Franklin County, Missouri Genealogy Trails

Civil War Events

Source: Goodspeed's Franklin County History, 1888, Goodspeed Publishing Co
Transcribed by: Barb Z. 2009

 

Events Preceding the Civil War.—The foregoing statistics show sufficiently the character of the county politically up to the present time. The most exciting times, and those which most "tried men's souls," were connected with the breaking out of the war, in 1861. In 1800, at the presidential election, the vote for the different candidates stood—Lincoln, 494; Bell, 577; Breckinridge, 108, and Douglas, 888. The combined vote against Lincoln was 1,573, and the combined vote against Breckinridge was 1,959, so that, if the combined vote against Breckinridge be taken to represent the Union sentiment in the county, it will be seen to have been overwhelmingly strong. However, it was, prob­ably, somewhat more evenly balanced than that. In fact, in the latter part of 1800 and in the early part of 1801, the political cal­dron was in a state of ferment, and excitement ran very high. Squads were drilling in different parts of the county as early as January, 1801, the secessionists, of course, commencing first, as was generally the case throughout the South. The Legislature of the State had passed a resolution or ordinance, January 10, call­ing a convention to meet February 28, "to consider the relations between the Government of the United States, the people and Governments of the different States, and the Government and peo­ple of Missouri:" or, in other words, to determine whether Mis­souri should secede. An election of delegates to this convention was held in Franklin County, February 22. The secession ele­ment in the county was extremely active, and at the court-house in Union took advantage of the absence of some of the leading Republicans, who were at dinner, and organized the meeting by selecting Edward J. Goode, a Southern sympathizer, as chairman, and appointed twelve others of like views as a committee on reso­lutions. At this juncture the absent Republicans, having heard what was going on, came into the court-house, and, on motion of A. W. Maupin, Asa Breckinridge. E. W. Murphy and E. B. Ham-mack, were added to the committee. On motion of J. W. Owens, A. W. Maupin was also added to the committee. The committee retired, and, while they were considering their resolutions, an im­mense meeting of citizens from all parts of the county was ad­dressed by William J. Brown, then a member of  the Legislature from Franklin County, on the part of the secessionists, and by J. TV. Owens, on the part of the Union men. The committee held n stormy meeting, lasting nearly two hours. Upon going into com­mittee it was found that the majority was already provided with a set of resolutions, which were ingeniously constructed with the view of deceiving the people, but which really meant secession and disunion. It was found impossible to agree upon a report, and two reports were therefore made to the meeting, the majority report being made by the chairman of the committee, and the minority report by W. A. Maupin. This report consisted of a series of ringing resolutions in favor of the Union. When the report of the majority was read Maupin offered the minority re­port as a substitute. A vote was taken which was so evenly di­vided that the chairman could not decide which had a majority of votes. A division of the meeting was therefore called for, all of those in favor of the Union being required to go to the west side of the court-room, and those in favor of the dissolution to the east side. Upon making the division intense excitement reigned in the court-house, and for some time it was difficult to determine which side was in the majority. At this critical juncture James White, an office boy of A. W. Maupin, who was then sheriff of the county, ran down to the sheriff's office, jerked off from the door a small Union flag, and, running back up stairs, handed the flag to Sheriff Maupin. Maupin immediately jumped upon a bench, waved the flag, and cried out to the crowd, calling upon all who were in favor of standing by the Union to rally round the flag. Every one instinctively knew what it meant to rally round the flag, and there was a great rush from the rebel to the Union side of the court-room, leaving the rebel element in a hopeless mi­nority. This exposure of their weakness was keenly felt by the secessionists, and occasioned no little excitement. An attempt was made to seize the flag, but unsuccessfully, and when the rebel element became convinced that they were beaten and that they could not intimidate those who loved the Union, order was restored and the minority report declared adopted, by at least four to one. This was the first political contest in Frank­lin County in the great struggle of the next four years. The election came off in due time, and the Union delegates to the State Convention of February 28, were elected: A. W. Maupin, of Franklin County; Charles D. Eitzen, of Gasconade County, and Zachariah Isbell, of Osage County, as members from the Twenty-first Senatorial District, against C. S. Jeffries, of Franklin County, Edward Luster, of Gasconade County, and William Mor­row, of Osage County.
   
    It is well to note in this connection that one of the resolu­tions reported by the minority was to the effect that those in favor of the minority report would stand by the Union, right or wrong, and that secession was no remedy for the evils com­plained of by the secessionists.

    First Troops.—Meetings continued to be held in different parts of the county, and the interest in the question of secession remained intense. About the middle of April Union men in the county were advised by F. P. Blair, of St. Louis, that the arsenal there was in danger, and he called upon them to send in troops to its defense. In a few hours a company of men, under com­mand of Capt. David Murphy, were on their way to St. Louis. They took the train at Washington, Mo., and, by arrangements with Conductor Charles White, the train was stopped at Twenty-second Street, and the company alighted from the train, unob­served, and virtually stole their way, one by one, until they reached the arsenal, and were the fourth company in the State outside of St. Louis to reach the arsenal. A regiment was immediately formed, under authority of Capt. Lyon, and placed under the command of J. W. Owens. This company was for some time secretly drilling with shotguns and rifles, getting ready to aid in the defense of their country. Col. Owens and A. W. Maupin applied in St. Louis, to Capt. Lyon, for muskets and ammunition, and their application was complied with on the condition that they would be personally responsible. Two hun­dred and fourteen muskets were sent out by Capt. Lyon to Washington, Mo., on the night of June 11, 1861, and with them were armed two companies, commanded, respectively, by Capt. Wilhelmi and Capt. Maupin. The former company, upon receiv­ing their muskets, immediately took possession of Washington, and the latter marched to Union. Upon approaching the town, Capt. Maupin took the precaution to place guards on every road leading out of Union, and then marched into town, the glistening bayonets of his 100 men making a brilliant spectacle. There were then about ten rebels in Union, and, upon seeing the approach of the " lightning rods," these rebels attempted to make their escape, but found every road closed against them, and were captured on different roads, and brought back into town. They were admonished to desist from all attempts to interfere with the Government in defending its existence. At that time there were seven secession flags flying in the county, but before night every one of them was taken down by the seces­sionists themselves.

    Early War Incidents.—From this time on the county itself was in comparative peace during the war, except during Price's raid, which was made in 1864. Price's army entered the county September 30, and remained in the county until October 4. It consisted of about 16,000 men, and, at a low estimate, the amount of property destroyed, including horses and mules driven away, amounted to $500,000. The number of men killed by his army was never definitely ascertained, but it was estimated at about sixty.
   
    Previous to Price's raid there were five men killed in Frank­lin County by Union soldiers. Morton Bournes was killed by Home Guards for resisting arrest. Benjamin Horine was killed by some troops from Jefferson County. August Dolle killed two of Capt. Maupin's men who had been discharged and were on their way home. He was afterward captured near Eolla, by Union troops, and sent home to be tried; but, upon arriving within the county, he was taken charge of by the militia and killed. Capt. James H. Barnes was taken out in 1863, four miles south of Union, by Capt. Fink's company, and was shot. The troops reported that he was shot in an attempt to escape, but his friends thought that he was murdered. Capt. Murphy and Herman Gehlert were afterward indicted for the killing of Barnes by the grand jury of Franklin County, and, on the application of Murphy, the case was transferred to the United States Court at St. Louis. Murphy was discharged upon pleading the constitution of the State of Missouri of 1865, which provided that no soldier should be punished for acts committed in the service of the United States, and Gehlert's indictment was nolle prosequied. But the severest crime committed in Franklin County, during and on ac­count of the war, was the killing of Maj. James Wilson and six of his men, on or near the farm now owned by William H. Bolte, by Tim Beeves' band of soldiers, to whom Maj. Wilson and his men had been turned over by Gen. Sterling Price, and most likely with the knowledge, or at least reasonable ground for suspicion, as to the fate in store for them. While Tim Reeves and his men were never directly punished for this cruel and cowardly murder, yet Maj. AVilson's fate did not go unavenged, for, later, in St. Louis, six rebel soldiers were, by order of Gen. Rosecrans, executed in retaliation for Reeves' crime.

    Companies Raised.—Company K, of the Eleventh Infantry, was raised in Franklin County. Its commissioned officers were as follows: Captains—William S. Stewart, commissioned Decem­ber 31, 1861, and resigned April 30, 1804; Cyrus D. Kendall, commissioned May 3, 1864, and mustered out at expiration of term of service, June 18, 1865; and D. E. Coogan, commissioned June 18, 1865. First lieutenants—W. A. Duggins, commissioned December 31, 1861, resigned June 18, 1862; Charles H. Foster, commissioned July 7, 1862, mustered out in 1864; and George C. Robinson, commissioned June 28,1865. Second lieutenants— Charles H. Foster, commissioned December 31, 1861, promoted first lieutenant June 19, 1862; Cyrus D. Kendall, commissioned July 7, 1862, promoted captain May 3, 1864; D. E. Coogan, commissioned March 29, 1865, declined; George C. Robinson, commissioned June 17, 1865, promoted first lieutenant June 28, 1865; and William Snow, commissioned June 28, 1865.
   
    Of Company H, Capt. W. W. Boatright was from this county. He was commissioned July 12, 1862, and transferred to the Seventy-first U. S. A. D. Infantry, March 20, 1804.
   
    This regiment was raised in Missouri and Illinois, between the middle of June and the 1st of August, 1861, us a rifle regiment, at the request of and for Capt. Rufus Saxton, of the regular army; but, as Capt. Saxton was promoted and sent to another department soon afterward, he never took command. The regiment was organized August 1, 1861, at the United States Arsenal, at St. Louis, and Capt. David Bayles took command as its colonel, and on the 6th of August, started with it to Cape Girardeau, arriving there on the 7th, and going into camp. On the 28th of the same month it was ordered on an expedition to Perryville, Mo., and was gone about seven days, capturing quite a number of rebels, breaking up quite a number of rebel recruiting stations, and marching about seventy-five miles. On its return it went into camp, and, on the 30th of September following, Col. Plummer succeeded Col. Bayles in command. The regiment had an extremely eventful and useful history, serving with credit and distinction to the end of the war.
   
    The Twenty-sixth Regiment of Infantry was raised largely in Franklin County. Benjamin D. Dean was its colonel, com­missioned June 13, 18G3, and mustered out at the expiration of term of service, January 9, 1805. Part of Company A was raised in Franklin County, and about one-half of Company C. All of Company E was raised in this county. Its commissioned officers were as follows: Captains—Robert C. Crowell, commis­sioned May 26, 1862, and promoted major June 1, 1863; Robert P. Denny, commissioned September 30,1863, and mustered out at ex­piration of term of service, in December, 1864. First lieutenants— Robert P. Denny commissioned July 5, 1862, and promoted captain June 2, 1863; Frederick Zender, commissioned Septem­ber 30, 1863, and mustered out in December, 1864. Second lieutenant, John T. Crowe, commissioned July 5, 1862, and pro­moted to first lieutenant of Company I, December 1, 1862, and mustered out at the expiration of term of service, December 25, 1864.
   
    Company F was also raised in Franklin County. Its com­missioned officers were: Captains—Benjamin D. Dean, commis­sioned January 13, 1862, to rank from December 20, 1861, and promoted to colonel May 28, 1863; William L. Wheeler, com­missioned June 22, 1863, and mustered out at expiration of term of service, December, 1864. First lieutenants—B. C. Anderson, commissioned January 17, 1862, to rank from October 2, 1861, and resigned March 29, 1862; William L. .Wheeler, commis­sioned May 26, 1862, promoted captain June 1, 1863; John W. Maupin, commissioned August 22, 1863, and resigned April 20, 1864; and Isaac Evins, commissioned October 22, 1864, but not mustered. Second lieutenants—William L. Wheeler, commis­sioned January 17, 1862, to rank from November 2, 1861, and promoted to first lieutenant, March 29, 1862; E. M. Koninzes-kie, commissioned April 26, 1862, and died June 30, 1862; John W. Maupin, commissioned July 23, 1862, and promoted first lieutenant June 2, 1863.
   
    Company I was also raised in Franklin County. Its com­missioned officers were: Captains—John McFall, commissioned January 17, 1862, to rank from November 25, 1861, and pro­moted to lieutenant-colonel February 1, 1863; John T. Crowe, commissioned August 22, 1863, and mustered out at the expira­tion of term of service, December 25, 1864; John W. Eeece, commissioned March 14, 1865, and promoted major June 12, 1865; John S. Price, commissioned June 12, 1865, and mustered out as first lieutenant August 13, 1865. First lieutenants—Wiley C. Wiseman, commissioned January 17, 1862, to rank from September 21, 1861, and died of chronic diarrhoea, November 18, 1862; James T. Berry, commissioned January 26, 1863, to rank from January 8, 1863, and promoted quartermaster January 8, 1863; John T. Crowe, commissioned June 22, 1863, and promoted captain, June 23, 1863; Ernest A. Solf, commissioned August 22, 1863, and mustered out at ex­piration of term of service December 30, 1864; John S. Price, commissioned June 6, 1865, and promoted captain June 12, 1865. Second lieutenants—William Gilcrease, commissioned January 17, 1862, to rank from September 21, 1861, and resigned March 29, 1862; E. M. Koninzeskie, April 26, 1862, and transferred to Company F; James T. Berry, commissioned May 26, 1862, and promoted to first lieutenant January 8, 1863; John S. Price, commissioned October 22, 1864, and promoted to first lieutenant June 6, 1865; and Benjamin Wheeler, commissioned June 12, 1865, but not mustered. Companies A, B, C, D, E, F and G, of this regiment, were mustered out at the expiration of their term of service, in January, 1865. The remaining companies, which were composed of recruits, were mustered out August 13, 1865, their services being no longer required.
   
    This regiment was organized in December, 1861, and soon afterward joined the expedition against New Madrid under Gen. Pope. It took part in the battle of Tiptonville, April 9, 1862; of Farmington, April 22, 1862; of Corinth, September 19, 1862; Port Gibson, 1863, and in those of Raymond, Jackson, Champion's Hill, Black River, Vicksburg and Missionary Ridge and in Sher­man's march to the sea. It also participated in the several bat­tles in the Carolinas, was present at the grand review in Wash­ington, and thence marched home, and was mustered out.

    Companies G and H, of the Thirtieth Regiment of Infantry, were raised in Franklin County. The commissioned officers of Company G were: Captains—George A. Munroe, commis­sioned October 31, 1862, and resigned December 5, 1862; Amos P. Foster, commissioned February 25, 1863, and mustered out December 10, 1864. First lieutenants—Daniel Harvey, com­missioned October 31, 1862, promoted to captain, Company F, September 30, 1864, transferred to Company C, consolidated battalion, and mustered out August 21, 1865. Second lieuten­ants—Joseph H. Porter, commissioned October 31, 1862, and resigned December 19, 1862; William J. Lack, commissioned February 25, 1863, and promoted to captain Second Mississippi Artillery, A. D., October 28, 1863.

    Company H.—Commissioned officers: Captains—Elias Boyd, commissioned October 31, 1862, and resigned February 9, 1863; Richard R. Hopkins, commissioned March 9, 1863, and mustered out December 10, 1864. First lieutenants—A. C. Stewart, commissioned October 31, 1862, and resigned March 20, 1863; Timothy Collins, commissioned April 7, 1863, promoted to cap­tain of Company D, June 30, 1864, and mustered out February 25, 1865. Second lieutenants—Timothy Collins, commissioned October 31, 1862, promoted to first lieutenant February 21, 1863; Joseph Paxton, commissioned April 7, 1863, and resigned the following year.

    Company G, Thirty-first Infantry, was raised in this county. Its commissioned officers were: Captains—William Osterhorn, commissioned September 15, 1862, and honorably discharged by Special Order No. 47, January 30, 1865; Matthias Neuner, commissioned August 17, 1864, and transferred to consolidated battalion, Thirty-first and Thirty-second Infantry.    First lieutenants—Charles E. Huge, commissioned September 15, 18G2, and resigned March 12, 1803; F. Rudershausen, commissioned April 2, 1803, and resigned March 4, 1804; Hugo Krause, com­missioned March 24, 1804, and declined the commission April 13, 1804; Matthias Neuner, commissioned June 10, 1804, and promoted captain April 17, 1804. Second lieutenant—Adolph Fricke, commissioned September 15, 1802, and resigned August 10, 1803.

    Capt. G. L. McCreary, of Company E of this regiment, was also from Franklin County. He was commissioned September 8, 1802, and resigned December 10, 1802.
Abraham J. Seay, of Franklin County, was major of the Thirty-second Infantry. He was commissioned November 19, 1802, to rank from October 20, 1802, and was transferred to consolidated battalion, Thirty-first and Thirty-second Infantry, of which Samuel P. Simpson, of the Thirty-first Infantry, was lieutenant-colonel. After the consolidation Maj. Seay was pro­moted lieutenant-colonel, January 14, 1805, and on June 12, 1805, promoted colonel, and commanded the battalion until its muster out, July 18, 1805.

    One-half of one company belonging to the Thirty-third Infantry was raised in Franklin County, and one-half of Com­pany K, Fortieth Infantry. The commissioned officers of this latter company were: Captain, Robert C. Allen, commissioned September 12, 1804, and mustered out August 7, 1805; first lieutenant, John J. Robertson, commissioned September 12, 1804, and mustered out June 12, 1805; second lieutenant, "Win-field S. Smith, commissioned September 12, 1804, and mustered out August 7, 1805.

    A portion of the Forty-seventh Infantry was raised in this county. The officers of this regiment were: Colonels—Thomas C. Fletcher, commissioned September 10, 1804, and resigned November 18, 1804; Amos W. Maupin, commissioned November 25, 1864, and mustered out at the expiration of term of service March 28, 1865. Lieutenant-colonels—Amos W. Maupin, com­missioned September 16, 1864, and promoted colonel; John W. Fletcher, commissioned November 25, 1864, and mustered out at expiration of term of service,  March 30,  1865.    Major—John W. Emerson, commissioned October 8, 18G4, and mustered out March 30, 1865. Adjutants—David Murphy, commissioned August 3, 18G4, promoted lieutenant-colonel of the Fiftieth Infantry, October 20, 1864, promoted colonel May 1, 18G5, and mustered out July 15, 18G5; Edwin E. Furber, commissioned November 18, 18G4, and mustered out April 1, 1865. Quarter­masters—John W. Fletcher, commissioned August 3, 1864, and promoted to lieutenant-colonel; Samuel B. Rowe, commissioned November 28, 18G4, and mustered out March 29, 18G5. Sur­geon—John H. Stumberg, commissioned November 2, 1864, and mustered out March 28, 18G5; and assistant surgeon—J. M. Youngblood, commissioned October 22, 18G4, and mustered out March 30, 18G5.
About one-half of Company 13 of this regiment was raised in this county. Its commissioned officers were: Captain, William J. Buxton, commissioned August 25, 1864, and mustered out March 29, 1865; first lieutenant, John C. Hamel, commissioned August 25, 1864, and mustered out March 29, 1865; second lieutenant, Benjamin F. Butler, commissioned August 25, 1864, and mustered out March 29, 1865.

    Company D was raised in Franklin County. Its commis­sioned officers were: Captain, John W. Maupin, commissioned September 12, 1864, and mustered out March 30, 1865; first lieutenant, Samuel J. Crowe; second lieutenant, Abraham J. Gilcrease; dates of commission and muster out the same as those of the captain.

    This regiment was raised by Col. Thomas C. Fletcher, in Southeast Missouri for service in that part of the State. Col. Fletcher, in raising the regiment, relied, in part, on the experi­ence of tried officers, whom he found unemployed: David Murphy, late of First Artillery; Maj. John W. Fletcher, late of Thirtieth Infantry; Col. Amos W. Maupin, late of Twenty-sixth Infantry; Capt. Jas. S. McMurtry, late of Thirty-first Infantry; Capt. W. T. Leeper, late of Twelfth Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, and papt. John W. Maupin, late of Twenty-sixth Infantry. Loyal men so promptly, and in such numbers, flocked to the standard of Col. Fletcher, that Geri. Rosecrans directed the organization of the Fiftieth Infantry, with which he intrusted Col. Fletcher, who turned it over to Maj. Murphy, who completed its organization, and became its colonel. Upon the completion of the organi­zation of the Forty-seventh Regiment, its companies were generally sent each into the county in which it was raised for duty there. Capt. Maupin, however, was sent to the Iron Moun­tain Railroad, to guard its bridges. Upon the approach of Gen. Price, on his last great raid through Missouri, Compa­nies A, F, G, H and I, after some experience with Price's raiders, concentrated at Pilot Knob, and participated in the gal­lant defense of Fort Davidson, under Gen. Ewing. All the offi­cers on this occasion covered themselves with glory, and Maj.-Gen. Rosecrans, in general orders, mentioned Col. Fletcher, Adjt. Murphy, and Lieut.-Col. Maupin. " On the retreat from Pilot Knob to Leasburg, a distance of sixty miles, every man and officer of the regiment, as indeed of the entire command, proved himself a soldier in the highest acceptance of the term." After fighting the whole distance, upon reaching Leasburg, tired, hun­gry and worn, they threw up fortifications, and defied the entire division of the enemy for two whole days. Having received re-enforcements, they pursued their march to Roll a, and relieved Gen. McNeil, who, with a cavalry force of 3,500, moved on to Jefferson City, and contributed largely to its safety. Capt. Mau­pin with his company, was sent up the Missouri River on a steam­boat to prevent the rebels from crossing the river. After the raiders had passed on beyond the reach of infantry the companies were sent back to their respective counties for the protection of the loyal people.

    When Sherman determined to march to the sea, these soldiers, although they had been enlisted, were sent, and went without fal­tering, to strengthen Gen. Thomas, so that he might be strong enough to cope with Hood. Col. Fletcher having been elected governor of the State, Lieut-Col. Maupin was commissioned colonel, and Adjt. Murphy was appointed colonel of the Fiftieth Infantry. Leaving for Nashville in December, the regiment reached Nashville three days after the battle with Hood; thence it marched to Spring Hill, Columbia and Pulaski, and guarded the communications of Gen. Thomas until March 15, 1865. Lieut.-Col. Fletcher, Capt. St. Geur (Company K), Lieut. J. T. Sutton (Company A), besides other officers of the regiment, were mem­bers of the State convention which framed the new constitution, and Capt. McMurtry (Company A) and Private Meloy were members of the Legislature. The regiment was mustered out about April 1, 1865.

    About one-half of Company F was raised in Franklin County. Its commissioned officers were: Captain, Robert L. Lindsay, com­missioned November 30, 1864, and mustered out at the expiration of term of service, April 8, 1865; first lieutenant, Henry O. Clarke, commissioned November 30, 1864, and mustered out April 24, 1865; second lieutenant, William J. Counts, commis­sioned November 30, 1864, and mustered out April 29, 1865.
Second Lieut. M. S. Woodruff, of Company F, Second Cav­alry, was from Franklin County. He was commissioned Febru­ary 11, 1864, promoted to first lieutenant, Company D, Novem­ber 17, 1864, transferred to field and staff as adjutant same day, and mustered out September 19, 1865.

    About one-half of Bowen's battalion, Missouri Volunteers, was from Franklin County. William D. Bowen was captain, and was commissioned lieutenant-colonel July 3, 1862, and transferred to the Ninth Cavalry the same day, the battalion being then merged into the Ninth Cavalry, and on December 4, 1862, six companies of this regiment and six companies of the Tenth Cavalry were consolidated, and subsequently known as the Tenth Cavalry Mis­souri Volunteers. Of this regiment F. M. Cornyn was colonel, commissioned December 11, 1862, and killed by Lieut.-Col. Will­iam D. Bowen, August 10, 1863.

    Company G, of the First Artillery, was in part raised in Frank­lin County. Lorenzo D. Immell, from this county, was first lieu­tenant; commissioned August 31, 1863, and mustered out July 28, 1865. Part of Company E, Second Artillery, was also from Franklin County, and about one-half of Company M, of the same regiment.

    Capt. Hermann Hartman of Company F, Second Infantry, was from Franklin County; commissioned June 25, 1862, and died December 7, 1863, of wounds received at the battle of Mis­sionary Eidge. Adjt. Edward F. Furber, of the Eighth Infantry, was from this county; commissioned August 8, 1862, transferred to the Forty-seventh Infantry, and mustered out at the expira­tion of his term of service, in April, 1865. Maj. Francis Wilhelmi, of the Seventeenth Infantry, was from this county; commissioned July 11, 1864, and mustered out at the expiration of his term of service, September 28, 1864. Capt. August Fisher, Company E, of this regiment, was from Franklin County; com­missioned December 16, 1803, and mustered out September 26, 1864. Capt. A. G. Huile, of Company I, Thirteenth Infantry, was commissioned September 1, 1861, and died of wounds received at the battle of Pittsburg Landing. Capt. John Creagan succeeded Capt. Huile, commissioned May 8, 1862, and transferred to Ohio, June 17, 1862. First-Lieut. James L. Ferris was commissioned January 18, 1862, and resigned March 16, 1862. The entire company was raised in Franklin County. James Wilson, major of the Third Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, was captured at the battle of Pilot Knob, September 27, 1864, and with six of his men murdered by Tim Reeves in Franklin County, October 3, 1864, an account of which may be found on a previous page.

    The statistics for the Twenty-sixth Regiment of Infantry are as follows: It was a three-years' regiment; the number of officers killed was 5, and, of men 15, 1 officer and 55 men died of wounds, 2 officers and 111 men of   disease, 121 men deserted, 27 officers and 450 men were honorably discharged, 134 men were discharged for disability, 1 officer was dismissed and 20 resigned, 16 men were missing in action, 2 were dishonorably discharged, and 12 were drowned.

    The Forty-seventh Regiment was a six-months' regiment. The casualties in the regiment were as follows: Two men were killed, 34 died of disease, 10 deserted, 36 officers and 336 men were honorably discharged, 7 men were discharged for disability, 3 officers resigned, and 1 officer deserted.

    Of the Enrolled Missouri Militia the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Regiments were both raised in Franklin County. The regi­mental officers of the former were: Colonels—George Krumsick commissioned September 22, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865; and Daniel Q. Gale commissioned September 29, 1864, vacated March 12,1853. Lieutenant-colonel—Morris D.Reese, commissioned September 22,18G3, vacated March 12,1865. Major—Augustus Spin­ner, commissioned December 15, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865. Adjutants—John M. Menkbam, commissioned December 15,1862 resigned March 22, 1864; Julius Wilhelmi, commissioned March 21, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Quartermasters—Daniel Crosby, commissioned October 28, 1862, resigned March 22, 1864; L.Wattenburg, commissioned March 21,1864,vacated March 12, 1865. Surgeons—F. C. Schweikart, commissioned December 3, 1862, resigned October 10, 1864; Charles Serger, commis­sioned October 10, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Assistant surgeons—E. S. Detweiler, September 30, 1864, resigned October 19, 1864; John Dugge, commissioned October 21, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company A.— Captain — Eobert Reichard, commissioned October 31, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants— Robert Reichard, commissioned September 10, 1862, promoted to captain; Helmuth Mayne, commissioned October 31, 1864, and vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants—Helmuth Mayne, commissioned September 10, 1862, promoted to first lieutenant; Joseph Eemme, commissioned October 31, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company B.—Captain, Henry Detmer; first lieutenant, Ger­hard Hagebush; second lieutenant, Henry Beincke; all commis­sioned September 10, 1862, and commissions vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company C.—Captain, William H. Bolte; first lieutenant, George Bergner; second lieutenant, Philipp Gerber; all commis­sioned September 25, 1862, and vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company D.—Captains—Augustus Spinner, commissioned September 25, 1862, and promoted to major; Julius Wurill, com­missioned November 3,1864, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieu­tenants—Adolphus Fricke, commissioned September 25, vacated by Special Order No. 126; William Ehlers, commissioned October 21, 1864, and vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants— Julius Wurill, commissioned September 25, 1862, and promoted to captain; Guardian Busch, commissioned November 3, 1864, and vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company E.—Captains—Silas Hall, commissioned October 16, 1862, and vacated by Special Order 126; George Wiser, com­missioned October 31, 1864, and vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants—James Mclntire, commissioned October 16, 1862, and vacated by Special Order No. 126; Charles Schaub, commis­sioned October 31, 1864, and vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—George April, commissioned October 16, 1862, and vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company F.—Captain, Tobias Stantenburg; first lieutenant, Leonard Toustevan; second lieutenant, John Gruther; all com­missioned September 10, 1862, and all vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company G.—Captains — Christian Weber, commissioned January 15, 1865, and vacated March 12,1865; Frederick Palide, commissioned September 10, 1862. First lieutenant, Christian Weber, commissioned September 10, 1862; second lieutenant, Henry Dravell, commissioned September 10, 1862, the last three all vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; second lieutenant, Herman Flur, commissioned January 15, 1865, and vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company H.—Captains—Ethan A. Clark, commissioned Sep­tember 11, 1862, and vacated by Special Order No. 126; John D. Miller, commissioned October 31, 1864, and vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants—Otto Erfert, commissioned September 11, 1862, and vacated by Special Order No. 25, 1865; Joseph Weiss, commissioned January 15, 1865, and vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants—Benjamin Buse, commissioned Sep­tember 11, 1862, and vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; and William Stutmahrn, commissioned October 31, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company I.—Captains — Peter King, commissioned Sep­tember 10, 1862, and killed by guerrillas; Michael Bauer, com­missioned November 5, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants—Michael Bauer, commissioned June 24, 1863, pro­moted to captain; Henry Lohmeyer, commissioned November 5, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—Henry Pull­man, commissioned September 10, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company K. — Captains — George Kunkle, commissioned October 16.  1862, vacated by Special Order No.  126, 1864; G. Hausgen, commissioned January 15, 1865, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenant, Henry Krog, commissioned October 16, 1862; second lieutenant, H. Poppenhusen, commissioned same day, and both the last vacated   by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company L.—Captain, Bernhard Cleve, commissioned Sep­tember 10, 1862. First lieutenant, John B. Basch; second lieu­tenant, Louis Wehrman; both lieutenants commissioned June 24, 1863, and all vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company M.—First lieutenant, Austin Wilkes; second lieu­tenant, G. H. Stohlman; both commissioned January 15, 1865, and vacated March 12, 1865.

    Fifty-fifth Eegiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia.—Colonel, August Krumsick, commissioned September 22, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865; lieutenant-colonel, Louis Johnson, commissioned September 22, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865; major, Philip Schenck, commissioned December 3, 1862, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; adjutant, William Meyersieck, commis­sioned January 10, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865; quartermaster, Charles Reinhard, commissioned January 10, 1863, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; surgeon, H. T. Gilbert, commis­sioned May 1, 1863, vacated March 12, i863.

    Company A.—Captain, Reuben H. Farrar, commissioned September 11, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865; first lieutenant, David M. Kerr, commissioned September 11, 1862; second lieu­tenant, Benjamin E. Anderson, commissioned May 12,1863; both vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company B.—Captain, William Dress, commissioned De­cember 24, 1862; first lieutenant, Charles Hugo, commis­sioned August 16, 1862; second lieutenant, Arnold Reiner, com­missioned December 24, 1862; all vacated March 12, 1865.

    Company C.—Captain, Andrew Fink; first lieutenant, Philip Briglett; second lieutenant, Herman Gehlert; all commissioned September 10,1862, and all vacated by Special Order No. 126,1864.

    Company D.—Captain, James H. Crews, commissioned October 16, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865; first lieutenant, Abra­ham Gilcrease; second lieutenant, Robert V. Wood; both com­missioned October 16, 1862, and vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company E.—Captain, Henry Gillhause, commissioned Sep­tember 10, 1802; first lieutenant, Austin Wilkins; second lieu­tenant, Henry Hemper; both commissioned November 18, 1802, and all vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company F.—Captain, T. W. Witbington; first lieutenant, Henry Ditmer; second lieutenant, John McDaniel; all commis­sioned October 16, 1862; the captain's commission vacated March 12, 1865; both lieutenants by Special Order No. 120,  1804.

    Company G.—Captain, Charles Dauz; first lieutenant, Henry Sclmiler; second lieutenant, John P. Boeder; all commissioned September 10, 1802, and all vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company H.—Captain, August Hauschen; first lieutenant. William A. Hartman; second lieutenant, John Schuster; all com­missioned October 16, 1862, all vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

    Company I.—Captain, Mathew Kochele, commissioned Janu­ary 10, 1863, first lieutenant, John Weiss; second lieutenant, William Stuhlman; both commissioned October 16, 1862, all vacated by Special Order  No. 126, 1804.

    The Eighth Regiment, Missouri Militia, was raised in Frank­lin County. Its officers were: Colonel, Daniel Q. Gale, commis­sioned March 25, 1805; adjutant, John T. Crowe, commissioned July 10, 1805.

    Company A.—Captain, Michael Bauer;first lieutenant, Henry Lohmeyer; second lieutenant, Henry Schmidt; all commissioned May 25, 1865.

    Company B.-—Captain, Benjamin E. Anderson; first lieuten­ant, George AV. Francis; second lieutenant, John S. Stephens, all commissioned August 24, 1865.

    Company C.—Captain, William H. Bolte, commissioned June 23, 1865; first lieutenant, George Bergner, commissioned December 29,1865; second lieutenant,
Philipp Gerber, commissioned June 23, 1865, commission vacated by Special Order No. 158.

    Company D.—Captain, Andrew Fink; first lieutenant, Philip Briegleb; second lieutenant, William M. Ferry; all commissioned June 23, 1865

    Company G.—Captain, "William Maupin; first lieutenant, Charles L. Eimbeck; second lieutenant, M. A. Coleman; all com­missioned December 29,1865.

    Company K.—Captain, William H. Mengel; first lieutenant, August Fisher; second lieutenant, William J. Lack; all commis­sioned August 16, 1865.

    Company L.—Captain, Bernard Cleve; first lieutenant, Guar­dian L. Busch; second lieutenant, Christian Ehlers; all commis­sioned July 18, 1865.

    Company M.—Captain, Austin Wilkins; second lieutenant, Thomas B. Jackson; both commissioned July 18, 1865.
About 600 citizens of Franklin County joined the rebel army, to whom befell the usual fortunes of war. All who returned home, after the cause for which they fought was lost, have accepted the situation with various degrees of gracefulness, and many of them are well satisfied that it was lost, and are as good citizens as any in the county.

    After the War.—One feature of the "reconstruction period' in Missouri was that quite a number of individuals in each of many of the counties was indicted for preaching and for teach­ing without taking the oath of loyalty, as required by the Drake constitution. Edward Faltman was indicted for thus preaching, April 1, 1867, and also for solemnizing the marriage ceremony. Similar indictments were also found against James E. Godby, James McGehee and Greenberry Mitchell. In all these and other similar cases, however, as also was the case with those indicted for teaching without having first taken the oath of loyalty, the indictments were quashed, or the cases nolle prosequied


 

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