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Clinton County, Missouri

Biographies
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JOHN M. BABER; farmer and stock raiser, section 18, post office Bainbridge, is among the old and favorably known farmers of this county. He is a native of Kentucky, born in Boonesboro April 16, 1816. There he received only a limited education, and was reared in the occupation which he now follows. In 1836 he emigrated to this state and settled in Clay County, where he remained two years, then moving to Platte County, where he lived for six years. He removed from there to Holt County, and after a residence of two years in 1850 he came to this county, where he has since continued to dwell. Mr. B. moved to his present farm in 1860, He has 120 acres of fine land, most of which is in cultivation. Upon his place is one of the finest mineral springs in this district, and with proper improvements will be one of the most popular summer resorts. It is located on an elevated plain, and the place as a sight for a town is unsurpassed. He is a breeder of light and heavy draught horses, and as such has attained no slight reputation. Mr. Baber was married February 15, 1839, to Miss Julia A. Aker, also a native of Kentucky. They have from this marriage ten children: Mary E., Isham M., John A., Eliza A., Willis, Susan A., Jacob, Randall A., James P. and Emma F. They are members of the Christian Church, and he has been at different times school director, constable and collector of his district.
(Source:  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

H. B. BAKER; farmer and stock raiser, section 36, post office Grayson, is a native of Bracken County, Kentucky, and was born July 28, 1830. He is the son of Mr. Isaac Baker, one of Hardin Township's oldest and most respected citizens. The subject of this sketch came to Missouri in 1847, and engaged in merchandising at Union Mills, where he continued one year, when he went to St. Joseph, and embarked in the pork packing business with his uncle. They were among the foremost in this branch in Northwest Missouri, and operated the first set of tanks. After a few years residence in St. Joseph, Mr. B. came to his present location, where he has since continued to be a resident with the exception of a few years spent in Nebraska. His estate consists of 240 acres of choice land, in a high state of cultivation. During his sojourn in Clinton County he has been recognized as a leader in all enterprises for the county's advancement. To him much credit is due for the live interest he has taken in securing the right of way for the Rock Island Road and the establishing of Grayson Station, in Hardin Township. He is a gentleman, thoroughly familiarized with the current events of the day, and a brilliant conversationalist. Mr. Baker was married, in 1855, to Miss Nancy Grayson, a daughter of George W. Grayson, one of the early settlers of Platte County. By this union they have had ten children: William H., George W. Melvina, Lizzie, John S., Ernst I. and Henry; lost three: Jessie, Clara and Joseph. Grayson Station, which was located on a portion of Mr. Baker's land, was named in honor of his wife. Mr. B. is a Master Mason, and a ruling elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

B. A. BALL; farmer and stock raiser, section 31, post office Stewartsville, is a native of Abbeyville District, South Carolina, and was born on the 6th day of September, 1842. He received a common school education, and at the age of fifteen years, with his parents, he moved to Greene County, Arkansas, and assisted his father on a farm until the spring of 1861. He then enlisted in Company E., Fifth Regiment, Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, and did guard duty until the following fall, when he was mustered into the Confederate service. He participated in the battles of Nashville, Tennessee, and Shiloh, and was wounded at the last named place. He was also at the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, and Kenesaw Mountain, and afterward returned to his home, in 1865. Mr. B. remained at home with his parents until he was married, on the 26th day of December 1866, to Miss Nancy F. Elwood, a native of Grayson County, Virginia. She was born on the 16th day of December, 1855, and, with her parents, moved to Arkansas. Mr. and Mrs. Ball came to this county in the fall of 1868, and for one year resided near Stewartsville. They then moved to DeKalb County, in 1869, and lived there until 1875, at that time returning to Clinton County. The subject of this sketch rented land, and, in 1877, made his first purchase of land, and is now the owner of 200 acres of well improved land, surrounded and subdivided by fine osage hedges. They have been blessed with a family of six children, all of whom are living: Mary C, Dora I., Lulu V., James E., Laura E., and Bennie.
(Source:  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

THOMAS G. BARTON; Thomas G. Barton, the fourth son of Dennis and Catherine Barton, was born in Listowel, Ireland, on the 2d day of December, 1843. His father emigrated to America, in 1848, and located in Bourbon County, Kentucky. He resided there till November, 1854, when he moved to La Salle County, Illinois. Thomas attended the public school at La Salle until the age of eighteen years, when he entered St. Vincent's College, at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where he remained three years. Upon leaving college, his intention was to go to Kansas and follow agricultural pursuits, but, visiting Clinton County, in the spring of 1868, he concluded to sojourn, for a time, with friends. He was finally persuaded to become a resident of the county, and, soon after his arrival, taught one of the public schools for a period of nine months. In 1870, he became a candidate for circuit clerk, which position he filled for four years in a creditable manner to himself, and with .great acceptance to the people. In October, 1874, he married Miss Clara A., daughter of David Ilolladay, of Weston, Platte County, Missouri. By this union they have had three children, two of whom, Maud Anna and Benjamin, arc now living, David Dennis dying when about eighteen months old. After his marriage, Mr. Barton turned his attention to speculating in real estate. In October, 1878, he opened a grocery store in Plattsburg, and continued in that business until April, 1880. In January, 1880, he began the publication of the Purifier, a weekly newspaper, at Plattsburg, with C. J. Nesbitt, withdrawing from the firm about August following. In May, 1881, he accepted a position as traveling salesman for James Walsh & Co., wholesale liquor dealers, at St. Joseph, Missouri. He is at this time (1881) still in their employ. Mr. Barton is a genial, liberal-hearted man, his unsuspecting and confiding nature sometimes causing him to lose sight of his own interest, in his desire to assist friends.
(Source:  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

JOHN BAXTER; farmer and stock raiser, section 26, post office Osborn. Among the worthy representatives of this county may be mentioned the subject of our sketch. He is a native of Manchester, England, and was born March 1, 1815. He was there raised, obtaining a fair education, mostly by self-application, and was brought up in the silk manufacturing business, at which he worked some thirty years. In the fall of 1867, he came to the United States, and landed in New York October 13; soon settled in Connecticut, where he commenced working in the silk manufactories, there remaining between seven and eight years. Mr. B. then emigrated west, and settled where he now resides in the fall of 1876, now owning a fine farm of eighty acres, improved. He takes quite an interest in educational matters, and, at present, holds the position of school director. He was married, August 30, 1846, in the Parish of Eccles, to Miss Mary Gartside, a native of the same place as himself. On the 22d of March, 1879, she died, leaving five children: Fannie, William G., John J., Annie and Robert E. The children are members of the Christian Church.
[Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; Publ. 1881 by O. P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

JAMES C. BERNARD, M. D.; was born in Franklin, Howard County, Missouri, October 7, 1821. He received a good common school education, and afterward attended the Georgetown College, of Kentucky. In 1840, having resolved upon the practice of medicine as a profession, he commenced its study with J. H. Ellison, M. D., an able physician in Kentucky, and after a thorough preparation and course in college,, he was graduated, in 1843-4, with honors. He commenced practicing in Howard County, Missouri, and then went to Clay County, locating near Liberty, when, after two years, or in 1848, he came to Hainesville. February 1, 1842, Dr. B. was married to Miss Susan F. Major, a daughter of Rev. John S. Major, a distinguished and well known Baptist clergyman. The doctor's father was raised in Richmond, Virginia, and came to Howard County, Missouri, in 1820. He was the first man in the state to start the manufacture of cordage, in old Franklin, where he manufactured it very largely. After being burned out, he erected a factory in Boonville, Cooper County. The doctor has been an active Royal Arch Mason since 1860. He has been a resident of Hainesville for thirty-three years, and, during this time, has had an extensive and successful practice. He is a man of good judgment, well read, and a gentleman in every sense of the term. In connection with his practice he has a drug store. Dr. B. was one of the leading business men when Hainesville was in her brightest days; but after the railroad passed by, its decline commenced, until he is now the most prominent business man in the place. He will live in the hearts and recollection of the people of Clinton County a long time after he is numbered with the dead.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

WILLIAM BOGART; farmer and stock raiser, section 17, post office Perrin, was born October 25, 1825, in Carter County, Tennessee, and was taken to Vermillion County, Indiana, when between four and five years of age. He was there raised and spent his boyhood days on a farm, receiving the benefits of a common school education, and has made agricultural pursuits his occupation through life. He removed west in 1868, and located where he now resides, commencing at once the improvement of a farm, and, by steady and energetic efforts, he has, under cultivation, 160 acres of land; also owns twenty acres of timber. Mr. B. was married October 5, 1845, to Miss Civilla Hood, a native of Vermillion County, Indiana, born March 23, 1825. They have had nine children, seven of whom are living: Isabella (now Mrs. W. Hale), William A., Marcus L., Talithia M., Fannie and Emma (twins), and Annie. Himself, wife, and eldest daughter, are active members of the M. E. Church South, of Perrin. Mr. B. stands among the old and well respected citizens of Clinton County.
[Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; Publ. 1881 by O. P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

JACOB BOHART; retired merchant, was born in Frederick County, Maryland, June 6, 1816, and in 1824, removed to Virginia, and afterwards to Kentucky, where he remained a short time. In 1837, he came to Buchanan County, Missouri, then attached to Clinton County, and located a claim near the head of Bee Creek; where he improved a farm. He married Miss Catharine Cogdill, daughter of Jacob Cogdill, August 26, 1838. Their family consisted of eight children: James M., Jacob C, Willard H., William A., Sarah, Emeline, Elizabeth and Christa Ann, and he has taken great pains in their education. He has been a large farmer, merchant and stock dealer, and was extensively engaged in hemp raising. In 1865, he sold his farm, and moved to Nebraska City, where he engaged in merchandising. He erected several large stores, and took a live interest in other enterprises of the city. In 1867, he sold out, and returned to Worth County, Missouri, and there he was engaged in farming and dealing in stock until 1875. In 1879, after closing up his large business, he moved to Lathrop, Clinton County, where he settled, purchasing a good home, and assisting his boys in their enterprises. He built a fine brick store building, one of the first erected. Mrs. Bohart died November 15, 1876, in Worth County, Missouri. She was a woman of strong mind and great will power, and did much to aid her husband in accumulating his fine property. In June, 1881, Mr. B. was again married to Mrs. Sally Laughlin, daughter of Edward Lindsay, of Clinton County, Missouri.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

JAMES M. BOHART; banker, was born in Buchanan County, Missouri, in 1841. He was raised on a farm and received a good education in the schools of Andrew County, and for several years was engaged in teaching. When the war broke out, he entered the Confederate service, and commanded a company. He was with Price, Bragg and Johnson for four years, participating in the battles, and sharing all the hardships and deprivations incident to a soldier's life. In 1866, he engaged in the hardware business in Clay County, and continued in it for some years, with satisfactory success. In 1875, he was elected to the State Legislature, and made a diligent and worthy representative, securing a high reputation for his fidelity to his constituents, for his liberality, and for the courtesy extended to all who approached him. In 1879, he became a resident of Lathrop, and engaged in the banking business with his brother, W. H. The firm has also a bank at Kingston, Caldwell County. As a business man, prompt and energetic, upright in all his dealings, he has secured the esteem of all with whom he has had to do. As a citizen, he has taken an active interest in whatever promises to be of permanent benefit to the city, and in educational matters, he has been prompt to act, and efficient to work. He has been twice married; first, to Miss Maggie E. Elliott, of Woodford County, Kentucky. She died in 1870, leaving one daughter, Sallie A. He married for his second wife, Miss Ada Field, in 1871. Their family by this union is composed of four children: Jacob Field, Nellie, Shannon Clay and Susie. Mrs. Bohart is a daughter of Jacob Field, Esq., of Liberty, Clay County, and is a lady whose graces of mind and person have endeared her to all who enjoy her acquaintance. She was educated at the female seminary of her native place, and at the St. Theresa Seminary, Kansas City.
(Source:  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

WILLARD H. BOHART; of the banking firm of W. H. & Jas. M. Bohart, of this city, was born in Buchanan County, Mo., May 6, 1850. He was raised a farmer until fifteen years old, receiving his primary education in a common school. He afterward attended the William Jewell College for three years, after which he was engaged in teaching eleven years at the Clay Female Seminary at Liberty, the Female Orphan School at Camden Point and other places, where he gained an enviable reputation as a successful instructor. Forming a preference for a business life, in August, 1879, he formed a partnership with his brother James in the banking business in Lathrop, and at the same time started a similar institution at Kingston, Missouri. The firm have the entire confidence of the community as correct, honest and straightforward business men. He married Miss Margaret E. Pixler, eldest daughter of Major P. E. Pixler, of Clay County, in October 1869. They have two children, James Edwin and Birdie Pixler. Mr. Bohart is an active member of the Christian Church, and takes a deep interest in the educational matters of the city.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

JACOB N. BRAWNER; was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, August 29, 1813, and came to Missouri in 1831, settling in Clay County, where he remained eight years. In 1840, he came to this county and bought from Mr. Ledgwood 260 acres of land, which he improved and there made a fine home. Upon selling out he bought 260 acres in section 24, where the family now lives, and which they have occupied for twenty-three years. Here the judge improved the farm, building a fine residence, and enjoyed it until his death, which occurred May 2, 1877, he being 64 years of age. He was a thorough farmer, and was interested in improved stock. He was also an active politician, feeling it his duty as well as pleasure to aid the Democratic Party. He was elected county judge, and served so faithfully that he was several times re-elected, and served altogether eight years. He was emphatically a man of the people, never deceiving or disappointing them, but in the discharge of his duties he reflected honor and credit upon his county, as well as upon himself. He was a zealous member of the Christian Church, and did much towards building it up, contributing liberally to its treasury. Judge B. married Miss Eliza Jane Miller, of Clay County, Missouri, in September, 1840. Her parents were from Kentucky. They had as a result of this union twelve children: Susan E. B., Sarah M., Frances C, Clara J., Thomas M., David Oliver, John Henry, Clifton M., Nannie M., Bird Smith, George Neet and Rosalie. Clifton M. lives with his mother and works the farm. Three unmarried daughters, Clara J., Nannie M. and Rosalie, also live at home. Mrs. B. is very energetic in taking care of the estate, in which she has been successful.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

Clarence A. Brakeman. Noteworthy among those who have been active and enterprising journalists of Clinton County is C. A. Brakeman, who was editor and proprietor of the Gower Enterprise at Gower. A son of John W. Brakeman, he was born February 10, 1865, in Franklin County, Kentucky, of old Knickerbocker stock.
John W. Brakeman, whose paternal ancestors came from Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, to America, was the son of a Methodist Episcopal minister, his father having been a pioneer circuit rider in Michigan some eighty years ago. He married Esther L. Quackenbush, a native of Michigan.
C. A. Brakeman acquired his rudimentary education in the public schools, later attending the Michigan Baptist College, in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He subsequently entered the field of journalism, and was connected in different capacities with various papers, including the Detroit Free Press, The Humorist, published by the Lime Kiln Club, and the Toledo Blade, in Toledo, Ohio.
Endowed by nature with undoubted musical talent and ability, Mr. Brakeman cultivated his voice when young, becoming a singer of note, and for a number of years was a member of the celebrated Boston Quartette, which gave entertainments in all parts of the United States. He was afterwards for three years connected with the Wilbur Opera Company as a tenor singer, and became quite popular with the music-loving public. Locating in Amity, Colorado, in 1905, the Colonel became editor and publisher of the Amity Optimist, which was published in the interests of the Salvation Army settlement of that place. In 1908 he bought from B. F. Hildebraudt the Gower Enterprise, which, under his wise and able ministration, became a bright, wide-awake sheet, full of news and interest, with a large and constantly increasing circulation. But he recently sold that publication.
Mr. Brakeman married, in Iola, Kansas, Miss Myrtle McCarty, who was educated in a convent at Wichita, Kansas. Mrs. Brakeman is a talented musician, as a singer having a voice of rare excellence and quality, and in" filling her engagements with opera troupes she has traveled extensively, visiting many of the larger cities of our country.
[A History of Northwest Missouri, Volume 2; edited by Walter Williams; Publ. 1918; Donated and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

A. BRECKENRIDGE; farmer and raiser of blooded stock, section 10, post office Edgerton. The subject of this sketch, is a native of Bourbon County Kentucky, and was born December 25, 1829. He was there raised and educated, and followed the occupation of cattle dealing, being one of the few men who drove herds of cattle through to New York and the east at an early day. He emigrated to this state and settled near the edge of this county, in Clay, in 1852, and after a long residence in that county he moved across the line into Clinton County, locating on his present place, where he has since resided. He has been closely identified with the farming and blooded stock raising interests of Northwestern Missouri, and has done much toward the advancement of the same. He has at present fifty head of short horns upon his place, which will compare favorably with any in the county. Mr. B. has 321 acres of excellent land, all of which is either in pasture or under cultivation. He has a good residence and barn, which are in fine locations. He has served as justice of the peace for a term of four years, and while in that capacity never had a case appealed. He has been also closely connected with the interests of the 'Female Orphan School of the Christian Church of Missouri since its incorporation, and has been local director of that institution for a number of years. He is president of the Protective Association of his district, also treasurer of the Masonic Lodge of Edgerton and clerk of this school district. Mr. Breckenridge has been twice married—first to Miss Nancy M. Winn, February 1, 1853. From this union there were two boys, both of whom died while young. Mrs. B.'s death occurred in 1856. His second marriage was to Miss Mary Scott, also a native of Kentucky. They are members of the Christian Church, and contribute liberally toward its support.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

Judge Adam A. Breckinridge. Prominent among the highly esteemed and valued citizens of Plattsburg is Judge Adam A. Breckinridge, an ex-judge of Clinton County, and one of the most extensive and successful farmers and stockmen of this part of Missouri. Coming from a family that stands among the first in honorable distinction in the annals of Kentucky, he was born March 18, 1837, in Bourbon County, Kentucky, a son of John Breckinridge, and grandson of Alexander Breckinridge. His great grandfather, George Breckinridge, son of the immigrant, was born in Virginia, where his parents settled when coming to America from England, their native country. He served as a brave soldier in the Revolutionary war. Alexander Breckinridge migrated from Virginia to Kentucky when a young man, and for upwards of a century and more the Breckinridge’s have been active in national affairs, serving their country in times of peace and war, filling the positions of senators, congressmen and diplomats, and as colonels or generals in the United States army.
Born in Kentucky in 1785, John Breckinridge was there a resident until his death, in 1854. He married Ann Brooks, a granddaughter of General Strobe, who served in the Revolutionary war, and of their nine children three sons settled in Clinton County, Missouri, namely: Alexander, Abijah and Allen A. Alexander died in Edgeton, Platte County, leaving a widow, who has since died. Abijah died in 1903, leaving two sons. The mother survived her husband many years, passing away at the venerable age of ninety years.
Brought up on the home plantation in old Kentucky, Adam A. Breckinridge obtained his education in the rural schools. During the war between the states he served as a soldier in the Confederate army, under command of his cousin, Col. W. C. P. Breckinridge, in the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry. Being captured by the enemy during one of the engagements in which he participated, he was first confined in the federal prison at Louisville, Kentucky, later being taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, and later to Fort Delaware, Ohio, where he remained until exchanged. Coming to Clinton County, Missouri, in 1874, Mr. Breckinridge was for seven years engaged in farming on rented land. Succeeding in all of his undertakings, he has since become one of the large landholders of this section of the state, he and his sons having title to 2,300 acres of valuable land, which they largely devote to stock raising. Mr. Breckinridge has ever taken an intelligent interest in local affairs, and for four 'years served as judge of Clinton County. He has accumulated a fair share of this world's goods, in addition to his landed property owning one-third of the Laclede Hotel, which cost $22,500.
Judge Adam A. Breckinridge married, October 6, 1856, Rebecca D. Wilmot, who was born in Kentucky, a daughter of John F. Wilmot, whose father served as an officer in the Revolutionary army for seven years, being colonel of a regiment of brave soldiers. Mrs. Breckinridge died January 22,1910, aged seventy-three years, after fifty years of happy married life. She was a woman of estimable character, much loved by all who knew her for her many virtues of heart and mind. The Judge and Mrs. Breckinridge were the parents of three children, namely: John C., W. Wilmot and Jefferson D. All of these sons are married and have families of their own, the judge being the proud possessor of six grandsons and five granddaughters.
[A History of Northwest Missouri, Volume 2; edited by Walter Williams; Publ. 1918; Donated and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

JOSEPH H. BREEDEN; (deceased) was a native of Tennessee, and was born in the month of May, 1820. He was reared to manhood in his native state, and about 1842 he came to Daviess County, Missouri, where he remained till the fall of 1858, and then moved to Texas, with the intention of making that his home. He and his family not being satisfied with the country, the spring following found him a citizen of Clinton County, Missouri. He located on the farm in section 32 now occupied by his widow. While in his native state he learned the cabinet trade, which he followed for a number of years after settling in Daviess County, Missouri. In April, 1845, Mr. B. was married to Miss Elizabeth J. McCulley. After his marriage he followed farming till the time of his demise, which occurred May 18, 1866. He left a farm of 100 acres to his family, which consisted of nine children, eight of whom are now living: John T., Mary J., Alexander L., Mattie A., Charles P., Louis C, Emily E. and Lizzie B. Mrs. Breeden is a native of Missouri, and was born April 5, 1830. Charles P. Breeden, who has taken charge of the farm since the death of his father, was born in Clinton County, Missouri, April 6, 1859, and has adhered closely to agricultural pursuits from boyhood.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

HIRAM BROWN; farmer, patentee and manufacturer of the Flora Washer, section 8, post office Stewartsville, was born in Canada West, Elgin County, October 4, 1841, and was reared and educated in his native state until sixteen years of age. In 1853, he accompanied his parents to Carroll County, Missouri, where he followed the painting business. In 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate service, and was detailed as pilot. He participated in the engagements at Boonville and Lexington, and in 1862, returned to Carroll County, and was united in marriage with Miss Lizzie Teeter, a native of Missouri, born July 28, 1845. In the autumn of 1863, he removed to Illinois, near Quincy, and engaged in farming for two years and in 1865, came to this county and settled near Stewartsville, and in 1867, purchased his present property, comprising forty acres of well improved land. In 1877, Mr. Brown invented the Floral Washer, a machine of superior merit, and the trade he has bu1lt up is a sufficient guarantee of its usefulness and labor saving qualities. Their family consist of seven children living: George W., Mary E., Anna E., Adda D., Effie M., James O. and Charles H. Lost one son—Willard P. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Baptist Church.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

W. H. BROWN; gone of the firm of McCrosky & Brown, stock dealers, and also of the firm of Brown & Ardery, feeders and dealers, is a native of Kentucky, and was born in Mason County, December 12, 1846. In 1856, his parents moved to Clinton County, Missouri, where he was reared and educated. He supplemented his early schooling by a course at the Platte City Academy. October 14, 1865, Mr. Brown was married to Miss Delia Ardery. She was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, September 23, 1852. After his marriage he moved to DeKalb County, Missouri. He has followed the stock business during life, and is now one of the leading stock dealers and feeders of this vicinity. His landed estate consists of 300 acres, all of which he uses for stock purposes.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

GEORGE BUCHANAN; farmer, section 35, post office Grayson, is one of the typical gentlemen of this township, and one who is well known in Clinton County. He is a native of Bourbon County, Kentucky, and was born November 29, 1816. His father, William, was a native of Virginia, and came to Kentucky when a young man. George was raised to manhood in his native state, receiving an education in the subscription schools. In 1836, he came to Platte County, Missouri, and made this and Clay County his home for three years, after which he returned to Kentucky. In 1858, he again took up his abode for a time in Platte County. He was a resident of Texas for several years, and eventually, in 1870, located in Clinton County, where he now resides. His estate consists of 74 acres, all under cultivation. Mr. B. traces his lineage to English ancestors. His mother was Sally Reed, of Virginia. He was married in 1868, to Miss Minerva Kelly, of Clinton County, Missouri.
(Source:  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

LIEUTENANT COLONEL HARVEY SMITH BUCK;
Among the representative citizens of Clinton County is Colonel, or, as he is familiarly styled, "Captain" Harvey Smith Buck, widely known as a popular banker of the town of Stewartsville, in DeKalb County, just across the line from Clinton County, where most of his landed possessions lie. He was born in Governor, Saint Lawrence County, New York, in 1838. His parents, Roger and Patty Maria Buck, moved from New York to Brown County, Illinois, where, in 1851, his father died, leaving a widow, three sons and four daughters, Harvey, then thirteen years of age, being the oldest son. After his father's death he was sent to Augusta, Illinois, to live with John B. Compton, a merchant, and husband of his oldest sister, Elizabeth, where he remained several years, acquiring knowledge of mercantile business. He was then sent to Galesburg, Illinois, and matriculated in Knox College, remaining there until he had exhausted the means saved in Augusta. Left to work his own way in life, without any means but the knowledge he had acquired in the store, the partial education obtained in school, a stout hand and a willing spirit, he, at the age of eighteen, began the battle which he has so successfully fought. He first sought a subordinate position in a store, but finding no situation that suited him, he determined to embark in business for himself, though absolutely without means. Securing the endorsements of the leading merchants of Augusta as to his integrity and business habits, he borrowed $1.50 to pay railroad fare, proceed to Quincy, Illinois, and bought, on credit, a small stock of drugs, books and notions. Assisted by Dr. Ellis, a physician of Augusta, he soon became a competent druggist, and by the correctness of his business habits succeeded in securing a large patronage. At the breaking out of the war, his business in the line of general merchandise was recognized as one of the largest and most prosperous in the place. In 1861, obeying the call of his country, he turned his business over to his head clerk, to whom he gave an interest in the profits, and with fifteen associates proceeded to Quincy, where he enlisted under Captain Sterling P. Delano, a prominent lawyer of that city, who was organizing a company of dragoons, afterward assigned to the Second Illinois Cavalry. This company was detailed as an escort to General B. M. Prentiss, who was soon relieved by General U. S. Grant, and the command proceeded to Cairo, Illinois. Shortly after this he was promoted to the position of clerk at General Grant's headquarters, where he remained until the battle of Shiloh, and, for gallant services rendered to General Grant as bearer of dispatches, etc., at the battles of Fort Donaldson and Shiloh, he was recommended for promotion to Governor Richard Yates. Although personally a stranger to Colonel Thomas J. Kinney, who had just organized the 119th Illinois Infantry Regiment, that off1cer, on the strength of his reputation for courage and ability, requested Governor Yates to commission Mr. Buck adjutant of his regiment, which was accordingly done. He was thus the first clerk at General Grant's headquarters who received a commission. He was with this regiment through all its campaigns in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi under General A. J. Smith, who commanded the Sixteenth Army Corps, and with General Banks in his Red River expedition. He served in fourteen engagements, in most of which he commanded the left wing of the regiment, the colonel being frequently in command of the brigade. In two hot engagements he commanded the regiment, the superior officers being absent or wounded. During the last battle at Nashville, December 15th and 16th, 1864, he performed some of the most daring feats of the war. In one instance, at a critical point, when his regiment was wavering before a storm of shot and shell from two six-gun batteries, he voluntarily headed the charge, and by his consummate skill and determined bravery, succeeded in inspiring his men to renewed effort, which resulted, after a desperate hand to hand conflict, in the capture of the guns. For this achievement he was unanimously elected by both officers and men to be major of the regiment, and strongly recommended to Generals A. J. Smith and George H. Thomas for gallant and meritorious conduct on the battlefield. Shortly after this, his regiment being transferred to New Orleans, he was detailed on General Canby's staff. In the spring of 1865, he was commissioned by the war department captain in the subsistence department, and assigned as above stated. He discharged the onerous duties of his position with marked ability until the fall of 1865, when he went to Washington and was mustered out of the service. He then spent considerable time in traveling over the United States, visiting all points of special interest, and observing the habits and customs of the people. In the spring of 1866, he moved to Clinton County, Missouri, where he improved what is known as the Maple Avenue farm, a highly adorned tract of 640 acres. Completing his work, he moved to Stewartsville, DeKalb County, and again engaged in mercantile pursuits. In 1875, 'n connection with Franklin Finch and William D. Totten, he established a bank in Stewartsville, which enterprise has added largely to the business facilities of the county, and ranks high as a safe and reliable institution. Of this bank he is now sole proprietor. His landed interests are extensive, including three large farms which he owns in Clinton County. One of these includes 640 acres, another 240 acres, and a third of 170 acres. He owns, besides, a fine farm of 320 acres in DeKalb County. These are stocked with about 380 head of cattle. 300 head of hogs, besides sheep, horses and other stock. The chief product of his farms is hay; live stock being the chief yield for market. He is an active worker and has, by his own efforts, accomplished much in promoting the general interests of Northwest Missouri, where he is held in universal esteem. Much of the proverbial prosperity of Stewartsville is due to the active and energetic efforts of "Captain" Buck, as he is still called, while in reality he ranks as lieutenant colonel. Through his management, old fabrics have been torn down, streets widened and new ones located. His residence is among the finest in the place, and through his untiring energy the town has grown from a small village to the proportions of a city of the fourth class, of which he is (1881), the mayor. Called upon to take the lead in all public and private enterprises, he is now at work with a determination of securing to Stewartsville, a point in the Saint Joseph & Eastern Railroad, about to be constructed from Saint Joseph to a point on the Wabash, Saint Louis & Pacific Railway. On the organization of the militia of the state, in 1867, he was appointed lieutenant colonel of the Thirty-eighth Regiment of Missouri State Militia. He united with the Masonic order, in Augusta, Illinois, and is an active member of the Chapter, Council and Commandery. He has served three successive terms as High Priest of Russell Royal Arch Chapter No. of Stewartsville. In politics, he has always been a staunch Republican. He was married January 18, 1866, to Miss Louisa Lewis, daughter of Judge William Lewis, of Brooklyn, Schuyler County, Illinois. They have (1881) four children: Frank, aged ten years, Dell, aged eight years, George, aged five years, and Pearl, aged three years. Colonel Buck's habits have ever been strictly temperate, the only stimulant in which he indulges being tobacco, and that in a moderate degree.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

George N. Budlong. A thriving agriculturist of Clinton County, George N. Budlong, who was elected to the office of county judge, First District, in 1914, is a well-known and popular resident of Lathrop. He carried on general farming and stock growing with excellent results, his fine and well-appointed estate giving substantial evidence of the care and skill with which it was managed, presenting to the passer-by a beautiful picture of country life, the abode of taste and refinement as well as of thrift and plenty. Since 1908 he has been living retired in Lathrop. A son of Erastus S. Budlong, he was born April 29, 1846, in Frankfort, Herkimer County, New York, of patriotic ancestry, his great-grandfather Budlong having served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war.
Erastus S. Budlong was born, bred and educated in New York State. A natural mechanic, he was an expert workman in either wood or iron, and for many years carried on an extensive business as a wagonmaker. He died at the home of his son, George N., at the age of seventy-four years, an honored and respected citizen. He married Mary L. Campbell, who was born in England, a daughter of James Campbell, who immigrated with his family to America, locating in New York. She attained the age of seventy-two years. She was an Episcopalian in religion, while her husband was liberal in his religious views, and a democrat in politics.
Brought up in Frankfort, George N. Budlong obtained his early education in the public schools. In 1868, seized with the wanderlust, he came to Missouri, then a border state, and found employment in Clinton County on a farm lying near Lathrop. Two years later he married, and for a number of years thereafter was engaged in farming on the homestead of his father-in-law, Edward Leake. Subsequently Mr. Budlong bought his present farm of 160 acres, and in its improvement met with eminent success, his house and barns being large and substantial, while his bluegrass pastures, productive meadows, and, in season, his waving fields of grain and corn, bear speaking evidence of his skillful management.
Mr. Budlong has been twice married. He married first, in December, 1870, Miss Ellen Leake, who died January 27, 1881, leaving one child, Nellie L. Morgan, of Bonner Springs, Kansas. On April 19, 1883, Mr. Budlong married for his second wife, Nancy Catherine Young, a daughter of Judge James E. Young, who was born in Kentucky, but settled in Clinton County on coming from his native state to Missouri, and here reared his family of five sons and three daughters. A prominent and active member of the democratic party, Mr. Budlong, at the urgent request of the voters of the county, was induced to accept the nomination as county judge, a position for which he is amply qualified and was elected.
[A History of Northwest Missouri, Volume 2; edited by Walter Williams; Publ. 1918; Donated and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

GEORGE N. BURCH; farmer, section 30, post office Stewartsville, is a native of New York, and was born in Columbia County, November 8, 1841. He received a fair education, and was for some time engaged in teaching. He was also employed at various occupations during his younger days.' In the fall of 1862, he enlisted in Company D, 150th New York, and remained in service fourteen months. In 1865, he went to Texas, where he was occupied in a mercantile establishment as book-keeper, for two year’s. then returned to New York and, in a short time, came to Missouri, and located in Kansas City, where he remained during the winter of 1868-69. He then located where he has since resided, except from 1871 to 1873. during which time he made his home in New York. His farm contains eighty acres. Mr. B. was married, October 28, 1868, to Miss Ann Elizabeth Dexter. She was born at Long Island in January, 1843. They have six children: Bernice L., N. Dexter, Carrie H., Charles E., George B. and H. Berkley.
(Source  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

O. B. BURGESS; farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Mason County, Kentucky, and was born on the 15th day of August, 1820. His father was a prominent and wealthy farmer of that county, and young Burgess turned his attention to the breeding of fine stock. He was united in marriage on the 2d day of February, 1842, with Miss Phebe D. Kilgore, a native of Kentucky. She was born on the 8th day of February, 1824. Mr. B., after his marriage, continued farming and the breeding of fine stock until 1860, when he moved to Minerva, for the purpose of educating his children. There he remained until 1864, when he closed out his entire business and moved to Platte County, Missouri. He was engaged in farming until 1867. when, with his family, he came to this county and lived at Plattsburg for one year. Mr. B. soon purchased his present farm, which now contains 120 acres of well improved land, situated in section 22, about eight miles northwest of Plattsburg. Mr. Burgess, in common with many others, lost heavily during the late war. He took no active part in that engagement, although his sympathies were with the South. He has' been a life long Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. B. have eight children living: Ann D. S., Martha M., R. O., Cora, Harrison G., Abbie, Ella, Mary F., and one deceased—Wm. S.
(Source:  The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

DR. J. C. BYNUM; a prominent and successful physician and surgeon of Stewartsville, is a native of Alabama, having been born in DeKalb County, on the 6th of December, 1847. In 1850, he was brought by his parents to Missouri, they locating near St. Joseph, in Buchanan County, where he remained until the following October. He then moved to Ripley, Mississippi, made his home there for one year, and soon after returned to St. Joseph. He was educated in the common schools of this district, afterwards supplementing it by a course in the college of Springfield, Missouri. For some time he lived in the country, six miles east of St. Joseph, and in the spring of 1856, went to Texas. Upon his return, he located at Springfield, Missouri, in the spring of 1857, and in 1858, again moved to Buchanan County. In 1866, Dr. Bynum took a trip, the second time, to Texas, returning to Clinton County in 1867. Having made choice of the practice of medicine as his profession, he commenced its study in 1867, under the tutorship of Dr. P. H. Hereford, of Easton. He was an attendant of lectures at the St. Louis Medical College, for one full course and a part of another. In October, 1868, he commenced the practice of his chosen profession in Buchanan county, there continuing until January, 1876, when he moved to Clinton County. Dr. Bynum further fitted himself for his calling, by attending the St. Joseph College of Physicians and Surgeons, during the session of 1879-80, graduating at its close. In the fall of 188o,'he located at Stewartsville, where he has since continued to practice, and with no small degree of success. He makes a specialty of the diseases of women. Dr. Bynum found a wife in the person of Miss Bettie Whitson, whom he married June 5, 1873. Mrs. B. is a native of Buchanan County, Missouri, and was born September 14, 1853. They have two children: Ella, born at Matney Mills, June 20, 1875, and John C, born at Starfield, August 17, 1877. In the spring of 1873, Dr. B. joined Agency Lodge No. 10. He was exalted to the Royal Arch degree, in Russell Royal Arch Chapter No. 11, in the fall of 1881.
(Source: The History of Clinton County Missouri; published 1881; O.P. Williams & Co.; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack)

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