Dade County, Missouri Genealogy Trails

 

Biographies

Page 1

William Allison, farmer and stock raiser of Smith Township, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1824, the son of James and Sarah (Lee) Allison, natives of South Carolina and Kentucky respectively. They married in Tennessee, where they lived till about 1830, when they removed to Ray County, Mo., remained seven years, and then came to Dade County, settling in the woods near where Greenfield now is, being among the first white settlers of the county, the inhabitants being mostly Indians, and the country abounding in wolves, bear, panther, wild cat, deer, etc. The nearest market and post office was Springfield; the nearest mill twenty-five miles away, on Little Sac River. Mrs. Allison died in 1850 at the age of fifty five, and Mr. Allison married for a second wife Mrs. Jane Bryant, by whom he had three children. He served in the War of 1812, having been with Jackson at New Orleans. He was also in the Black Hawk War, and was major of militia in Ray County. His father, Joseph Allison, born in America, of English and Irish descent, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and died in Tennessee. One of his sons, Hon. Samuel Allison, by his second wife, was congressman from Tennessee at one time. Mr. Allison died in Dade County in 1869 or 1870 at the age of 85. William Lee, grandfather of William Allison, was of Welsh descent, and died in Ray County, Mo. The subject of this sketch, the third child of three sons and four daughters, had but very little education. Remaining at home till he was twenty one, he began farming for himself, and in 1847 enlisted in Company F, Third Missouri Mounted Volunteers, for live years, serving but eighteen months. He was in the battle of Vera Cruz, crossed the plains to New Mexico, returned by the same route, and was discharged at Independence, Mo., in the fall of 1848. In 1850 he crossed the plains to California with an ox team, being four and a half months on the way, and remained there nearly twelve years engaged in mining. He spent one year in Idaho, and went to Montana Territory in 1863, where he lived till 1870, mining and furnishing water for the mines. In the meantime he returned to Dade County in 1866, and the next spring married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Matilda Taylor, natives of Tennessee. After coming to Dade County, Mrs. Tay­lor died, Mr. Taylor living to be about sixty eight years of age. After his marriage, Mr. Allison returned to Montana by way of the Missouri River, being sixty days en route. In 1870 he returned to Dade County, and has since lived on his present farm of 160 acres, being the owner also of eighty acres of timber. After the war he also purchased a small farm for his father, who lost all his property during the war. He was elected county judge in Montana the year he left there, but did not serve. The family consists of one son and three daughters: Emma Louella (born in Montana, wife of John Parminter), Sarah Lee, George Walter and Ida Elizabeth. Mrs. Allison died February 17, 1889. Mr. Allison is a Democrat, having voted for Polk in 1844. He a member of the Baptist Church, as was also his wife. He is greatly interested in education, and is something of a poet.

 [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Dr. Charles Aaron Badgley, doctor of dental surgery, of Greenfield, Mo., is a native of Auglaize County, Ohio, born in 1854, and is the son of George and Martha (Watkins) Badgley; grandson of George and Rebecca (Eddy) Badgley; great grandson of Aaron and Joannah (Hedges) Badgley; great-great-grandson of George Badgley, and great-great-great-grandson of George Badgley, who was a native of England, born in the latter part of the sixteenth century, and a ship carpenter by trade. He was also one of the best swimmers known, yet he came to his death by drowning. George Badgley (great-great-grandfather) came to America about 1740 with his cousin, Anthony Badgley, and died here in 1799. Aaron Badgley (great-grandfather) was born August 10, 1771, and married Miss Hedges, January 1, 1791. George Badgley (grandfather) was born in April, 1800, and married Miss Eddy in 1824. They became the parents of six sons and two daughters, George Badgley (father of the subject of this sketch) being the eldest son and second child. He was born November 27, 1828, in the State of Ohio, was a teacher by profession, but at the time of his death, which occurred in Auglaize County, Ohio, in 1860, he was a student of dentistry. His wife, Mrs. Martha (Watkins) Badgley, was a native of Ohio, born in 1833, and after the death of Mr. Badgley, she married Stephen Armstrong, who is also deceased. Mrs. Armstrong now resides in Putnam County, ILL., and is the mother of six children, three living, two by her first mar­riage, and one by the second, viz.: Dr. Charles A.; Hester C., wife of H. C. Mills, of Putnam County, ILL.; and Willis, in Auglaize County, Ohio. Dr. Charles A. Badgley received his literary education in his native county, and in 1871 commenced the study of dentistry at Winona, ILL., with his uncle, Dr. A. E. Badgley, where he remained a student three years. He then commenced practicing with his uncle, which he continued until 1875, when he went to La Salle, ILL., and in 1879 came to Greenfield, Mo. September 14, 1879, he married Miss Georgia M. McDowell, a native of Dade County, Mo., and the daughter of W. G. and M. J. (Jones) McDowell, and only sister of Mrs. Addie (McDowell) Dixon, at this time of Trinidad, Colo. To this union were born four children: Irma, Edna, Charles (deceased) and George. Dr. Badgley is the only resident dentist in Dade County, is a skillful workman and gives good satisfaction, all his work being war­ranted. He has a large and increasing practice, is a man much respected, and is one of Greenfield's best citizens. He visits Golden City, Lockwood, Ash Grove and Everton at stated intervals each month. He is a Republican in politics. Dr. Badgley and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Ex-Judge Orlando H. Barker, a prominent farmer and a suc­cessful breeder of Jersey cattle in Lockwood Township, was born in Delaware County, Ohio, in 1843, and is the son of Daniel B. and Rebecca (McCoy) Barker, both natives of Ohio, the former born in Delaware County, in 1818, and the latter in Franklin County, in 1824. After marriage the parents settled in Delaware County, where Mr. Barker died about 1850. He was a woolen manufacturer. Mrs. Barker married the second time, and died in Indiana in 1874, while visiting her sister. Her father, Robert McCoy, was born in North Ireland, and came to the United States when a young man. He was married in Pennsylvania, and was one of the early settlers of Franklin County, Ohio, where he spent the balance of his days. He was a farmer by occupation. The paternal grandfather, Orlando H. Barker, was born in Massachusetts, and, when a young man, learned the woolen manufacturer's trade, after which he went to Pittsburg, Pa., and then to Ohio. In that State he was a teamster in an Indian expedition, and when the War of 1812 broke out he joined Gen. Harrison's command, and served with him through that war. He afterward settled in Delaware County, Ohio, where he established a woolen manufactory, one of the first in the State, which he operated successfully until his death, which occurred about 1848. Great grandfather Barker was of Scotch descent. He served through the Revolutionary War as a commis­sioned officer. Ex-Judge Orlando H. Barker was the eldest of four children, two sons and two daughters, only the subject of this sketch and Mary Delasmutt, of Ohio, now living. The brother, Robert M., died from exposure in the army. He was a sergeant. Orlando H. Barker attended five winters of public school, or until the war broke out. In April, 1861, he joined Company I, Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as private, and afterwards held all the offices to first lieutenant, which position he held with credit until he received his discharge, in October, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. He served about three years and four months, three years of this time in the Army of the Potomac, and was in all the leading engagements. He was wounded Octo­ber 15, 1863, which disabled him for several months. In July of the same year he was placed on recruiting service, and spent the winter of 1864-65 in Ohio in that service. In March, 1865, he was made first lieutenant of Company C, One Hundred and Eighty-sixth Ohio Infantry, and again went to the front, where he was in active service until the close of the war. Afterward he spent one year in the Wesleyan University of Ohio, and, in the meantime, studied law, being admitted to the bar by the supreme court of Ohio in February, 1868. In June, 1867, he married Miss Alma, daughter of John E. Mills, Sr. Mr. Mills was born in Rockingham County, Va., and, when a boy, went to Ohio, where he married and lived until about 1880, when he came to Dade County, Mo., where he is now living. In early life he was a painter, but later, for many years, was a wealthy furniture manufacturer of Chillicothe, Ohio, where he lost two wives. To Mr. and Mrs. Barker were born six children, two sons and three daughters living. In 1868 Mr. Barker came to Greenfield, where he practiced law with success until after the panic of 1873, when he removed to Springfield, and there continued his practice until 1883. He then settled on a farm near Lockwood, where he has since been engaged in stock breeding and farming, and has a fine herd of Jerseys. He served as mayor of Greenfield in 1871 or 1872, and in 1873-74 was judge of the probate court of Dade County. He is a Republican in politics, was formerly a Greenbacker, and his first presidential vote was cast for Lincoln, in 1854. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., is also a member of Lockwood Post No. 325, G. A. R., and the Encampment at Springfield. Mrs. Barker is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William R. Bowles, attorney-at-law and editor of the Dade County Advocate, of Greenfield, Mo., was born in that village in 1857, and is the son of Dr. Samuel B. and Elizabeth J. (Vaughan) Bowles. Dr. Samuel B. Bowles was born in Portsmouth, N. H., in 1805 and was of English descent. His father having died, Samuel was taken and reared by his uncle, Samuel Bowles, who lived in the city of Boston. It was in this city that Dr. Samuel B. Bowles was reared, and where he received his literary educa­tion. In 1847-48 he took a course of medical lectures, at the Med­ical College in Memphis, Tenn., and in the last named year he grad­uated as an M. D. from the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis. About 1827 he married Miss Elizabeth Jones, and by her reared two daughters: Kate E., wife of Dr. William H. Jopes, of Greenfield, Mo.; and Almena C., wife of William Grigsby, of Jack County, Texas. After marriage, Dr. Bowles went to Raleigh, N. C, and about 1830 he moved to Middle Tennessee, where he remained for some six years, and then went to Utica, Miss. In 1838 he lost his wife and returned to Tennessee, locating at Murfreesboro, where he married Miss Elizabeth J. Vaughan in 1839. There are eight living children born to this union: Jane, wife of L. W. Shafer, attorney-at-law at Greenfield, Mo.; Mary, wife of Wash. Broyles, of Butte County, Cal.; Ella V., wife of James Curran, of Yolo County, Cal.; Stearns H., of Capay, Yolo County, Cal.; Laura, wife of Finis E. Garrett, Golden City, Mo.; Dr. Frank R., of Jack County, Texas; William R.; and Lina K., wife of J. L. Wetzel, a dry goods merchant, of Greenfield, Mo. In 1851 Dr. Bowles came to Greenfield, Mo., and there died August 1, 1887. For thirty years he was the leading physician of Dade County, and during all those years ran a drug store in connection with his practice. He was one of the most influential citizens of Dade County, was a Mason in good standing, being a member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery. William R. Bowles was educated in Greenfield, and at the age of sixteen he commenced as an apprentice in a printing office. At the age of twenty-one he became a disciple of Blackstone, and in the fall of 1880 he was admitted to the bar. He then practiced law for six years, and in October, 1887, became editor of the Dade County Advocate, which he has since edited in an able and efficient manner. Mr. Bowles is a young man, and the Dade County Advocate, under his able management, has met with success. The paper is newsy, and sparkles with good editorials from his pen. In politics Mr. Bowles is a Democrat, and his paper upholds the principles of the party in an able and capable manner. He is a member of the Masonic order, Washington Lodge No. 87, Royal Arch Chapter No. 38, and Constantine Commandery No. 27. In August, 1885, he married Miss Cora Kimber, a native of Illinois, and the daughter of Joseph H. and Ellen Kimber. Two chil­dren, Samuel O., and John Herschel, were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowles. Mrs. Bowles is a member of the Methodist Epis­copal Church. The paternal grandparents of our subject were William and Elizabeth Bowles, the grandfather being a captain in the United States Navy for a number of years.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Charles S. Cannady, dealer in harness and saddlery. Among all classes and in every circumstance of life are those who suc­ceed in whatever they undertake, whether of a professional, agri­cultural or commercial nature, and prominent among them stands the name of Mr. Cannady, who, although a young man, has the reputation of being a first class business man. He was born in Bartholomew County, Ind., near Hartsville, May 6, 1867, and is the son of Henry H. and Louisa Cannady. The father was born in Harrison County, Ind., June 20, 1829, and was by occupation a farmer and wagonmaker. He moved to Dade County, Mo., in 1882, and is now a resident of Dadeville. He is of Irish descent. The mother was born in Coles County, ILL., January 6, 1838, and by marriage became the mother of six children, five now living. Of these children, Charles S. Cannady is the eldest. He moved with his parents from Indiana to Kansas in 1872, and there received his education, coming to Missouri in 1882. In August, 1887, he opened a harness and saddlery shop, and has success­fully conducted this business ever since. He has a stock of goods valued at about $800, and is prepared to please the public with the quality of his goods as well as his moderate prices. Politi­cally he is a Republican.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Franklin Carlock, undertaker, furniture dealer and proprietor of the "Ozark House," of Everton, is a native of McMinn County, Tenn., having been born in 1827, a son of Isaac and Sarah (Ruckman) Carlock, natives of South Carolina, Mr. Carlock being of German descent; they came with their parents to Middle Tennessee, where they married, removing from East Ten­nessee to Dade County about 1839, where Mr. Carlock died just before, and Mrs. Carlock during the war. They were among the old settlers of Dade County, he being a Baptist and she a Cum­berland Presbyterian. Franklin Carlock, the youngest of four sons and seven daughters, was educated at the common country schools, reared on a farm, and at the age of twenty three married Susan, daughter of James and Barbara Wheeler, of Tennessee, who came to Dade County about 1837 or 1838, where they died. Mrs. Carlock died in Dade County in April, 1887, leaving seven sons and one daughter. In October, 1887, Mr. Carlock married Mrs. Sarah Starr, daughter of Charles O'Kelly, an early settler of Southwest Missouri, where Mrs. Carlock was born, and where her father is still living with his third wife at the age of seventy-nine. Our subject lived in Polk Township and farmed till 1881, when he came to Everton and built the first dwelling, the Everton House, of which he was proprietor till 1884, when he pur­chased his present residence, the Ozark House, the finest in town. In 1884 he erected a business house, and has since been engaged in the furniture and undertaking business. In politics he is a Republican, formerly a Whig. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, his wife being a Methodist. Mrs. Carlock has one son living, by her first husband.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

James M. Carlock, farmer and stock raiser of Morgan Town­ship, was born in Dade County, Mo., October 25, 1848, and is the son of Lemuel L. and Angeline (Davidson) Carlock. Lemuel L. Carlock was born in Tennessee, in 1821, and is now living in Greene County, Mo. He came to Dade County, Mo., in about 1842, and was among the first settlers, and has followed agricultural pursuits the principal part of his life. He is now living with his second wife, Angeline (Davidson) Carlock, who was born in Ten­nessee, March 13, 1825, and who still survives. They are the parents of eleven children, four sons and seven daughters, all living. The father had one daughter by his first wife, and she is living in Polk County, Mo. James M. Carlock is the second child in order of birth, born to his parents. He remained at home until the latter part of the war, when he enlisted Sep­tember 13, 1864, in Company D, Fifteenth Regiment Missouri Calvary Volunteers, and was discharged from service June 30, 1865, at Springfield, Mo. He was at Sedalia at the time of Marmaduke's raid in Missouri. On June 6, 1869, Mr. Carlock mar­ried Miss Mary Tarrant, who was born in Dade County, Mo., November 11, 1853. She is a sister of William Tarrant, whose sketch appears in another part of this volume. To Mr. and Mrs. Carlock have been born two children: Harry L. and Virgil. After marriage Mr. Carlock located on a farm ten miles east of Greenfield, where he resided until 1879, and then moved to his present property, which consists of 160 acres of land, and about all under cultivation. He has a fine farm, a splendid orchard, and is one of the industrious farmers and highly respected citizens of the county. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; and he is a Democrat in his political views. His paternal grandfather's name was Isaac Carlock.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Joseph W. Carmack, farmer and justice of the peace of Mor­gan Township, resides near the village of Dadeville, and is the son of John and Elizabeth (Chapin) Carmack, both natives of Overton County, Tenn., born in 1807 and 1809, respectively. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, and came to Dade County, Mo., in 1853. He was a farmer by occupation, and died in the last named county in 1856. His wife is still living, and makes her home with her son, Joseph W. Carmack. She is seventy nine years of age, and is the mother of eight children, four now living, three sons and one daughter. Joseph W. Carmack is a single man, has always remained at the home place, and is one of the substantial citizens of the county. He was born in Overton County, Tenn., May 26, 1838, and was principally educated in the com­mon schools, although he attended one term in the high schools at Springfield, Mo. In August, 1877, he was elected justice of the peace of Morgan Township, and is still acting in that capacity, being an efficient and obliging officer. In connection with his office, he attends to pension claims and does a good business in that line. He has three farms, one consisting of 100 acres, all under cultivation, with good improvements in the shape of build­ings, etc.; another of 118 acres, with about ninety-five under cultivation, and another farm of 200 acres, about sixty-five under cultivation. These farms are all in Morgan Township, Dade County, Mo. Mr. Carmack is a Republican in his political opin­ions and is a highly respected citizen. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Sixth Missouri Cavalry, and served as first lieu­tenant in that regiment until 1864, when he was discharged; in September, 1864, he was commissioned second lieutenant in the Seventy-sixth Regiment Enrolled Missouri Militia. In March, 1865, he went in the Fourteenth Missouri Veteran Cavalry, and was first lieutenant until the close of the war. He was in the battle of Wilson's Creek when Gen. Lyon was killed, was in the battles of Sugar Creek, Wet Glaze, Pea Ridge, Prairie Grove, and many skirmishes. He was a good soldier and a gallant officer. He is a man universally respected and esteemed by all who know him. In 1864 he was elected sheriff and collector ex-officio, but declined to serve on account of rebels being in arms in the State of Missouri, and he preferred to be a soldier in time of war. In 1866 he was commissioned first lieutenant and enrolling officer for Dade County, Mo., and enrolled and organized the militia of this county. From the close of the war to 1872 he was a teacher in the public schools of the county, since which time he has been in the mercantile business until recently.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Edgar Clark, county collector of Dade County, Mo., was born in Benton County, Mo., in 1841, and is one of the prominent citizens of the county. He is the son of John B. and Margaret (Homer) Clark, the former a native of New Jersey, born in 1841 and the latter a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1801. John B. Clark was of Scotch descent, and was a cabinetmaker by trade. When a young man, or about 1815, he went to Harrisburg, Penn., and was there married to Miss Horner. In 1837 they emigrated to Benton County, Mo., and in 1850 Mr. Clark went overland to California, to seek for his share of the hidden wealth. In 1853 he returned to Missouri and settled in Dadeville. During about three years of the war he was in Washington, D. C. He died in 1878 at Springfield, Mo., where he had lived three years. He was representative in the lower house from a county in Pennsyl­vania, and was a member of the State Senate in Missouri from Dade County, being elected in 1866. His wife died in 1877. They were the parents of nine children: Robert A., of Springfield, Mo., engaged in milling; Louisa, widow of Charles Clark, in Warsaw, Benton County, Mo.; Samson S., proprietor of Wash­ington Hotel, in Greenfield; Eliza J., widow of T. S. Switzler, at Billings, Mo.; John B., clerk in pension department at Wash­ington, D. C.; Mary G., wife of James Mackelworth, in Waxahachis, Texas; Charles P., deceased; Edgar; and Margaret A., wife of Charles A. Prentice, in Washington, D. C. Edgar grew to manhood on a farm, and came to Dade County when he was but a lad. July 2, 1862, he enlisted in Company L, Sixth Mis­souri Volunteer Cavalry, and was in the fight at Prairie Grove, and was also in numerous skirmishes. He was discharged July 2, 1865, at Baton Rouge, La., and afterward returned to Dade­ville, Mo., where he commenced clerking in a general store. In 1867 he and E. R. Hughes and E. J. Morris formed a partnership, and the firm title was Morris, Clark and Hughes, thus continuing until 1881, when Mr. Morris withdrew and Mr. Clark and Hughes moved their stock to Everton, and there continued until 1885. Since that time Mr. Clark has been salesman in McLemore Bros. store at Everton. In November, 1888, Mr. Clark was elected county collector of Dade County by a majority of 162. In 1870 he married Miss Eliza Morris, a native of Cass County, Mo., born in 1843, and the daughter of Mount Etna Morris. Four children were the result of this union: Joannah, Maggie, Jennie and Edgar C. In his political views Mr. Clark affiliates with the Republican Party, and his first presidential vote was cast for Abraham Lin­coln in 1864. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is also a member of Everton Post No. 369, G. A. R. Mrs. Clark is a member of the Christian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

John R. Clopton, merchant and mail contractor at Dadeville, Mo., is a native of Dade County, born on Sac River, two miles south of Dadeville (where he now lives), January 22, 1852. He moved to Dadeville March 14, 1866, went to California in November, 1873, but returned in October, 1873, and, July 19, 1874, he chose for his companion in life Miss Martha A. Gaunt, who was born in Dadeville, November 10, 1852, and who is the daughter of John M. and Emily (Pyles) Gaunt, very early settlers of this locality. The father is still living, but the mother died in 1877. To Mr. and Mrs. Clopton were born six children, all liv­ing: Walter T, Carter E., Charles R., Franklin E., Elizabeth J. and John H. Soon after marriage Mr. Clopton moved on a farm at Sun Creek, in Dade County, but subsequently sold to William Johnson, and moved to what is known as the "Fanning farm," where he remained one year. He then traded a farm in Polk County for one in Dade County, on Sac River, settled on the same, and there remained two years, after which he moved back to the Fanning Farm. Later he moved to Dadeville. He has the mail route from Buckley to Cane Hill, and has the contract for six years, which time expires July 1, 1891. Mr. Clopton has seven acres of land on the town site of Dadeville. He is a Repub­lican in politics. He is the son of R. G. and Elizabeth (Fanning) Clopton, the grandson of Gui and Mary (Bryant) Clopton, who were born in North Carolina in 1777 and 1787, respectively. The grandparents emigrated from Tennessee to St. Charles County, Mo., in 1825, and were early settlers of that county. After residing there nine years they came to Dade County, Mo., and were among the first settlers of this vicinity. Gui Clopton died here in 1839, and his wife, Mary, died in 1879, at the age of ninety two years. Both were of English descent. R. G. Clopton, father of the subject of this sketch, is still living, and is engaged in the mercantile business with his son. He was a mule trader during the war, and, in 1862, was captured by a rebel squad, who, after discovering that he had money, relieved him of $300, and then allowed him his liberty. After reaching home he discovered that he had about $100 which they had failed to find. His wife, Elizabeth (Fanning) Clopton, was born in Ten­nessee in 1829, and is yet living. Her father, Thomas Fanning, was of English descent, and died in Dade County, Mo., in 1860. Her grandfather, Thomas Fanning, Sr., and his wife, Sarah Fan­ning, were both born in England, and died in Tennessee.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Robert Cowan, farmer and stock raiser, residing three miles northeast of Dadeville, Mo., was born in Sullivan County, East Tenn., in 1827, and is the son of William R. and Nancy (Sursong) Cowan. The father was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., about 1790, was of Irish descent, and a farmer by occu­pation. He died in his native county about 1868. The mother was born in Washington County, Va., near 1800, and died in Sullivan County, Tenn., in 1878. They were the parents of eleven children, eight sons and three daughters, six now living. Robert Cowan was the second child in order of birth. He left home at the age of seventeen, and in 1848 he was united in mar­riage to Miss Mary J. McConnel, who was born in Washington County, Va., about 1828, and died in Dade County, Mo., in 1850, leaving one child, William R. In 1851 Mr. Cowan married his second wife, Miss Margaret E. Haley, who was born in Bruns­wick County, Va., in 1831, and is the daughter of Meredith and Dorothy L. Haley. Her parents came to Dade County, Mo., in 1838, and were among the pioneer settlers of that county. Here the father died in 1856. He was a native Virginian. The mother also died in Dade County in 1863. She was also a native of Vir­ginia, born in the year 1800, and was of Irish descent. To Mr. Cowan's second marriage were born six children, all living: Mary V., Anna L., wife of Thomas Davidson; James M., now in Califor­nia; John A.; Dorothy, wife of W. R. Dye, in Dade County, Mo.; and Ella, wife of Solomon Wilson, and now residing in Aurora, Mo. Mr. Cowan moved to Cedar County, Mo., in 1844, and soon after settled in St. Clair, where he resided three years. He then moved to his present property, which consists of a fine farm of 320 acres, with about 180 under cultivation. In 1862 Mr. Cowan entered the army, in Company I, Sixteenth Regi­ment Missouri Cavalry, and served about three years. He was elected county judge of Dade County at one time, and affiliated with the Republican party until 1884, since which time he has been a Democrat. Mrs. Cowan is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Their son, John A. Cowan, was born in Dade County, Mo., in 1858, and in 1882 married Miss Nora Dinwiddie, who was born in Dade County, Mo., in 1865, and is the daughter of Nathan and Almina (Morris) Dinwiddie, both deceased, the mother dying in Dade County about 1875, and the father in the same county in 1888. Both were natives of the State of Missouri. To John Cowan and wife were born two children. Mr. and Mrs. Cowan reside on the old homestead with the elder Mr. Cowan, but he is also the owner of 240 acres of his own. He is a Democrat in politics, and his wife is a member of the Christian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Robert M. Crutcher, M. D., a successful practicing physician and surgeon of Areola, is a native of Middle Tennessee, born April 7, 1848, and is the son of William H. and Charity (Evans) Crutcher. The father was a merchant of Nashville, Tenn., for several years, was also a farmer, stock dealer and real estate agent, and is now living at Nashville. His wife was also born in Tennessee, and died about 1853. She was the mother of eight children, five now living. Dr. Crutcher was the sixth of these children in order of birth, and received his education in the public schools of Nashville. In 1874 he graduated in the medical department of the University of Nashville, and the same year he came to Cane Hill, Cedar County, Mo., where he began the practice of medicine. He resided there about eight­een months, when in August, 1879, he moved to Areola, and there he has since resided. He has built up a large and lucra­tive practice, and is one of the leading practitioners of Dade County, his practice including a circuit of over twelve miles. In 1874 he married Miss Mary V. Rountree, who was born in Polk County, Mo., in 1860, and who is the daughter of Rufus M. and Lucretia Rountree, the former born in 1833, and died in July, 1886, and the latter born in 1841, and yet living. They came to Missouri about 1870. To Mr. and Mrs. Crutcher were born six children, five living: Henry C, James E., one deceased, Edgar, Robert Lee and Lucian. Mr. Crutcher is a member of the Garrett Lodge of Free Masons of Areola. He is also a member of the Christian Church, is an elder in the same, and is superintendent of the Sunday school. Mrs. Crutcher is a mem­ber of the same church. The Doctor is a Democrat in politics.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

John L. Daugherty, one of the prominent educators of Dadeville, Mo., was born in Tazewell County, Va., January 22, 1858. His parents, George G. and Mary (Gillispie) Daugherty, were both natives of Virginia, the father born in 1829, and the mother in 1838. The former was a tailor by trade, and of Irish descent. He first left his native State for Missouri in 1860, and after remaining there two years, returned to Virginia, and resided in that State until 1870, when he again returned to Missouri, locating in Gentry County. He resided there until 1876, when he moved to Dade County, where he died in 1880. His wife is now living in Ash Grove, Mo. They were the parents of five children, all living. John L. Daugherty is the eldest of these children. He remained with his parents until he had attained his majority, and received most of his education in the common schools, although he attended one term in Ash Grove, Mo., College. At the age of nineteen years he taught his first term in Dade County, Polk Township, in what is known as Pemberton District, and has, since then, taught sixteen terms of school, teaching one year in Dadeville, and giving general satisfaction. He is a courteous, obliging gentleman, and is highly respected by all who know him. In 1882 he married Miss Flora Wheeler, who was born in Dade County, Mo., in 1864, and who is the daughter of James and Mary E. Wheeler. Mr. Wheeler was born in Tennessee, and died in Dade County, Mo., in May, 1876. His wife is now living in Harper County, Kan. Mr. Daugherty is a member of the Masonic order, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

W. J. Davis, proprietor of the Evergreen Stock Farm, Lock-wood, Dade County, Mo., and breeder and dealer in choice Clydesdale horses since 1884, has the finest lot of blooded ani­mals in the West. He has ten head of fine imported stallions and mares, and has done more toward improving the horse than any man in Southwest Missouri. For seven years previous to the above date Mr. Davis was extensively engaged in breeding, fine Jacks and Norman horses, and he has been awarded first premiums and sweepstakes premiums at nearly all the fairs in Southwest Missouri, at Peirce City, Springfield, Sarcoxie, etc. He is a practical horseman, and is perfectly contented and at home among his stock. He was among the first men to introduce the breeding of thoroughbred cattle in Southwest Missouri, and for some years was successful in that business, starting with some of Kentucky's choicest animals. Mr. Davis was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., in 1835, and is the son of Richard C. and Susan (Pawling) Davis, natives of New York, where they were married and where they lived until 1842. They then moved to DeKalb County, ILL., where they died, the father in 1877 and the mother about 1874. Richard C. Davis was a well-to-do farmer and dairyman in butter and cheese, and followed this occupation the principal part of his life. His father, James L. Davis, was a native of New York, and died in that State at the age of ninety three years. He was of English Holland descent, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Davis' father, William Pawling, was a Scotchman, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, on the side of the Colonists. He afterward deserted, and started, with his wife and two children, to join Burgoyne's army. He and wife each took a child on horseback, and were well on the way before his wife knew his intention. She at once seized the other child, retraced her steps, and never afterward heard of her traitorous husband. Richard C. Davis was married twice, his second wife being the mother of the subject of this sketch, who was the second of five sons and one daughter. He attended school but very little until twenty one years of age, and then only three months at Pawpaw, ILL., whither he had gone with his parents. At the age of sixteen he commenced working out on the farm for five dollars per month, and the next year for eight dollars per month. He was married in 1862 to Miss Sarah Kellogg, a native of New York, who bore him three children: Susie, wife of Charles Polstand; Minnie B., wife of Samuel Hunt; and William Henry. After marriage Mr. Davis settled in La Salle County, ILL., where he farmed until 1869, and then moved to Dade County, Mo., settling on wild prairie land, the present site of Lockwood, and was one of the first settlers on the prairie. He had a team and about $1,000, and soon became one of the leading farmers of the county. At one time he owned 480 acres of land, but gave his children and wife property to the amount of about $10,000. In this connection it is but proper to state that Mr. Davis' wife, though surrounded by every needed comfort and many luxuries, after manifesting continual dissatisfaction and dis­content, left home during the absence of her husband on one occasion, and since then has become divorced. Mr. Davis giving her $7,000. He still owns a splendid farm of 160 acres near Lockwood, considerable town property, and has two good farms in Kansas. His home is one of the most attractive and desirable in Southwest Missouri, and Mr. Davis has spared no expense to make it pleasant and beautiful. He has 1,000 evergreens which he selected from the forests of Arkansas, 100 miles away, and he hauled the lumber from which he built his present residence, 100 miles, from the pine mills of Arkansas. He is the only man in Dade County who has given the right of way to the Gulf Railroad. He laid out the town of Lockwood, named after one of the railroad officials, and also gave Mr. Lockwood a lot for a Christmas present. Mr. Davis was the first postmaster of the place. He gave the site for the Lockwood Roller Mill and $50 cash and one half the ground for the school house, and has assisted largely in the erection of all the churches. He is a mem­ber of Lockwood Lodge No. 445 of the I. O. O. F. and was several terms vice-grand and noble grand. He is also a member of Lamar Encampment No. 99. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

John A. Davis, circuit clerk of Dade County, Mo., was born in Ripley County, Ind., in 1842, and is the son of William and Lydia (Shook), Davis, and the grandson of George Davis, who was a native of Wales. George Davis came to the United States with his two brothers, and all located at Lancaster, Penn. George was a carpenter and blacksmith by trade in early life, but afterward followed farming. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. In 1836 he emigrated to Ripley County, Ind., and died there in 1853 at the age of eighty-six years. His wife, Nancy Davis, was a native of Scotland. She died in 1869 at the age of ninety-five years. Her father was an aid-de-camp on General Green's staff in the Revolutionary War. William Davis was born in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Penn., in 1816, and came to Indiana in 1836, where he was married, and where he lived until 1857, at which date he moved to Fayette County, Iowa, and there died in 1887. He was a soldier in the Mexican war. His wife, Lydia, was born near Baltimore, Md., in 1829, and died in 1871. They were the parents of five children, two of whom are now living. John A. Davis is the elder child, and received his education in the common schools of Indiana, and also attended the Upper Iowa University, at Fayette, Iowa. In 1860 he engaged in the teacher's profession, and followed this for nine terms in district schools. He was a strong Union man during the war, and, July 4, 1861, enlisted in Company E, Fifth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, for three years. He was in the fights at New Madrid, Iuka, Corinth, Fort Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, and at Champion's Hill, in which action he was severely wounded in the right thigh by gunshot. He was taken to Vicksburg, and remained four weeks in a hospital at that place, after which he was taken to Memphis, and remained three months, when he was sent to St. Louis, and there received his discharge in December, 1863. He then returned home, where he improved so rapidly that, on October 10 of the subsequent year, he enlisted in Com­pany F, Fifth Iowa Cavalry, and immediately went to the front. He was at Columbia, Tenn., Maury's Mills, Franklin and Nash­ville, in which action of the first day's fight, November 15, 1864, he was shot in the right foot, the wound being so severe that in two days amputation was necessary. He remained in Nashville until February, when he was sent to Keokuk, Iowa, and, in July, 1865, he was discharged and sent home. After the war Mr. Davis was in the lumber business; in 1868 was elected sheriff of Buchanan County, Iowa, being reelected in 1870. He was also city marshal of Independence, Iowa, but, in 1880, he removed to Nevada, Mo., and was proprietor of the Central Hotel. In 1885 he became a citizen of Greenfield, Mo., and in 1886 he was elected circuit clerk of Dade County, which position he is now holding. He is a Republican in politics, casting his first presi­dential vote for Lincoln in 1864. He is a member of the Masonic order, Greenfield Lodge No. 446, and is also a member of the G. A. R., Greenfield Post No. 75. In January, 1869, Mr. Davis married Miss Ellen Long, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1849, and who became the mother of four children: William, Frank, Harry and Karle. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

James M. Divine, sheriff of Dade County, Mo., was born in Monroe County, Tenn., in 1842, and is one of the representative men of the county. He is the son of Alfred and Artemissa (Mc-Nabb) Divine, the grandson of James Divine, and the great grand­son of Thomas Divine, who, though a native of Ireland, came to America previous to the Revolutionary War, and was a soldier in the same. James Divine was a soldier in the War of 1812, and in 1822 emigrated to East Tennessee, carrying his two children, Alfred and a sister, on a pack horse, while he and his wife walked the entire distance. In 1854 James Divine removed to Dade County, Mo., and died in 1871.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Alfred Divine was born in South Carolina, in 1817, and was of Irish descent. He came to Dade County, Mo., in 1852, and located in Sac Town­ship, where he followed farming. He is yet living, is the owner of eighty acres of land, and is one of the old and prominent citi­zens. His wife, Artemissa (McNabb) Divine, was born in East Tennessee in 1816, and was the daughter of Baptist McNabb, who was a soldier in the War of 1812. Her grandfather was a native of Ireland, and was a soldier in the War for Independence, and in the War of 1812. Mrs. Divine is yet living. Eight chil­dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Divine: Elvira, wife of Andrew Smith, at Corry, Mo.; James M.; Orzina, wife of James P. Fan­ning, of Dade County; William T.; Nancy A., wife of J. B. Rem­ington, of Hickory County; Margaret, wife of John Friend, of Dade County; Martha, wife of J. A. Fanning, of Lamar, Barton County, and Harriet, wife of Joseph A. Fanning, of Dade County. James M. Divine was ten years of age when he came with his parents to Dade County, Mo., was reared to manhood on a farm, and remained with his parents until twenty one years of age. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh Provisional Regiment, Missouri Mounted Cavalry, and was in the fight at Springfield and Humansville. He was in service until March, 1864, was deputy sergeant of his company, and was discharged at Springfield, Mo. June 3, 1863, Mr. Divine married Miss Parthina Fanning, a native of Dade County, Mo., born in 1847, and the daughter of Thomas Fanning. Eight living children were born to this union: Horace G., Alice M., Fred, Mike, Mease, Alfred, Lydia and Blaine. After the war Mr. Divine began till­ing the soil, which he continued until 1886, when he was elected sheriff of Dade County, and reelected in 1888, on the Repub­lican ticket, his majority being 172 the first time, and the last time 322. Mr. Divine owns eighty acres of land, and a house and lot in Greenfield. His wife belongs to the Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

R. C. Divine, a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Sac Township, whose fine farm is seven miles northeast of the county seat, is a son of W. W. and Jamima (Wartan) Divine. The father was born in McMinn County, Tenn., November 3, 1820, and was of Dutch Irish descent. He was a farmer by occupa­tion, and followed this calling in Tennessee until 1856, when he moved to Missouri, and located in Dade County in 1857. There he is still residing. The mother was born in Alabama May 2, 1822, and is also living. They were the parents of eight children, five now living. R. C. Divine is the third child born to his parents, his birth occurring in Monroe County, Tenn., March 28, 1846. He remained at home assisting his father on the farm until twenty one years of age, received his educa­tion in the common schools of Dade County, and on July 1, 1864, he donned his suit of blue, shouldered his musket, and enlisted in Company E, Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry, Federal Army, and serving one year. On November 22, 1866, he married Miss Phrana Y. Russell, a native of Dade County, Mo., born Novem­ber 15, 1847, and the daughter of M. M. and Sarah J. Russell. Mr. and Mrs. Russell came to Dade County, Mo., in 1835, and were among the early settlers of that county. Both died in that county. To Mr. and Mrs. Divine were born twelve children, eleven now living: Lula, wife of Isaac A. Hembree; Mary A. (deceased), William A., Orra H., Otis M., Charles, Evva M., Frank A. and Minnie C. (twins), Vernie R. and Ethel (twins), and John H. Mr. Divine located on the place where he now lives in 1871, and has 480 acres, with about 280 under cul­tivation. In 1876 he was elected assessor of Sac Township, served one term, and in 1880 he was elected assessor of the entire county. He served two years, and made an able and efficient officer. He has been school director of his district at various times; is a member of the G. A. R. and A. O. U. W., and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Divine's grandfather, Thomas Divine, was born in South Carolina, and died in Monroe County, Tenn., in June, 1856.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Martin Fidler, another enterprising farmer of Washington Township, and the son of David and Elizabeth (Williams) Fidler, was born in Lawrence County, Ind., in 1844. David Fidler was born in North Carolina, moved with his parents to Indiana, and was married in Lawrence County, of that State, to Miss Williams, who died there in 1861. The father died in Dade County, Mo., about 1884, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a farmer by occupation. The mother was a member of the Christian Church. Martin Fidler was the youngest of two sons and one daughter born to his parents, and received his education principally by his own exertion. In 1861, when seventeen years of age, he joined Company G, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served four months, when he was disabled. He afterwards joined Company G, of the Fourth Indiana Cavalry, Seventy seventh Regiment, and served until the close of the war. He was in many prominent engagements, was all through the Georgia campaign, and was wounded in the left shoulder at Montgomery, Ala., April 11, 1865, and was disabled from fur­ther service. He received his discharge at Louisville, Ky., and returned home. He was married in 1870 to Miss Nancy Ann, daughter of John and Mary Parman, and to them were born four children, three now living. Mrs. Fidler was born in Kentucky, and her parents are yet living. In 1871 Mr. Fidler moved to Jackson County, Mo., thence to Cass County, and finally to Dade County, where he has a fine farm of 200 acres on Turnback Creek, 150 acres under cultivation. He is one of the representative farmers of the county, and is engaged in improving stock, cattle, horses and hogs. Politically a Repub­lican, his first vote was for Gen. U. S. Grant in 1868. He is a member of Greenfield Post of the G. A. R. Mrs. Fidler is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

James F. Finley, farmer of Center Township, residing three miles northeast of Greenfield, is a native of Hopkins County, Ky., born September 11, 1818, and is one of the old and much respected citizens of the county. He is the son of William and Leah (Dobbins) Finley, and the grandson of Howard Finley, who was a native of North Carolina, and who moved to Hopkins County, Ky., in 1804. He died in 1840. William Finley was born in North Carolina in 1792, was of Irish descent, and followed farm­ing all his life. He was but twelve years of age when he went to Kentucky, and was there married in 1817 to Miss Dobbins. In 1841 he came to Dade County, Mo., on a prospecting trip, remained a few years, and then returned to Kentucky. In 1848 he again returned to Missouri, and made his home with his son, James F. He died in 1872. His wife, Leah Dobbins, was born in Virginia, was of English descent, and died in Lawrence County, Ark., in 1850. After her death Mr. Finley returned to Hopkins County, Ky. Three children were born to this union, who lived to be grown: James F., Thomas R., and John M. James F. was but an infant when his parents moved to Arkansas, and was twelve years of age when his mother died. He remained on the farm until eighteen years of age, when he commenced selling goods. In 1843 he married Miss Nancy Brooks, who was born in Hopkins County, Ky., in 1826, and one child was born to this union, William, who was drowned on a Mississippi River steamer near Cape Girardeau in 1865. In May, 1846, Mrs. Finley died, and in December of the same year Mr. Finley came to Dade County, Mo., but later returned to Kentucky, where he remained until the spring of 1848, when he returned and located in Green­field. He commenced clerking in a store, and October 15, 1849, he married Miss Mary Earll, a native of Stewart County, Tenn., born in 1832, and the daughter of Henry Earll. Fourteen children were the fruits of this union: Madora, wife of Samuel W. Dicus; Paulina, wife of John E. Garrett; Harry H., Albert and George (twins); Ellen, died at the age of sixteen years; Aurelia and Cor­delia (twins), the former dying at the age of two months; Lolla, wife of J. W. Crank; James; Elder, died at the age of eighteen years; Grace, Gusta, and Howard. Mr. Finley sold goods in Greenfield for about four years, and in 1850 bought 166 acres of land, where he now resides, but did not locate on the farm until about 1851. He is one of Dade County's old settlers, and has been successful in his business pursuits. He came to Dade County a poor man, but year by year he has, by his industry, economy and good management, added to his property, and at present has about 100 acres of good land, well improved with good buildings, fences, etc. In politics he is a Democrat, cast­ing his first vote for Gen. Harrison in 1840, but previous to the war he was a Whig. He is a member of the Masonic Order, Washington Lodge, Greenfield. He and wife and children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Dr. Ferdinand Fischer, physician and surgeon, of Lockwood, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, January 1,1851, being the son of Andrew and Clara (Magold) Fischer, who were born in the same place, where the father still lives, aged seventy-four; the mother died in 1883. They were Catholics, and he was quite a prominent citizen, having been mayor and justice of the peace. They had a family of one son and six daughters. The Doctor, the only son, received the best of educations in his native country, the last three years being spent in the university at Munich. In 1866 he came alone to America, the trip occupy­ing fifty eight days. After spending five years in teaching German schools in Canada, he came to Christian County, ILL., and began the study of medicine with Dr. R. W. Johnson, grad­uating from the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1879, after a three years course. He began the practice of his profession in Christian County, ILL., where he continued till 1882, when he came to Lockwood and built the first house south of the railroad, in Eldridge's addition, and in 1888 built one of the finest offices in Southwest Missouri. He is one of the leading physicians of Dade County. In 1879 he married Maggie F., daughter of Henry and Nancy Bess, of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively, Mrs. Fischer having been born in Ohio; her parents still reside in Christian County, ILL. They have four children. He is a Democrat, a member of Lockwood Lodge No. 445, I. O. O. F., and Sons of Rebecca. Mrs. Fischer is a mem­ber in good standing of the United Brethren Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Cicero T. Gass. Among the prominent farmers and success­ful citizens of Center Township, Dade County, Mo., stands the name of the above mentioned gentleman, who resides two-and-a-half miles northwest of Greenfield. He was born in Richland County. Ohio, in 1827, and is the son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (McClure) Gass. Benjamin Gass was born in Pennsylvania in 1797, was a farmer by occupation, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. He went to Richland County, Ohio, and was mar­ried there, and there passed his life. He died in 1878. His wife, Elizabeth (McClure) Gass, was born in Virginia in 1797, and died in 1865. She was the mother of five children. Cicero T. Gass was the eldest of these children, and remained with his parents until twenty-one years of age. He was in the quarter­master's department during the war, and in 1863 was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Castor, who was born in Richland County, Ohio, in 1842. Three children were the fruits of this union: James, Mary and Charles. In 1866 Mr. Gass moved to Grundy County, Mo., and in 1867 to Crawford County, Kan., where he remained until 1873, when he moved to Dade County, Mo., and bought 160 acres, where he now lives, and where he has since resided. He is now the owner of 280 acres, and is a well-to-do farmer. In politics he is a Republican. His grand­father, William Gass, was a member of the State Senate in Ohio, from Richland County, for a number of years, and the brother of William Gass, Patrick Gass, was with Lewis and Clarke on their famous expedition through the West.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

E. C. Gillett, presiding judge of the county court of Dade County, and a resident of Lockwood, was born in Stephenson County, ILL., in 1836. His father, Ezra B. Gillett, was descended from three brothers who came from Wales in a very early day; he was born in Oneida County, New York, in 1806, but left home in 1826, went to Wisconsin, and mined several years, then to Ohio, where he married Sophronia Rima, a native of Onon­daga County, New York, born in 1810. From there he removed to Illinois, thence to Wisconsin, and in 1870, to Lawrence County, Mo., where he still lives, his wife having died in 1884. He was a farmer, and a soldier in the Black Hawk War. The subject of this sketch, the second of two sons and two daughters, received his education at the common schools till the age of eight­een, when he attended the State University, at Madison, Wis., one year. In i860, in Illinois, he married Eliza C, daughter of Jacob and Nancy Miller, of Center County, Penn., both of her parents having died in Wisconsin, about 1845. He engaged in farming till 1867, when he removed to Monroe, Wis., and entered the grain and stock business, remaining there until 1880, when he went to Lawrence County, Mo., and the next year to Lockwood, where he has since conducted a grain and stock business with success. In 1886 he was elected presiding judge of Dade County Court for four years. He owns a good property in Lockwood and about 600 acres of land in Dade, Lawrence and Jasper Counties, and in Texas. In politics he is a Republican, having voted for Lincoln in 1860. He was formerly a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and a Good Templar. Both he and his wife are Methodists, he formerly being a member of the United Brethren Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Henry Gillman, an extensive sheep raiser and farmer of Marion Township, Dade County, Mo., and president of the Bank of Lockwood, was born in Brunswick, Germany, in 1831. His parents, Andrew and Mary (Lohman) Gillman, were both natives of Germany, the former born in Brunswick in 1800, and the latter in Hanover in 1811. They were married in their native country, emigrated to the United States in 1849, and settled in Macoupin County, ILL., where the father spent the remainder of his days. He died in 1868, but the mother is still living, and is a member of the Lutheran Church. Andrew Gillman was a shepherd and sheep raiser all his life, as was his father before him. Henry Gillman was the eldest of four sons and four daughters. He at­tended the common schools until fourteen years of age, and came with his parents to the United States when seventeen, settling in Illinois, where he was married in 1857 to Miss Kate Sinholz, who was also a native of Hanover, Germany. Her parents died when she was young, and she was the only one of the family who came to the United States. To Mr. Gillman and wife were born four sons and three daughters. Mr. Gillman removed to Montgomery County, ILL., about 1866, and in 1868 he came to Dade County, Mo., where he settled on the unbroken prairie. Here he has since lived, and here he has 1,040 acres of excellent land, all the result of his own efforts. In 1864 he engaged in the sheep raising business, and since then has been extensively engaged in that occupation, having at the present time 1,000 head of fine Merinos. He is one of the practical farmers and representative citizens of Dade County. In politics he was formerly a Demo­crat, but is now a Republican. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. Since the organization of the Bank of Lockwood, in October, 1888, Mr. Gillman has been its president. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Charles W. Gray is a member of the firm of C. W. Gray & Co., dealers in general hardware, farm machinery, etc., at Lockwood, Mo. This business was established in 1888, as successors to H. C. Watterman & Sons, the value of the stock being from $5,000 to $6,000, and is one of the best establishments of the kind in Dade County. Mr. Gray was born in Chester County, Penn., in 1834, and is the son of William and Catherine (Bender) Gray, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, respectively. They were married in Pennsylvania, and when their son, Charles W. Gray, was but an infant, they moved to Stark County, Ohio, where they both died, the mother in 1855, and the father in 1872. Both were members of the United Brethren Church. Grand­father Gray was a native of Germany. Charles W. Gray was the third of four sons and three daughters. He received a common school education in Ohio, and was married in 1856 to Miss Barbara E., daughter of Henry and Sarah Newman, both natives of Ohio, as was also their daughter. The mother died in that State, but the father is still living, and has been a resident of Dade County since 1882. To Mr. and Mrs. Gray have been born eight children, three sons and two daughters living. In 1862 Mr. Gray enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Fifteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was almost all the time on guard and on construction duty in Tennessee. He served until the close of the war, and was discharged at Murfreesboro, Tenn., in June, 1865. He returned home, and, in 1867, came to Dade County, where he followed farming in Marion Township (in June, 1888, was set off to Lockwood Township), until December, 1888, when he engaged in his present business. He is the owner of 265 acres of good land; is a Republican in politics, and his first presidential vote was cast for J. C. Fremont in 1856. He and wife and two eldest children are members of the United Brethren Church, Mrs. Gray having been a member since 1859. Mr. Gray is a class leader. His children are named as follows: Elenore E.; Mary E., wife of J. W. Evans; Julia A., George N. and Samuel A. When Mr. Gray first came to Missouri, he settled on an unbroken prairie, and here he improved a good farm. He became one of the leading farmers of the county, and one of its best citizens. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Frederick Grether, hardware merchant, of Greenfield, is a native of the Grand Dutchy of Baden, Germany, born in 1850, and is the son of Jacob and Mary Grether. There were eight chil­dren born to this union, five of whom came to the United States. Frederick Grether was but nine years of age when he accompanied his sister to the United States. They settled in Philadelphia, remained there three years, and then Frederick emigrated to Bond County, ILL., and two years later went to St. Louis. In 1866 he commenced working at the tinner's trade, and served an apprenticeship of three years. He then worked for three years as a journeyman, and in 1883 became a citizen of Greenfield, Mo., where he established a hardware store. He has met with good success, and is one of the leading business men of the town. In December, 1881, he married Miss Augusta Dienst, a native of Gasconade County, Mo., born in 1850, and to this union have been born three children: Walter, Frederick and Ralph. In his polit­ical views Mr. Grether affiliates with the Republican Party, and his first presidential vote was for Horace Greeley in 1872. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. O. U. W.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Charles W. Griffith, editor of the Greenfield Vedette, was born in 1837, near Gettysburg, Adams County, Penn. He lived in the State of Ohio from 1842 to 1870, and was educated at the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio; taught in the public schools of that State seven years; served in the Union army from August, 1863, until November, 1866. Came to Dade County, Mo., in September, 1870, where he has ever since resided.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

John Harrison, postmaster at Greenfield, Mo., was born in Boone County, Mo., May 22, 1825, and is the son of George and Malinda (Lynes) Harrison, and the grandson of John and Eliza­beth (Harris) Harrison. George Harrison was born in Alexan­der, Va., September 3, 1800, and was left an orphan when but a small boy. After the death of his parents he was taken by his uncle, a Mr. Dennis, who removed to Woodford County, Ky., and here George learned the saddler's trade. When a young man he went to Old Franklin, Howard County, Mo., and shortly afterward to Columbia, Boone County, of the same State, where he was married, March 24, 1824, to Miss Malinda Lynes. Mr. Harrison died in Hempstead County, Ark., September 22, 1859. His wife was born in Madison County, Ky., August 12, 1803, and when five years of age her parents, Joseph and Mary Lynes, moved to St. Louis, and thence to Boone County, Mo., being among the pioneer settlers. Since 1851 Mrs. Harrison has lived with her daughter, Elmira Meng, of Dover, Mo. Mrs. Harrison is the mother of four children. John Harrison attained his growth in Boone County, Mo., and received a fair education in the schools of that county. After leaving home he commenced working at the harness maker's trade, but a few years later took up merchandising at Walnut Grove, Greene County. May 18, 1853, he married Miss Mary E. Foushee, daughter of William and Narcissa (Hunt) Foushee, of St. Charles County, Mo., and a native of Claiborne County, Tenn., born in 1833. William Foushee was a native Virginian. To Mr. and Mrs. Harrison were born nine children: Roger H., a physician near Gainesville, Texas; Charles, deputy postmaster of Greenfield, and a harness maker by trade; Mark E., a dentist of Nevada, Mo.; Edwin, assistant cashier in Dade County Bank: Ralph, cadet at West Point: William, in Victoria, New Mexico, manager of a broom factory; Ruth (deceased), Hugh and Elmira. After marriage Mr. Harri­son located in Bolivar, where he established a harness and saddlery shop, and where he remained until after the war. In 1866 he became a citizen of Greenfield, and established a harness and saddle shop, which he conducted until May 19, 1885, when he was appointed by William F. Vilas as postmaster of Greenfield, which position he filled to the satisfaction of all concerned. He is a Democrat in his political views, casting his first presidential vote for Gen. Taylor in 1848. He was a member of the school board of Greenfield for a number of years, and was one of the initial members. He was also a member of the city council for some time. Mrs. Harrison is a member of the Christian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William T. Hastings, farmer and notary public of Rock Prairie Township, was born in Jackson County, Ala., in 1826. His father was John H. Hastings, born in North Carolina in 1793, who married Margaret Gentry, a native of Tennessee, who died when the subject of this sketch was three weeks old. Mr. John H. Hastings married the second time in Tennessee, and in 1846 came to Greene County, Mo. He was of a roving nature, and lived in Texas at the breaking out of the war, and after­wards went to Kansas, where he died in 1860. He was a son of John Hastings, who was born in England, and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, dying in Tennessee about 1831. Will­iam T. was the last of four sons and one daughter. He was raised by an aunt in Tennessee until he was twelve years of age, and received but little education. He afterward lived with his father in Alabama and Mississippi. He was married in 1844 to Isa­bella Massengale, who was born in Madison County, Ala., and died in 1874 in Dade County. They had a family of ten chil­dren, of whom four sons and one daughter are living. He married the second time, December 8, 1874, Serena C. Cotner, daughter of Daniel and Minta Cotner, early settlers of Dade County, where Mr. Cotner, a saddler, lived till his death, Mrs. Cotner dying in Newton County. By this wife he had two chil­dren. Mr. Hastings came to Greene County, Mo., in 1851, and in 1853 to Dade County, where he has 240 acres of land near Everton, and where he has since lived. He has acquired this Land by his own efforts and hard work. He served about twelve months in 1862 and 1863 in Company L. Seventy second Enrolled Missouri Militia, then twenty months in Company I, Fifteenth United States Missouri Cavalry, traveling all over Southwest Missouri as commissary sergeant, employing many scouts. He served as justice of the peace from 1874 to 1886, with satisfac­tion, with but two appeals to higher courts, and they were com­promised before trial. He has been notary public since 1886. He has been a Democrat in politics all his life, the first president he voted for being Polk, in 1844. He is a member of Washing­ton Lodge No. 87, A. F. & A. M., at Greenfield, having been made a Mason in 1850, in Mississippi. He is, and for about fifty years has been, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, both his wives also being members. When quite young Mr. Hastings learned the trades of blacksmith and stone ­mason, following them many years in connection with farming.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Amos Helphenstine, hardware merchant of Greenfield, and one of the prominent business men of the city, was born in Greene County, Penn., in 1837, and is the son of William Alexander and Elizabeth (Piatt) Helphenstine, and the grandson of William Henry Helphenstine. The grandfather was a native of Holland, and came to the United States long before the Colonial period, and the family took active part in the Revolution. He was a mer­chant at Winchester, Va., and died in 1852, at the age of 87 years. William Alexander Helphenstein was a native of Win­chester, Va., born April 1, 1808, and was a coppersmith and tin­ner by trade. He is now living at Waynesburgh, Penn., where he has made his home since 1834. His wife, Elizabeth Piatt, was born near Waynesburgh, Penn., in 1818, and was the daughter of Amos, who was a native of Paris, France, and Julia Ann (Engle) Piatt, who was a native of Maryland, born near Frederick. Julia Engle Piatt's father was a soldier in the Revolu­tionary War, and was on Gen. Washington's staff. Amos Piatt was expelled from France during the Huguenot rebellion. Mrs. Helphenstine is still living, and is the mother of eight children, six sons and two daughters. Of these children Amos Helphenstein, the subject of this sketch, was the eldest. He was educated in Waynesburgh College, and, in 1851, he commenced learning the coppersmith and tinner's trade, working as an apprentice for seven years. In 1855 he went to Jackson County, Ohio, where he began working at his trade, and where he also took up the study of music; was an apt pupil, and soon became a skillful Eb bugle player. In August, 1858, he returned to his birthplace to attend college, but the war came on before he graduated, and in July, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Eighth Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. He was in the seven days fight in front of Richmond, and was in service until August, 1864, when he was discharged at Baltimore, Md. After the war Mr. Helphenstine went west to Oskaloosa, Iowa and in 1867 came to Greenfield, Mo., where he has since remained, engaged in the hardware business. March 10, 1868, he married at Crawfordsville, Ind., Miss Sarah Jane Newton, who was born in Farmington, Iowa, in 1842. Two chil­dren were the fruits of this union, Mary E. and Annie E. Mr. Helphenstine has done considerable teaching of band music, having been the instructor of one of the best bands in the State. He thoroughly understands both the science and art of the pro­fession. He is a member of the G. A. R., post commander of Greenfield Post, and has been counsel of administration of the State for two years. In his religious views Mr. Helphenstein is a Spiritualist in belief, and his wife is a Presbyterian. He is one of the prominent citizens of the county, is a man who assists in all laudable and public enterprises, and is an ardent supporter of free public schools, and a strong Republican on all occasions.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Joel T. Hembree, ex-county judge and proprietor of the Chal­lenge Mills at Greenfield, Mo., purchased one half interest in the mills in 1881. The mill was erected in 1880, at a cost of $3,000, with two sets of buhrs, and in 1887 it was changed to eight sets of rollers, with a capacity of forty barrels per day. Mr. Hembree started in partnership with C. Depee, but in 1883 he bought Mr. Depee's interest. Mr. Hembree was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1824, and is the son of Isaac and Mary (Blake) Hembree, and is the grandson of Joel Hembree, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and who emigrated to Roane County, Tenn., in 1806. The old homestead is yet in the Hembree fam­ily, and is owned by his cousin, Joel Hembree. Isaac Hembree was born in Spartanburg District, S. C., in 1796, and was of Welsh extraction. He was but ten years of age when he went with his parents to Tennessee, and in that State he grew to manhood. He was married in Roane County in 1823, and in 1852 came to Cedar County, Mo., locating one-half mile east of Stockton. He died in 1864. He was a prominent man and judge of the county court of Cedar County for some time. He was also a soldier in the War of 1812. He was twice married, his second wife being Miss Salissa S. Price, a native of Tennessee, who died in 1883. Mr. Hembree's first wife, Mary Blake, was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1803, and died in 1836. She was the mother of seven children, Joel T. being the eldest. He was reared to farm labor, also assisted his father in running a mill, in running a cotton gin, a wool carding machine, and assisted him in running a distillery. In February, 1850, he married a Miss Nancy C. Hembree (cousin), who was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1830. Two children were born to them: Marietta V., wife of W. K. Marcum, and Charles C. The same year of his marriage, Mr. Hembree left his native State, moved to Dade County, Mo., and located six miles northeast of the county seat. He was the owner of 1,200 acres of land, and was a successful farmer. August 20, 1862, he enlisted in the Enrolled Militia, and November of the following year he enlisted in Company E, Fifteenth Regiment Missouri Cavalry, serving until July 1, 1865, when he was discharged at Springfield, Mo. He was a brave and gallant soldier, and was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant. Mr. Hembree was a Democrat in his political views up to the war, and his first presidential vote was for Gen. Cass, in 1848. Since and during the war he has affiliated with the Republican party. After the war he returned to farming, which he continued up to 1887, since which time he has been engaged in the milling business. In 1854 he lost his wife, and in April of the subsequent year he married Miss Nancy Hayes, a native of Indiana, born in 1834. Four children were the result of this union: Lewis J.; Hugh A., who is with his father in the mill; Isaac A., and Harriet C. (deceased). Mrs. Hembree died in January, 1864, and March of the same year Mr. Hembree married Miss Sarah J. Marcum, who was born in Tennessee, in 1844, and who bore him ten chil­dren: Mollie; Ida, wife of Robert Brockman; Annis, Ottis, Maud, Joel, Susan, Grant, Garfield and Bird. Mr. Hembree is a mem­ber of the Masonic fraternity, Greenfield Lodge No. 446, and is also a member of Greenfield Post No. 75, G. A. R. He and wife and three children are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Hembree and son do business under the firm title of Hem­bree & Son. [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

W. C. Holman is a native of Dade County, having been born here in 1851. His parents are Giles and Louisa (Hayter) Holman, of Tennessee, where they were married, and, in 1850, came to Dade County; they have since lived near the boundary in Polk County. Mr. Holman has a good farm, and is a suc­cessful farmer and stockraiser. His wife died in 1876. W. C. Holman is the oldest of eight children, four sons and four daughters, and was educated in the common country schools. In 1872 he was married to Elizabeth J., daughter of James Moore, born in Missouri. Her parents dying when she was a few months old, she was reared by an uncle. In 1875 they removed to Bar­ton County, and in 1879 to Kansas, where they lived till 1882 or 1883, when they returned to Dade County. Mr. Holman is a liveryman and stock and grain dealer, being engaged extensively in the latter business, at which he has served since he was fifteen years old. Since 1887 he has been in the livery business, having good horses and accommodations. In politics he is a Democrat, and voted for Tilden in 1876. He is the present constable at Everton, and a member of the A. F. & A. M., Everton Lodge, of which he is past master. He is also a Knight Templar and Royal Arch Mason, a member of Constantine Commandery at Green­field, and in religion is a Cumberland Presbyterian. Mr. Holman is a thoroughgoing business man, and an active worker for the general good of the community.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Seymour Hoyt, attorney-at-law, real estate agent and abstracter, of Greenfield, Mo., was born in Marshall County, ILL., in 1844, and is one of the successful legal practitioners of Dade County. He is the son of James and Maria (Hitchcock) Hoyt, and the grand­son of Benjamin Hoyt, who was a native of Connecticut. James Hoyt was born in Stanford, Conn., September 19, 1807, and is the seventh child of the seventh generation of that family in the United States, Simon Hoyt having emigrated from England to the United States in 1628 or 1629. In his youthful days James Hoyt was a tailor by trade, but later in life he followed farming, and paid for his first forty acres of land by following his trade. He was married in New York City, but soon moved to Ohio, where he remained until 1831, when he removed to Springfield, ILL., and after remaining there a short time located in Marshall County, ILL., where he resides at the present time. For the past twenty years he has resided at Lacon, the county seat; was town­ship treasurer for about twenty years, and justice of the peace a number of years. He is still living, and is one of the county's best citizens. His wife, Maria Hitchcock, was born in Connecti­cut in 1811, and died in 1848. After her death he married Eliza Jane Mathis, who is yet living. Mr. Hoyt was the father of nine children by his first wife, and Seymour Hoyt is the youngest child of the nine now living. He was educated in the public schools, also two terms at Lombard University, Galesburg, ILL., and took a full course at the commercial business college of Bryant & Stratton, Chicago, ILL., receiving his diploma in August, 1865. At the age of nineteen he entered the teacher's profession, and this continued until May, 1864, when he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty Second Illinois Infantry, for 100 days, and was under the command of Capt. Hugh Shepherd, of Mendota, ILL. Mr. Hoyt was on post duty for five months at Paducah, Ky., and was discharged at Chicago, ILL., April 9, 1867. He became a resident of Greenfield, Mo., and in the fall of the same year he commenced teaching, and this continued for four terms in Missouri. While in Greenfield he was deputy circuit clerk two years, justice of the peace four years, and in 1878 he was elected probate judge of Dade County, and served four years. In 1882 he commenced the study of law, and in April, 1884, was admitted to the bar. Since then he has practiced his profession. In 1881 he engaged in the real estate business, and in 1883 in abstracting. From March, 1883, to 1887, he was notary public. May 26, 1868, he married Miss Mattie McDow­ell, a native of Greenfield, Mo., born in 1850, and the daughter of Nelson and Catherine (Casebier) McDowell. Mr. McDowell was a member of the first county court of Dade County, and was one of her pioneer citizens. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt were born seven children, five now living: Allan, Kate, Nellie, Mary and James L. In his political views Mr. Hoyt is a staunch Republican, and cast his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant in 1868. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, Greenfield Lodge No. 466, Royal Arch Chapter No. 38, Constantine Commandery No. 7. He is also a member of the G. A. R., Green­field Post No. 75; and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church, he being clerk of the same.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Monroe Ingraham, proprietor of the Dadeville Roller Mill, is a native of Chautauqua County, N. Y., born November 16, 1825, and the son of Thomas and Julia (Balis) Ingraham, both natives of Dutchess County, N. Y,, the former born June 20, 1802, and the latter September 19, 1803. Thomas Ingraham was of English descent, and was a farmer by occupation. He emigrated to Chautauqua County, N. Y., about 1823, and from there to Washtenaw County, Mich., in 1832, where he passed the remain­der of his days, dying March 17, 1865. He was one of the pioneers of that county. The mother died at the home of her son. Monroe Ingraham, August 24, 1872, the same year she came to Missouri. They were the parents of five children, who grew to maturity, Monroe being the eldest child. He remained with his parents until twenty five years of age, and August 7, 1850, he married Miss Mary Abbott, who was born in the town of Bath, N. H., September 25, 1825, and who is the daughter of William and Patience (Burbank) Abbott. Mr. and Mrs. Abbott were both natives of New Hampshire, and emigrated from their native State to Michigan, in 1827. Here they both died, the mother in 1829, and the father in 1861. To Mr. and Mrs. Ingraham were born four children, all living: Carlton A., Delia B., wife of Daniel J. Blakemore; John C, and Julia Patience. Mr. and Mrs. Ingraham, after marriage, which occurred in Michigan, moved to Missouri, settling at Springfeild in 1857, and there Mr. Ingraham started a foundry and machine shop and made the first casting in Southwest Missouri. He resided there until 1870, when they moved to Dadeville, Mo., and started a saw mill the same year, and in connection built a grist mill in 1872, which he operated until 1877. He then sold the saw mill, but still con­tinued to operate the gristmill until 1886. He then completed the roller mill, which he still owns, and which is considered the best mill in Dade County. It cost about $10,000, and was the first roller mill in that county. It has a capacity for fifty barrels of flour per day, and Mr. Ingraham is doing a successful busi­ness. He was at first a Free Soil man in his politics, then a Whig, and afterward a Republican, but is now a Prohibitionist. His first presidential vote was cast for Gen. Scott. He is an earnest worker for the cause of temperance, and he and wife and two children belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Col. Benjamin S. Jones, farmer and stock raiser, of Rock Prairie Township, was born in Putnam County, Ind., in 1832, his parents being the Rev. Benjamin and Hester (Alexander) Jones, born in Maryland in 1779 and 1796, respectively. They were married in Kentucky in 1822, and the same year moved to Indiana, where he died in January, 1845, the mother dying in April of the same year. Mr. Jones was a Methodist minister for twenty five years. He was of Welsh descent, a son of Benjamin Jones, who was born in Wales, and came often a young man to America, settling in Virginia, where he died when his son Benjamin was four years old. Grandfather Peter Alexander was a Revolutionary soldier, and died in Kentucky. The sub­ject of this sketch, the eighth of a family of ten children, was left an orphan at the age of twelve years; he then lived with an elder brother till he was eighteen years of age. He was educated at the common schools till the age of seventeen, when he attended one year at Asbury, now De Paw University, Indiana, after which he went to Iowa and taught school about ten years. At the breaking out of the war he was clerk in a bank, but enlisted in Company M, Third Iowa Cavalry, and on organization of the regiment was made first lieutenant. He held the offices of cap­tain, major and lieutenant colonel, and September, 1864, was made colonel of the regiment, which he commanded till the close of the war, when he was mustered out at Atlanta, Ga., August 9, 1865, after nearly four years of hard service. He was at the battles of Pea Ridge, Hartsville, Mo.; Little Rock; Tupelo, Miss.; Tallahatchee, Miss.; Montevallo, Ala.; and many others. In 1864 he married Mrs. Kate Newcomb, daughter of James McCashen, of Pennsylvania, she having been born in Ohio. Mr. McCashen died in Lee County, Iowa. They have one daughter, Cora F. The Colonel now lives one and a half miles east of Everton, where he has a fine farm of 280 acres, which he himself has well improved. He is a genial, sociable and esteemed gen­tleman. From 1868 to 1870 Col. Jones was treasurer of Wayne County, Iowa; he then served four years as auditor of the same county, when he assumed the editorship of the Wayne County Republican, which he ably edited for eight years, when he was compelled to resign on account of ill health, and after spending some time in Kansas looking for a suitable location, finally settled near Greenfield, Dade County, Mo., where he lived a few years. In politics he has, been a life long, earnest Republican, casting his first vote for Fillmore, in 1856; he has been an earnest worker for the party. He is the present commander of Everton Post No. 359, G. A. R., and is a devout member of the Methodist Epis­copal Church. His wife died in 1883.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

R. N. Killingsworth, who resides in North Township, nine miles northwest of county seat, and who is one of the prominent agriculturists and stock raisers of Dade County, is a native of Greene County, Mo., born January 12, 1840, and is the son of Joseph and Melinda (Barnett) Killingsworth. Joseph Killingsworth was born in McMinn County, E. Tenn., May 12, 1813, and died October 16, 1888, in Dade County, Mo. He was of Scotch descent. In 1838 he came to Greene County, Mo., followed agricultural pursuits, and was one of the early settlers of that county. His wife was born in Tennessee, in 1817, and died October 6, 1886. They were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom grew to maturity, and nine now living. R. N. Killingsworth is the second child born to his parents. He remained at home until twenty one years of age, and in July, 1861, enlisted in the Federal Army, in Company D, Sixth Mis­souri Cavalry, and served six months. In 1863 he married Miss Martha P. Martin, who was born in Tennessee in 1843, and who is the daughter of Isaac and Margaret Martin. Mr. Martin came to Missouri about 1850, and is yet living. Mrs. Martin died about 1855. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Killingsworth: Lewis R., Delia and Dora (twins), Berry, Halla N., William, Burton L., Leslie and Lois B. Mr. Killingsworth has resided on the farm he now owns since 1880; he has 120 acres in the home farm, eighty acres in another, and forty in still another tract. He is a Democrat in his political views, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. His grandfather, Reuben Killingsworth, was born in Tennessee about 1788, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died in Greene County, Mo., about 1857. His wife, Anna (McClain) Killingsworth, died in Greene County, Mo., about 1862.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

James M. Kirby, a farmer and prominent stock raiser of Morgan Township, who is located ten miles northeast of Greenfield, is a native of Kentucky, born December 1, 1830, and the son of Tully C. and Nancy (Hernington) Kirby. (For further particu­lars of parents, see sketch of Fred W. Kirby, which appears elsewhere in these pages.) James M. Kirby was the fourth of eleven children born to his parents, and remained with them until nineteen years of age, when he enlisted for the Mexican War, and was a soldier under Capt. McNair, in Company A, Third Regiment Mounted Infantry of Missouri, and served nine months. He had two older brothers in the same war, one serving eighteen months in Old Mexico, and the other in New Mexico until the close of the war. James M. Kirby was discharged at Independence, Mo., and returned to Dade County, of the same State. In 1861 he joined the Home Guards of Missouri, and a short time after enlisted in the Enrolled Missouri Militia, being elected first lieutenant of Company E, Seventy-sixth regiment a short time after enlisting, in which capacity he remained for eight months, when he was promoted to the rank of cap­tain, and held this until the close of the war. He was at Springfield in 1864, when that city was attacked by General Marmaduke, and was in a severe skirmish at Greenfield also in 1863. Previous to the Civil War, in 1850, he married Miss Mary J. Grisham, a native of Tennessee, born February 24, 1830, and the daughter of John and Mary Grisham, both de­ceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Kirby were born twelve children, eight living: John T., Joseph D., William M.; Nancy F., wife of John A. McConnell; Elnora, wife of John B. McConnell; Cora; Lula, wife of Alfred Smith; and Carrie. Mr. Kirby has resided on his present property, which consists of 250 acres of land, since 1877, and aside from this is the owner of 120 acres in another tract. He is a good citizen, and an influential and well-to-do farmer. He is a Republican in politics, and was appointed reg­ister of veterans of Dade County soon after the close of the war; was also appointed assessor of the county at one time. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Dadeville, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Frederick Kirby, another prominent agriculturist of Morgan Township, was born in Dade County, Mo., September 16, 1848, and is the son of Tully C. and Nancy (Hernington) Kirby. Mr. Kirby was born in Kentucky in 1802, and was of English-Welsh descent. He was a farmer by occupation, and emigrated from his native State to what is now Dade County, Mo., in 1837. He was one of the first settlers, locating in the county before the village of Dadeville was laid out for a town. His wife was born in Kentucky in 1805, and they were married in that State. Their family consisted of eleven children, five now living, four in Dade County, and one in Cedar County. Both parents are living, and make their home with their son, Frederick Kirby, who is the youngest member of the family. He received his education in the county schools of Dade County, and in 1864 he enlisted in Company A, Sixteenth Missouri Cavalry, served about ten months, and partly lost his eyesight during service. March 7, 1882. he married Miss Lauraetta Walker, who was born in Ohio in 1863, and who is the daughter of Amos J. and Martha Walker. Mr. and Mrs. Walker came to Dade County, Mo., from Illinois in 1878, and both are living. After marriage Frederick Kirby located on the old homestead where he was born, resided there one year, and then moved to Dadeville, where he now resides. The homestead contains 300 acres of land, but has since been divided among the children. Four children, three sons and one daughter, were the result of his marriage. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Baptist Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Thomas J. Lawrence and Arthur M. Morrison, dealers in general merchandise at Cedarville, Dade County, Mo., carry a stock of goods valued at $2,000, and are the leading merchants of that village. Mr. Lawrence was born in Alabama in 1859, and is the son of Edward and Martha E. (Morrison) Lawrence. Edward Lawrence was born in Tennessee about 1818, and is of En­glish descent. He is now residing in Fayette County, Ala., and has followed agricultural pursuits all his life. His wife was born near Savannah, Ga., and was burned to death March 14, 1878, by the explosion of a can of oil. They were the parents of six children. Thomas J. Lawrence was the eldest of this family, and received his education in the public schools of Ala­bama. He came to Dade County, Mo., December 22, 1882, and October 7, 1883, married Miss Julia Ducket, who was born in Barton County, Mo., March 15, 1853. Mr. Lawrence is a mem­ber of the Masonic order, is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church. He is postmaster of Cedarville post office.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Arthur M. Morrison was born in Tennessee in 1830, and is the son of Thomas and Nancy (Chastain) Morrison, the father born in Virginia, in 1808, and died in Douglas County, Mo., in 1888. He came to Missouri about 1868. Mrs. Morrison is still living, and was born in Tennessee in 1808. They were the par­ents of ten children, all of whom survive. Arthur M. came to Missouri in 1866, and, in 1869, he opened a store of general mer­chandise and (with the exception of about two years) has been engaged in the business ever since. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Garrett Lodge, at Areola, and is a prominent business man. Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Morrison, are pleasant, obliging gentlemen, enjoying the fullest confidence of their patrons, and are doing a good business.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Joseph B. Lindsey, stock dealer and feeder at Lockwood, Mo., was born in Fond du Lac County, Wis., in 1847, and is the son of Keyes and Almira (Button) Lindsey, natives of Vermont, born in 1809 and 1811, respectively. Keyes Lindsey was left an orphan when a boy, and was partly reared in New York. Mrs. Lindsey went to New York with her parents when young, there met and was married to Mr. Lindsey, and there remained until 1845, when they removed to Fond du Lac, Wis., and there lived until 1881. They then moved to Dade County, Mo., where the mother is still residing. Mr. Lindsey died March 10, 1889. Both were members of the Presbyterian Church for many years. While living in New York Mr. Lindsey was a car­riage manufacturer, and after moving to the West he was a trader in real estate, at which he was very successful. He was of Scotch-Irish descent. Joseph Button, the paternal grand­father of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Vermont, and died in New York, where he left a large family.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

John Cyrus Lindley, the subject of this sketch, was born in the northeast corner of Dade County, Mo., September 11,1852, where he has resided since his birth. He is the son of John and Mary Lindley, who came to this county from Kentucky at a very early day. In the year 1833, they settled on the place where J. C. Lindley now lives, and have never moved from it. John Lindley, who was born August 9, 1809, was shot by some unknown person, while in his field sowing wheat, October 7, 1864, from the effects of which he died October 18, 1864. He came to this country poor, but, by industry and good manage­ment, acquired considerable property. At the commencement of the late Civil War he was the largest tax payer in Dade County, Mo. His wife, whose maiden name was Brasher, was born Feb­ruary 25, 1811, and is now living on the old homestead with her son, J. C. Lindley. Although seventy eight years old, she is hale and hearty, and our subject cannot remember the time when she was sick enough to call in a physician. She is the mother of three children, all living. One son, J. R. Lindley, living at Ridgeway, Hopkins County, Tex., is one of the large land and stock owners of that part of Texas. A daughter lives in Jerico Springs, Cedar County, Mo. Both were married, and left the old home before the third child, J. C. Lindley, was born. Mr: J. C. Lindley received only a moderate English education in the district schools of Morgan Township, his circumstances being such that he could not attend higher schools, his father's death leaving him the charge of an aged mother, and the business devolving upon him. January 25, 1877, Mr. Lindley was united in marriage to D. F. Hailey, who was born in Dade County, Mo., November 23, 1854, and is the daughter of Allen and Eva Hailey. Mr. Hailey was shot at his home during the late war. The mother is still living on the farm where her husband was killed. Mrs. D. F. Lindley is an amiable, even tempered lady, of whom her husband is very proud. To them have been born six children, four boys and two girls: James Walter, John Elmer, Mary Eva, Laura Jane, Albin Rollo, and Frank Lee. Mr. Lindley is the owner of about 1,600 acres of land, divided into three improved farms; two are in Cedar County, Mo., and the old home place, where he lives, is about equally divided in Dade and Cedar Counties. Mr. Lindley is one of the stockholders in the Dade County Bank; handles con­siderable stock, among them some short horned cattle, jacks and stallions, and is the largest taxpayer in his township. He, wife and mother, are members of the Church of Christ, and he is a deacon in the same. In politics, he is a Democrat. Although having no political aspirations, he was unanimously chosen a candidate for representative in 1888. Owing to the large Republican majority in Dade County, he was defeated. Dade County has a Republican majority of 360 odd, and Mr. Lindley was beaten by only 146 votes. He disclaims any intention of ever entering politics again, and only consented this time at the earnest solicitation of his "true and tried" friends. His only ambition, as a public man, has been to be a minister of the "gospel of the grace of God." Although not an ordained minister, he has preached some. He says: "In a quiet way, I expect to spend the remainder of my days at the dear old home­stead, where my sainted father sleeps, and the roof of which has been my shelter 'mid all the vicissitudes of life."  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Capt. E. Addison Mc Caleb, farmer and stock raiser of Lockwood Township, and son of Samuel and Catherine (Wood) Mc Caleb, was born in Putnam County, ILL., in 1833. Samuel Mc Caleb was born in Rockbridge County, Va., in 1794, and his wife in Mason County, Ky., in 1801. They were married in Kentucky about 1819, and from there removed to Ohio, thence to Indiana, and in 1832, to Putnam County, ILL., where Mr. Mc Caleb died in 1839. He was a stone-mason and brick-layer by trade, and was justice of the peace for many years. Mrs. Mc Caleb lived a widow for over forty years, and died in Illinois in 1882. They were the parents of ten children, eight sons and two daughters. Of these children, Capt. E. Addison Mc Caleb was sixth in order of birth. He was educated in the rustic log schoolhouses of Illinois, until seventeen years of age, and then attended one year at Judson College, at Mt. Palatine, ILL., after which he taught two winters. He was married in 1853 to Miss Susan Conrad, a native of Schuyler County, ILL., and the daughter of Jeff. Conrad. Mrs. Mc Caleb died in Illinois, in 1868. To this union was born seven children, four now living. November 7, 1872, Mr. Mc Caleb took for his second wife, Miss Ara E., daughter of Townsend G. and Zilla Fife, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Mr. Fife died in Illinois, but his wife is still living. The second Mrs. Mc Caleb was born in Illinois. To this union were born five children, two now living. Mr. Mc Caleb served seven months in the United States Army, Company B, Seventy seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and operated from Covington, Ky., in 1862, to Vicksburg, Miss. He was in the attack on Haines Bluff, and was at the capture of Fort Hinman, at Arkansas Post. He enlisted as second lieutenant, was afterward made captain, but resigned in April, 1863, on account of disability, and returned home. In 1870 he came to Dade County, Mo., and settled on a wild piece of prairie land in the southwest part of the county. He is now one of the most extensive farmers of Dade County, being the owner of 1,003 acres of land, with 800 acres under cultivation. He deals largely in live stock, and is engaged in rearing short horned cattle. Since 1886 Mr. Mc Caleb has lived in Lockwood, and was justice of the peace for three years. He has been a Democrat in his political views all his life, and his first presidential vote was cast for James Buchanan in 1856. He has been a member of the Ancient, Free and Ac­cepted Masons for thirty five years, now belonging to Lockwood Lodge, and to the Greenfield Chapter and Commandery. He has been senior warden. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Lockwood Post, and he and wife are members in good standing in the Christian Church. He has been an earnest worker for the cause of education, and for the general up building of the country. His children are named as follows: Lydia, wife of William Forrest, of Putnam County, ILL.; Kate, wife of Joseph Miller; Clarence A., and Samuel A. Capt. Mc Caleb was reared in the pioneer days of Illinois, by a widowed mother, who had a large family to support, and much of his success, integrity and uprightness is due to the early training of a true Christian mother. His advantages for an education were very limited, but by earnest effort on his part he obtained a good practical educa­tion, and is one of the prominent agriculturists of Dade County.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Thomas Mc Dermid, farmer and stock dealer of Lockwood Township, was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1843, and is the sec­ond of seven children, five sons and two daughters, born to John and Margaret (Frazier) Mc Dermid, and the grandson of Hugh Mc Dermid, who was a native of Scotland, and remained there until after his marriage, when he and wife removed to Lower Canada, and afterward to Upper Canada, and there passed the remainder of their lives. John McDermid was born in Quebec, Canada, and his wife was born in Scotland. When about fifteen years of age she came with her parents to America, settled in Lower Canada, and was there married to Mr. McDermid. They soon after moved to Ontario, Canada, where they are both living. Thomas McDermid was reared on the farm, and received his education in the common schools. He was married in August, 1869, to Miss Elizabeth N., daughter of Thomas and Margaret Crozier. Mrs. McDermid was born in Canada, and by her marriage became the mother of two children, a son and daughter. In 1870 they came to Dade County, Mo., and two years afterward settled on the prairie near Lockwood, and here they have since remained. He has 320 acres of well improved land, and is one of the leading pioneer settlers. He has an attractive and beautiful home. He was president of Lockwood Union Agricultural, Mechanical and Stock Association, at its organization in 1886, and was re-elected in 1887, 1888 and 1889, and is an earnest worker for the cause of education and for the up building of the county. He and wife are members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Mr. McDermid is the only one of his father's family living in Dade County, Mo. One brother is living in Dakota, and they are the only ones in the United States. Mr. McDermid is a thorough going, practical farmer and stockgrower, and is principally engaged in the raising of cattle. Politically he is a Prohibitionist, and longs for the day when strong drink, the worst enemy of man, shall be banished from the land. Mrs. McDermid's father was born in Ireland, and her mother in England. They left their native land when young, and settled in Canada, where they were married, and where they remained until 1872, when they moved to Dade County, Mo. Here they both died; Mr. Crozier on November 26, 1877, and Mrs. Crozier about seven years previous. Mr. Crozier was a well-to-do farmer and stock-raiser.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Archibald McLemore, farmer, and an old citizen of Center Township, five miles northeast of Greenfield, is a native of Knox County, Tenn., having been born in 1817. His father was Archibald McLemore, of North Carolina, who went to Knox County, Tenn., when a young man, where he married Sarah Plumley. In 1820 they removed to Monroe County, where he died in 1825, at about the age of forty five, his wife dying in 1824. She was the mother of eleven children, the subject of this sketch being the seventh, who, after his parents' death, lived with his brother, Abram, working for him until he was nearly grown. In 1827 he assisted the governor to remove the Cherokees to their reservation in In­dian Territory. September 15, 1842, he married Miss Mollie Brown, who was born in South Carolina, in 1817, the daughter of Robert and Jennie (Dennis) Brown, who moved to Monroe County, Tenn., about 1820. In 1842 Mr. McLemore came to Dade County, Mo., and settled two miles from Greenville, on the farm which is now owned by John Higgin. He remained two years, when, owing to ill health, he returned to Tennessee, and, in 1849, again came to Dade County, settling on the farm which he now owns, comprising about 265 acres. Their family con­sisted of six children: Mary, who died in 1886, aged forty three; Robert, a merchant at Everton; Sarah Ann, wife of James McConnell; William, merchant at Everton; Paulina, wife of George Wilson, merchant at Everton. Mr. McLemore is a highly re­spected citizen; in politics he is a Republican, casting his first vote for Van Buren in 1840, being a Democrat before the war. He and his wife belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William Y. McLemore, born in Dade County in 1852, son of Archibald and Mary (Brown) McLemore, is the senior member of the firm of McLemore Brothers, general merchants and deal­ers in farm implements, livestock, etc., established in July, 1884. The value of their sales annually is about $30,000, the value of the stock being about $8,000. The subject of this sketch, the fourth child of a family of six, three sons and three daughters, was raised on the farm, received a common school education, and remained at home till 1878, when he entered the mercantile business at Crossroads with G. W. Wilson, where they remained in business till the railroad was built, at which time they re­moved to Everton and built the first store building, which was in the woods. The firm continued till 1882, in September, when Mr. McLemore retired, and in 1884 established the present firm with his brothers, Robert F. and Jasper M. This firm is one of the strongest mercantile firms in Dade County. They began with nothing, are thoroughgoing and live business men, and upright citizens. In 1881 William Y. married Serepta C., daughter of Calvin and Acenith Wheeler, formerly of East Tennessee, but early settlers of Dade County, where Mrs. McLemore was born, and where the father died. The mother died in Kansas. Mr. Wheeler was a merchant and manufac­turer. Our subject has had three children, two of whom are liv­ing. In politics he is a Republican, voting for Hayes in 1876. He and wife are Presbyterians.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

C. C. McLemore, of Washington Township, was born in Monroe County, East Tennessee, in 1837. His parents were John and Delila (Bredon) McLemore, of Tennessee, where they lived till 1852, when they came to Dade County, where the father died in March, 1880, and the mother, June 30, 1868. Mr. McLemore was a well-to-do farmer and blacksmith, of Scotch descent. The subject of this sketch was the third of six sons and four daughters, all living but one daughter. He received a common school education, and in January, 1868, married Sarah A., daughter of Joshua and Sarah Ragsdale, natives of South and North Carolina, respectively, who went to Tennessee when young, and came to Dade County in 1837, where they spent the remainder of their lives. They were among the first white settlers, coming when the country was wild and new. Mr. C. C. McLemore has had a family of eight children, five sons and two daughters now living. In 1863 he went to Colorado, and for seven years was engaged in the stock business there with suc­cess. Since his marriage he has lived in Dade County, where he has 837 acres in different farms, 350 of which is under culti­vation. He is an extensive stockdealer, and is engaged in breeding short horned cattle and fine Clydesdale horses. He is a Democrat, a member of Greenfield Lodge No. 446, A. F. & A. M., of Royal Arch Chapter No. 37, and of Constantine Commandery No. 27, and is one of the wealthy citizens and practical farmers of Dade County. Mrs. McLemore is a mem­ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

S. N. McMillen, a prominent farmer and stockraiser of Washington Township, was born in Hardeman County, W. Tenn., in 1833, and is the son of Robert D. and Mary (Neely) McMillen. Robert D. McMillen was born near Knoxville, Tenn., in May, 1794, and after living in different parts of Tennessee, he moved with his parents to Mississippi, and was married in Monroe County, of that State, in 1823, to Miss Neely. After marriage he removed to Hardeman County, Tenn., and in 1836 returned to Mississippi. One year later he came to what is now Dade County, settling in a small log cabin near South Greenfield, and there improved a good farm. He died there in 1868. All was wild and unbroken when he settled in Dade County, wild game was plentiful, and the nearest doctor was in Greene County. They were obliged to go to Springfield to mill, and the nearest post office was at Boli­var. Mr. McMillen handled a great deal of stock. Mrs. Mary M. (Neely) McMillen was born in Tennessee, and died when the sub­ject of this sketch was but an infant. Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. McMillen, six are still living. After the death of his wife, Robert D. McMillen took for his second wife Miss Minerva Anderson, who died in Dade County, Mo., in 1844. He then married Mrs. Permelia Ann Thaxton, who died in 1868. S. N. McMillen was reared in the wilds of Dade County, and owing to the scarcity of schools, never attended but a few months. He began for himself at the age of twenty two or twenty three, and in 1855 went with an exploring expedition through New Mexico and Oklahoma. In 1857 he went with others to Choctaw Nation, purchased cattle, and drove them to California, the trip taking 108 days. In 1858 he returned to Missouri, where he and another man purchased a large number of sheep, and started for Texas, but near Fort Smith he was taken sick and returned to Missouri. In 1862 he was made second lieutenant of a company of Enrolled Missouri Militia, was captured the same day and paroled. He soon after considered it unsafe to remain at home, and went at once to Rolla, where he was engaged as a teamster for the Gov­ernment to transfer supplies from Rolla to different points. This he continued for eighteen months, when his health failed. He then went to Leavenworth, made one trip with freight to Denver, Colo., in 1864, and returned in 1865. In July of the last named year, Mr. McMillen married Miss Sarah A., daughter of Archi­bald and Patsey Morris, natives of Robertson County, Tenn., who came to Dade County, Mo., in 1843. Here Mrs. Morris died in 1888. Mr. Morris is still living, and is seventy five years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. McMillen were born eight children, two sons and three daughters now living. After marriage Mr. McMillen rented land for a few years, and then settled on the old home farm, where he now has 255 acres of good land, mostly the result of his own labor. He was president of the school board near South Greenfield, for a number of years, was his party's choice for public administrator in 1888, but was defeated with the rest of the Democratic party. He was a Whig previous to the war, but since then he has affiliated with the above party. His first vote was cast for Mr. Fillmore, in 1856. Mr. McMillen is one of the few who have lived in Dade County fifty two years, and has witnessed the marvelous growth of the country in that time. He was reared almost among the Indians. His grand­father, William McMillen, was a native of Scotland, and came to America when young. While a soldier in the War of 1812, he was captured by the Indians, and retained a prisoner three and a half years. His family, which was then living in Tennessee, supposed him dead, and were greatly surprised when he returned to them and related his experiences with the Indians. He died in Tennessee. He married Miss Mary Doak in 1792.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Honorable Edgar P. Mann, attorney-at-law and mayor of Green­field, Mo., became a resident of the town in August, 1883, and one year later formed a partnership with Mason Talbutt. Mr. Mann is a native of Warren County, Mo., born in 1858, and is the son of Josiah and Elizabeth (Moore) Mann, and the grandson of Thomas Mann, who was a native of North Carolina, and a farmer by occupation. He came to Lincoln County, Mo., when a young man, and there died in 1872 at the age of seventy-two years.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Josiah Mann was born in Lincoln County, Mo., in 1823, and was of English descent. He was married in Warren County, Mo., and immediately afterward located there. He was a farmer by occupation, and was assessor of Warren County two terms. He now resides in LaFayette County, Mo., where he has lived since 1872. His wife, Elizabeth Moore, was born in Virginia in 1831, is of Scotch Irish descent, and is yet living. They were the parents of eight children. Hon. Edgar P. Mann was the fifth child in order of birth, and was reared and grew to manhood on a farm, making his home with his parents until eighteen years of age. He received his rudimentary education in the public schools, and his collegiate education at Warrensburg State Normal. At the age of nineteen he entered the teacher's pro­fession, and followed this for four terms in LaFayette County, Mo. During his teaching he became a disciple of Blackstone, his preceptor being Hon. John S. Blackwell, of Lexington, Mo. December 21, 1881, he was admitted to the bar at the last mentioned place, and commenced his practice there. In 1883 he came to Greenfield, Mo., and was elected mayor of that city in 1888. He is a Democrat, politically, and has been a delegate to several State conventions, all since 1884. His first presidential vote was for Hancock in 1880. June 2, 1887, Mr. Mann married Miss Mary E. Clark, who was born in Missouri, and who is the daughter of S. S. Clark. One child, Frank, has been born to this union. Mr. Mann is a member of the A. O. U. W., is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and is one of the promising young men of Southwest Missouri. Mrs. Mann is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William H. Mitchell, farmer and stock raiser, of Rock Prairie Township, was born in Grainger County, Tenn., in 1836. His father, Preston Mitchell, was probably born in New York in 1808, but came with his parents when quite young, to Grainger County, Tenn., where he was reared and married, and in 1855 came to Dade County, where he died in 1875; he was a farmer and deputy sheriff in Tennessee, and justice of the peace in Dade County some years. His mother, daughter of Edward Church­man, was born in Grainger County, Tenn., in 1812, and died in Tennessee in 1878, where she went in 1876. His grandfather, Greenberry Mitchell, was English, and his grandmother German; both came when young to the United States, afterward working to pay their passage, and were among the first settlers of Grainger County, where Mr. Mitchell died a year or two before the war, at the age of seventy three. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, was justice of the peace many years, and among the wealthiest men in the county at his death. The subject of this sketch, the third of a family of six, was educated at the common log school houses, and, coming with his parents to Dade County, in 1856 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Archie and Mary Poindexter, natives of Kentucky, who came to Dade County about 184S, where they died. They have ten children, three sons and five daughters living. Since marriage he has lived on his present farm of 265 acres, it then having five acres cleared, whereas now there are 150 under cultivation. He served about two and a half years in the Union Army; was in Company E, Seventy sixth Enrolled Missouri Militia about six months, in the Provisional service some six months, then twenty months in the United States service, Company E, Fifteenth United States Cavalry, in Southwest Missouri, and, having been captured in Jasper County, after one day and night was exchanged. He is a Republican in politics, and religiously a Presbyterian; his wife being a Cumberland Presbyterian.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Marshall C. Murray, stock dealer and farmer of Grant Town­ship, Dade County, Mo., and the son of Judge John and Sarah (Lettreal) Murray, was born in McMinn County, Tenn., in 1831. The parents were natives of North Carolina, the father born in 1799, and the mother in 1796. They were married in Tennessee in 1819, and afterward moved to Greene County, Mo., being among the first settlers of Southwest Missouri. Mrs. Mur­ray died there in about 1844, and Judge Murray in about 1866. He was a farmer and stock raiser for many years, and was also judge of the county court of Greene County, Mo. He served on the frontier in removing the Indians at an early day. He and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His father, William Alexander Murray, was born in North Carolina, and died in Tennessee. He was of French origin, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. His grandfather was a Frenchman. Mrs. Sarah (Let­treal) Murray was of Scotch French descent and the daughter of Lewis Lettreal, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and died in Tennessee. Marshall C. Murray was the fifth of nine children, six sons and three daughters, and was reared in Greene County, Mo., from four years of age. He received a very lim­ited education, owing to the scarcity of schools, and in 1858 he was united in marriage to Miss Frances Jane, daughter of Zachariah and Eliza Jane Sim, then of Greene County, Mo., where Mrs. Murray was born. Her parents were formerly from Tennes­see. Mrs. Murray died October 25, 1886, leaving nine children, seven sons and two daughters. Mr. Murray lived in Greene County, Mo., until 1878, when he came to Dade County, Mo., and settled on his present farm, which then consisted of wild prairie land. He now has 490 acres of well improved land, all the result of his own efforts, and is one of the prominent agricul­turists and stock raisers of the county, having followed this busi­ness for the last fifteen years. During the late war he was in the Confederate Army, Company C, of Campbell's Battalion of Missouri, and operated in Southwest Missouri, Arkansas and Mississippi. He was captured at Big Black Bridge, Miss., in the spring of 1864, was taken to Camp Morton, Ind., and a few weeks later to Fort Delaware, where he remained a few months. He was then taken to Point Lookout, on Chesapeake Bay, where he was held about three months before peace was declared, and then returned home after four years of hardship and suffering. He was in the battle of Pea Ridge, Corinth, Grand Gulf, and was in the fights at Iuka, etc. Politically a Democrat, his first presidential vote was for Franklin Pierce, in 1852, and for nearly every Democratic candi­date since. He has been a member of Lodge No. 101, of the A. F. & A. M., at Springfield, since twenty-two years of age, is a Master Mason, and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for about thirty years. Four of his children are, and Mrs. Murray was also a member of the same church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Col. Jason W. Newell, farmer, of Marion Township, was born in Utica, Oneida County, N. Y., in 1834, and is the son of Rev. Jeffrey and Christina (Traver) Newell, the former born in Stockbridge County, Vt., about 1785, and the latter born on the Hud­son River, N. Y., being six years her husband's junior. They were married in New York, and lived there until 1849, when they removed to Springfield, ILL., and in 1851 to Calumet County, Wis., where Mr. Newell died in 1867. Mrs. Newell died during the war. Mr. Newell was a minister in the Christian Church, and preached the doctrines of that church for over fifty years with great success. He was of English origin, but his people had lived in America for probably 250 years. Col. Jason W. Newell is next to the youngest in a family of thirteen children, seven sons and six daughters. He received a good academic education, finishing in Calumet County, Wis., and came West with his parents. When a boy he learned the machinist and engineering trade, which he followed until the breaking out of the war, and was engineer on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad for some time. In 1854 he married Miss Lydia I., daughter of William and Lydia Lee, natives of New York and Vermont, respectively. Mrs. Lee died in 1859, and was a mem­ber of the Christian Church, and Mr. Lee died at the home of his son-in-law, Col. Newell, in 1872. He was a sailor nearly all his life, was at the battle of Trafalgar, and saw Napoleon while he was crossing the Alps. His father was a native of Ireland, but he knew very little about his parents, as he was kidnapped when six years of age. In August, 1862, Col. Newell enlisted in Com­pany E, Twenty first Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, was soon made orderly sergeant, then, in October, was made second lieu­tenant, and soon after first lieutenant, which position he held until June, 1863, when he resigned on account of sickness and losses. In 1864 he removed to Chicago, where he was employed by the Government to erect barracks, etc. In February and March, 1865, he organized seventeen companies from the Rebel prisoners at Camp Douglas for frontier service. Seven of these companies were mustered into service, and Col. Newell was made Captain of Company A, after which he crossed the plains to Salt Lake City, etc. He was mustered out at that city in May, 1866, on account of disability. He then returned from the West, and since the war has been engaged principally in farming. In 1870 he was elected sheriff of Calumet County, Wis., re-elected in 1872, and served four years, against a Democratic majority of 1,400. He was the only Republican elected, and received 400 majority. In 1879 he came to Dade County, Mo., where he has since lived, and where he has a good farm of eighty acres. In 1884 Col. Newell was elected to the Legislature, and re-elected in 1886, holding the position with distinction and credit. He was reared a Democrat, his first presidential vote being for James Buchanan in 1856, but since the war he has affiliated with the Republican party. He is a member of Lockwood Post No. 325, G. A. R., was the organizer of the same, and was its first commander Col. Newell and wife have been members of the Christian Church for twenty three years, and their two daughters are also mem­bers. Their family consists of one son and two daughters. While on the frontier in 1866 he was appointed captain in the United States regimental service, but never reported to the exam­ining board on account of his disability before the board met. His commission as captain of the command on the frontier was one of the very last acts of President Lincoln, being signed by him just the day before his assassination. Colonel Newell, as he is familiarly called, is a man of more than ordinary ability and cul­ture. He has spared no pains for the social condition of his family, and has also been active in educational affairs. His eldest child, Perry T., one of Dade County's well-to-do farmers, is the husband of Miss Sarah Lemon, a native of Missouri, and the father of three children; the second child, Grace, is the wife of W. K. Hulbert, a well known pioneer of Dade County, and now a hard­ware merchant of Stockton, Kan.; the third child, Maud, is at home.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Joseph A. Patton, who excels in farming and stock raising, and whose farm is situated in Cedar Township, Dade County, Mo., sixteen miles northwest of the county seat, was born in Tipton County, W. Tenn., September 9, 1837, and is the son of George and Taphenis (Leeper) Patton. George Patton was born in Pennsylvania about 1800, and, when about three years of age, emigrated with his parents to St. Louis County, Mo., resided there a few years, and then emigrated to Franklin County, Mo. He received his education in St. Louis, and afterward went to Texas, where he taught school a number of years. He then mar­ried Miss Leeper, who was born in Hawkins County, Tenn., about 1812, and three years after marriage he and wife came to Greene County, Mo., resided there one year, and then moved to Dade County, being among the early settlers of this county. He died in Barton County, Mo., in February, 1845. They suffered all the hardships and privations incident to pioneer days, were obliged to go thirty miles to mill, and wolf scalps, honey and beeswax were articles of trade. They raised their own flax and cotton, and manufactured their own clothing. Their family consisted of six children, five now living. Joseph A. Patton's entire school­ing did not exceed four months, and he remained on his father's farm until 1850, when he took a trip across the plains to Califor­nia with his three brothers. He remained there thirteen months, engaged in herding stock and in mining, after which he returned home, and in 1862 enlisted in the Federal Army, Company G, Fourteenth Missouri Militia, afterward the Eighth Missouri, and served until the close of the war. He then returned to the old homestead, and lived with his mother until after her death. He now lives on the old farm with his brother, John M., and a sister, Martha E. The farm contains 610 acres, and is well improved. Mr. Patton is a member of the Masonic order, of Washington Lodge at Greenfield. He was a Democrat in politics, but voted for Peter Cooper in 1876; J. B. Weaver, 1880; B. F. Butler, 1884; and A. J. Streeter, 1888.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Howard Pierce was prominent among the enterprising and suc­cessful farmers and stock raisers of Grant Township, Dade County, Mo., stands the name of Mr. Pierce, who was born in Greene County, N. Y., in 1828. His parents, Dr. Eli and Sarah (Burgess) Pierce, were born in Otsego County, N. Y. and Philadelphia, respectively. They were married in New York, and in about 1844 removed to Indiana, where the mother died before the war, and where the father died about 1880. Dr. Pierce was an eminent physician for twenty-five years on the Hud­son River, N. Y., but after he removed to Indiana retired from practice. He was at one time president of the New York State Medical Association. Dr. Pierce was of the old Puritan stock, and was of the same family as President Pierce. Howard Pierce, the fourth of five sons and three daughters, received a good education, and studied the languages under a private tutor. He came to Indiana with his parents, and was there married in 1855 to Miss Mary J., daughter of Francis and Rheua E. Mossman, natives of Coshocton County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Mossman removed to Indiana when Mrs. Pierce was a girl, and there they still live. To Mr. and Mrs. Pierce were born ten children, five sons and three daughters now living. In 1857 Mr. Pierce removed to Fond du Lac, Wis., but afterward to Milwaukee, where he was engaged in the grain business there and at Chicago, until 1871, when he came to Dade County, Mo. Here he settled on prairie land near his present residence. In 1879 he settled on his present farm, which consists of 160 acres, all the result of his own industry. In politics he was formerly a Whig, casting his first presidential vote for Gen. Taylor in 1848, but at present he is a staunch Republican. He has been a mem­ber of the A. F. & A. M. for thirty years, and he and his wife are members of the old school Presbyterian Church. His grand­father, William Burgess, was born in England, as was also Mrs. Burgess, and died in Otsego County, N. Y. He raised a com­pany, and offered his services in the War of 1812, but was not needed. He was a wealthy and influential farmer.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William N. Poe, farmer, of Washington Township, and judge of the Dade County Court from the Eastern District, was born in Benton County, Ark., in 1846. His parents were John and Matilda Ann (Ferguson) Poe, he of Dutch descent, and probably of North Carolina, and she of Tennessee. About 1845 they removed to Benton County, and, when William N. was about nine months old, removed to Dade County, finally settling on a small improvement of the farm where our subject now lives, and where they were burned out in 1862. In February, 1863, Mr. Poe died, at the age of sixty three, his wife afterward marrying John B. Evans, dying, in 1879, at the age of fifty two. Both were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Poe was married three times, the first two wives living but a short time. He had two children by his second wife. The subject of this sketch is the second of a family of eight children, all the sons and two daughters living. He attended school but very little, and, after the death of his father, the family returned to the farm, on which our subject has since lived. He is now the owner of 140 acres of good farm land. In March, 1869, he mar­ried Louisa, daughter of William and Isabelle Cecil, of North Carolina, who came, in 1841, to Johnson County, where the mother died in July, 1888. The father, who served in the Fed­eral army, and who was constable for some years, is still living. William N. has four children: John William, Albert, Arthur and David Lee. In 1888 he was elected county judge by a good majority. He is a Republican, having voted for Grant in 1868, and every Republican candidate since; is a member of South Greenfield Lodge No. 292, I. O. O. F., having served one year as vice grand. He and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for nearly twenty years he has served as steward.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Isaac Preston, a pioneer of Smith Township, was born in what is now Johnson County, Ky., in 1823. His parents were Isaac and Sarah (Downing) Preston, natives of Virginia, who went to Kentucky early in the present century, and in 1837 came to Missouri, settling in Dade County in 1840 on a small improve­ment on the west fork of the Limestone, where they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1848, and the mother in 1856. Mr. Preston was a soldier under General Harrison in the War of 1812, and was a well-to-do farmer and stock raiser. The subject of this sketch, a farmer and stock raiser, one of ten chil­dren, had a very limited education, and remained at home until twenty three years of age; he worked as an employee till he had a capital of $300 or $400, when he went to Fort Scott, then a Government post, where he engaged for five years in furnishing supplies to the troops, from which he made considerable money. He returned to Dade County, and in 1851 married Susan, daugh­ter of William and Susan Fryer, who came to Dade County from North Carolina about 1841, where they both died. He has a family of two sons and three daughters living. With the excep­tion of about four years during the war, he has lived on his pres­ent farm of 360 acres since his marriage. From 1862 till the close of the war he served in the Confederate Army, first in a Texas regiment of cavalry, and afterward with General Joseph Shelby in a Missouri regiment. He is a Democrat, and himself and wife are Cumberland Presbyterians. The children are: Christopher C, William; Nancy V., wife of John Hoshaw, of Lawrence County; Louie B., wife of William R. Kates; and Sallie, wife of Oliver Murry.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Cyrenus Z. Russell, county clerk of Dade County, Mo., was born in Peoria County, ILL., in 1840, and is the son of Abner and Samantha (Seward) Russell, and grandson of Abner Russell, who was a native of Massachusetts. Abner Russell, Sr., moved to Peoria, ILL., in 1836, and there died in 1857. Abner Russell, Jr., was a native of Erie County, N. Y., born in 1815, and was a minister in the Christian Church. He was engaged in his minis­terial duties for many years. He moved with his parents to Peoria, ILL., in 1836, and was married in that State to Miss Seward. He is yet living, and resides in Kirksville, where he has resided since 1875. His wife was born in Broome County, N. Y., in 1820, and she too is living. The family consisted of nine children, five of whom are living. Of these children, Cyrenus Z. Russell was the eldest. He received a liberal educa­tion in the district schools of Illinois and Missouri, and was reared on a farm. During the late war he was a strong Union man, and, June 18, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty first Regiment Missouri Infantry; fought at Athens, Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Battle of Corinth, Tupelo, and was in many skirmishes. He entered as a private, and was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant. After being commissioned he was on staff duty, and was mustered out and discharged at St. Louis in February, 1865. After the war, or in 1866, he located in Marshall County, ILL., at Henry, and began a hardware and implement business, which he continued for some time. Previous to this, in 1865, he attended commercial college (Bryant and Stratton's) in St. Louis, and, in January, 1870, he went to Fort Scott, Kan., where he resumed the same line of business commenced in 1866. The firm of which he was a member was J. Russell & Co., J. Russell being our subject's uncle. He was first a clerk for his uncle, and after­ward became partner. He remained at Fort Scott until January, 1874, when he became a citizen of Dade County, Mo., locating on a farm in Grant Township. In the fall of 1886 he was elected clerk of the county court of Dade County, by a good majority, and held this position for a period of four years. In December. 1886, he removed to Greenfield, where he has since resided. In 1867 he married Miss Ala Ann Teagarden, who was born in Ken­tucky, and who bore him five children: Charles £., who was named after Col. Ellsworth, of Chicago, ILL.; John A., Will­iam O., and Leulah and Beulah, twins. In politics Mr. Russell is a Republican, casting his first presidential vote for Lincoln in 1864. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Lockwood Lodge, and is also a member of Post No. 75, G. A. R., at Greenfield. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Judge Frederick Schnelle, associate judge of Dade County Court from the Western District, was elected in November, 1888. He is a successful farmer and stock raiser of Grant Township, and was born in Prussia in 1836. His parents, Henry and Mary (Linback) Schnelle, were natives of Prussia, the father born in 1808, and the mother in about 1811. They were married in their native country, and in 1852 came to the United States, settling in New York, and there remained until 1854, when they moved to Mason County, ILL. Here the mother died in 1855. Mr. Schnelle afterward married Mrs. Henrietta Linback, sister to his first wife. She died in 1882, and two years later Mr. Schnelle came, with his son, Frederick Schnelle, to Dade County, where he died July 3, 1887. He was a farmer by occupation. He served three years in the Prussian army. His father, Carl Schnelle, spent all his life in Prussia, and was a well-to-do farmer. Judge Frederick Schnelle was the second of three sons and five daughters, two sons and one daughter now living. He attended the common schools in his native country until fourteen years of age, after which he came, with his parents, to the United States, and attended school for two months in New York, obtaining a fair knowledge of the English language. He went with his parents to Illinois, and in 1861 was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Behrens, a native of Prussia, where her parents died when she was quite young. She came to the United States with friends in 1859. By her marriage to Mr. Schnelle she became the mother of twelve children, five sons and five daughters now living, all of whom were educated in the English and German languages. Judge Schnelle resided in Mason County, ILL., until 1884, when he came to Dade County, Mo., and has since lived on his present farm, which consists of 296 acres, situated six miles southwest of Lockwood, all the result of his own hard labor. He is engaged in farming and stock raising, his stock being short horned cattle and Poland China hogs. For seven years he was township collector of Mason County, ILL. He is a staunch Democrat, and, although Dade County is largely Repub­lican, he was elected to the judgeship by a majority of fifty one votes. No further test is necessary as a proof of his popularity and ability, he being the only Democrat elected to a county office in Dade County. He cast his first presidential vote for Stephen A. Douglas, in i860. He and family belong to the Lutheran Church, and he is one of the leading citizens of the county.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

James R. Scott, a prominent agriculturist of Center Township, residing four miles northeast of Greenfield, was born in Dade County, Mo., in 1847, and is the son of Emerson C. and Amanda (Tucker) Scott. Richard Scott, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Kentucky, and died in Dade County, Mo., in 1858, at the age of seventy five years. Emerson C. Scott came to Missouri at the age of twenty two years, and was married in 1845 to Miss Tucker. He pre-empted 300 acres in Section 3, Township 26, Range 26, where he located, and where he passed his life. He was killed, after night, in his own house, in June, 1863, two men committing the dastardly deed. Amanda (Tucker) Scott was born in Middle Tennessee, December 10, 1822, and is the daughter of James and Catherine Tucker, who were residents of Dade County, Mo., in Center Township. Mrs. Scott is still living, and is the mother of eight children: Narcissa C, born in 1846, the wife of J. J. Winkle; James R., Alexander Hamilton, Albert H., William E., Oliver P., Sterling Price and Emerson C. James R., the eldest son, was reared and grew to manhood on a farm. In 1873 he married Miss Sarah C. Studdard, a native of McMinn County, Tenn., born in 1853, and the daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Harleson) Studdard, of Dade County, Mo., the former born in 1793, and the mother in 1812, in North Carolina. They died in 1857 and 1882, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are the parents of one child, William E. Scott. Mr. Scott resides on a portion of the old homestead, and is the owner of ninety three acres. He is a Democrat politically, cast­ing his first presidential vote for Seymour in 1868. He is a member of the Masonic Order, Washington Lodge, at Greenfield. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and his mother is also a member of the same church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

 J. C. Shouse, another wide awake, thorough going farmer and stock raiser of Morgan Township, residing six miles northwest of Dadeville, is a native of Shelby County, Ky., born November 3, 1834. His parents, William 0. and Harriet (Bryan) Shouse, were natives of Kentucky, born in 1812 and 1814, respectively. The father was of German descent, and at an early age emigrated from his native State to Jackson County, Mo., in 1837, being one of the early settlers of that county. He is now living in Kansas City, where he has made his home for twenty five years, and where, in about 1863, he invested in city property. He is now the owner of $150,000 in that city. To this marriage were born three children, J. C. Shouse being the eldest. The latter remained in Jackson County, Mo., from 1837 to 1880, and received his education in the common country schools. In 1857 he married Miss Mary Ann Campbell, who was born in Kentucky in 1834, and who died in Jackson County, Mo., in 1874. To this union were born twelve children, all living: William; Eva, wife of John B. Clark; Nannie; Ettie, wife of John Todd; Harry, Charley, Mary, Mattie, John C., Carrie, Edward and Benjamin. In 1875 Mr. Shouse married Mrs. Niece, who was born in North Carolina in 1846, and is the daughter of Henry and Mrs. Muller, both now deceased. By his last marriage Mr. Shouse became the father of five children, all living: Mattie, John C, Carrie, Edward and Benjamin. Mr. Shouse located on his present place of resi­dence in 1882. He has 347 acres of land, with about 200 acres under cultivation, has good buildings on the same, and is one of the county's substantial farmers. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Dadeville.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

John D. Smith, produce dealer, and express agent of Lockwood since the express office was opened in 1881, was born in Henry County, Tenn., in 1851, and is the son of John W. and Elizabeth (Haynes) Smith. John W. Smith was born in Murfreesboro, Tenn., in 1811, and his wife was born in Robertson County, of the same State, in 1809. They were married in Henry County, and with the exception of a few years in Carroll County, Tenn., spent the remainder of their lives in Henry County. The mother died in September, 1868, and the father in October of the same year. Mr. Smith was justice of the peace for eighteen years in Henry County, Tenn., and was constable for a number of years in Carroll County. John D. Smith is the youngest of three sons and three daughters. He received a liberal education in the common schools, and after the death of his father began farming for himself. In 1870 he went to Weakley County, where he was married, in 1872, to Miss Nicie E., daughter of James O. and Mahala Walters, natives of Carroll and Weakley Counties, respect­ively. Mr. Walters died in the last named county, 1881, but Mrs. Walters is still living there. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith were born six children. In 1881 Mr. Smith came to Lockwood, where he has since been engaged in his present business. He is a good business man and a prominent citizen. He is a Democrat in politics, and his first vote was for Horace Greeley in 1872. He has a good home in Lockwood. He and Mrs. Smith have been members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church for many years.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Fergus C. Snoddy, stock-raiser and farmer, of Rock Prairie Township, was born in Clay County, Ind., in 1847, the son of Josiah and Margaret (Clough) Snoddy, born in Kentucky, in 1801, and Virginia, in 1809, respectively. The parents, in an early day, settled in Clay County, Ind., where the father died in 1848 or 1849; the mother is still living in Greene County, Mo. The subject of this sketch, the youngest of seven children, at­tended the country schools about nine months, and, when fifteen years of age, joined Company D, One Hundred and Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was for six months in the Army of the Cumberland. After the close of the war he joined Com­pany G, Eighteenth United States Infantry, and served three years on the Western frontier, having been with General Carrington's expedition against the Sioux Indians, as soldier and team­ster, and traveling over Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and nearly all the Rocky Mountain country, experiencing many hard­ships. Coming to Dade County in 1869, in 1872 he married Mar­tha, daughter of William B. and Nancy Landers, a native of Dade County, where her parents have lived for many years, her father having been in the Federal Army, and having served as justice of the peace for some years. They have six children, four sons and two daughters. He has lived on his farm of 312 acres about nine years. When a young man he learned the harness trade, which he followed for five years, at Dadeville, just before remov­ing to the farm. In politics he is a Republican, is a member of Everton Lodge No. 405, A. F. & A. M., and of Everton Post No. 369, G. A. R. Mrs. Snoddy is a Cumberland Presbyte­rian. Mr. Snoddy spares no pains to educate his children, and is a successful farmer and stock raiser.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Mason Talbutt, ex-probate judge and attorney-at-law of Green­field, Mo., is a native of that city, born in 1846, and the son of Co­lumbus Talbutt. The father was born in Bourbon County, Ky., and died in 1872. He was of French descent. While in Kentucky he followed the tailor's trade, and in 1840 came to Missouri, and to Dade County in 1840. Later he settled at Greenfield, where he worked at his trade, and was one of the first tailors in the county. He was justice of the peace for a number of years, and was judge of the probate court at the close of the war. His wife, Amanda Allison, was a native of Tennessee, and is yet living. Her parents, Mathias H. and Mary Ann (Howland) Allison, came to this place in 1836, and became the owners of the land on which Greenfield is now standing. Mr. Allison donated the fifty acres for the site of the county seat. He died in 1878, but his wife is yet living at the advanced age of eighty-five years. To Mr. and Mrs. Talbutt were born nine children, Mason being the eldest. He was born in Greenfield, Mo., in 1846, and remained in school until eleven years of age. When twelve years old, he entered a printing office, and his first work was on the Southwest, at Greenfield. He worked as an apprentice two years. September 1, 1863, he enlisted in Company I, Seventh Provisional Regiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia, and November I of the same year he enlisted in the same company, Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry Vol­unteers, and was in the service until June 30, 1865, when he received his discharge, at Springfield. His service was in South­west Missouri and Arkansas. In the fall of 1865 Mr. Talbutt resumed work as a printer and continued as such until 1868, when he became partner with John P. Giggs in the Greenfield Vedette, and edited it until 1869, when he bought his partner's interest, and, in 1870, sold out. In 1871 Mr. Talbutt engaged in the grocery business, which he continued one year, and in the sum­mer of 1873 he followed agricultural pursuits. During the winter of 1873-74 he published a paper called the Phoenix, and in the last mentioned year, went to Texas, where he remained during the summer. In the fall, he returned, and January 1, 1875, he became deputy circuit clerk and recorder, filling this position until June, 1877, when he commenced the publication of the Advocate, for B. G. Thurman, and continued at this for three years. In 1881 Judge D. A. De Armond and Mr. Talbutt bought the paper, and Mr. Talbutt published it until October, 1887, when he leased it. About 1870 he commenced reading law, and in June, 1879, was admitted to the bar, and commenced his practice. In 1882 he was elected judge of the probate court, and served four years, since which time he has confined his attention to his prac­tice. In October, 1884, the firm of Mann & Talbutt was formed. Mr. Talbutt was justice of the peace six years, was a member of the school board three years, was mayor of Greenfield two years, and was a member of the city council two terms. December 7, 1879, he married Miss Clara Kimber, a native of Illinois, and the daughter of J. H. and E. A. Kimber. Five children were the fruits of this union: Florence, Mary, Maggie, Henry and Lucy. In politics Mr. Talbutt is a Democrat, casting his first presiden­tial vote for Lincoln, in 1864. In 1886 he was a delegate to the State Convention. He belongs to Greenfield Lodge No. 446, A. F. and A. M.; Greenfield Chapter No. 37; Constantine Commandery No. 87, and is a member of Greenfield Post No. 75, G. A. R. In 1888 he was commander of the post. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William M. Tarrant. Prominent among the farming and stock raising interests of Dade County, Mo., stands the name of William Tarrant, who was born in Warren County, Ky., August 20, 1842, and came with his parents to Dade County, Mo., when less than six months old, he being the eldest of nine chil­dren. He lived with his parents until April 10, 1862, when he enlisted in Company D, Sixth Regiment Missouri Cavalry of Vol­unteers as a private, and was afterward promoted to the rank of orderly sergeant. He served three years, was in the battle of Prairie Grove, and was in numerous skirmishes. In 1866, Sep­tember 5, he married Miss Josie King, a native of Polk County, Mo., born in 1841 and the daughter of Henry and Eliza King, both deceased. The mother died at the home of William Tarrant May 19, 1888, and the father died in Polk County, Mo., October 19, 1878. To Mr. and Mrs. Tarrant were born four children : Albert, Flora, Fanny J. and Eva. In 1867 Mr. Tarrant settled on his present property of 160 acres of land, with about 120 acres under cultivation. Aside from this Mr. Tarrant has 120 acres in another tract, and forty acres more in still another. He is well-to-do, and one of the prominent farmers of the county. He was formerly a Republican in politics, but is now a Union Labor man. Both he and wife are members of the Baptist Church. He is the son of John M. and Nancy (Potter) Tarrant, the grandson of Minus and Nancy (McConnell) Tarrant, and the great grand­son of Samuel Tarrant, who was born in England. John M. Tarrant was born in Warren County, Ky., January 11, 1820, and is now one of the oldest settlers living in Dade County. He is a prominent farmer and stock raiser. Minus Tarrant was born in South Carolina about 1785, and died in Kentucky in 1871 at the age of some eighty six years. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. Nancy Tarrant, our subject's grandmother, was born in Simpson County, Ky., about 1796, and was of Scotch descent, her grandfather being a native of Scotland. Her father, James McConnell, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Nancy Tarrant died in Warren County, Ky., about 1852.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

J. W. Toliver, merchant, farmer and stock raiser, also dealer in stock at Dadeville, Mo., is a native of Lawrence County, Mo., born in 1855, and the son of John H. and Ann (Laster) Tol­iver. John H. Toliver was born in Tennessee in 1813, and came with his parents, John H., Sr., and Polly Toliver, to Lawrence County, Mo. He was a farmer, and was also a mule trader by occupation. He held the rank of captain in the Confederate Army, and died in 1862. His mother, Polly Toliver, died at the age of ninety two years in Lawrence County, Mo. Ann (Laster) Toliver was born in Tennessee in 1817, is now living, and is the mother of ten children, eight now living, J. W. Toliver being the ninth child in order of birth. He remained with his mother until twenty one years of age, and in 1877 married Miss Amanda A. Watkins, a native of Dade County, Mo., born in 1861, and the daughter of George and Lydia Watkins, who were among the earliest settlers of the last mentioned county. To Mr. and Mrs. Toliver were born two children: George and Erne. Mrs. Toliver died in October, 1883, and on January 15, 1885, Mr. Toliver married Miss Marrillena (Clopton) White, daughter of R. G. and Elizabeth Clopton. Mrs. Toliver was born in Dade County, Mo., December 27, 1850, and was the mother of three children by her first husband: Elmer R., born June 28, 1871; Clyde C, born July 2, 1873; and T. H. White, born September 4, 1875. January 6, 1886, Mr. Toliver was appointed postmaster of Dade­ville, and is still acting in that capacity. He has a general store in connection with the post office, and carries a stock of goods valued at $5,000. He is a Democrat in his politics, and is an enterprising, industrious business man. He has 160 acres of land in Kansas, and 400 acres in Missouri, which he keeps well stocked. Mrs. Toliver is a member of the Cumberland Presby­terian Church. Mr. Toliver's maternal grandfather, Canon Laster, died in Dade County, at the age of ninety-two years.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Rev. Thomas Toney, A. M., M. D., ex-president of Ozark College, now real estate, loan and insurance agent, Greenfield, Mo., was born in Warren County, Ky., November 3, 1836. His parents were Jesse and Mary (Elliott) Toney. Jesse Toney was a native of Virginia, born in the year 1795, near Richmond; and his mother was named Susan Putnam before her marriage to Joab Toney. Jesse Toney was a professional teacher, but engaged in merchandising before his death. He died in 1837. His wife, Mary Elliott, was a native of Virginia, and the daugh­ter of Maj. William C. Elliott, who was a soldier in the War for Independence and 1812. Maj. Elliott married Miss Phoebe Porter. Both were born in Scotland. Dr. Thomas Toney, the subject of this sketch, is of Scotch descent, and is a fair type of the American Scotchman. He received his education principally at the Mt. Mary Seminary, in Kentucky, and Glenville College, in Alabama, and received the degree of B. S. from the latter insti­tution. The degree of A.M. was conferred on him by Cumber­land University. He graduated in the medical department of the University of Nashville, and was also one of the first gradu­ates in the medical department of Vanderbilt University. The subject of this sketch is strictly a self-made man, having been left an orphan when but a child, and had to work his way through every department, and that without assistance. He commenced teaching very young, at Walnut Grove, Ky., in the same house where he learned his alphabet, and here among the friends of his childhood he taught for the money that carried him through school, until the breaking out of the war. In 1862 he volun­teered in the First Kentucky Cavalry, of the Southern army. He was forced to this, as he thought, by threats made against him if he did not join the United States army. He was opposed to secession, but he was also opposed to being driven or dictated to by any man or set of men. He was in the battles of Gallatin (Tenn.), Bacon Creek, Munfordsville, Perryville, Crab Orchard, Lexington, Lancaster, Augusta, in Kentucky; and Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and about 150 other smaller engagements. He was paroled as captain with 184 men, on the 24th of May, 1865, at Albany, Ga. He was wounded several times, but not so as to be permanently disabled. While in the army he led an active and vigorous life, and had perfect control of men, even in the midst of "shot and shell." The life of Dr. Toney has been a laborious one. He has always worked hard, and has been devoted to teaching and preaching. He was instrumental in founding the Tullahoma (Tenn.) Masonic Institute, the Beach Grove College, the Wartrace (classical) Academy, and the Lebanon Business College and Telegraph Institute. While engaged in teaching he usually preached every Sunday. He has been pastor of the following congregations of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church: Tullahoma, Shelbyville, Mt. Hebron, Green Hill and Chattanooga. To some of the above he preached several years. While principal of the Lebanon Business College, which was a department of Cumberland University, he was also presi­dent and superintendent of the Lebanon and Nashville Telegraph Company, which position he held for years. He has always been a strong temperance man, yet very many of his strongest friends have been of the opposite party. In 1880 he moved from his home in Nashville, Tenn., to Fredonia, in Kansas. He took part as temperance lecturer in the great temperance wave that swept over that State soon after his arrival there, which resulted in the prohibitory amendment to the constitution. Dr. Toney was elected president of Ozark College, December 26, 1883. He served as such until June, 1887, when he resigned. The college under his administration was a great success, there being the largest attendance during the last year the institution has ever had. He is a Master Mason, also Royal Arch, Council and Sir Knights Templar. He is an Odd Fellow, having taken the high­est degrees in that order. He is a member of the K. of H., also of E. A. W. Though he was in the Confederate army, yet his best and most intimate friends have been among the ex-Federal soldiers. He has waited upon many of them in their afflictions, and preached their funerals, mingling tears of sympathy and sor­row with their bereaved. Dr. Toney is a public spirited, edu­cated Christian gentleman, of large means, always willing to do his part in every enterprise that tends to advance society and better the condition of his fellowmen. He is a logical, fluent speaker, a popular lecturer, and a skillful presiding officer. He has had the honor of presiding over many noted public assemblies, such as the Southwest Missouri Immigration Association, which met in Springfield in 1888; the Railroad Extension Con­vention at Stockton, and many other important assemblies. He married Miss Mintie Truitt, of Warren County, Ky., who still lives. In closing this little sketch of Dr. Toney, it will not be out of place to say that he is a man of strong convictions; as a friend he is faithful and loving to the last; as an opponent he is fair, yet pushing, persevering and unfaltering; as an enemy he is fearless and undaunted. Such characteristics will usually stir up some enemies, but their friends will be many, and of the class known as "true and tried."  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Ex-Judge George W. Wells. Prominent among the repre­sentative men of Washington Township and among the enter­prising farmers and stock raisers of the same, stands the name of Mr. Wells, who was born in Monongalia County, W. Va., in 1839. He is the son of Benjamin L. and Sophia (Kughn) Wells and the grandson of James Wells, who was of Welsh descent, and who went, when young, from Baltimore to Greene County, Penn., where he died at the age of ninety three. His father was an early settler of Baltimore. Jacob Kughn, the maternal grandfather of George W. Wells, also went when young from Baltimore to Greene County, Penn., and there he died at the age of ninety five years. He was of Welsh descent, and was a soldier in the early wars. Benjamin Wells and wife were natives of Pennsylvania and both died when their son, George W. Wells, was but a lad. Mr. Wells was justice of the peace for many years. George W. Wells was the fourth of five children, two sons and three daughters, and received very little schooling after the death of his parents. He lived with relatives and strangers until fifteen years of age, and then learned the car­penter trade, which he followed until the war. In 1854 he went to Illinois, thence to Iowa, Nebraska, Ohio, etc., and in 1859 to Greenfield, Mo. In May, 1861, he went to Chicago, and in October of the same year joined Company F, Fifty seventh Illi­nois Volunteer Infantry, and was in the fights of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, and was with General Hulbert through Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, etc. In the spring of 1864 he joined General Sherman, and was all through the Georgia and Atlanta campaign. He was at the grand review at Washington, D. C, and was discharged at Louisville, Ky., July 7, 1865. He held the office of corporal, third and first sergeant, and from October, 1864, he commanded his company as captain. He was in the service nearly four years. After the war he traveled in different States until 1866, when he returned to Dade County, Mo., and in 1867 married Mrs. Letitia Poage, a native of Dade County, Mo., and the daughter of Jonathan and Catherine Weir. Mr. Weir was born in Cooper County, Mo., and his wife in Kentucky. They were married in Cooper County, and Mr. Weir is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Wells were born six children, five now living, one son and four daughters. Since the war Judge Wells has lived on his present farm, which consists of 180 acres of excellent land, 80 acres in another tract, and over 100 acres under cultivation, all the result of his own efforts, as he started a poor boy. In 1876 he was elected judge of the county court from the Eastern District, and in 1878 he was elected presiding judge, serving in the latter capacity four years with ability and credit. He is a Republican in politics, and his first presidential vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln, while in service. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Lacon Lodge No. 75, and he is also a member of Greenfield Post, of the G A. R. His wife is a mem­ber of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is an active worker in the cause of education and for the general up build­ing of the country; he is one of the progressive and indus­trious farmers of Dade County, and spares no pains for the improvement of his stock. Although of Southern birth, Mr. Wells took a firm stand for the Union at the breaking out of the war. His brother was also a staunch Union man, but many of their relatives were in the Confederate Army.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

Rev. David G. Young, ex-circuit clerk and ex-officio recorder of Dade County, Mo., now residing one and a half miles north of Greenfield, was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 1829, and is the son of Uriah and Phoebe (Gregory) Young. David G. Young was left an orphan when a small boy, and he was then taken by his uncle, William B. Young, who had married a sister of Phoebe (Gregory) Young. About 1836 David Young went to Genesee County, Mich., and it was here he grew to manhood. In 1855 he married Miss Margaret Pratt, who was born in Shia­wassee County, Mich., in 1831, and to this union was born one child, Margaret, who is now the wife of Milton Holly, of Millbrook, Mich. After one year of married life Mr. Young was left a widower, and, in 1857, he engaged in the teacher's profes­sion, which he continued for some time in Williamson County, ILL. In 1861 he married Miss Amanda E. Roberts, who was born in Williamson County, ILL. Nine children were the fruits of this union, seven now living: Emily, John C, William E., Susie, James, Clarence and Ida. August 12, 1862, Mr. Young enlisted in Company D, Eighty first Regiment Illinois Infantry, and was in the fight at Port Gibson, Raymond, Vicksburg; was in the Red River expedition, and was in the fight at Guntown. At the last mentioned action he was captured, was in the prison at Macon, Ga., for six weeks, Savannah six weeks, was at Charleston, S. C., one month; and, while at the last mentioned place, had the yel­low fever. During the winter of 1864-65 he was at Columbia, and, in March of the last mentioned year, he was exchanged, sent to Annapolis, Md., and was granted leave of absence. He then went to St. Louis, where he was discharged. In the battle of Raymond he was wounded in the left leg by a minnie ball, and was disabled for some time. He at first entered the service as a private, but was promoted through all the different ranks to that of captain, being commissioned such May 22, 1863. In 1865 was elected county superintendent of schools of Williamson County, and served four years. In 1870 he removed to Dade County, Mo., settling in Cedar Township, and, in 1874, was elected circuit clerk and ex-officio recorder. In 1878 he was re-elected, and served in all eight years. At the age of eighteen he was converted, and in 1859 he was licensed to preach the missionary doctrine. He had charge of four churches in Will­iamson County, erected the Baptist Church in Marion, ILL., and was pastor of that church when he came to Dade County. He has had charge of five churches in Dade County, and organized the Baptist Church at Greenfield. Rev. David G. Young is one of Dade County's most highly esteemed citizens. He is the owner of 200 acres of land, and is a well-to-do farmer. In poli­tics he is a Greenback Prohibitionist. His official and private life has been one of purity and above reproach.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]

William Marshall Young, one of Center Township's suc­cessful and enterprising farmers, was born in Dade County, Mo., in 1845, and is the son of Isom A. and Mary M. (McLemore) Young, and grandson of Matthew M. and Elizabeth (Neal) Young. Matthew Young was born in South Carolina, and when young went to Tennessee, where he remained until 1860, when he moved to Hamilton County, ILL., and there died four years later. His wife, Elizabeth Neal, was a native of Ireland. Isom A. Young was born in Monroe County, Tenn., in 1822, and moved to Dade County, Mo., in 1842, where, the following year, he married Miss Mary M., daughter of Archibald and Sarah (Plumley) McLemore, who were natives of North Carolina, and Knox County, Tenn., respectively. Her father died in 1825, and the mother the year previous. Mrs. Young was born in Monroe County, Tenn., in 1823, and is the mother of eight children: William Marshall, Mary (deceased), wife of Albert Wells: Harriet (deceased), wife of Jerome McClure; Martha (deceased); Virginia, wife of Harry H. Finley; Monroe, in Washington Township; Madora, wife of John O. Mitchell; and Matthew L., furniture dealer in Greenfield. Immediately after his marriage, Isom A. Young located on Sac River, four miles north­east of the county seat, and there passed the remainder of his life. He came to Dade County when it was in a wild state, with but few white settlements, and when wild game was plentiful. He came without money, but with a large reserve of latent energy, which, put into play, soon placed him beyond the reach of want. At the time of his death, which occurred April 10, 1885, he was the owner of 880 acres of land, and was one of the best citizens of Dade County. As a memento, he left behind him a good name and a highly respected family. In 1870 William Marshall Young married Miss Dialtha McClure, a native of Dade County, Mo., born in 1847, and the daughter of Frank McClure. To Mr. and Mrs. Young were born seven children: Martha L., Viola M., Frank J., Ruthy F., Marshall A., Mathew Boyd and Lucy V. In December, 1888, for the purpose of educat­ing his children, Mr. Young moved on the farm where he now lives, which consists of sixty-five acres. He also owns 391 acres on Sac River. He is one of the county's best farmers and most successful men, dealing quite extensively in raising stock. He is a Democrat in politics. Mrs. Young is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.  [History of Hickory, Cedar, Polk, Dade, and Barton County, MO , transcribed by Char Slater]


 

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