby on their famous raids. He was orderly sergeant of his company, being promoted after enlisting, and was discharged at Springfield on the 30th of June, 1865. He is now a member of the Hubbard Post No. 194, G. A. R. His father, Charles Gunier, was born in Upper Canada, and afterward moved to Detroit, Mich., where he carried on an extensive cooperage business. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, being under Col. Lewis Cass, the Democratic can­didate for president in 1848. He surrendered with Gen. Hull. During the war his wife, Elizabeth (Metta) Gunier, and his chil­dren stayed in Fort Detroit for safety, and his eldest son was born there. Charles afterwards participated in the Black Hawk War. His wife's father, Theophilus Metta, was one of the first settlers of Detroit, and lived to the advanced age of 104 years. His son Boswell was one of the first settlers of Chicago, and died an old bachelor. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HAMLETT, WILLIAM B.
William B. Hamlett, a farmer residing about eight miles from Stockton, Mo., was born in Henderson County, Tenn., Jan­uary 27, 1833, his parents, Richard and Elizabeth (McCullester), Hamlett, being Tennesseans who died in their native State. William B. was the second of their six children, and, after the death of his parents, went to live with his grandfather, James Hamlett, but, after remaining with him one year, hired out to a farmer to work by the month. In September, 1854, he married, in St. Clair County, Mo., Miss Amanda A. Phillips, who was born in Henderson County, Tenn., in 1836, and died August 31, 1873, leaving, besides her husband, the following children to mourn her loss: George W., Andrew J.; Martha J., wife of James I. Simmons; William A., Mary F., James M., and Lizzie C. On November 8, 1874, Mr. Hamlett married Mrs. Mary A. (Reed) Blodgett, a daughter of James Reed. She was born in Georgia, about 1845, and her marriage with Mr. Hamlett resulted
in the birth of eight children, seven living: Charles B., Harriett N., Nellie May, Sena F., Laura E., Adda D. and Elsie A. January 1,1854, Mr. Hamlett emigrated to Missouri, and located in St. Clair County, where he resided until 1858, when he crossed the plains to Pike's Peak. He returned to Missouri the same year, and now owns 370 acres of land, 165 acres being under cultivation. In 1862 he enlisted in Company M, Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry, and after serving three years, returned to the peaceful pursuit of farming, which he has since continued. He is a staunch Republican in politics. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HARTLEY, JOHN E. John E. Hartley, President of the Stockton Exchange Bank, of Stockton, Mo., was born in Dickson County, Tenn., on the 13th of February, 1821, his parents being James and Elizabeth (Walker) Hartley, who were born near Augusta, Ga., and in Tennessee in 1780 and 1790, and died in Cedar County, Mo., and Bond County, ILL., in 1835 and 1855, respectively. They were married in Dickson County, Tenn., whither James had gone when a young man, and in 1831 he emigrated to Bond County, ILL., and in 1837 to Polk (now Cedar) County, Mo., the farm which he owned being now in the possession of J. W. Bugg. He did all his trading at the town of Bolivar, and, like the majority of the pioneers, was compelled to suffer many privations and hardships, but by hard work and good management, conquered many diffi­culties and became well-to-do. The following are his children: Willis, residing on a portion of the old homestead; John E., Solomon, Richard, Thomas, Henry, and Mary, widow of Solomon Hopkins, deceased. Four children are deceased. John E. Hart­ley was ten years old when he left Tennessee, and sixteen when he came to Cedar County, Mo. He was reared on a farm, and made his home with his father until he was over twenty one years of age, and received quite poor educational advantages, but made good use of his opportunities, and was an intelligent young man. From the time he was eighteen to thirty years of age he was afflicted with rheumatism. From 1845 to 1848 he served as deputy circuit and county clerk of Cedar County, and in 1848 was elected sheriff and ex-officio collector of Cedar County, and was reelected in 1850 without opposition, but was debarred fur­ther reelection by the statutes. From 1852 to 1854 he was en­gaged in merchandising, and at the latter date was again elected to the position of sheriff and collector of the county. In 1855 he purchased another stock of goods, and with the assistance of his brother, Thomas, managed this in connection with the duties of his office. He hauled his goods from Boonville and Jefferson City, a distance of 140 miles, and was engaged in mercantile pur­suits until 1862, when his goods were taken by the soldiers of the late war. Late in the fall of that year he went to Versailles, where he remained until the spring of 1865, then made the overland trip to Montana, and engaged in stock raising and trading in stock. In the fall of 1872 he returned to Cedar County and located at Stockton, and in the spring of the following year opened a store at that point, and also one at Caplinger's Mills, Richard Huston being manager of the latter establishment. In 1878 he was burned out at Stockton and closed out his store at Caplinger's Mills, but in June, 1881, engaged in the banking business in Stockton with a capital stock of $15,000, and the fall of the same year moved to the building he now occupies. Two years later he organized the Hartley Bank at Jerico, Cedar County, Mo., and in January, 1886, sold his stock and was the prime mover in the organization of the Mt. Vernon Bank, at Mt. Vernon, Lawrence County, Mo., but the same month and year disposed of his stock in the bank at Jerico. At the time of the organization of the bank at Stockton he was elected president, and M. B. Loy was chosen cashier. In October, 1887, Walter M. Hartley became cashier. Mr. Hartley is now the owner of 840 acres of land, at one time being the owner of about 1,500 acres, and all his property has been acquired by industry and sterling business principles. He has always been very liberal in supporting worthy enterprises, and aiding in the development of the county, and is one of the prominent men of the same. He has been a lifelong Democrat, and James K. Polk received his first vote for the presidency. He became a member of the Masonic fraternity in 1850, and now belongs to the Stockton Lodge No. 283. May 9, 1850, he was married to Miss Sarah J., a daughter of Jacob Sherrill, who came to Cedar County about 1840. Mrs. Hartley was born in Carroll County, Tenn., in 1834, and died in Montana Territory in 1871, having borne the following family of children: William L., assistant cashier in his father's bank; James H., a farmer; Jacob M., in Montana Territory; Minnie L., wife of C. B. Jones, of Montana Territory; Lurah Dean, wife of M. B. Loy, an attorney-at-law of Stockton, Mo.; Walter M., cashier of the Stockton Exchange Bank; Jean, who is attending Baird College, at Clinton, Mo.; and Robert Lee, in Morrisville College. In 1877 Mr. Hartley took for his second wife Mrs. Mary E. (Loy) Lesley, a daughter of Thomas Loy. They have one child, Leona. Mrs. Hartley is a member of the Christian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HARTLEY, RICHARD Richard Hartley, one of the old and influential agriculturists of this region, residing eleven miles southeast of Stockton, Mo., was born in Tennessee, on the 25th of July, 1825, being the fifth of a family of eleven children born to James and Elizabeth (Walker) Hartley, a short sketch of whom is given in this work. He came from his native State to Cedar County, Mo., in 1837, and, owing to poor school facilities at that time, acquired but a limited education. In 1847 he united his fortunes with those of Miss Almira Underwood, who was born in Roane County, Tenn., about 1849, being a daughter of Enoch and Sally Underwood, who came to Cedar County in 1840. Mr. and Mrs. Hartley's union resulted in the birth of the following family: Ellen E., wife of William Lynch; William H. (deceased); Mary (deceased); Lorinda, wife of Brantly N. Davis; Richard D. J.; Enoch, who was killed by a falling tree, in 1877: Almira (deceased); Lurah D., wife of Frank Tow; an infant (deceased), John E. and Sol­omon W. Mr. Hartley owns 800 acres of land, situated on Little Sac River, which makes a splendid grain and stock farm, and usually has about forty head of horses and mules, and about the same number of cattle. He devotes seventy-five acres to corn annually. He is a Democrat politically. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HARTLEY, THOMAS J. Thomas J. Hartley was born in Dickson County, Tenn., May 1, 1830, and is a brother of Richard Hartley, whose sketch precedes this, being the ninth in the family. After remaining with his father until twenty years of age, he, on the 1st of May, 1850, started to cross the plains to California, and for four years worked in the gold mines of that State. He returned to Cedar County, Mo., in June, 1854, and the following year engaged in merchan­dising at Stockton, being occupied in the business about three years. In 1858 he espoused Miss Rachel M. Church, who was born in Tennessee, and who died December 23, 1858, having borne one daughter, Rachel M., the wife of R. C. Pyle. She was a daughter of C. C. and Nancy Church, who died in Cedar County. February 14, 1866, Mr. Hartley wedded Miss Margaret C. Montgomery, who was born in Roane County, Tenn., a daughter of John W. and Elizabeth (Jackson) Montgomery. To this last marriage seven children were born: Laura, (deceased); William L., Lizzie, Josie May, Maud, Thomas F. (deceased) and Gertie J. In 1864 Mr. Hartley went to Idaho, thence to Oregon, and from there by water to New York City, where he arrived January 1, 1866, and then back to Cedar County, Mo., which place he reached in March of the same year. During the Civil War he was with Sterling Price six months. About 118 acres of his 200 acre farm are under cultivation, and 80 acres are situated on the river bottom. He is a Democrat, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife belong to the Method­ist Episcopal Church, South. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HIGGINS, WILLIAM A. William A. Higgins was born in Jo Daviess County, ILL., in 1842, and is a son of William H. and Priscilla (Journey) Hig­gins, who were born in Kentucky and St. Clair County, ILL., in 1813and 1815, and died in Cedar County, Mo., and Illinois, in 1865 and 1867, respectively. The father removed from his native State to Illinois with his father, William Higgins, at an early day, and after making a few changes of residence finally located in Cedar County, Mo. William A. Higgins is the third of six children, and received his early education in the common schools of Illinois. He lived with his father until the latter's death, and since 1868 has been a resident of Cedar County, where he owns 250 acres of land. He is a Republican in poli­tics, and cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. November 4, 1869, he was married to Miss Annie E. Allen, who was born in Cedar County, Mo., in 1853, and by her is the father of four children: Dora M., Bertha A., Walter E. and Nellie L. Mr. Higgins and wife are members of the Christian and Baptist Churches, respectively. Her parents, Joseph and Beulah Allen, were among the first settlers of Cedar County, Mo., of which he was elected the first county clerk by the Dem­ocratic party. He became one of its prominent citizens, and he and wife died here when quite advanced in years. While a resi­dent of Tennessee Mr. Allen was also clerk of Dade County. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HORN, DR. SAMUEL W. Dr. Samuel W. Horn, the oldest physician and surgeon of Cedar County, Mo., was born in the State of Georgia, near Augusta, in 1811. His father, Dr. John Horn, was a Virginian, born in 1778, and was a medical graduate and soldier in the War of 1812. At Norfolk, in 1814, he was thrown from his horse and died the following day. His wife, whose maiden name was Charity Brown, was born in Georgia, and died in 1836, at the age of forty-five years, in Smith County, Tenn. Her two children are living : Dr. Samuel W. and Miranda, wife of Allan Horn, of Greene County, Ark. The former was three years of age when his father died, but he continued to make his home with his mother, and went with her and his stepfather, Henry McMullen, to Tennessee. He was reared to manhood on a farm in Smith County, and in 1829 began teaching school, continuing this occupation for four terms in Mount Holly Academy, and at the same time pursued his medical studies, using his father's books, which his mother had preserved. He also studied under the direction of Drs. Ben R. Owen and John Daugherty, and in 1833 entered the Medical College of Louisville, Ky., from which institution he graduated in May, 1834. He began practicing at Lancaster, and in May, 1835, married Miss Margaret Tyree, who was born in Smith County, Tenn., in 1822. Of their ten chil­dren seven reached maturity: Mary, who died in 1863, at the age of twenty-five years, was the wife of William Cawthorn; William J., Francis H.; Samuel W., Jr., who died in 1870,aged twenty two years; Martha L. J., wife of Joseph C. Ledbetter ; Alexander M.; and Miranda C, wife of William C. Preston. In 1843, Dr. Horn left Tennessee and went to Mississippi, and in February, 1844, landed at what is now Cedar County, Mo., and located on the farm where Thomas Hackleman now resides, where he entered upon the practice of his profession, there being only three other doctors besides himself in the county, and he is the only one now living. He devoted his time to his profession until June, 1882, and since that time has lived a quiet, retired life. He had only been in the county a short time when his worth and merit as a physician became known, and for over twenty years he had the most extensive practice of any doctor in the county, and very often was called a distance of forty miles from his home to attend the sick. Many a time he has been on horseback a week at a time, with but little rest, and often fell asleep on his horse, and one time was knocked from his saddle by the branch of a tree. Another time his horse stopped, and he slept for several hours before waking. During all his years of residence in Cedar County, his good name has remained untar­nished. He is known the county over as "Uncle Sammy," and is reverenced by all who know him. Previous to the late war he was a Whig in politics, and voted for Henry Clay for the presi­dency in 1832; since that time he has been a Democrat, but during the War was a strong Union man. In 1850 he took the first cen­sus in Cedar County, and was one of the original stockholders of the Bank of Exchange of Stockton. He has been a member of the Masonic Order for forty four years. In 1885 he lost his estimable wife, and since that time his youngest son has been living with him. He has given each of his children $2,200, and has always been very liberal in contributing to worthy enter­prises. On coming to the county he had not a relation, but now, besides his own children, he has thirty nine grandchildren and sixteen great grandchildren. He has been very successful finan­cially, and is one of the well-to-do men of the county. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HUDSON, JOHN M. John M. Hudson is one of the substantial farmers of the county, and deserves honorable mention as such. His farm, on which he located in 1877, situated about eight miles east of the county seat, comprises 180 acres of good land, about 140 of which is under cultivation and well improved, his residence being a handsome two-story frame structure. He was born in the county in which he now resides, in 1849, and was the eighth of nine children born to the marriage of Meredith Hudson and Matilda Moore, who were born in West Virginia and Tennessee, respectively, the latter's birth occurring in 1808. When a young man the father left his native State, and went to Tennessee, where he was married, and afterward removed to Cedar County, Mo., in 1843, where he entered land on which he died in August, 1860. His widow is still living. John M. Hudson resided with his parents until he attained his twenty-first year, then began doing for himself, and in 1872 was married to Miss Rebecca Butner, who was born in Cedar County, Mo., and died in 1878, having borne three children, Mary A., being the only one living. In 1879 Mr. Hudson took for his second wife Mrs. Frances (Little) Hobbs, who was born in Adams County, ILL., in 1849, and by her has four children: Rosa T., Sarah M., Charles B. and Elsie M. Mrs. Hudson's parents are Andrew J. and Mary A. Little. Since 1875 Mr. Hudson has resided on his present property. He is a Republican in politics, and cast his first presi­dential vote for Abraham Lincoln. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

HURT, SAMUEL F. Samuel F. Hurt, who is closely associated with the farming and stock raising interests of Cedar Township, was born in that town­ship in 1842, and is the eldest of four sons and three daughters born to Burgess and Elizabeth (Davis) Hurt, natives of Adair County, Ky. The parents resided in their native State until 1842, when they moved to Cedar County, Mo., and located one mile west of where their son, Samuel F., is now living. About two years later they returned to Kentucky, resided there for three or four years, and then moved to St. Clair County, where they remained until the war, when they moved to Kansas. Here Mrs. Hurt died, and afterward Mr. Hurt returned to St. Clair County, where he died in 1888. He was a blacksmith by trade and a farmer by occupation. His father, William Hurt, was probably a native of Virginia, and died in Adair County, Ky. He was of French descent; was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was sheriff of Adair County for a number of years. Samuel F. Hurt received a limited education, owing to the scarcity of schools, but was attending Fairview College when the war broke out. In 1863 he joined Company I, Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, and remained with this company until the close of the war, serving most of the time on the plains of Western Kansas. He was ser­geant the latter part of the war, and was wounded once by a gun­shot. He was married in St. Clair County, Mo., in 1866, to Miss Mary, daughter of William and Nancy Dudley, and a native of St. Clair County. Mr. and Mrs. Dudley were born in Virginia and Kentucky, respectively, but were early settlers of St. Clair County, where they are living at the present time, and where Mr. Dudley is engaged in tilling the soil. To Mr. Hurt and wife were born three children, one son and two daughters. Mr. Hurt resided in St. Clair County until about 1877, and then moved to Cedar County, locating on his present farm, which consists of over nine hundred acres, and is considered one of the finest tracts of land in the county. He was collector of Washington Town­ship, St. Clair County, two years; is a Democrat in politics, cast­ing his first presidential vote for McClellan ; is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 342, and has been master of the same for about two years. He and wife have been members of the Christian Church for many years. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

JACKSON, JEFFERSON Jefferson Jackson, general merchant, and a member of the firm of Owen & Jackson, of Stockton, Mo., was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1818, and is a son of John and Jane (Preston) Jackson, who were also Tennesseeans, born in 1792 and 1795, respectively. The father was a farmer and carpenter, and served in the War of 1812. They both died in 1840, her death preced­ing his nine days. Jefferson is the fourth of their nine children, and was educated in the early subscription schools, and was reared in a mill and still house. After remaining with his parents until twenty one years of age, he began doing for himself, and, in 1843, was married to Miss Matilda Crawford, who was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1818. To them were born seven children: Elizabeth Jane, wife of J. R. Owens; James M., a merchant of Stockton, Mo.; Margaret, the deceased wife of C. W. Paynter, of Stockton; Nancy S., wife of Daniel M. Bailey, of Kansas City; Sarah, wife of Dr. R. A. Brown; Amanda, wife of Lon Pyle, and John R. (deceased). Mr. Jackson left his native State in the fall of 1843, and moved to the State of Arkansas, but, in Novem­ber, 1845, came to Cedar County, Mo., and settled, and until the late war was engaged in farming eight miles east of the county seat. In 1861 he enlisted in the Home Guards, but soon after returned home, and resumed farming. In 1862 he enlisted in Company M, Fifteenth Regiment Missouri Cavalry, and, after being in the service twenty months, was discharged at Spring­field. His son James M. was in the same company. In the fall of 1865 he commenced clerking in Stockton for his son, James M., and J. R. Owen, remaining with them five years. In 1870 he was elected sheriff and ex-officio collector, and served two years. In 1880 he and J. M. Thompson purchased an interest in the gen­eral store of J. R. Owen, in Stockton, but, in December, 1888, Mr. Thompson sold his interest, since which time Mr. Owen and Mr. Jackson have been in business alone. Since 1871 he has had an interest in the store belonging to his son and C. W. Paynter, eight miles east of Stockton. He owns 550 acres of land in Cedar County, and is one of the substantial business men of the com­munity. When he commenced life for himself he was the owner of two ponies, two cows, and one colored man, but at present is one of the wealthy citizens of the county. He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Harrison for the presidency in 1840, being then a Whig. He is a Mason, and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for twenty five years. His wife died in 1876, and in 1881 he married Harriet E. Pollard, a native of Tennessee, whose maiden name was McMinn. James M. Jackson, his son, was born in Roane County, Tenn., and received his education in Fayette College, Howard County, Mo., which institution he entered in 1858, remaining eighteen months. When eighteen years of age he began teaching school in Cedar and Polk Counties, continuing this occupation until the fall of 1863, when he enlisted in Company M, Fifteenth Missouri Cav­alry, U. S. A., and served for twenty months in Southwest Mis­souri, receiving his discharge at Springfield. January 1, 1865, he formed a partnership with J. R. Owen, and, until 1872, the firm was Owen & Jackson, but, at that date, Mr. Jackson purchased Mr. Owen's interest, and, almost immediately, A. J. Bacon and Jefferson Jackson became members of the firm, which is now known as J. M. Jackson & Co. The establishment comprises two rooms and a basement, and is filled with a first class stock of general merchandise. Mr. Jackson is a live, energetic business man, and, besides his store, owns 240 acres of valuable land, a one third interest in Caplinger's mills, and a general merchandise store, managed by T. B. Kannady, at the latter place. He is a Democrat, politically; his first vote being cast for John Bell, in i860. He has served as a member of the town council, and has been secretary of the same. He is a Royal Arch Mason. On the 15th of March, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Seraphine Bacon, a daughter of Abel J. and Hannah (Hembree) Bacon. She was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1849, and she and Mr. Jackson are the parents of four children: Walter L., a salesman in his father's store; Abel J., a student at Morrisville College; Otis M. and Pearl C. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

JACKSON, JOHN A. John A. Jackson, Sr., who is classed among the prominent farmers and stock raisers of Cedar County, was born in Ander­son County, East Tennessee, April 21, 1820, and is the son of Claiborne and Kizzie Jackson, natives of North Carolina, where Mrs. Jackson had married a Mr. Cheek, who died. She went to Tennessee in about 1817, and was there married to Mr. Jack­son in 1819, after which they spent their lives in that State, she dying just before the war, and he just after. Mr. Jackson was a farmer and trader, and was a member of the Baptist Church. John A. Jackson, the eldest of three sons and four daughters, received a very limited education, never attending school more than a few months in all. He was married September 15, 1842, to Miss Sarah L. Hardin, the daughter of Marlin and Maria Hardin. Mrs. Jackson was born in East Tennessee, August 28, 1822, and died December 9, 1888, aged sixty six years three months and eleven days. When nineteen years of age she had joined the Baptist Church, but, at the time of her death, was a faithful member of the Christian Church. She left two sons and two daughters: Abner, John A., Jr., Sarah E. and Margaret C. wife of Elihu Hess. All are living in the neighborhood of their father. One son, Samuel Fuston, lost his life in the Confederate army, it is supposed. Mary J. died in August, 1865; Nancy A. died January 1, 1884; and Samantha A. died in September, 1880. In 1854 Mr. Jackson came to Cedar County, Mo., settled on his present farm, and there he has since lived, with the exception of a short period during the war. He has about 300 acres in different tracts of land, and is one of the substantial farmers of the county. He is honest, industrious, and is one of the county's first-class citizens. He is a member of the Christian Church; was a justice of the peace about three years previous to the war, and is virtually the founder of El Dorado Springs. For some years prior to its publicity he had made considerable use of the water, carrying it a distance of two miles in a jug to his home, and, during the summer season, he would frequently spend nearly the entire day at the spring. It was he who piloted Joshua Hightower and family through the woods to the spring, they being the first to camp there. Mr. Jackson is a Democrat politi­cally, and his first presidential vote was for James K. Polk, in 1844. He is one of the pioneers of northwest Cedar County, and at the time of his settlement on his present farm there were but eight acres cleared. He now has a well improved farm. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MONTGOMERY, JOHN John Montgomery Jackson, a farmer and stock dealer resid­ing two miles northeast of Stockton, Mo., was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1842, and is a son of James Preston and Mar­garet (Montgomery) Jackson, who were also from Tennessee, the former born in Roane County in 1816, and the latter in Roane County in 1822. They were married in their native State, and in 1843 came to Cedar County, Mo., and located on a farm eight miles east of Stockton, where the father has since been living. The mother was a daughter of John Montgomery, and died Janu­ary 9, 1888. The paternal grandfather, John Jackson, was born in Jefferson County, Tenn., in 1792. John Montgomery Jack­son is the eldest of five surviving members of a family of ten children, his brothers and sisters being as follows: Mary, wife of Samuel McAckron; Sarah, wife of John B. Salmon; Nancy A., wife of John Oldham; and William. John Montgomery Jackson has been a resident of Cedar County since he was one year old, and remained under the shelter of the paternal roof until he was twenty years of age. March 18, 1862, he enlisted in Com­pany D, Eighth Regiment Missouri Cavalry, and August, of the same year, was wounded in Benton County, Mo., by a gunshot, which disabled him for seven months, being in the hospital at Jefferson City two months, and the rest of the time at home. February 1, 1866, he was married to Miss Amanda J. Connaway, a daughter of Dennis H. and Rebecca (Tatom) Connaway, who came to Cedar County, Mo., in 1838. Rebecca Tatom was born in Bond County, ILL. Soon after Dennis H. Connaway came to Missouri his father died, leaving him, the only son, to care for the family; a mother and three sisters. He had a fair educa­tion, but maintained the family principally by farming and teach­ing school. Until later on in years, he honorably filled several prominent offices, that of clerk, collector and representative. He was married to Rebecca Tatom in the year 1844. They lived happily together eight years, when Mrs. Connaway died, leaving three small children, of whom Mrs. John M. Jackson is the oldest. The other two children, both boys, are now living in Ore­gon, the elder a doctor, and the younger, cashier of the First National Bank. Independence, Oregon. After the death of Mrs. Connaway, Mr. Connaway, with the help of his oldest sister, took care of his children and aged mother, for five years, at which time he married Serena J. Bugg in the year 1857. They had five children, four boys and one girl, two of the boys living in this State, one a veterinary surgeon, living at Colum­bia, Mo., and the other a doctor, living in Cedar County, Mo. The other three are living in Kansas, engaged in farming and raising stock. Mr. Connaway spared no pains in educating his children, and teaching them to be useful members of society. His mother died in the year 1864, aged seventy years. He is now in his seventieth year, and is in poor health; is now visiting his sons and relatives in Oregon. He is a strong Republican; held the offices of lieutenant and captain in the late war; has been a strict member of the Christian Church for a number of years. Mrs. Jackson was born in Cedar County in 1846. She and Mr. Jackson have four children: Oscar C, Samuel E., Mar­garet R., and Walter T. In 1864 Mr. Jackson bought 370 acres of land twelve miles west of Stockton, but in 1881 located on the farm of 360 acres where he now lives, where he is quite extensively engaged in stock dealing. He is a Democrat in poli­tics, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

KERR, THEO Theo. L. Kerr, editor and proprietor of the Jerico Springs Optic, was born in Newark, N. J., in 1854, and is the youngest of four children born to Joseph and Jane (Hopkins) Kerr, both of whom were born in Sussex County, N. J., the former in 1819, and the latter about 1825. They are now residing in Newark, and are hale and hearty old people. The father is a printer by trade, and as early as 1850 published the Temperance Advocate in Newark, and is now the proprietor of a job printing office in that city. Here it was that the immediate subject of this sketch, Theo. L. Kerr, received his education, and in his youth learned the printer's trade of his father, afterward working in different offices. In 1877 he went to Stafford, Kan., and for a short time edited the Stafford Citizen. He then gave up this work, and went to Arkansas, but, after tilling the soil for a short time near Little Rock, he was employed on the Little Rock Gazette, and at the end of six months came to Jerico Springs, and March 30, 1888, the first copy of the Jerico Springs Optic was issued. The paper is published in the interest of the Democratic Party, is bright and newsy, and some useful information can always be gleaned from its columns. In 1876 he was married to Miss Hannah Myers, who was born in Bradford County, Penn., in 1856, and is a daughter of Jacob and Hilah Myers. He and wife are the parents of four children. He is a member of the Typo­graphical Union, and his wife belongs to the Christian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LEEDY, SIMON B. Simon B. Leedy has resided in Cedar County, Mo., since 1878, and has a fertile farm of 160 acres nine miles west of Jerico. His native State is Ohio, and he was born in Knox County of that State, December 14, 1838, being the eldest of twelve children of Samuel A. and Elizabeth (Bostater) Leedy, and the grandson of Abraham and Elizabeth (Zook) Leedy, the latter couple being Pennsylvanians, who died in Ohio, whither they had moved in 1829. The Leedys are of Swiss descent. Samuel Leedy and wife were born in Bedford County, Penn., and Washington County, Md., May 19, 1816, and August 26, 1815, respectively, and the former was a farmer and Brethren minister, but is now retired from the active duties of life, and is residing with his son, Simon B. His wife died in February, 1887, in Cedar County, Mo., whither they had come in 1882. Simon B. Leedy resided with his parents until his marriage to Miss Elizabeth Martin, which event took place in 1865. She was born in the "Buckeye State" in 1835, and is the mother of five living children: Ira C, Orpheus A., Elda M., Aquilla G. and Lucian G. Samuel is deceased. In 1878 Mr. Leedy removed to Cedar County, Mo., where he has since made his home. He has 100 acres of land under cultivation, and forty acres of timber land. Stephen A. Douglas received his first vote for the presidency, and he is now a Democrat politically. Mr. Leedy is a Brethren minister, and all the family are church members. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LEGG, JAMES WILLIAM James William Legg, sheriff of Cedar County, and proprietor of the Tennessee Hotel at Stockton, Mo., was born in Cole County, of the same State, August 13, 1855, and is a son of Samuel Harrison and Elizabeth (Merritt) Legg, who were born in Tennessee and Virginia, respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1831. He came with his father, Henry Legg, who was also from Tennessee, to Cole County, Mo., and was there married, in 1866 moving thence to Morgan County, and ten years later to Barton County, and in the spring of 1889 to Vernon County, where he is at present residing. His wife died in 1874, having borne a family of nine children, eight of whom are still living: James W.; Sarah E., wife of Rev. Dejarnot, of Sheldon, Vernon County, Mo.; Ellen, wife of Leo Rouselbaugh, of Morgan County; Emma, John H., Edward F., Margaret and Alice. James William was reared on his father's farm, and resided under the shelter of the paternal roof until twenty one years of age, and on the 20th of February, 1876, was married to Miss Martha Jane Buzan, a daughter of Payton Buzan. She was born in Cam­den County, Mo., in 1855, and she and Mr. Legg are the par­ents of five children: Charles S., Gracie, Laura B., Blanche E. and Evert. After his marriage Mr. Legg began depending on his own resources for obtaining a livelihood, and in 1882 came to Cedar County and began merchandising at Jerico, and in November, 1888, was elected to the office of county sheriff by a majority of fifty five votes. He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Tilden in 1876. He is a member of Bear Creek Lodge No. 447, I. O. O. F., at Jerico, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LIGHT, SAMUEL D. Samuel D. Light, another substantial farmer and stockraiser of Box Township, Cedar County, Mo., and the son of Henry and Nancy (Dinwiddie) Light, was born in Floyd County, Va., in 1820. His parents were natives of New York and Mary­land, respectively, were married in Virginia, and there spent the rest of their lives, he dying in 1823, and she in 1856. Mr. Light was a farmer by calling, and was of German descent. Samuel D. Light, the ninth of seven sons and three daughters, received a very limited education, and remained with his mother until grown. He was married in 1843 to Miss Margaret Smith, daughter of John and Nancy Smith, all natives of Virginia. To Mr. and Mrs. Light were born eight sons and three daughters: the eldest son Ferdinand, died August 30, 1878, in Cedar County, Mo.; Henry J., of California; McIlvaine, of Cedar County, Mo.; Angelina, wife of William D. Richardson, of Texas; Nancy E., wife of S. W. Beck, of Cedar County, Mo.; Nathaniel G., of Cedar County, Mo.; Lydia M., wife of Joseph E. Davidson, died June 29, 1882, in Cedar County, Mo.; James S., of Texas; Samuel W., of Vernon County, Mo.; Ellis H., and William U., at home. In 1857 Mr. Light moved to St. Clair County, Mo., resided there until 1862, then came to Hickory County, where he remained until 1866, and then moved to Cedar County. Here he settled on his present farm, which was then small, but which has been increased to 280 acres. This farm he has carefully improved, and here he has engaged in stock raising in connection with his farming interest. He is a Democrat in politics, his first presiden­tial vote being for J. K. Polk, in 1844, and he was elected to the office of court and deputy sheriff in Virginia by that party. He and wife have been members of the Baptist Church since 1872. Mr. Light's grandfather, Lazarus Light, was born in New York, and died in Virginia. He was for many years a successful phy­sician. The maternal grandfather, James Dinwiddie, was prob­ably born in Virginia, and is supposed to be of the same family as Gov. Dinwiddie of colonial days. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LINDLEY, JACOB Rev. Jacob Lindley, a highly esteemed resident of Cedar County, Mo., is a native of Christian County, Ky., and was born in 1814. His parents, Jahu and Parthenia (Gibson) Lindley, were born in North Carolina, in 1782, and died in Christian County, Ky., and Cedar County, Mo., in 1847 and 1824, respect­ively. In 1832 the father came to the State of Missouri, and located in Cedar County (Jacob afterward being engaged in merchandising at Orleans). Two of his four children are now living: Jacob, and Sallie, the wife of James Taylor. The former grew to manhood on his father's farm, obtaining his schooling by working Saturday and at night for his board, and in the fall of 1831 came to Missouri with his Uncle, Jacob Lindley, and located in what is now Miller County, near Osage. Here Mr. Lindley taught his first term of school, which lasted three months, and was on the subscription plan, the tuition of each pupil being $2. About this time he embraced Christianity, and did some preaching that winter. During the summer of 1832 he farmed near Edwardsville, ILL., but returned to his birthplace in the spring of 1833, returning, in the fall of the next year, to his uncle's, in Missouri, where he resumed teaching and preaching. In 1836 he went to Polk County, where he taught school, and in 1855 he moved to Cane Hill, where he lived for ten years, and in 1865 located where he now lives, and has been engaged in farming and preaching, being an expounder of the Christian doctrine. He taught the first term of school ever taught on Horse Creek, and the second ever taught in Polk County. He has been preaching the gospel for the past fifty seven years, and is the oldest minister living in Cedar County. In 1840 he espoused Miss Matilda Hembree, a daughter of James Hembree. She was born in Warren County, Tenn., and died in 1841. Four years later he married Miss Jane Roundtree, who was also born in Tennessee, and died in 1864, leaving three children: Bettie, wife of Rev. D. M. Cotton; Alice, wife of Jackson Hacker; and Sarah. Mrs. Hester Ann (Campbell) Dudley, a daughter of Robert M. and Elizabeth (Smith) Campbell, who were Kentuckians, became his wife in 1865. Mrs. Lindley was born in Columbus, Adair County, Ky., in April, 1822, and first married, in 1835, Christopher Corbin, who was born in Hopkins County, Ky., in 1811, and died in 1843, and by whom she became the mother of four living children: George R., county treasurer of Cedar County; James M., master mechanic, designer and builder, of Nevada, Mo.; Mary, widow of Jackson Cluch; and Catherine, wife of David Roundtree. In 1849 Mrs. Corbin married Dr. James Dudley, who was born in Adair County, Ky., in 1807. They came to Stockton, Mo., in 1855, where he practiced medicine until his death, February 17, 1863. Her union with Dr. Dudley was blessed by one child, John, who is the popular and courteous clerk of the Tennessee Hotel, which house his father built. Dr. Dudley was a skillful physician and surgeon. His widow married Rev. Lindley, as above stated. The latter is a Republican in politics, and cast his first vote for Harrison for the presidency in 1840. Mrs. Lindley and her children belong to the Christian Church, of which she has been a member for the past forty six years, also being a member of the Eastern Star Lodge. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LINDLEY, DAVID J. David J. Lindley, M. D., a well known practicing physician and surgeon of Cedar County, Mo., makes a specialty of chronic diseases, in the treatment of which he has won an enviable repu­tation. His birth occurred in Christian County, Ky., on the 20th of February, 1831, being the third of six children born to the marriage of Jonathan Lindley and Margaret Armstrong, who were also born in Christian County, the former in 1806, and the latter in 1807. Jonathan Lindley was of English descent, a farmer by occupation, and emigrated to Webster County, Mo., where he died in 1884, at the age of seventy eight years. His father, Jahu Lindley, who was born in England and emigrated to Ken­tucky at an early day, died in that State, also at the age of seventy eight years. David J. Lindley remained with his parents until his mother died, and received the advantages of public and private schools in Kentucky. In 1855 he began the study of medicine under D. J. and J. G. Gishat Hopkinsville, Ky., and, after devot­ing his attention to that science for two years, he began practic­ing in the town, continuing until 1859, when he located in Cedar County, Mo. When the war broke out he was appointed post surgeon and examining physician of Cedar County, and moved to Stockton, the county seat. At the end of three years he moved to Madison County, ILL., and, after practicing medicine there for three years, he located in Lamar, Barton County, Mo., and purchased a hotel, which he managed in connection with his practice until his removal to Papinsville, Bates County, Mo., three years later. After conducting a drug store in this place for about eight years he moved back to Barton County, being engaged in farming and stock raising up to September 1885. Since that time he has resided in Jerico Springs occupied in the practice of his profession. He was married in 1857 to Miss Serena H. Steward, who was born in Trigg County, Ky., in 1838, being a daughter of Wilson and Lucinda Steward. They have a family of four children. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LISTON, ELISHA Elisha Liston, nurseryman and fruit-grower, established his business in 1869, and has nearly eighty acres in standard orchard, largely young trees, and a full and complete stock of home grown nursery trees. He also makes a specialty of raising bees and honey. He has the most extensive nursery in the county, and raises 1,000 to 2,500 bushels of apples per annum. He is also engaged in farming. Mr. Liston was born in Preston County, W. Va., in October, 1835, and is the son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Smith) Liston, natives of Preston County, W. Va., where they have spent all their lives. Mr. Liston died eighteen or nineteen years ago, but Mrs. Liston is still living. He was a farmer by occupation, and was captain of the militia in the days of muster. His father, John Liston, was a native of Delaware, and an early settler of Virginia. John Smith, the maternal grandfather of Elisha Liston, spent the latter part of his life in Indiana. Elisha Liston is the eldest of three sons and six daughters. He was educated in the common subscription schools, worked on the farm, and, in 1858, was united in marriage to Miss Martha Matheny, a native of Preston County, W. Va., and the daughter of Isaiah Matheny. She died in 1875, leaving five children: Dr. E. B.; Thankful Lurretta, wife of Rev. J. M. Galbraith, a Methodist minister; Prof. George M., a graduate of Warrensburg Normal School, and school commissioner and teacher of Cedar County; Emma A., and E. Herman. Mr. Liston's second marriage was in 1878, to Miss Nettie Fittsjarrell, daughter of Levi Fittsjarrell, of Illinois. Her parents came to Cedar County, Mo., in 1874, and here her father now resides. The mother died in Illinois. Mr. Liston was a lieutenant in the militia in 1859 and i860, and served about fifteen months in the Union Army, Company A, Seventh West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, as corporal, enlisting in 1861, but was dis­charged on account of disability. In 1856 and 1857 he was with his uncle in the mercantile business in Indiana, and followed it by himself from 1864 until 1869, when he came to Cedar County to engage in fruit growing and stock raising, but, not being able to obtain the kind of trees he desired, he at once began to grow his own, and has been in the nursery business ever since, meeting with considerable success. He is one of the most active educa­tional workers in the county, and has spared no pains to give his children good education. He is a Democrat in politics, having affiliated with that party almost all his life, and his first presiden­tial vote was for Douglas, in i860. He has been an active Pro­hibitionist for some years. He and Mrs. Liston and three children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They are temperance and Sunday school workers. He has been an active officer in the church since his membership. He has real estate of 240 acres near Virgil City, with about 125 acres under cultivation, all the result of hard labor and good management. He was postmaster at Willow Branch Post Office, Hancock County, Ind., for five years, from 1864 to 1869. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LOY Thomas T. and Milton B. Loy, attorneys at law of Stockton, Mo., are natives of Cedar County, Mo., born in 1854 and 1859, respectively, and are the sons of Thomas and Sarah (Turner) Loy. In the latter part of the eighteenth century, Thomas Loy, the grandfather of our subjects, came from England and settled in the State of North Carolina, and about 1815 or 1820 removed to Adair County, Ky., bringing with him his son Thomas, who was born in North Carolina in 1811. The latter was married in that State in 1832, and in 1848 or 1849 came to Cedar County, Mo., and in the latter year started out for the gold fields of California, but was taken sick with cholera and taken to Independ­ence, Mo., where he was cared for until his recovery. He then returned to his family in Cedar County, and bought 200 acres of land, on which he settled and passed the remainder of his life, dying in July, 1884. His wife was born in Virginia in 1815, and is yet living, being the mother of six children: Louisa, wife of T. N. Hill; Mary E., wife of J. E. Hartley, president of the Stock­ton Exchange Bank; Jennie, wife of Nathaniel Jones; Georgia Ann, wife of W. D. Love; Thomas T., and Milton B. The last two named received their rudimentary education in the common schools, and were reared to manhood on their father's farm. At the age of twenty two years Thomas T. began teaching school, which occupation he followed four terms, and then entered the law department of the State University at Columbia, Mo., from which institution he graduated in 1880. He then formed a partnership with R. F. Buler, of Carthage, with whom he has since remained associated, Mr. Buler having charge of the practice at Carthage, and he at Stockton. December 12, 1880, he was married to Miss Emma Wells, who was born in Cedar County, Mo., in 1861. They have two children: Carroll G. and Alice E., Milton B. Loy commenced teaching school at the age of eighteen years, and in 1879 began attending the Commercial Business College of Keokuk, Iowa, and in the winter of 1879 and 1880 attended the Literary Department of the State Uni­versity. In the latter year he became a disciple of Blackstone in the office of Judge D. P. Stratton, of Nevada, and was admitted to the bar the same year, but, upon the organization of the Stockton Exchange Bank, he was elected cashier, and filled the position very ably for five years. Since October, 1887, he and his brother Thomas T. have been law partners, and are enterprising and successful members of the legal fraternity. They are well posted, social, courteous, and have many warm personal friends. They are Democrats, and members of the Masonic Order, Stockton Lodge No. 283, Royal Arch Chapter No. 70, and Constantine Commandery No. 27, at Greenfield. They also belong to the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 103. May 9, 1880, Milton B. was married to Miss Lurah D., a daugh­ter of J. E. Hartley. She was born in Missouri, in February, 1864, and she and Mr. Loy have one son, Walter M. His wife, as well as his brother's wife, are members of the Christian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

LYON, WILLIAM William J. Lyon, a farmer residing about ten miles east of Stockton, Mo., was born in Smith County, Va., on the 24th of July, 1824, being the only surviving member of a family of six children. At the age of thirty years he left the home of his birth, and came to Cedar County, Mo., where he has ever since made his home, being the owner of 176 acres of land, and is considered one of the successful farmers of the county. He is a member of the Masonic order, and in his political views is a Democrat, being elected by that party to the office of public ad­ministrator, and served two years. In 1847 he married Louisa Whitehead, who was born in Virginia in 1824, and died May 28, 1851, leaving one child: Robert Newton. Her parents were Aaron and Martha Whitehead. In 1853 Mr. Lyon married Mrs. Sarah A. (Cowan) Lightner, who was born in Tennessee in 1825. She was a daughter of William and Nancy Cowan, and died Jan­uary 30, 1866, having borne two children: Nancy A., wife of John A. King; and Mary F., wife of P. R. Holbert. Mr. Lyon married his third wife October 27, 1867. Her maiden name was Martha J. King, a daughter of Thomas and Ava King, and the widow of Mr. Kizer. Her death occurred on the 6th of Novem­ber, 1885, she having become the mother of two children: James I. and David K. Mr. Lyon is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His parents, Jacob and Mary (Snodgrass) Lyon, and his grandparents, Umberson and Ann (Long) Lyon, were all Virginians, the former couple being born in 1779 and 1799, respectively. Their father was a farmer, and died in 1867, his wife dying in 1850. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

McFARLAND, THOMAS Thomas J. McFarland, farmer and stock dealer, of Box Town­ship, Cedar County, Mo., was born in Benton County, Mo., in 1849, and is one of the wide awake, thorough going citizens of that township. He is the son of James and Letitia (Nave) Mc­Farland, and the grandson of Rev. Alexander McFarland, who was born in Kentucky, but who came to Boonville, Mo., at a very early day, and there remained for many years. He then moved to Cass County, where he died before the war. He was a successful minister in the Presbyterian Church, and followed this calling nearly all his life. He was of Scotch-Irish descent. The maternal grandfather, Hardin Nave, who died when Mrs. McFar­land was quite young, was an early settler of Missouri. James McFarland was born in Cooper County, Mo., in 1822, and his wife was probably born in Tennessee, but came to Morgan County, Mo., with her parents when quite young. They were married in Benton County in about 1848, lived there for some seven years, and then removed to Cass County, in 1863 to Henry County, and, in 1865, came to Cedar County, where Mrs. McFarland died in 1876. Two years later Mr. McFarland followed her to the grave. Both were mem­bers of the Methodist Church for many years, and he was a farmer by occupation. Thomas J. McFarland, the eldest of four sons and four daughters, assisted his father in the arduous duties on the farm, and received a limited education. At the age of fourteen years, Thomas J. McFarland was obliged to sup­port the family, owing to the fact that his father was par­alyzed, and he took care of the family until his majority. He removed with his parents to Cedar County, and was married, in 1874, to Miss Mollie Pruet, a native of Knox County, Mo., and the daughter of John C. and Elizabeth Pruet. Mr. and Mrs. McFarland are the parents of four children, three sons and one daughter. Mr. McFarland rented land for two years, after which he purchased his present farm, which consists of 235 acres. He is one of the leading farmers in the county. He was elected sheriff of Cedar County, Mo., in 1882, was reelected in 1884, and served four years with credit and satisfaction. He is a Dem­ocrat in politics, voting for S. J. Tilden in 1876; is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Clintonville Lodge, No. 482, at El Dorado, and of the Chapter of Stockton; has held all elective offices, and is at present master. He is also a member of the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and the Farmers' Alliance. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mrs. McFarland's father was born in St. Louis County, Mo., in 1831, was married there in 1851, and in 1852 removed to Knox County, where he served in Company I, First Missouri Cavalry, Second Division, Confederate Army, as a courier two years. In 1865 he came to Cedar County, Mo., and is one of the prominent farmers of Box Township. His father, John Pruet, was also a native of St. Louis County, born in 1808, and died in Scotland County in 1874 or 1875, where he had lived since 1849. His father, Samuel Pruet, was a Frenchman, and one of the first set­tlers of St. Louis, where he died. He was a soldier in the Rev­olutionary War. Mrs. McFarland's mother was born in England, and came, with her parents, to St. Louis when about five years of age. Her parents, William and Joanna Atherly, were natives of Devonshire, England. Mr. Atherly died in St. Louis in 1849, of cholera, and Mrs. Atherly died in Cedar County in 1884. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MACE, CHRISTOPHER Christopher Hannibal Mace, a retired merchant of Stockton, Mo., was born in Scott County, Va., in 1835, and made his home with his parents, Stephen and Rebecca (Murry) Mace, until he was thirteen years of age, at which time he went to Floyd County, Ky., and, as a means of obtaining a livelihood, engaged in school teaching, continuing this occupation two years. In 1856 he came to Polk County, Mo., where he followed the same calling three terms, and in 1859 returned to Kentucky, and taught one more term. He then taught school in Fannin County, Texas, from i860 to 1863, then came north to Arkansas, with forty one men, and enlisted in Company K, Fourteenth Regi­ment, Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, U. S. A., and was in several fights and many skirmishes. He was discharged at Pine Bluff, Ark., and went to Illinois, but spent the winter of 1865-66 in Texas, coming in the summer of the latter year to Cedar County, Mo., where he again engaged in teaching. In 1868 he began merchandising in Stockton, and continued this occupation very successfully until 1884, and has since lived a quiet life, and looked after his real estate, which consists of about a section of land. In 1881 he took a pleasure trip to the Pacific coast, start­ing from home April 14, and reaching that State July 4, in com­pany with thirteen men. They journeyed slowly, and spent their time in hunting and fishing along the route. Mr. Mace was gone about six months, and spent a very enjoyable time. In 1870 he was married to Miss Martha J. Davis, a daughter of L. B. Davis. She was born in Cedar County, Mo., in 1849, and died in 1877, having borne two children: Cathleen and Claudius E. September 30, 1885, he married his present wife, Nancy Ward, who was born in Johnson County, Mo., in 1851. Mr. Mace is a staunch Republican in politics. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MARQUIS, ISAAC F, Dr. Isaac F. Marquis, whose success as a physician and sur­geon has made his name well known throughout Cedar and adjoining counties, was born in Darke County, Ohio, December 22, 1849, and is the son of George W. and Elizabeth (Miller) Marquis. George W. Marquis was born in Virginia, but when quite small went with his parents to Ohio, where he grew to manhood, and where he was twice married, his second wife being Miss Miller, mother to the subject of this sketch. In about 1858 George Marquis moved to Cedar County, Mo., where he is now living with his third wife. He is a successful tiller of the soil. His father, William Kidd Marquis, was a native of Vir­ginia, and of French extraction. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and an early settler of Ohio, where he died about thirty years ago. Dr. Marquis, the elder of two children, received a fair education in the common schools, and began for himself in 1868, as a farm hand in St. Clair County. In about 1872 he began practicing medicine, having studied with a cousin, Dr. A. C. Marquis. He practiced with success until 1884-85, and then attended the American Medical College at St. Louis, from which institution he graduated in the same year. He first com­menced practicing at Osceola, was then in Bates County, after that was five years at Roscoe, and since 1880 he has resided on his present farm near Cedar Springs, where he has 200 acres of good land. He settled on the farm with the intention of retiring from practice, but has found it impossible to do. He was mar­ried, in 1874, to Miss Marila Marquis, a native of Jay County, Ind., and the daughter of Dr. James and Mary Marquis, natives of Virginia. Her parents lived in Jay County, Ind., but came to Missouri soon after the war, and here the father practiced his profession successfully for some time. To Dr. Isaac F. Marquis and wife were born four children, one son and two daughters now living. The Doctor was a Republican in politics until 1876, since which time he has been a Greenbacker and Prohibitionist. His first presidential vote was cast for Gen. Grant, in 1872. He is a member of the Good Templars, and is also a member of the Farmers' Alliance. Mrs. Marquis is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church in good standing. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MARTIN, ISAAC J.  Isaac J. Martin may be classed among the many successful farmers of Cedar County, for he is the owner of 280 acres of fertile land about four and a half miles southeast of the county seat, of which 175 are under cultivation. He was born in Overton County, Tenn., April 21, 1852, and is the third of nine children, eight living, born to the marriage of Obadiah Martin and Anna Johnson, who were also from Tennessee, born in 1807 and 1821, respectively. The father was of Irish Welsh descent, a farmer by occupation, and for a number of years was justice of the peace and held the office of surveyor of Overton County, Tenn., in which State he died in 1873. His parents, Mynad and Betty Martin, also died in that State. The boyhood days of Isaac J. Martin were spent in tilling the soil and attending the common schools, and in 1878 he was married in Cedar County to Miss Lucretia Allen, a native of that county, and a daughter of Will­iam R. Allen, whose sketch appears in this volume. Mr. Martin cast his first vote for U. S. Grant for the presidency, but is now a member of the Union Labor party. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MITCHELL, MORRIS W. Morris W. Mitchell, a retired farmer of Jerico Springs, Mo., is a native of Blount County, Tenn., born July 1, 1821, his parents being Jesse Mitchell and Providence (Norwood). The father was born in Virginia, March 8,1796, and in early boyhood became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and afterward became an ordained minister in the Methodist Episco­pal Church, South, in Polk County, Mo., where he arrived June 11, 1836. He was among the early settlers of the county, and died in 1854, having charge of the Stockton circuit at the time of his death. His father, Morris Mitchell, was also a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and came to Polk County, Mo., in 1835, where he and wife spent their declining years. Providence (Norwood) Mitchell was born in Tennessee, in 1800, and died in Polk County, Mo., about 1884, having been a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for many years. Their union resulted in the birth of fourteen children, eight of whom are now living. Morris W. Mitchell is the second of the family, and, after residing with his parents until twenty seven years of age, in 1846 he enlisted in Company H, Willick's Battery, to serve in the Mexican War. After his return to Polk County, Mo., the 28th of September, 1848, he married Miss Mary Jane Lindley, who was born in Kentucky, July 5, 1831. Her parents, John and Mary Lindley, came to Missouri two years after her birth, and here the father was shot, in 1863, while sow­ing wheat. Mr. Mitchell and wife are the parents of four children: James L.; Mary E., wife of F. A. Brasher; W. F., and Laura L., wife of Dr. J. P. Brasher. In 1850 Mr. Mitchell started for the gold fields of California, with an ox-team, and reached his journey's end at the end of four months and ten days. After being engaged in mining in that State for two years, he returned to his family in Missouri, and here he has ever since made his home. He owns 600 acres of land near Jerico Springs, but since 1884 has given up farm work. He is an influ­ential citizen, well-to-do, and is a stockholder in the Jerico Bank. He is a Democrat in politics, and has held the following offices: County sheriff, ex-officio collector of the county, county assessor two years, and census taker one year. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since i860, and since ten years of age has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which his wife is also a member. During the Civil War he was captain of a company in the Confederate army for three years. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

 MITCHELL, JAMES L. James L. Mitchell, a prominent druggist of Stockton, Mo., was born in Cedar County, in which he now resides, in 1849, being a son of Morris W. Mitchell, whose sketch appears in this work. James L. received the rudiments of his education in the common schools of the county, and later entered the High School of Stockton, and then spent one year in the State Uni­versity at Columbia. From 1872 to 1873 he was engaged in clerking in a drug store in Stockton, and then went to Fannin County, Texas, and was occupied in teaching the young idea for one year, then returned to Missouri, and followed the same occu­pation for six months, after which he resumed clerking in a drug store. In 1876 he became a partner with C. H. Mace, and con­tinued for five years, the firm name being Mace & Mitchell, and then Mr. Mace sold his interest to R. A. Brown. In 1886 Mr. Mitchell became sole proprietor of the stock, and is the oldest druggist in Stockton. He is a Democrat, and has always taken a deep interest in politics, and has been a member and secretary of the Senatorial Democratic Committee for years. He is a member of Lodge No. 285, A. F. & A. M., and is a charter member of the K. of P. In 1876 he was married to Miss Jennie M. Church, a daughter of Jackson and Mary A. Church. She was born in Stockton, Mo., March 23, 1859, and she and Mr. Mitchell are the parents of two children :Clarence and Myrtle Jane. Mrs. Mitchell is a member of the Christian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MONTGOMERY ALEXANDER Alexander C. Montgomery. In giving a brief sketch of this successful farmer of Cedar County, Mo., it is but just to say that he has proved himself honest and industrious, and has won the good will and respect of all who know him. He was born on the 2d of May, 1837, in Roane County, Tenn., and is the third of thirteen children born to the union of William Montgomery and Elizabeth Mitchell, who were born in Tennessee in 1811 and 1813, and died in Cedar County, Mo., in June, 1887, and Jan­uary 11, 1888, respectively, to which county they had moved from their native State in 1841. Mr. Montgomery was one of five men who selected and donated the land for the present county seat. He served as sheriff of Cedar County for about four years, and as assessor two years. His father, John Montgomery, was a Virginian, and died in Tennessee. The maternal grandparents, James and Sarah Mitchell, were among the first settlers of Polk County. Alexander C. Montgomery attended the early subscrip­tion schools in his youth, and resided with his parents until he attained his majority. In 1859 he married Miss Julia Noffsinger, who was born in Botetourt County, Va., in 1835 (for parents' history see sketch of Judge N. S. Noffsinger), and by her be­came the father of seven children, four now living: Mary E., wife of Isaac Baton; Ella J., George T. and John William. In 1862 Mr. Montgomery enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry, U. S. A., and served until July 1, 1865, and was in a number of engagements. At the close of the war he returned to Cedar County, and took charge of a gristmill, in which he purchased an interest about the beginning of the war, and this he successfully managed until it was destroyed by fire in 1872. Since that time he has given his attention to agricul­tural pursuits, and owns over 400 acres of valuable land, besides owning an interest in the Montgomery & Brown ferryboat. He is a Democrat in politics, has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1868, and he and wife are members of the Meth­odist Episcopal Church, South. He has nine brothers, and seven besides himself are Free Masons, belonging to the Chapter. Five have been Master Masons, two High Priests, and four have taken the Knight Templar degree. Three of his brothers-in-law are also Masons. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MONTGOMERY, THOMAS R. Thomas R. Montgomery is the owner of a fine farm situated two miles west of Cane Hill, his acreage amounting to 580 acres, 350 of which are under good cultivation. He is the sixth of ten children, and was born in Cedar County, Mo., on the 22d of December, 1850, his parents being John W. and Elizabeth (Jackson) Montgomery, who were born in Roane County, Tenn., October 2, 1816, and September 13,1824, respectively. In 1840 Mr. Montgomery came to Cedar County, Mo., where he was engaged in farming and resided until his death, on the ninth of September, 1861. His widow is still living, and resides with her son, Thomas R. The latter spent his youth on the farm and in attending the common schools, and in 1874 was married to Miss Elvira Alder, who was born in Christian County, Ky., in 1852, by whom he has ten children, four living: Thomas Claude, Willie May, Mertie P. and Kyle J. Mr. Montgomery has always supported the measures of the Democratic party, and he and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mrs. Montgomery's parents, James and Sarah (Pyle) Alder, were born in Virginia and Kentucky in 1806 and 1815, and died in Kentucky, and Cedar County, Mo., in 1858 and 1884, respectively. George and Millie Alder were the grand­parents. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

MOORE, W. W W. W. Moore, attorney-at-law and notary public of Jerico Springs, is a native of Kentucky, born on the 5th of July, 1841, being the son of a successful Kentucky farmer, Michael Moore. The latter's birth occurred in Floyd County, Ky., April 3, 1815, and he died there on the 3d of April, 1888, being a son of Chris­topher Moore, who was born in Alleghany County, Penn., and died in Kentucky in i860, at a very advanced age. His wife was a Kentuckian, who died in 1859. Diana (Enex) Moore, the mother of our immediate subject, was born in Morgan County, Ky., March 3, 1815, and is yet living in her native State. W. W. Moore is the third of nine children, and until twenty four years of age resided under the paternal roof. On the 22nd of February, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Sophia McDonald, who was born in Fayette County, Ohio, June 14, 1846, a daughter of Stephen and Priscilla McDonald, who lived and died in the "Buck­eye State," and by her became the father of seven children, five of whom are living at the present time: Binaro O., Levi V., John C. B., Angelia D. and Thomas F. A. In 1883 Mr. Moore and family moved to Barton County, Tenn., where he resided three years, and then moved to Jerico Springs, where he is now living. He began the study of law in 1874, and Septem­ber 21, 1876, was admitted to the bar at Vanceburg, Ky., and practiced there in the criminal courts, being admitted to practice in the civil courts in November, 1881. Having received a good education in his boyhood, he became a successful teacher, which occupation he followed from 1869 to 1879, with the exception of the time spent in the army. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F, Second Regiment of Virginia Infantry, C. S. A., and served as lieutenant colonel all through the war, being a participant in many battles in Pennsylvania and Virginia, and being wounded five times. He held the office of justice of the peace while in Kentucky, and is holding the same office where he now is. He is a Democrat politically, and his first presidential vote was cast for George B. McClellan. He is a Mason, and is a consistent member of the Christian Church, his wife being a member of the Baptist Church. Nicholas Moore, the great grandfather, was born in Ireland, and previous to the Revolution came to the United States, and served in the Continental army for five years. He died about 1848, Nicholas County, Ky., being named in his honor. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

NANCE, WILLIAM E. William E. Nance, collector of Cedar County, Mo., was born in Trigg County, Ky., in 1849, his parents being Barton G. and Lavica S. (Harrison) Nance, who were born in Davidson County, Tenn., and Owen County, Ky., in 1822 and 1820, and died in Cedar County, Mo., May 15, 1888, and April 29, 1875, respect­ively. The father went to Trigg County, Ky., in 1844, was married there in 1847, and in 1851 came to Cedar County, Mo., and located four miles east of Stockton, where he reared the fol­lowing family: Sarah E., wife of J. F. Hopkins; William E.; Margaret M. C, wife of E, M. Morton; and John G., residing on the old homestead. The maternal grandparents, Jeremiah and Sallie (Hearn) Harrison, were natives of Henry County, Va., and Woodford County, Ky. William E. Nance was only two years old when his parents came to Cedar County, and here he grew to manhood on a farm, making his home with his parents until his thirty first year. In December, 1880, he married Miss Dora Hornbuckle, of Bates County, Mo., who was born in St. Clair County, Mo., in 1862, and by her has two children: Walter E. and Emmet W. In 1874 Mr. Nance engaged in school teaching, and for about ten years followed that occupation during the win­ter seasons, and farmed during the summer months. In Novem­ber, 1888, he was elected county collector by the Democratic party, by a majority of 59 votes. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

NOFFSINGER, NEWTON Judge Newton S. Noffsinger, one of Cedar County's leading farmers and stockraisers, is a native of Botetourt County, Va., born in 1844, a son of John and Elizabeth (Trout) Noffsinger, the former of whom was also born in Botetourt County, his birth occurring in 1803. He was married in Roanoke County (the mother's birthplace), November 5, 1822, and in 1856 moved with his family to Cedar County, Mo., where he died July 5, i860, having been a zealous member of the Lutheran Church from 1842. His wife also died here in 1870, having borne a family of eight children, four now living. Newton S. Noffsinger is the seventh of the family, and acquired a fair education in the common schools of Virginia and Missouri. In 1863 he enlisted in the Confederate army, and after serving two months was dis­abled and returned home, removing soon after to Northwest Missouri, where he resided until the close of the war, and then returned to Cedar County. In 1867 he married Miss Ann Dunnegan, who was born in Polk County, Mo., September 7, 1846, and to them was born a family of seven children, six now living: John F., Susan E., Lewis B. (deceased), Sarah E., Mat­thew N., William C. and Clyde. Mr. Noffsinger came with his parents to Cedar County, Mo., in 1856, and with the excep­tion of a few years has resided here ever since. He owns 890 acres of land, and gives considerable attention to the propaga­tion of good stock. In 1880 he was elected by the Democratic Party as county judge, and performed his duties very faithfully for two years, being an obliging and efficient officer. He is a Royal Arch Mason, belongs to Stockton Lodge No. 70, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Noffsinger's parents, Francis and Nancy Dunnegan, were born in North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, and both died in Cedar County, Mo. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

PAYNTER, CHARLES W. Judge Charles W. Paynter, merchant and farmer of Payntersville, Mo., is a native of Botetourt County, Va., where he was born on the 2d of October, 1842. His parents, Christian and Mary (Woods) Paynter, were born in the same county as himself, the former's birth occurring in April, 1798. He emi­grated to Cedar County, Mo., in 1857, and here died on the 13th of March, 1885. The mother also died in Cedar County, in 1860. Charles W. Paynter is the eleventh of fourteen children, and un­til 1862 remained with his parents, at that date enlisting in Com­pany D, Eighth Missouri State Militia, serving three years. He was in the fight at Jefferson City, and was taken prisoner at Sedalia in October, 1864. After the close of the war he returned to Cedar County, Mo., and in 1866 married Miss Margaret Jackson, who was a native of the county, born March 5, 1850, and died July 28, 1872, a daughter of Jefferson and Matilda Jackson. She became the mother of three children: John W., Elsie M., wife of Dr. S. Hopkins, and Mary E. October 30, 1873, he married Miss Martha J. Dunnegan, a native of Polk County, born in 1842, her parents, Frank and Nancy Dunnegan, being among the early settlers of that county. By his second marriage, Mr. Paynter became the father of three children: James L., Robert J., and Hiram N. In 1870 Mr. Paynter opened a general mer­chandise store at what is now Payntersville, and is doing a fairly good business. He is an energetic business man, and has a good share of this world's goods. In 1886 he was elected presiding judge of the county by the Republican party, and is now acting in that capacity, making an efficient officer. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the G. A. R. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

PETERS, EDWARD C. Edward C. Peters was born on the nth of August, 1833, in Botetourt County, Va., and is a son of Jacob and Barbara (Moomaw) Peters, the former born in the same house as his son July 4, 1810. He is yet living in his native county, and for about thirty years was a member of the county court. His wife was also born in Botetourt County October 7, 1805, and died in 1869. Abram Peters, the grandfather, was born near Hagerstown, Md., and in 1817, while engaged in clearing new land, was accidentally killed. His wife lived to be over 100 years of age. Edward C. Peters is the eldest of ten children, and made his home with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age, then began working on a farm by the month as overseer of a gang of slaves, continuing one year, and then started to seek his fortune in the far West. He came as far as Cedar County, MO where he purchased land, but at the end of two years, returned to Virginia and was married there to Miss Mary Henderson, who was born in Montgomery County, VA in 1835, being a daughter of William and Elizabeth Henderson. Their union resulted in the birth of six children, the following being alive; Mary Z., wife of Samuel B. Webb; William A.; Anna L.; and Nora V. In 1867, Mr. Peters returned to his home in Missouri and, by hard work and good management, has become the owner of 453 acres of land, which comprises some of the best land in the county. He owned the first steam engine ever brought to Cedar County and also the first steam sawmill. He belongs to the Masonic lodge of Stockton. He is a Democrat in politics and, during his residence in Cedar County, has been a clerk and treasurer of his school township three years, deputy sheriff two years, and served as county clerk four years, to which office he was elected in 1874. During the war, he served in the C.S.A. from March 1, 1862 to April 9, 1865 in Hardiway's Battery of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia. He and wife belong to the Old School Presbyterian Church. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]



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