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Greene County
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WILLIAM PARISH CAMP
Is the son of William G. and Lucy C. (Foster) Camp, and was born in Hawkins county, Tennessee, March 22d, 1841. His parents emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, when he was quite young. At the death of his father, the family being poor upon account of unfortunate ventures, he was thrown upon his own resources, and set about fitting himself for the profession of medicine. He worked upon the farm in the summer, went to school in the winter, and soon began teaching, which he successfully carried on until the breaking out of the war. He enlisted at the first call for troops in Phelps’ regiment, and served until Phelps’ term expired and then re-enlisted under Colonel Geiger,--8th Missouri cavalry,--and served until the end of the war. At the battle of Prairie de Han the doctor was put in command of his company, and received a dangerous wound in this right side. He was transferred to an ambulance corps, where he had fine opportunity to study medicine and surgery. At the end of the war he came home and resumed teaching, and attending college as his means would allow. He practiced for some time in Arkansas, and as soon as he had acquired money sufficient he took a regular course of medicine, graduating from the Missouri medical college in 1875. He then located at Ozark, Christian county, where he practiced three years. He then settled permanently in Brookline where he has built up a large and lucrative practice, and where he enjoys the confidence of all. He was married August 15th, 1880, to Miss Alice O’Bryant. Their union has been blest with one child, Fred O. He and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He is a member of Relief Lodge, No. 341, A. F. and A. M. The doctor is Republican in politics and generally liberal in all questions.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JOHN E. CAMPBELL
Mr. Campbell is the son of William H. and L.J. Campbell, and was born in Lawrence county, Arkansas, September 21st, 1852. His parents moved to Newton county, Missouri, in 1871, where they are yet living. At the age of twenty-one John commenced driving the state between Neosho and Joplin, which he followed about a year and then worked in the commission house of Craudus, Winn & Co., of Neosho, for about eight months. He then began working on the Neosho section of the railroad, where he worked until 1876, and then commenced braking upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad. In 1882 he was promoted conductor, and now runs a train upon the Arkansas branch, between Winslow and Porter. Mr. Campbell was married January 9th, 1879, to Miss L. Robertson, of Ashland, Oregon. Their union is blest with two sons, Fay and Gay.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

E.M. CAMPBELL
Mr. Campbell is the son of J.T. and Mary A. Campbell, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, May 29, 1853. His parents came to this country in 1831, and he was educated in the High School of Springfield, at the Washington University, St. Louis, in 1862-3; at the College of the Christian Brothers in 1863-4, and in 1873-4 attended the Christian University at Canton, Mo. Mr. Campbell was married June 24, 1879, to Miss Sallie M., daughter of William and Margaret White. They have one son, Albert J. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are members of the Christian church. Mr. Campbell is a farmer and stock raiser, and owns two hundred and fifteen acres of Greene’s best lands.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ROLLA CARTER
Mr. Carter is the son of Caleb and Nancy (Ferguson) Carter, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, in 1830. His father was a native of Virginia, and his mother of Tennessee. His grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. In 1833 his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, and were among the early pioneers of this country. His father was a blacksmith by trade and had his shop where Rolla now lives. There being no shop near him, he did the work for a space of country extending twenty-five or thirty miles from home. During the war Rolla served in Captain Redferan’s company of militia about a year. Mr. Carter was married in 1850 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Darrell, of this county. Her parents were from Indiana, and were among the first settlers of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Carter were blessed with thirteen children, nine of whom are still living. Mr. Carter is one of the most substantial citizens of Center township, owning over five hundred acres of land.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JOHN L. CARSON
Mr. Carson is the son of Jesse H. and Nancy Carson, and was born in Williamson county, Tennessee, November 4th, 1833. He came to Springfield, Missouri, July 29th, 1855, and began work for William McAdams in the saddlery and harness business. He worked at his trade some fifteen months, and then accepted a clerkship in the dry goods store of Shepard & Kimbrough. After staying with them six months, he worked again at his trade a short time, and then sold goods for Vinton & Hornbeak two years. After the battle of Wilson’s Creek, he left Springfield, but returned and clerked for L.A.D. Crenshaw for a year, and then for two years the firm was Crenshaw & Carson. He then went into the drug business with Oliver Smith. In 1865 Smith sold out, and the style of the firm was J.L. Carson & Co. Mr. Carson then bought out the concern and changed the business back to dry goods. In 1870 he went to St. Louis, and was a traveling salesman for a year. He returned to Springfield, and was of the firm of Hornbeak, Carson & Oliver eight months, and, from September, 1871 to February, 1873, was of the firm of Doling, Carson & Robberson, of North Springfield. In February, 1874, he bought out Massey & Onstott, and has continued the dry goods business ever since. He also owns the grain elevator on Jefferson and St. Louis streets, and has been dealing in grain, more or less since 1874. He was married December 12th, 1864, to Miss Annie E., daughter of Maj. Joseph Weaver, Sr. They have three sons and one daughter. His father was born in Virginia, and died in Tennessee in 1874. His mother was born in North Carolina, and died in Tennessee in 1858. They had a family of five sons and three daughters, John L. being the third child.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEWIS S. CASS
Mr. Cass is the son of Dudley and Martha (Robbins) Cass, and was born in Madison county, New York, November 3, 1838. When he was about six years of age his parents moved to Wisconsin. When Lewis was about twenty-three years of age he went to Lake county, Illinois, where he lived two years. He then went to Benton county, Iowa where he also lived two years, and then, in 1867, came to Springfield. In July of that year he taught a select school for a few weeks upon Boonville street. In September of that year he took a position in the public school where he taught three years. In August he commenced selling groceries and continued the business while he was engaged in teaching. In 1875 they built the store-house they now occupy upon College street. It is a two-story brick, 20 x 80 feet. The grocery firm of L.S. Cass & Co. is one of the oldest and best in the city. They own besides their business house, the house occupied by Parce & Gray. Mr. Cass married Charlotte Collier, of Lake county, Illinois. They have six children, one boy and five girls. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., K. of H., and A.O.U.W. He was elected upon the Democratic ticket to the city council from the fourth ward in 1878 and 1879. He and his wife are members of the Baptist church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CHANDLER, W. R.

It matters little what vocation a man may select as his life occupation so long as it is an honorable one.  If he is an honest upright man, courteous in his intercourse with his fellow–man, and possessed of the average amount of energy and business sagacity, he is bound to make his business a financial success.  Mr. Chandler possess all the above mentioned requirements, and is today a prosperous general merchant of Ash Grove.  He was born in Fitchburg, Mass., September 19,1849, son of J. L. and Abbie (Kimball) Chandler, the paternal ancestors having come from England to this country during its early history, and in 1637 became residents of Connecticut(sic) and still later Massachusetts, where they were known for many years.  Members of this family were soldiers in the Revolution, and John Chandler, the great grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a captain in the Continental army.  The Chandlers have been prominent in the affairs of their adopted country from the very first, and the majority of them were men of influence and affluence.  The great-great-grandfather held the rank of cornet in one of the French and Indian wars, in the English service, and the grandfather, Samuel Chandler, was a major-general of Massachusetts State Militia and captain of the Ancient and honorable Artillery Company of Boston.  J. L. Chandler was born in Massachusetts in 1820, and in that state continued to reside until he reached manhood.  In 1853 he emigrated to St. Louis, Mo. where he followed mercantile pursuits until the opening of the late lamentable civil war, where he enlisted in the Seventh Missouri Calvary, was elected adjutant, and was later promoted to lieutenant-colonel, a position which he ably filled until 1865 at the termination of the war.  Some of the important battles in which he participated were Prairie Grove and Little Rock.  He was wounded during his service, but not seriously.  After the war he took up his residence in Memphis, Tenn., where he engaged in business as a wholesale grocer and cotton factor, later becoming a traveling salesman, the greater part of his business being transacted in Texas and a few other Southern States.  He was an intelligent and wide-wake man of affairs, and his death, which occurred in February, 1880, was much regretted.  His wife died in May of the same year.  To them three children were born, of whom the immediate subject of this sketch was the eldest.  Ella is the wife of W. J. Hawkins, of Greene County.  Bessie married a Mr. Janes, and died in 1884 in ash grove.  Mr. Chandler was a republican in his political views.  Socially, he belonged to the A. F. & A.M. and the local l. O. O. F., and at one time was collector of revenue of Memphis, Tenn.   The early life of W. T. Chandler was spent in Missouri, and his education was received in the excellent public schools of St Louis and in the --------University of that city.  He started on his business career in 1873, in Ash Grove, and since that time he has carried on a successful general mercantile business, and gained the esteem and respect of the community at large and of the citizens of Ash Grove in particular.  He does an annual business of $ 20,000, the value of his stock amounting to about $15,000.  In addition to himself, he finds constant employment for three or four clerks, who have a thorough knowledge of their business and are well posted, accommodating and agreeable.  The establishment has a frontage of 24 feet and a depth of 94 feet.  Mr. Chandler is a republican in politics and has always taken a deep and abiding interest in the political issues of the day, and especially those of his section, and has held a number of important offices in the town.  He is a member of the A.O.U.W., but aside from those does not belong to any secret organization.   He is owner of considerable real estate, principally city property, and has a pleasant and comfortable residence in the eastern part of Ash Grove.  Mr. Chandler was married in June 1882 to miss Roxie Comegys, daughter of William Comegys, the postmaster at Ash Grove.  She was born in Indiana and has borne her husband four children; Triece K., Almira, Courtney, and John l.  The children are bright and intelligent, and the eldest is now attending school.  
Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893, Pages 27-28, Transcribed by Bud

FRANK CLARK
This gentleman is the son of Thomas and Mary Clark, and was born in Nottinghamshire, England, March 3, 1836. At the age of seventeen he learned the jeweler’s trade, and carried on the business at Mislerton, England, until 1873. He then came to the United States, landing at Galveston, Texas. He spent four years in Texas, working at his trade and traveling in different parts of the State. In 1877 he located North Springfield, Missouri, where he has since carried on the jewelry business. He has a nice stock of goods and is one of the best practical jewelers in the Southwest. Mr. Clark was married in 1855 to Miss Mary Gunthrop, of Nottinghamshire, England. Their union has been blest with three sons and four daughters.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JASPER N. CLARK
Mr. Clark is the son of Dr. John M. and Parmelia S. (Nelson) Clark, and was born in Polk county, Missouri, March 2, 1842. His father was a native of Tennessee, and came to Polk county, in 1840, and practiced his profession until his death in 1847. His mother was also a Tennesseean, and is now living in Springfield. Jasper went with his parents to Taney county, Missouri, when he was very small, where they lived about two years, and then moved to Christian county and remained there five years. They next located in Greene county, and this has been his home ever since. He was educated in Christian and Greene counties, and finished at Carton’s College. In August, 1862, he was mustered into company E, 8th Missouri volunteers, under Capt. Bodenhamer. He was at the battles of Prairie Grove and Little Rock, besides minor engagements. He was mustered out in May, 1865, as Sergeant Clark. At the close of the war he went to farming, and in March, 1870, he purchased the place where he now resides. He owns one hundred and eighty acres of land, mostly in cultivation. He raises fruit, stock, etc., and is a very successful farmer. Mr. Clark was married September 11, 1866, to Miss Francis E. Snyder, who was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 6th, 1846. Her parents were John and Hannah Snyder, who came to Clark county, Missouri, in 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have six children, Lula M., Charles C., Mollie H., Myrtle G., Bertha P. and Laura E. Mr. Clark and wife are members of the M.E. Church South. He received the Greenback nomination for sheriff in 1882, but was beaten by the Republican candidate.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ROBERT A. CLARK
Is the son of John B. and Margaret (Horner) Clark, and was born at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, June 19, 1824. His parents emigrated to Missouri, 1837, and settled at Warsaw, Benton county. Robert went to California in 1849 and returned to Melville, Dade county, Missouri, in 1851, where he, in partnership with T.A. Switzler sold goods. In 1871 he represented Dade county in the Legislature, being elected upon the Republican ticket. In 1874 was elected presiding justice of the Dade county court. In 1876 he came to Springfield and was of the firm of Peck & Clark in the wholesale and retail notion business until 1879. When the Queen City Milling Company was organized, he took stock and was chosen manager, which position he now holds. He was married at Warsaw, Missouri, in September, 1862, to Miss Julia A. Withrow, of Virginia. They have four children, two boys and two girls. Judge Clark is a strong advocate of the temperance cause, and Mrs. Clark is a member of the Calvary Presbyterian church. Judge Clark has in his possession an old musket, that was carried by his grandfather in the Revolutionary war.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN CLAYPOOL 
Is a son of Jeremiah and Rebecca Claypool, and was born in Warren county, Kentucky, October 18, 1822.  His father was a native of Kentucky, and emigrated to Polk county, Missouri, in 1839, where he still resides.  John’s mother was from Ireland, and died when he was but a boy.  He received his education in the common schools of Polk county, and after his school days were over, began farming as the business of life.  He had moved with his parents to Polk county in 1839, and continued there till he came to Greene, and located where he now resides in 1851.  He owns a fine farm of 160 acres two and a half miles north west of Walnut Grove.  When the war came on in 1861, Mr. Claypool enlisted for Union defense, under Col. Phelps at Rolla and served till mustered out in 1862.  During his term, he participated in the battle of Pea Ridge and other fights and skirmishes.  Mr. Claypool was married in May, 1851, to Miss Rebecca M., daughter of James Christian, a prominent farmer of Polk county.  Mrs. C.’s mother was a Ross, and she died in Tennessee.  Mr. C. and wife have had a family of ten children, five sons and four daughters of whom are living at this writing, named as follows:  Robert B., Elmira J., Susan A., Esther M., James E., Jeremiah M., Harriet Geneva, John P., and David E.  Anna E., born April 21, 1856 died when but three months old.  Mr. Claypool belongs to the Baptist church, and his wife to the Cumberland Presbyterians, and no family ranks higher with their neighbors than does that of John Claypool.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

DR. JOHN F. CLAYTON.
Dr. Clayton was born in Washington county, Maryland, February 5, 1832.  His father, Joseph Clayton, was born in Frederick county, Virginia, in 1804, and is still living at this writing in Ohio, having been a prominent merchant for many years.  His father (grandfather of John T.), was a captain in the Revolution and was killed at the battle of Long Island.  His widow was famous for the part she played on behalf of freedom.  She resided at Sharpsburg, Maryland, and one of her many useful services was knitting stockings for the American soldiers.  Often she entertained Gen. Washington at her house.  In religion she was a Methodist, and was one of the western pioneers of that creed, dying at Rushville, Ohio, having been for years a government pensioner in consideration of her services in the cause of liberty.  At about ten years old, John T. Clayton moved with his parents to Fairfield county, Ohio, where he was chiefly educated.  He began the study of medicine at twenty-one, and at twenty-four commenced the practice, and for eighteen years continued the practice in Central and Northern Ohio, achieving quite a reputation as a successful physician.  In 1872, Dr. Clayton came to Cass county, Mo., having recommendations from some of the leading citizens of Ohio.  Here he practiced ten years, building quite a business in his profession.  He came to Walnut Grove, Greene county, in July, 1882, and invested in property at Springfield as well as Walnut Grove.  Besides being a physician, Dr. C. was for many years a local preacher of the Methodist church, and preached both in Ohio and Missouri.  He is now, however, devoting his undivided attention to the study and practice of his profession.  Dr. Clayton has had a family of seven children, having been married in January, 1853.  All the children survive at this writing save one.  John C. Clayton, the oldest, is in the livery business at W.G.  Wm. C. Clayton, another son, is manager of the Clayton House of W.G., and fully understands the art of pleasing the public.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

WILLIAM CLIBORNE
Mr. Cliborne is the son of Jubal and Charlotte (Williams) Cliborne, and was born in Knox county, Tennessee, January 30th, 1820. He was reared upon a farm in Tennessee, and in 1851, he emigrated to Missouri, settling in Greene county where he has since resided. When he reached here game was abundant and the settlers never knew what it was to be without fresh meat. As late as 1860 a large herd of deer passed over Mr. Cliborne’s farm. When the war of the rebellion came on he was elected second lieutenant of Captain V. Abernathy’s company of Home Guards. After the battle of Wilson’s Creek, a party of rebels went to Mr. Cliborne’s house and put a rope around his neck and threatened to hand him, because they said he had signed a petition for the Dutch soldiers to come to the county. They released him upon the condition of his leaving the country. He went to Rolla, but returned with the army. He suffered at the hands of both armies who “pressed” his stock and feed. Mr. Cliborne was elected justice of the peace in 1860, and served until 1876. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk war. He was married the first time in Monroe county, Tennessee to Miss Drucilla Ann Gilbreth. That union was blest with four children three of whom are living. He was married the second time in March, 1855 to Mary Logan. They have three children, two boys and a girl. Mr. and Mrs. Cliborne are Methodists, and he is a Democrat in politics. He gave the first ground for the town site of Republic, and is a gentleman who takes active interest in the good of the county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JAMES P. COFFEY
Mr. Coffey was born in Kentucky, March 17, 1860. At the age of sixteen he began braking upon the W. & St. P. R.R., and broke upon that road nine months. He then went home and lived with his father until 1878 when he went on the L. & N. R.R., where he was brakeman two years. In 1880 he changed to the St. Louis & San Francisco R.R. where he braked until December 18, 1882, when he was promoted conductor and is now running a train upon that road. Mr. Coffey was married January 21, 1881, to Miss Harriet Salsman. Though quite young he is regarded as one of the most reliable conductors upon that celebrated road.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS CONLON
Is the son of Roger and Mary (Smith) Conlon, and was born November 23, 1832, in county Leitrim, Ireland. At the age of eighteen he came to America, landing in New York City. He soon after went to Auburn, New York, where he learned the carpenter’s trade. In 1851 he went to Cincinnati, and from there to Columbus, Ohio, where he lived until 1854. He then went to Chicago, where he lived until 1859, and then removed to St. Louis where he lived until 1870. While in St. Louis he had charge of the repair work in the post-office building from Lincoln’s to Grant’s administration. He also had charge of Jefferson Barracks as foreman, for four months. In 1870 he moved to Lebanon, Laclede county, Missouri, and built the Catholic church of that place. In 1872 he came to Springfield, and was soon appointed foreman of the carpenter construction of the ‘Frisco railroad in the Cherokee nation. He then went to Texas, and was superintendent of bridge construction for a private corporation for eight months. He returned to this place and lived three years, and then went to Leadville, Colorado, and followed mining and carpentering for a year and returned to Springfield, where he has since lived. Mr. Conlon is a large contractor and builder, having built many of the business blocks and fine residences of the city. He is a director and valuator of the Building and Loan Association of Springfield. He is a member of the city council from the first ward, elected upon the Democratic ticket. Is vice president of St. Vincent De Paul Society, a Catholic organization. He was married January 15, 1853, to Miss Ann Mooney, of Columbus, Ohio. Their union has been blest with nine children, six boys and three girls, all living, and all members of the Catholic church. Mr. Conlon’s father died in Ireland in 1845, and his mother died at sea in 1848, on her way to America. They had seven girls and five boys, of whom Thomas is the second son.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

SAMUEL R. COOPER
Is a native of Missouri, born in Franklin county, January 24th, 1845. In 1858 he began railroading as brakeman in Virginia, continuing about three years. When the war came on, Mr. Cooper enlisted (in Callaway county, Missouri) in the Confederate service, joining company B, first battalion of Missouri volunteer infantry. He was transferred subsequently to company A, first Missouri cavalry, and his regiment assigned to service in Virginia. November, 1863, he was promoted to second lieutenant, and served until the war closed. Returning to Missouri, he went to “braking” on the Missouri Pacific railroad. In 1869 he came on to the “Frisco” line, and in 1873 was given charge of a train as conductor, and at this writing runs his train regularly from North Springfield. He belongs to the Temple of Honor, and also to the Royal T. of H. Mr. Cooper was married October 3rd, 1872, to Miss Anna Kennedy, and has, at this writing, three children.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM W. COOVER
Mr. Coover is the son of S. H. and Catherine (Wilhelm) Coover, and was born at Vandalia, Montgomery county, Ohio, September 16, 1850. His parents moved to Iowa, and settled near Muscatine in 1857, where they lived about nine years, and then came to Springfield, Greene county, Missouri, where his father was a contractor and builder for some time. William W. was educated in the common schools of the county. His first mercantile employment was with Sheppard & Co., in Springfield. After being in their employ three years, they put him in charge of a stock of good sat Brookline, he receiving one-third of the profits. In 1875 he, with his father and John Potter, sold goods for themselves at the same place. In 1878, Mr. Coover moved to Republic, and opened the same line of goods in partnership with M. P. Johnson, a commercial traveler, who continued to travel, and Mr. Coover managed the business. At the end of three years that partnership was dissolved, and now Mr. Coover owns the whole business. Besides his merchandizing Mr. Coover deals largely in grain shipping last year about one hundred thousand bushels of wheat. Mr. Coover was married December 27, 1876, to Miss Mary E., daughter of S. F. Gibson, of Brookline. Their union has been blest with one child, Samuel Clyde. Mr. Coover is one of the staunch business men of the county, and enjoys an enviable reputation.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

M.D. CORDRAY
Mr. Cordray is the son of J.P. and Sallie A. (Allen) Cordray, and was born near Farmington, Delaware, November, 1846, and was educated at the Farmington institute. In January, 1869, he went to Attica, Ind., and lived in the State of Indiana until 1878. He then went to Shelby county, Tenn., where he was superintendent of a large cotton plantation for two years. In the spring of 1880, he went to Lonoke county, Ark., and engaged in the hotel business for fifteen months, and then moved to Gallaway, Ark., where he was in the mercantile business until January, 1883, when he came to Springfield, Mo. Mr. Cordray is a member of the Knights of Pythias, having joined Lonoke lodge, No. 9. He is past chancellor, and was master of finance for two years, and also a member of the Endowment Ring, K. of P. Mr. Cordray was married March 9, 1873 to Mary O. Pierce. He and wife are both members of the M.E. church. His father was a native of Delaware, and was a large real estate owner, and dealt largely in fine stock. He died at his home in Delaware, February 16, 1881. His wife died when our subject was but thirteen years of age. They had seven children, five sons and two daughters.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN RUSSELL COX
Mr. Cox is the son of John and Louisa Cox, and was born in Daviess county, Mo., January 17, 1853. His father was born in Bartholomew county, Ind., and his mother was a native of this State, and died when John was quite a boy. He was then taken by his grandfather, Nathan Cox, and reared and educated in Greene county. His chief occupation has been farming. Mr. Cox was married January 16, 1876, to Miss Mary E. Pierce. She was born in Franklin county, Arkansas, November 11, 1857. They have one child, Louisa C., born February 18, 1879. In 1882 Mr. Cox and Mr. M.N. Wertz perfected a wheat cultivator and ground pulverizer, and have applied for a patent upon the same. Mr. Cox is one of the safe, reliable young men of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JEREMIAH C. CRAVENS.
This gentleman was born in Saline county, Missouri, February 18th, 1838.  He is a son of Dr. John Cravens, who for many years was the peer of the finest physicians and surgeons of the State.  They are of Virginia ancestry, Jeremiah’s grandfather, Dr. Joseph Cravens, being for many years a leading physician of Rockingham county, Virginia.  Jere C. graduated from the Missouri State University in the class of 1860, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts.  The civil war breaking out soon after leaving school, he cast his lot with the fortunes of the Confederacy, and followed its flag until its brilliant star set forever at Appomattox.
He was promoted by Gen. Slack to the position of aid-de-camp, to rank as lieut. colonel.  He was at the battle of Pea Ridge, in March, 1862, by the side of General Slack, when that gentleman fell mortally wounded.  After the battle he went with the army to Corinth, Mississippi, and shortly after the evacuation of that place, he returned to Missouri, with Col. Hughes, and participated in the battles of Independence and Lone Jack.  At the last named engagement, Lieut. Colonel Cravens commanded a company of recruits who fought desperately upon that sanguinary field.  After the battle he was chosen captain and served with his company in the 6th Missouri Cavalry, under Generals Marmaduke and Shelby, until the war closed.  He then began the study of the law and was licensed to the practice at Batesville, Arkansas, in 1866.
In 1868, he came to Springfield, where he has since resided, and ranks with the best legal talent in the State.  He is, and has been for ten years, a member of the Board of Curators of the University.  He was married at Batesville, Arkansas, August,11th, 1864, to Miss Annie D., daughter of Colonel Robert Smith.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

WARREN C. CRANE.
This gentleman is the son of Joseph W. and Olive (Chatfield) Crane, and was born in Medina county, Ohio, May 15, 1840.  His father emigrated from Massachusetts to Ohio about the year of 1820, and settled in Sharon township of said county.  His mother was a native of New York, but married in Ohio.  They had nine children, viz.:  Tryphena C., Warren C., Corydon G., Mary, Charles A., Martha, Henry L., Willis G., and Etta M., all of whom are living save Corydon, who died in 1862 in Ohio, aged eighteen.  Tryphena C. is the wife of J.F.G. Bentley, the leading merchant and banker of Ash Grove; Charles A. is engaged in the lumber business at same place; Willis G. is a harness-maker at same place; Etta M. is the wife of J.W.B. Appleby, cashier of the bank and salesman for J.F.G. Bentley.  Warren C. Crane, the subject of this notice, lived in Ohio until 1854.  He then engaged in the photographing business for two years.  Then, with a cousin, he took a drove of five hundred sheep to Minnesota where he lived for about two years, when he came to Springfield Missouri.  He returned to Ohio, and with his brother, Charles A., brought out a drove of fifteen hundred sheep, being ninety days upon the road.  After selling his sheep he went out to Chetopa, Kansas, and sold groceries for about a year.  In 1870 he came to Ash Grove and sold goods for J.F.G. Bentley for nine years.  In 1879 he embarked in business for himself at Ash Grove, selling furniture, agricultural implements, and sewing machines, in which he had no competition.  He was married January 20, 1866, to Miss Lucy Wright, of Dade county, Mo.  This union has been blest with one child, Mabel Olive, born November 29, 1876.  Mr. Crane is regarded as one of Ash Grove’s most enterprising business men, and a thorough gentleman.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

CHARLES W. CRAWFORD
Mr. Crawford is a son of Charles and Lucy (McNeil) Crawford, and was born October 14, 1825, in Robertson county, Tennessee. His parents died, and are buried in the county which gave him birth. Charles W. received his education at the common and private schools of his section, and at Walnut Academy in Robertson county, Tenn. He began teaching school in 1852, and continued until 1857, when he closed his last school in Tennessee, in Cheatham county. On the 28th of April, 1857, he reached Springfield, Missouri, where he shortly afterwards married Sallie M., daughter of John H. and Nancy M. (Holland) Jernigan, and then returned to Tennessee. In November, 1857, he came back to Springfield, stopping with his father-in-law until June, 1858, when he moved to Keetesville (now Washburn), Barry county, Missouri, and on the 14th of the same month took charge of a private school called the Union Institute, which he conducted until 1861. In January, 1862, he returned to Springfield and lived upon the farm of his father-in-law until September, 1864, when he accepted a clerkship in the quartermaster’s department, then at Springfield, where he remained until the war closed. Mr. Crawford then taught school in and around Springfield until 1875. In 1868 he moved into Springfield, and bought property, and in 1871, sold his town property and bought a small farm, two miles east, on the St. Louis road, where he now resides. He has a family of six boys and one girl. His wife died July 17, 1882, and is buried beside her father, mother and two brothers in the family burying-ground. In 1880 he was nominated by the Republican party for county collector, and elected. His son, Alonzo B., was his deputy. He is a Mason, and has been secretary of the lodge, and is regarded by all as an upright official and a thorough gentleman.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN F. CRUTCHER
Is a son of Dr. A.L. Crutcher, both the doctor and wife being natives of Kentucky. In 1862 the family moved to Indiana and lived there till 1868, when they moved to Missouri. They first stopped at Leasburg, but two years later moved to St. James, remaining there till the spring of 1873, then moving to Springfield, this county. Dr. Crutcher died, leaving a wife, four sons (John F., Leonidas C., William C. and Luke F.) and one daughter (Mollie), wife of S.L. McLane, of the St. L. & S.F. R.R. Dr. Crutcher had been forced to sacrifice his property in Kentucky owing to war troubles. The expense of moving his family a great distance, left him, on reaching Springfield, with very small means. The sons began railroading very young, and worked their way up to positions of conductors on the road, and acquired means sufficient to place themselves in easy circumstances. The subject of this sketch was born November 10, 1853. He commenced “braking” on the railroad in 1872, and four years subsequent accepted the position of baggage master, and in 1879 was promoted to a conductorship on the St. L. & S.F. December 24, 1878, he married Miss Catharine Jones, of Anderson county, Kentucky. They have one child, Edgar L., born October 30, 1880. Mr. Crutcher is senior conductor of Ozark lodge, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors, and is also a member of Springfield lodge, No. 218, I.O.O.F.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEONIDAS COLEMAN CRUTCHER
Is a son of Dr. Crutcher, elsewhere mentioned, and was born April 15, 1855. In 1870 he began “braking” on a train of St. L. and S.F., and worked for a while as brakeman, then baggage master, next yardmaster, from which he was promoted to conductor. He has at this writing been running a train five years. On November 25, 1880, he married Miss Sallie A. McFee, of Springfield. They have one child, a daughter named Gracie, born October 17, 1881. Mr. Crutcher is a member of the Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 218, and Umpire Encampment, No. 42, I.O.O.F. He was a charter member of Ozark Division, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors, which order he has served officially.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LUKE F. CRUTCHER
The youngest son of Dr. Crutcher, born March 24, 1858. He was also the youngest conductor that ever ran a train on the St. Louis & San Francisco railroad. He began railroading on that line at the age of fourteen, and at the age of seventeen they put him in charge of a freight train which he conducted for over two years. He was then promoted and given a passenger train which he is running at this writing. On the 3rd of June, 1880, he married Mary L., daughter of L.A.D. Crenshaw, an old citizen of Greene county. They have one son, Luke Allen, born May 24, 1882. Mr. Crutcher is a member of St. John’s Commandery, No. 20, Knights Templar.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

J.P. CULBERTSON
Was born in Burke county, North Carolina, July 28, 1826.  He went to Tennessee in 1848, and resided in Greene county, that State, till his coming here in 1852.  He first entered land in Center township, where he remained till 1859, when he changed to Boone township, and again entered land.  He enlisted in the army on the side of the United States in 1862, and fought the rebellion for about a year.  After the war he returned to this county where he has ever since lived.  Mr. C.’s parents were Thomas and Martha Culbertson, both North Carolinians by birth.  Mr. C. was married August 26, 1848, to Miss Mary A. Rincor, a native of Tennessee, who died in this county, April 1, 1879.  They had six children, five of them still living at this writing.  Though Mr. Culbertson owned many slaves before the civil war, he was, on principle, an abolitionist of decided views; and he gave up his slave property under emancipation with that patriotic spirit always so becoming to loyal citizens.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

THOMAS N. CULBERTSON.
Mr. Culbertson was born in Greene county, Tennessee, August 26, 1849.  When he was three years old his parents came to Greene county, Mo., bringing Thomas N. with them, and here he grew up, receiving his education in the common schools.  He began life as a farmer, and is still engaged in that worthy calling.  In July, 1882, he purchased the place where he now resides, containing 200 acres of fine land, well improved, and part of it in a high state of cultivation and productiveness.  His farm lies one mile and three-quarters south of Ash Grove, and ranks among the very best in the township.  Mr. Culbertson was married January 26, 1879, to Miss Nancy J. Hammond; she died however, in July, 1880, and the next year Mr. C. married a second time, his last wife being Huldah R. Hammond, a sister to his first wife.  The great grandfather of Thomas N. (whose name was also Thomas Culbertson) was a soldier in the war of 1812.  Mr. Culbertson has one child, a son by his first wife, named Everette, born July 22, 1880, just before the death of his mother.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver



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