CLAY COUNTY MISSOURI
OBITS



 Berry Garrett passed away on Tues at the residence of his son, Luther Garrett.  The deceased was a Kentuckian, having been born in Shelby Co., Apr 29, 1820.  Came to Clay Co. nearly half a century ago.  Resided there until the removal of L.P. Garrett to Richmond, some years ago.  Berry Garrett was married in KY to Miss Mary Smith.  Of this union 7 children, 2 of whom, L.P. Garrett of Richmond and Mrs. Holt, of Birmingham, survive.  His wife died during the cicil and he was never married again.  He was a soldier of the confederacy.  He was with Quantrell.  Leaving soldier live, he never returned to Clay County and was placed under bond by the federals to keep the peace.  Almost killed by some federal troops.
(Source: Richmond Democrat, Sept. 7, 1900, Missouri SGA Journal, Fall 1987. Transcribed by Kathy Haggerty)


 Mrs. Julia Blanche Gaw, wife of John J. Gaw, died Mon. at home of her sister, Mrs. A.S. Brown.  The dec’d had been in failing health some time.  The family moved to Bucklin, Mo., last spring.  A few weeks ago, seeing the end was approaching, Mrs. Gaw returned here, her old home, to be with her brothers and sisters.  Leaves a large family of children; 6 sons and one dau.  Albert and Lewis, who are married, Miss Mary, and four younger children.
(Source: Liberty Tribune, Oct. 12, 1900, Missouri SGA Journal, Fall 1987. Transcribed by Kathy Haggerty)


 Major John Grimes died at Knoxville, Ray Co., Aug 22, aged 81 years.  He was born in Campbell Co., Tenn.  Following taken from Richmond paper.  “Maj. Grimes, at the breaking out of the civil war, espoused to the cause of union and was made captain of Co. G. in the Mo. state militia.  Promoted to Major.  He was in command at the fight at Albany, Ray Co. in 1865, when the notorious bushwacker, Bill Anderson, was killed, and at the time of his death had in his possession the gold watch carried by Anderson when killed.  Maj. Crimes represented Ray Co in the lower house of Mo. in 1854, etc.  It is stated that he was captain of a company that fought the Indians in Florida in 1836 and as captain, he was present at Far west when the Mormons surrendered.
(Source: Richmond Democrat, Sept. 7, 1900, Missouri SGA Journal, Fall 1987. Transcribed by Kathy Haggerty)

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