Franklin County, Missouri Genealogy Trails


Isaiah Wall, the eldest of the eight children of John and Lorinda (Moore) Wall, was born in Franklin County, in 1840. The parents were natives, respectively, of Franklin and St. Louis Counties, Mo., and in 1870 they moved to Elk County, Kas., returned to Franklin County two years later, and in 1880 settled in Lawrence County, Mo. Mrs. Lorinda Wall died in 1858, aged forty-one years. In 1859 John Wall married Mrs. Mary A. Cole, nee Thurmond, and by this union is the father of two children. He was a farmer in early life, but is now engaged in merchandising. He is a son of Simeon and Mary (Wells) Wall, natives of or very early settlers in Tenntssee, who moved to Franklin County, Mo., about 1815, where the family was reared and the father died. With the exception of a short residence in St. Clair County, Ill., Isaiah Wall has spent his life in his native county, in the pursuit of farming. His educa­tional advantages were limited, and he began doing for himself when twenty years of age; he now owns 250 acres of well-improved land. He was married in 1860 to Miss Martha Boyd, a native of Franklin County, and a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Johns) Boyd. Mr. and Mrs. Wall are the parents of nine children, viz.: John N. (deceased), Ulysses, George (deceased), William O., Mary E. (deceased), James, Perry A., Anna, Cora. Mrs. Wall died May 8, 1887. Mr. Wall is a Republican, and cast his first presidential vole for Bell and Everett.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009


Ernst Walter, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Suhl, Germany, in 1834, the fifth in the family of thirteen children born to John B. and Mary (Barthold) Walter; the former, a farmer by occupation, was drowned while en route to St. Louis, Mo., from Germany via New Orleans. He was about forty-five years of age.    Mrs. Mary Walter died October 29, 1887, aged eighty-two years. Ernst Walter immigrated to the United States with his parents in 1846, landed at New Orleans, and settled first in St. Louis, removing the following year to a farm near Qlencoe, St. Louis Co., Mo., where he remained until 1854, being then nineteen years of age. He then, in company with others, went across the plains to California, the journey occupying five months and two weeks; they located at Placerville, El Dorado County, where Mr. Walters en­gaged in mining until 1858, when he returned home by the way of the Isthmus of Panama and New York City. That winter he purchased and moved to his present farm, which consists of 175 acres of well-improved land. He was mar­ried in the spring of 1860 to Miss Caroline Sandfos, a native of Hanover, Ger­many, and a daughter of John and Johanna (Meyer) Sandfos, who came to this country in 1846, first settled in St. Louis, and later removed to a farm on Wild Horse Creek, same county. John Sandfos served in the War of 1812, partici­pating in the battle of Waterloo. Mr. and Mrs. Walter are the parents of nine children: Charles W., John E., Amelia H., Frank, Louisa J,, Anna M., Lizzie S., James B. and Elsie Nellie. Mr. Walter, who is a Republican in politics, is a member of the G. A. R. He enlisted for service in the late war, in September, 1862, was wounded in the right hand at Ringgold, Ga., and was discharged at Nashville, Tenn., in June, 1865.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Hamden O. Walton, one of the oldest living settlers of Franklin County, Mo., is the son of William and Susan (Wash) Walton,both of whom were natives of Virginia, where they were reared within a mile of each other. After marriage they settled upon a farm in their native State, and here passed the remainder of their days. The mother died when our subject was but six years of age, and the father afterward married Elizabeth Christmas. To the first marriage were born three children, all sons, and to the second marriage four children,one son and three daughters. The father was a man of great physical strength, which he retained until his death, at the age of seventy-five. Grandfather Walton was a Revolution­ary soldier. Hamden O. was the eldest child by the first marriage, and was born in the year 1818, f orty-five miles west of Richmond, Va. He grew to manhood on the farm,but received a very limited education. At the age of sixteen he was placed in charge of a four-horse team, to haul produce to Richmond,at which busi­ness he continued for four years. For three years he was overseer of a plantation. In 1834 he married Mary S., daughter of Rev. T. T. Swift. She was born in the same neighborhood as our subject, in the year 1815. In 1836 they came to Frank­lin County, and the following year they settled on the farm where they now reside. To them were born six children: Susan A., William T., Charles S., Alva C, Andrew B. and Martha E. All the family are members of the Mission­ary Baptist Church. Mr. Walton is a Democrat in politics, and has always been a strictly temperate man. He is now nearly seventy-five years old, has been a hard worker all his life, and is as vigorous as most men at fifty. Starting life a poor boy, he arose to the ownership of about 1,300 acres of land, of which he still retains over 700 acres. In June, 1887, he lost his faithful companion, she having been afflicted for over twenty years. For nearly forty years Mr. Walton has been a delegate to the Union United Baptist Association of Missouri, hav­ing been clerk of the same for ten years.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Louis Wehrmann, real estate, insurance and collection agent, of Wash­ington, Mo., was born in Prussia, February 14, 1826, and is the son of Louis and Charlotte (Reckmann) Wehrmann. The father was born in Prussia, in the year 1783, and was a farmer by occupation. He died in 1847. The mother was also born in Prussia, in 1792; she came to America in 1850, and died in Washington, November 23, 1857. She was the mother of six children, Louis being the fifth. He was educated in Germany, and at the age of fifteen years, commenced working at the shoemaker's trade, serving an apprenticeship of five years, and then worked as a journeyman three years in various cities. In 1848 he left his native country and came to the United States, locating in St. Louis, Mo., where he worked at his trade. Coming to Washington in 1851, he established a busi­ness as dealer in boots, shoes, harness, saddles, leather and hides. January 12, 1857, Mr. Wehrmaun married Miss Amalie Storck, a native of Hanover, Ger­many, born May 12, 1830, who came to the United States in 1855. To this mar­riage five children were born: William, Emilie, Gustaf, Amalie and Louis. Emilie died July 13, 1887, at the age of twenty-seven years, and Gustaf died in infancy. Our subject continued at the above business until 1873, when he gave it up and established his present business, in which he has been engaged ever since. He is working for the North British & Mercantile, Northern, Niagara, Royal Queen Fire Insurance Companies, and the Germania Life Insurance Com­pany. He is a Republican in politics, and April 27, 1870, he was appointed postmaster of Washington, Mo., a position he held for thirteen years, till April 1, 1883. During the late war he was for six months a member of the home militia, and was one of first to assist in its organization.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Fritz Wehrmaun is a general blacksmith, and three-fourths' owner of the steamer " New Haven," which sank at the landing, and while yet under water was purchased by him. He remodeled it and attached a cabin etc., and since then it has been used as a transfer boat between St. Louis and New Haven. It was formerly used as a ferry boat at New Haven. Mr. Wehrmann is a native of Germany, born in 1847, and the son of William and Menne (Coestermyer) Wehr­mann. The father was a carpenter by trade.and was twice married, his last wife being the mother of our subject. Both parents passed their lives in Germany, the father dying about 1880, at the age of seventy-two, and the mother in 1884, at the age of sixty-five. Fritz remained at home until seventeen years of age, and received a common-school education. He then learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1866 came to the United States, where he spent the first six years in Warren County. In 1872 he came to New Haven, where he has since con­tinued successfully engaged in his trade. Besides his steamer, he has a good property in the city, and ten acres of land, for which he paid $2,600. He lias served in various city offices, trustee, alderman, member of the school board, etc. He had charge of the levee at New Haven, for which he donated liberally. In March, 1871, he married Miss Bda Reker, a native of Warren County, Mo., and the daughter of William and Cbarlotta Reker, both of whom were natives of Germany. To Mr. and Mrs. Wehrmann were born six children: Bettie, Clara, Paulina, Frederick, Paul and Dellephina. Mr. Wehrmaun is a Republi­can in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for Gen. Grant. He is a mem­ber of the A. O. U. W., Farmers' and Mechanics' Aid Association, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Church.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

August H. Wehmueller, member of the firm of Degen, Breckenkamp & Co., proprietors of the Washington Saw, Planing and Grist Mills, lumber yard and carpenters and builders of Washington, is a native of Westphalia, Prussia, born in 1848, and the son of Christopher and Francisca (Nollkemper) Wehmueller, natives of Westphalia, Prussia, born in 1820 and 1816, respectively. In 1853 they came to America and located in St. Louis, where they remained one year, but the following year he moved to Franklin County, Mo., and was foreman on a section on the Missouri Pacific Railroad a number of years.    He died in 1876. His wife is yet living and by her marriage became the mother of two children: August H. and Minnie, wife of Charles Neirdick, shoemaker, of St. Louis. August H. was only five years of age when his parents came to America, and he grew to manhood in Washington, Mo. He then farmed for a while, was also in the brickyard, and afterward learned the cooper's trade, at which he worked for three years. He worked one year on the railroad, and at the age of twenty-one began learning the cabinet-maker's trade of W. H. Otto, where he remained two years as an apprentice and afterward one year as a journeyman. In 1872 he and Henry Stienhaus became partners in the furniture and undertaker's busi­ness, and this lasted one year, when our subject sold his interest to Henry Langenberg, and for the following two or three years woiked at the carpenter's trade. In 1881 he became a partner in the present business, and has since con­tinued the same. He is overseer of the planing mill department and lumber trade. September, 1873, he married Miss Catherine Scheer, who was born at Port Hudson, Franklin Co., Mo., in 1852, and to them were born four children: Julius, Edward, August and Emily. Politically, Mr. Wehmueller is a Republi­can, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

John Clay Weimer, clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County.Mo., was born in York County, Penn., April 20, 1834, and is the son of John and Mary (Nesbit) Weimer, both natives of Pennsylvania. The father was born in 1806, was reared on a farm, and later engaged in the furniture business. The mother was born in 1812, and died in 1884. Our subject left his native State in 1859, for Illinois, and was variously employed until January 15, 1862, when he enlisted at Chicago, 111., in Company D, Ninth Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, for three years " or during the war." He served under Gens. Curtis and Steele, in their campaigns, in 1862, through Missouri and Arkansas, and in January, 1863, was detailed as clerk at headquarters, Department of the Missouri, at St. Louis, Mo., where he remained as clerk until April, 1865. He then went to Union, Mo., the county seat of Franklin County, and on May 4, 1865, took a position as deputy in the office of the circuit court clerk, and held the same up to his election, as a Republican, to the office of circuit court clerk, in 1870. He was also deputy collector of Franklin County, Mo., during the years 1879 and 1880, and deputy county clerk during the years 1881 and 1882. He was again elected to the office of circuit clerk in 1882, and re-elected to the same position in 1886, and holds the same at the present time. Mr. Weimer was married August 5, 1872, to Miss SallieE. Jeffries, a native of Franklin County, Mo., born December 31, 1846.
She is the daughter of the late A. W. Jeffries,who died in 1870,and who was an attor­ney at law. He held office for a number of years, and was one of
the leading and substantial men in the county of his day.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Herman T. Weirich, a prominent merchant, farmer, stock dealer, notary public, postmaster, land agent and collector, Spring Bluff, was born in Mecklen­burg, Schwerin, Germany, August 2, 1851, and is the eldest of the fourteen chil­dren of Frederich I. and Louisa (Schrader) Weirich, who immigrated to the United States in 1859, and settled in Missouri the following year, two miles east of Union, where the father followed shoemaking. Herman T. Weirich received a common-school education, working in the summer time and attending school in the winter. In 1867 he accidentally shot himself in the right knee, and was confined to his room about three years, when, in 1870, he went to St. Louis, where he worked at the butcher's trade four years, at the expiration of which time he returned to Franklin County, rented a small house, and with a stock of goods, worth about $300, started in the mercantile trade.    Part of this was loaned him by a true friend, Richard Farvarsen, now deceased, and the balance by another friend, Henry Wellenkamp, to whose kind assistance Mr. Weirich attributes his early start in business life, referring to their help with grateful remembrance. By good management and economy, his trade rapidly increased. He was appointed postmaster in 1875, and two years later bought of Isaac Young his present site, then known as Five Points; to this point the postofflce was moved, and Mr. Weirich was re-appointed postmaster. The place is now know as Spring Bluff. Mr. Weirich is one of the leading merchants of the county, and carries a general stock valued at $8,000, and his real estate is worth that much or more, and clear of all debts. June 21, 1874, he married Martha J., daughter of Daniel Miller, who departed this life November 3,1880, leaving two children, Frederich D. and Edward F.; a daughter, Anna L., having preceded her mother to the grave, and Frederich D. followed January 26, 1883. January 13, 1881, Mr. Weirich married Virginia A., daughter of Eli Park, and by this union are two children, Leonora V. and Gustave E. Mr. Weirich is a member of no church, but a supporter of all worthy enterprises. He is a Republican in politics, and in 1886 was elected justice of the peace by a large majority of the people of Boon Township, which position he resigned in 1887. He is an enter­prising citizen aud does business on a purely cash basis. He is the only Repub­lican that holds a postofflce under the Democratic administration since the year 1887, for which he is very thankful to said party.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

James Whitsett, a native of Guilford County, N. C, is the eldest of a family of fifteen children, and was born June 10, 1818. His parents John and Alpha (Witty) Whitsett, also natives of Guilford County, N. C, moved to St. Louis County, Mo., in 1836, where they lived and died; the former in 1836, aged sixty-two years, and the latter, in 1886, at the age of eighty-six. John Whitsett was the son of James and Mary (Moore) Whitsett, of English and Irish descent, respectively. William Whitsett, father of James, was born near the northern boundary of England, and was the father of nine children, two girls and seven boys; six of his sons fought in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Alpha Whitsett was a daughter of Elijah and Trainey (Cummings) Witty, also natives of Guilford County, N. C. Elijah Witty was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was the son of Ezekiel and Nancy Witty, natives of England. Mrs. Whitsett was the youngest of seven children; her oldest brother, Ezekiel Witty, died in Wilson County, Tenn., in July, 1885, aged ninety-four years; his wife died the same day, aged ninety-three years. Mrs. Whitsett's oldest sister married Elijah Win­chester, of Kentucky, and died in August, 1883, at the age of ninety-eight years. When eighteen years old James Whitsett immigrated to St. Louis County, Mo., with his parents, where he remained until 1841, when he moved to a farm near Pacific. In 1845 he located in Gray's Summit, and, five years later, went to Jefferson County and engaged in merchandising, at a place called " Yerkes Mill," for one year. He subsequently purchased and moved to a farm six miles south of Catawissa in 1850, and opened a farm, also conducting a general store, in 1854, on his farm. He farmed there until 1864, having, in 1863, purchased a stock of goods of Patrick Ryan, at Catawissa, and engaged in merchandising, at which he continued until 1875 or 1876. He then followed farming until 1880, when he again engaged in merchandising as well as farming. Beside his stock of goods, he owns 600 acres of land around Catawissa, and 320 acres in St. Louis County. February 14, 1840, he married Miss Margaret McCullough, a daughter of Judge Henry McCullough, of St. Louis County, who died September 1, 1840. August 38, 1841, Mr. Whitsett married Miss Mary Keatley, daughter of William Keatley, of Franklin County. Six children have blessed this union, viz.: John C, James M., Samuel B., Altha P. (now Mrs. James Richey), Mary (now Mrs. E. C. Robertson, deceased), Jane B. (now Mrs. Murry Spencer.) Mr. and Mrs. Whitsett are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Whitsett is a Democrat politically and a strong temperance advocate. He has served his county at different times as justice of the peace twenty-seven years. He is a Master Mason and a member of the "Franklin County Protective Association," of which he was the first president.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

S. B. Whitsett, dealer iff general merchandise, Pacific, was born in Frank­lin County, Mo., in 1848. He obtained his early education at the common schools of the county, later attending, for a short time, the school of the Chris­tian Brothers, at St. Louis, and spending one term at Steelville Academy, and two terms at St. James College, in Phelps County. With a small capital, he estab­lished business at his present location, in September, 1876, purchasing a small stock of goods of J. F. Withington. As a result of his energy and business ability his business has increased to its present lucrative proportions. He was married in 1876 to Mise Bettie Houston, a native of Du Page County, Ill., and a daughter of Hamilton and Mary (Dreyer) Houston. They are the parents of three children, Ida May, Jessie Maude and Mary Ethel. Mr. and Mrs. Whitsett are members of the Baptist Church, of which he is a deacon. He is a Democrat in politics, a Master Mason, a member of the A. O. U. W. and Select Knights, and also of the "Order of Chosen Friends." His father, James Whitsett, has served as justice of the peace for nearly thirty years. S. B. Whitsett was the fourth in the family of six children of James and Mary (Keatley) Whitsett, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Missouri.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

J. F. Whitson, a young and enterprising citizen of Union, and present recorder of Franklin County, was born in Union, Franklin Co., Mo., June 15, 1860, the son of John and A. J. (Maupin) Whitson. The father was born in Vir­ginia, January 1, 1829. He was a mechanic, and later in life was engaged in the livery business at Union. His death occurred June 29, 1870. The mother was born in Franklin County, Mo., December 5,1825, and is now a resident of Union. Our subject was reared in the town of his birth, and received a good education in the schools of the same. He entered the probate court in 1880 as clerk for Judge Bolte, and continued in that capacity for six years, during which time he performed clerical duty in the office of the circuit court. In November, 1886, he was elected on the Demociatic ticket to the office of recorder of Franklin County, and received a majority of 632 votes, notwithstanding the county has a Republican majority of about 600, which was a decided compliment to him. He is discharging the duties of his office with ability and satisfaction, and as a young man has a very nattering record.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

G. J. Wiley, citizen and retired merchant of Franklin County, Mo., was born in Jefferson County, Mo., September 27, 1840, and is the son of Eli and Lucina (Marsh) Wiley, natives of Tennessee and Illinois, respectively. His father was born in 1796, came to Jefferson County, in 1819, and here passed the remainder of his days, dying in 1882. He was a farmer, was judge of the county court for many years, and was also magistrate. The mother is now a resident of Jefferson County, Mo., and is living on the old homestead at the advanced age of eighty-three. They were both members of the Presbyterian Church for many years, and of their family of thirteen children, seven are now living. Our subject received his education in the schools of St. Louis County, and at the breaking out of hostilities between the North and South left home and joined Company Q, of the Third Missouri Cavalry, Confederate service, as ser­geant, but was afterward promoted to first lieutenant. He participated in the battles of Hartville, Springfield and the raid from Balesville (Ark.) to Cape Girardeau (Mo.), Helena (Ark.), Little Rock, Camden(Ark.), Saline (Ark.), and was in Price's raid through Missouri, in 1864. He served altogether three years and four months, and was slightly wounded twice. After the war he returned and engaged in merchandising on the old homestead. In 1867 he went to Rob-ertsville, and again engaged in merchandising, but at the end of one year moved to Moselle, where he was for five years engaged in the same business. October 28, 1868, he married Miss Martha E. Beeler, a native of Tennessee, and the daughter of Jesse F. Beeler. To this union was born one child, Ida Belle,' who is now living at home with her parents. After coming to Moselle Mr. Wiley was part of the time a partner of C. E. Frost. They carried a stock of goods worth $7,000 to $8,000, had one store at Robertsville, which C. E. Frost oper­ated, and another at Moselle, of which Mr. Wiley was manager. They sold from $15,000 to $20,000 worth of goods per year. In 1872 Mr. Wiley formed a partnership with James McLord, and engaged in milling for three years. Since then he has been engaged in farming and buying wheat in Moselle. He was notary public from 1868 to 1878, and since October, 1885, has been postmaster at 11086)16. He is a Democrat, is a member of Fraternal Lodge, No. 363, A. F. & A. M., and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Henry C. Williams, editor and proprietor of the Pacific Herald, a Dem­ocratic organ of Franklin County, was born April 10, 1860, in Pacific, Mo., and is the eldest of nine children born to Henry and Elizabeth (Zeiger) Williams, natives, respectively, of Etten, Holland, and Baden, Germany. Mr. Williams immigrated to the United States in 1853, and first settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he opened a boarding house, which he shortly after abandoned to accept a position on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad; he subsequently obtained a position on the Missouri Pacific road, and later located at Pacific, attending to the pump and switch works of the company at that place. He was a member of the Catholic Church, of which he was a director; he was also alderman of Pacific for several terms. Mrs. Williams came to this country in 1852 with her father, and first settled in St. Louis, Mo.; her parents were Joseph and Eliza beth (Alt) Zeiger, the former a shoemaker by trade. Theodore Williams w as a farmer by occupation, and died in Holland in 1846; his wife died in 1847. Henry C. Williams received his education in the public schools in Pacific, and worked in his father's lumber yard and office until nineteen years of age. He then opened his present job printing rooms, and January 29, 1880, issued the first number of the Pacific Herald. Since hia father's death he and his brother, Joseph P. Williams, have had the management of the lumber yard, and he is also in partnership with C. C. Close in the insurance business. He was made justice of the peace of Boles Township in 1882, serving until January, 1887, when he was elected mayor of Pacific. He has also served as alderman, and is now notary public. Mr. Williams is a rising young man; his paper is a bright, newsy sheet, averaging 1,000 subscribers, and is appreciated by the people of the surrounding country—as its prosperity attests.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

 

John B. and Elijah G. Wilson, farmers, of Section 19, Township 44, Range 1, St. John's Township, were born in Franklin County, Mo., in 1836 and 1848, respectively. They are the sons of Elijah and Ellen (Cahill) Wilson. The father was a native Kentuckian, born about 1800. He married in the State of Kentucky in 1826, and in 1828 came to Franklin County, Mo.,  where he purchased 137 acres in Section 19, Township 44, Range 1, and where he settled, and where he passed the remainder of his days, dying in 1854. In connection with his farming interest, Mr. Wilson worked at the carpenter's trade. He was one of the first settlers of Franklin County, and erected one of the first houses in the City of Washington. His wife was born in the State of Kentucky in 1807, is yet living, and is the mother of four children: Penolepy (widow of John H. Parker), John E., Elijah G. and Margaret Baumann. John and Elijah were born on the farm on which they now reside. After the death of their father they assumed charge of the old home place, and have since run it successfully. They now own 206 acres, and have a good home. John E. has never married, but, in 1877, Elijah G. wedded Sarah Murphy, who was born in Franklin County, Mo., and who bore him three children: Lou, Emma and Ida May. Our subjects are both Democrats, and their mother is a member of the Baptist Church.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

 

Joseph Winistoerfer, farmer, is a native of Switzerland, born in 1837, and the son of Allois and Agada (Born) Winistoerfer, also natives of Switzerland, born in 1795 and 1793, respectively. They were married in 1814, and in 1852 came to the United States, and located in Franklin County, where the mother died in 1855. The father afterward moved to Holstein, Warren County, where he died about 1859. He was a farmer by occupation. Joseph was reared at home, and educated in his native language. He came with his parents to the United States, and in 1861 enlisted in Company F of the United States reserve corps, as sergeant, under Col. Greggle. He was discharged in 1862, after which he returned to his former employment, that of ferryman, at the New Haven crossing. This he continued until 1865, when he purchased his present farm, which is situated two and a half miles east of Berger, and consists of sixty-two acres. March, 1863, he married Miss Frederica Schormann, a native of Holstein, Mo., and the daughter of Henry and Charlotta Schormann, natives of Prussia. To this marriage were born seven children, six now living: Joseph C, Gustav (deceased), Carrie, Elizabeth, Augusta, Edward and John. Mrs. Winis­toerfer died January, 1882. Our subject is a Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for A. Lincoln in 1864. He is a member of the A. O. U. W. Henry Winkelmeyer. farmer, of Township 43, Range 1 west, of Franklin County, Mo., was born in Hanover, Germany, November 7, 1842, and is the son of John Henry and Mary Winkelmeyer. The parents moved to America in 1844, and located at St. Louis, where they remained until about 1858, and then removed to Franklin County. The father died in St. Louis in 1847, and the mother died iu Franklin County, in 1881. Henry after moving to Franklin County engaged in agricultural pursuits, and now owns 103 acres of good farm­ing land, two miles south of Union. In 1861 he enlisted in the Federal army, joining Company G, Seventeenth Regiment of Missouri Volunteers and served three years. In 1864 he married Miss Catherine Buscher, who was born in Germany, and is the daughter of William Buscher, of Franklin County. To this union eleven children have been born, eight now living. In his political views Mr. Winkelmeyer is a Republican, and quite a prominent member of that party.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

 

George Wolff, of the firm of Wolff & Bro., proprietor of the New Haven Roller Mills, is a native of France, born in 1842, and is the son of John and Katie (Kline) Wolff, also natives of France. The mother was born in 1805, and in about 1869 came to the United States, and is now living in New Haven. The father died when George was an infant. The latter received but a limited education, and began working on a farm at the age of nine, where he remained three years, and then learned the milling business. In 1860 he came to the United States, and worked for some years in a foundry in Connecticut. He then went to New York, and from there to Ohio, and in 186S to St. Louis, where he was married, in 1867, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Kauffman. Seven children were the result of our subject's marriage, viz.: Amelia, Lillie, Leanora, George, Emil, Delefln, and Clara. After spending five or six years in Southeast Missouri, having charge of a mill for a St. Louis firm, Mr. Wolff, in 1876, came to New Haven, and soon after he and his brother, Jacob, purchased the New Haven flour mills which they have recently very much improved, and which has a capacity of 200 barrels per day. It now turns out 1,100 barrels per week. Mr. Wolff is strictly independent in his political belief, and he and his wife are members of the German Lutheran Church.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

David P. Wood, an old and influential citizen of Franklin County, Mo., was born in Amherst County, Va., February 2, 1818, a son of Thomas and Louisa J. (Gooch) Wood, who were natives of Louisa County, Va. The father died in Franklin County, August 21, 1851, and the mother in the same county eight years later. This family came to Franklin County, Mo., in the fall of 1831, and settled on the farm on which our subject is now residing. The father was a farmer all his life, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. They were for many years members of the Baptist Church, he joining that denomination before coming to Missouri and she immediately after. Nine children were born to this union, five sons and four daughters, only five of whom are now living. David P. received his education in Virginia and Missouri, and a few years after gaining his majority acted as overseer for his uncles. At the age of twenty-one he was appointed deputy sheriff and served as such under his brother, S. W. Wood, for four years. He then engaged in farming, which he continued until 1850, when Judge G. B. Wade was elected sheriff, and he again acted as deputy. Since then he has turned his attention exclusively to agricultural pursuits. December 28, 1842, Mr. Wood married Miss Mary E. Ming, a native of Camp­bell County, Va. born August 13, 1822, and the daughter of W. and D. Ming. She died in Franklin County, October 29, 1887. She was the sister of Hon. James M. Ming, whose sketch appears elsewhere in these pages. To Mr. Wood and wife were born nine children, six now living, viz.: Mrs. Agnes Jones, the wife of Charles Jones, Jr., now living in St. Louis; James L. Wood, now living in Montana, a stock raiser and dealer and miner; Leslie E., ex-recorder of Franklin County, and now living at Labaddie; John W., now a resident of Kansas City, in the insurance business; Charles B., a resident of Boles, and Mortimer,'at home. Those deceased are: Doratha V. Riggin, aged twenty-six, and the wife of Eugene Riggin, at St. Louis; Louisa J., aged twenty-two and Albert W., aged twenty-three.    Mr. Wood is a Democrat in his political views.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Charles W. Wood was born in Louisa County, Va., August 26, 1827, and is the fifth son of Thomas and Louisa J. (Gooch) Wood. The father was born in Louisa County, Va., May 14, 1790, and died in Franklin County, Mo., August 21, 1851. The mother was born in Guochland County, Va., December 3,1793, and died in Franklin County. Mo., May 29, 1859. The father was a soldier in the War of 1812, was a farmer, and one of the early settlers of Franklin County, Mo., coming here in a wagon, when there were very few settlers in the county. Their home for three years was in a cabin that had not a nail in its structure. Tbe roof was held on with poles, and the doors were hung with wooden pegs. Both he and wife were members of the Baptist Church, of which he was a deacon. Nine children were the result of his marriage, five sons and four daugh­ters, five now living. Charles W. received the rudiments of an education in the schools of Franklin County, and very different was the log school house of that day, with its split logs for seats and puncheon floors, from the elegant school houses of late years. Our subject owns part of the old homestead, but has added other land, and now owns 240 acres and two small tracts. In the fall of 1860 he moved to his present place of residence, where he has erected a handsome building. February 15,1859, he married Martha E. Murdock, a native of St. Charles County, Mo., born June 21, 1839, and the daughter of James and Lydia Murdock. To this marriage were born three children: Louis M., Lydia B. and Charles W. Mr. Wood and wife are worthy members of the Christian Church, of which he is a deacon. He is a Democrat, but crosses the line for better men, and is also a Prohibitionist.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

George W. Wood, a member of the law firm of Gallenkamp & Wood, was born in Springfield, Ill., December 38, 1840, and is the son of George and Eliza (Wiley) Wood. The father was born in England in 1808, and immigrated to America with his parents when but nine years of age. They located in Boston, Mass., but the father of our subject afterward went to New York City, and from there to Springfield, Ill., in 1832. He is a tailor by trade, and followed that in early life, but later was engaged in the clothing business. He is now a citizen of Decatur, Ill. The mother was born in New York City in 1810, and is still living. George W. was reared and educated in Springfield and Decatur. He enlisted from Decatur in 1861, joining Company I, of the Seventh Regiment of Illinois Cavalry, for a period of three years. He served out his enlistment, re-enlisted, and was finally mustered out at Springfield, Ill., in October, 1865. In December of the same year he removed to Union, Franklin Co., Mo., where he has since resided, and where he has filled various city or municipal official posi­tions. He was married in 1870 to Nellie Evans, of Belleview, N. Y., and to them were born three children. Mrs. Wood died in 1876, and in 1877 Mr. Wood mar­ried Miss Virginia Jeffries, of Franklin County, daughter of Gen. Jeffries. To this union were born three children.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

Frederick Wortmann, merchant, of Beemont, is the son of Herman and Mary (Weaver) Wortmann, both natives of Westphalia, where they grew up, married and reared a family of six children, three sons and three daughters. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died in the old country at the age of fifty-five. The mother afterward married Peter Quest, who also died in Germany. In 1858 the mother came to America, and died in St. Louis at the age of sixty-six. Our subject was born in the year 1862, and received his education in Germany. In 1853 he sailed for America, landing at New Orleans at the end of seventeen weeks. At the end of a month he reached St. Louis, and, after working at the cooper's trade for about two years spent the next three years on a farm in St. Charles County. In 1859 he came to Franklin County, locating on his farm, and eight years later built a good storehouse at Beemont, »nd engaged in mer­chandising. In 1883 he sold the stock and rented the house, but in 1886 again returned to merchandising. In connection with this he also owns 200 acres of good land. In 1856 he married Miss Catherine Grose, who bore him six children: Caroline, Sophia, Anna, Henry, William and Frederick. In 1869 his wife died, and he afterward married Mrs. Hearietta Flottmann. He is now living with his third wife, Christina Gaupp, who bore him one child, a daughter, named Lizzie. During the war Mr. Wortmann served in Company I, of enrolled mili­tia, for some time, and later in Capt. Cleves' company of cavalry.    He is a Republican in his political views, and a member of the Evangelical Church, of which his wives were also members.
Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by Barb Z. -2009

 

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