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WILLIAM P. DABBS
This gentleman was born May 28, 1829, in Virginia, and is the son of Abner and Mary Dabbs. His parents moved to North Carolina in 1838, and remained there until 1844. They then came to Greene county, Missouri, where Wm. P. grew to manhood, in the city of Springfield. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in the State Guards, and in February, 1862, he joined Capt. Dick Campbell’s company, under Gen. Price. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Champion Hill, Miss., upon the 17th of May, 1863, and held at Camp Morton, Fort Delaware and Point Lookout until March, 1864, when he was released. He then went to Clark county, Ohio, where he met his family, who had been ordered out of the county in the spring of that year. He lived in Ohio until September, 1881, when he returned to Greene county, Missouri, and bought the farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres, where he now resides. Mr. Dabbs was married October 3, 1858, to Miss Hannah M., daughter of John B. Johnston, a former citizen of Springfield. Their union has been blest with ten children, eight of whom are now living, viz.: Mary C., John W., Hannah E., Clara L., Ellen V., Edward A., Thomas E. and an infant daughter.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CHARLES L. DALRYMPLE
This gentleman is the son of Allen S. and Eliza (Churchill) Dalrymple, and was born March 2, 1832, in Marion county, Tenn. He was educated at Knoxville and Chattanooga, and in 1849 he came to Springfield, Missouri. Shortly afterward he left Springfield for Santa Fe, New Mexico, where for two years he was agent for a transfer company. He then traveled about for some two years and then returned to Chattanooga, Tenn., where he lived until 1856. In 1857 he went to Memphis, where he remained until 1868. He was engaged in railroad construction work until 1860. April 29, 1863, he was appointed assistant U.S. Assessor for the eighth district of Tennessee, and held that office until 1866. He was then appointed U.S. cotton weigher, which position he retained until 1868, being also at the time tobacco inspector. July 21, 1868, he came to Springfield, and in the latter part of that year was made assistant U.S. assessor for the counties of Laclede, Dallas, Polk and Cedar, and held that office until 1871. In 1872 he was deputy circuit clerk of Polk county, and in 1873 came back to Springfield, where he was deputy county recorder for some time. In 1874-5, he was city recorder upon Republican ticket, and was elected justice of the peace in 1874, and resigned in 1879. Mr. Dalrymple was married March 21, 1856, to Miss Martha J. Thurston. Their union was blest with three sons and four daughters. His father was born Dec. 18, 1802, and is yet living. His mother was a native of Virginia, and died in 1856. They had but one child, Charles L.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN DANFORTH
Mr. Danforth was the son of Josiah and Sarah Roane Danforth, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, Sept. 19th, 1800. His father was a native of Massachusetts, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. His mother was a native of Charlottesville, Va. When John W. was about nine years of age, he went to Augusta, Ga., where he received a fine education, and became an expert accountant. After coming to this county he settled in Springfield and was engaged in mercantile business under the firm name of Danforth Bros. for a number of years. In 1845 he went to Taney county, Mo., and founded the town of Forsyth, and became postmaster and county clerk. In 1856 he returned to Greene county and located three miles northeast of Springfield. During the war he was clerk in Capt. Owen’s office at Springfield. He was married Dec. 19th, 1838, to Priscilla, daughter of Col. William Price, of Washington county, Va. He was a colonel in the war of 1812, and died in his native county, Sept. 20th, 1837. Mrs. Danforth’s mother was Miss Elizabeth Cecil, born in Tazewell county, Virginia, and died Nov. 20th, 1841. Mrs. Danforth was born in Washington county, Virginia, Oct. 5th, 1820. Mr. Danforth was a Royal Arch Mason, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Mrs. Danforth is a consistent member of that church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

EDWARD C. DAVIS
Mr. Davis is a son of Charles and Mary (Cummings) Davis, and was born in Wisconsin, March 21, 1854. His parents moved to Iowa when Edward was an infant, and settled upon a farm in Johnson county, fourteen miles from Iowa City. It was here Edward grew up and attended the public schools of the neighborhood. When he was seventeen years of age his mother moved with the family to Missouri, his father remaining in Iowa to settle up his business. He died, however, in Iowa, and Ed and his mother located at Springfield. He attended Drury College three consecutive terms, beginning the second term after the opening of that institution. He then went to live with Mr. E.C. Powell, with whom he farmed, and in 1872 his mother died, and then he began farming for himself, and part of the time operated a threshing machine. He was appointed deputy sheriff in October, 1877, under Sheriff A.J. Potter, and has served ever since, receiving his last appointment from Sheriff Patterson. Mr. Davis was married June 12, 1879 to Miss Alice M., daughter of Z.M. Rountree, Esq., of this county. Mr. Davis has made an efficient officer, and enjoys the confidence of a large circle of friends. He is a member of the C.P. church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HON. DANIEL E. DAVIS
This gentleman is the son of Isaac N. and Malinda A. (Gillespie) Davis, and was born July 6, 1834, in what is now Pulaski county, Missouri. When he was fourteen years of age his parents moved to California. Daniel returned in 1855, and in the latter part of that year went back to California. He remained there until 1858, when he again returned to Missouri. He was educated in his native county, and at the university at Sonora, California. In 1863 he enlisted in company A, 48th Missouri volunteers, as first lieutenant, but soon promoted captain. He was mustered out January 30th, 1875, at St. Louis, and returned to Richland, Pulaski county, where he was for many years engaged in farming, building and merchandising. In 1870 he was elected upon the Democratic ticket to represent the county in the Legislature. He was the representative of the county every time but once until 1877. He has been county surveyor of Hickory county from 1858 until the war began. He came to Springfield in the fall of 1881, and is now extensively engaged in contracting and building. He employs a large force of help and has already taken high rank in the business. Mr. Davis was married November 2, 1855, to Miss Mary P., daughter of A.H. Foster, county and circuit clerk of Hickory county, Missouri. They have two sons and two daughters. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church. Mr. Davis is a Mason and a member of the A.O.U.W. His oldest son, C.H. Davis, is prosecuting attorney of Pulaski county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM H. DAVIS
Mr. Davis is the son of Robert and Mahala J. (Murray) Davis, and was born December 15, 1847, in Cass township, Greene county, Mo. When he was fifteen years of age his parents moved to Gentry county, Mo., where he received his education. In 1867 they came to Polk county, Mo., where they lived a year, and then moved to Walnut Grove, Greene county, Mo. William taught school and read law, and was admitted to the bar in March, 1878, at Springfield. He practiced at Walnut Grove until November, 1881, when he came to Springfield. His parents came to this county in 1847, from Monroe county, Tennessee, and settled upon Clear creek, where they lived three years, and then moved to Lawrence county and lived there six years, and returned to Greene. Mr. Robert Davis was second lieutenant for six months in the Home Guards. In 1868, 1869 and 1870 he operated a carding machine, and was connected with a saw and grist mill at Walnut Grove. William’s grandfather, Lewis Davis, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and served under Gen. Jackson. At the battle of Horseshoe he was taken prisoner. He is now living at Lebanon, Laclede county, Mo., aged eighty-eight.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CALEB W. DAWLEY
This gentleman is the son of James and Nannie H. (Ambrose) Dawley, and was born April 2, 1859, in Covington, Ky. His parents moved to Kansas City, Mo., in 1867. He received his education at Kansas City, William Jewell college, and at the State university at Columbia, graduating in the class of 1879. He then returned home and taught school at Belton, Cass county, for a year. Here he met the lady whom he married December 23, 1881. She was Miss Lula Boyer. He and his wife are both members of the Baptist church. He came to Springfield in May, 1881, where he has since been superintendent of the Springfield Gas-Light Company. His parents are living upon a farm near Kansas City. They have three sons, Caleb W. being the oldest.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE SALE DAY
This gentleman was born at Lynchburg, Va., December 23, 1826. In 1837 he came to St. Louis, where he was educated in private schools, and at St. Xavier’s College, now St. Louis University. While in St. Louis he learned brick-laying and brick-making, and then became a contractor, and has since followed that business. In 1850 he went to New Orleans and staid there until 1852. He then went to Vicksburg, where he lived until 1856. He next returned to St. Louis, where he lived until 1871, when he came to Springfield, and has since made this his home. He has had contracts on many of the best buildings in the city. Mr. Day was married at New Orleans in 1852 to Theresa A. Fox. Their union was blest with one child, Laura, who married Prof. S.M. Godby, of Morrisville Institute. She died February 13, 1880, leaving an infant daughter. Mr. Day’s first wife died May 29, 1882. In December following Mr. Day was married at Independence, Mo. to Mrs. L.C. Leftwich, by Dr. W.M. Prottsman. In 1876 Mr. Day was elected councilman of the city, serving two years, and in 1882 he was elected mayor upon the Republican ticket. Mr. Day was a Whig during his early life, but, on the dissolution of that party, became a Republican. He is a member of the M.E. Church South, and has been since eleven years of age. His father was Ezekiel Day, and mother was Miss Elizabeth Sale, a daughter of Col. George Sale, of the war of 1812. Mr. Day was named for him.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS J. DELANEY
Mr. Delaney is the son of James and Alice (Mahon) Delaney, and was born at New Orleans, La., May 10, 1859. His parents were natives of Ireland, and came to this country when still young. They first stopped in New York city, but moved to New Orleans in 1858. They had four daughters and one son. His father was a Confederate soldier, and was killed in battle. Thomas was educated at St. Mary’s academy at New Orleans, and at the age of fifteen left home. In April, 1874, he came to North Springfield, Mo., and worked for the St. L. & S.F. R.R. for four years, being, during the time, fireman, baggage-master and storekeeper. For seven months he was clerk in the offices at St. Louis. He entered the St. Louis law school October 15, 1878, and graduated June 9, 1880, taking the highest honors of a class of twenty-nine. He then practiced law for a year in the office of Britton A. Hill. In June, 1881, he came to Springfield, Mo., and on April 4, 1882, was elected city attorney upon the Democratic ticket. Mr. Delaney was married December 29, 1880, to Miss Cordie, daughter of Hon. S.H. Boyd. They have one child, Thomas James.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

S. DINGELDEIN
Mr. Dingeldein was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Middle Germany, October 15th, 1842. He learned the trade of a brewer, and traveled around for some seven years. He landed at New York City, October 6th, 1867, and went from there to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and in October, 1868, he went to St. Louis, Mo. He worked in the largest breweries and malt-houses of that city for over eight years, and then came to Springfield, Missouri. He was married in St. Louis to Miss Dora Stuet. They have two sons and one daughter. His father died in Germany in 1859, and his mother died in 1862. They had a family of seven girls and six boys. Four boys and four girls are yet living. The brewery was built by Buehner & Finkenauer in 1872. Mr. Dingeldein leased the property in October, 1876, for ten years, and in June, 1882, bought it before the lease expired. The old cellar is 16 x 36, 11½ feet high; fomenting cellar is 30 x 15; brew-house is 25 x 30 feet; the new cellar is 68 x 38, 13 feet high, and will store 1,200 barrels. The walls are of the best rock and laid in cement. The new brewery is 40 x 40, 2½ stories high. When first started the brewery turned out eight hundred barrels per year. In 1882 they made twenty-one hundred.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

J.M. DISHMAN
This gentleman is the son of Jeremiah and Cynthia A. (Smith) Dishman, and was born in Simpson county, Ky., February 5, 1830. He is the oldest of a family of five children, all of whom, except one, are now living. J.M. Dishman made two trips from Kentucky to Greene county, Mo., upon horseback, one in 1853 and one in 1855. He was educated in the common schools of his native county. When he came to Missouri the second time, all of his father’s family came also, and settled on the head of Dry Sac river, in Jackson township. He lived there until his father’s death, April 27, 1876, at the age of seventy-two years. Mr. Dishman was married August 16, 1859, to Miss Harriet, daughter of Samuel Piper, a prominent farmer, and early settler of Greene county. Their union has been blest with eight children, seven sons and one daughter, all of whom are now living, viz.: Jane, Wm. F., Samuel, James W., Jerry, Charles, Bert and Leonidas. Samuel is at present section boss on the ‘Frisco railroad at Strafford. Mr. Dishman has always followed farming. He purchased the farm of one hundred and sixty acres of land upon which he now lives, in February, 1875, and removed there soon after, and has since made many valuable improvements. He is one of the substantial farmers of his section, and stands well in the regard of all.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

SAMUEL DISHMAN
This gentleman was born in Simpson county, Kentucky, July 29, 1835. He is the third of a family of five children, four boys and one girl. His father was Jeremiah Dishman, a native of Virginia, who was brought by his parents to Kentucky when he was a child. He grew to manhood and followed farming in that State until 1855, when he moved to Greene county, Missouri. They stopped some time in Springfield, and finally settled in Jackson township. He was married in 1829 to Miss Cynthia A. Smith, of Simpson county, Kentucky. She is still living with her son, Samuel. Jeremiah Dishman died April 24th, 1876, aged seventy-two years. Samuel was engaged in farming with his father until 1860, when he embarked in the milling business, which he followed for fourteen years. He then settled on a farm which he had bought in sections 21 and 22, township 30, range 20. He has since followed the independent life of a farmer. He was married August 5th, 1865, to Miss Mary J., daughter of R.L. Banfield, a prominent farmer of Greene county, formerly of Tennessee. Their union has been blest with six children, five of whom are still living. Mr. Dishman is a member of Strafford Lodge, A.F. and A.M. He is one of the substantial citizens of the county, and enjoys the confidence of all.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

REV. J. HERVEY DOBBS
Mr. Dobbs was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1844, and is the son of Bennett and Nancy Dobbs. After having served in the State and National Guards, he enlisted for government service in the civil war, in the Mississippi squadron, being assigned to duty on gunboat Silver Lake, No. 23, where he remained till the war closed. He was mustered out June 26, 1865, at Mound City, Illinois, and soon afterwards entered Genesee Wesleyan seminary, of New York State, where he completed his education. He then went into the mercantile business, till 1876, when, by the urgent importunities of his friends he was induced to enter the temperance work as a lecturer, and also lectured on other subjects. Subsequently, he entered on the ministerial work, as a local preacher in the M.E. church, though he still continued his temperance work till the spring of 1878, when he was appointed State deputy and lecturer of the I.O.G.T. of Pennsylvania. While holding that position he was appointed secretary of the executive committee of the Pennsylvania State Temperance Union, and placed in charge of the legislative work in behalf of temperance. In March, 1881, he resigned his position and took a transfer from the Central Pennsylvania conference to the St. Louis conference, and was stationed at North Springfield, Greene county. Mr. Dobbs was married December 28, 1868, to Miss Mary Johnston, of Dunkirk, N.Y. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dobbs, two of whom still survive, named, Mary D. and Nettie M. These children Mr. Dobbs and wife have taken great pains to rear and educate properly, teaching them the religion that gives the greatest value to life. Mr. D. was assigned to a charge in Kansas City early in 1883.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

A.B. DODSON
This gentleman is the son of James M. and Mary Dodson, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February 11, 1847. His parents are yet living upon the old homestead in Tennessee. He came to Missouri in 1870, and farmed three years in Greene county. He then moved into Springfield and engaged in business. He began firing upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad in December, 1880, and has recently been promoted engineer, and is now running an engine upon that road. Mr. Dodson was married in 1870 to Miss F.E. McMeen, of Maury county, Tenn. They have one child, Olivia, born December 16, 1871.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

F.M. DONNELL.  The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a well known citizen of Greene County, Mo., whose intelligence, enterprise and energy, with many other estimable qualities have secured him a popularity not derived from any factitious circumstances, but a permanent and spontaneous tribute to his merit.  He is a native of the county in which he now resides, his birth occurring September 22,1847, a son of John M. and Jane (McLain) Donnell, the former of whom was born in Tennessee in 1800, becoming a citizen of Greene county, mo. in 1832.  In his veius flowed sterling Scotch-Irish blood, and for some time after the family  had taken shelter ender the “stars and stripes” the name was known as O’Donnell.  The paternal great-grandfather was one of the brave men who fought for home and liberty during the Revolution. And his son, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, showed his love of his country  and his patriotism by service in the War of 1812.  John M. and Jane Donnell were among  the first to locate in Greene County, Mo., coming thither from Tennessee by wagon, and settling on a farm in the northern part of the county.  They purchased a tract of good farming land, but Mr. Donnell continued to add to his acreage until he became a large land holder.  He gave much attention to trading in mules, shipping them South, and in his branch of business he was very successful.  He was a member if the A.F.& A. M.  and was Master of Solomon Lodge for some time in its early history.  He was well known throughout the county, and was respected by all, having many warm friends.  His wife, who was also born in Tennessee, died in 1848, after having become the mother of ten children, seven of whom are still living: Monroe, who was a farmer in Texas, and a man of family; Mary A. who died in 1868,was the wife of David Kepply of this county, and lift four children; George W. is a man of family and is a farmer in the southern part of Greene County;  William S. is married and a farmer of Saline County, Mo.; Sarah C. is the wife of James Armstrong, of Polk County, Mo., and has four children; C. W., is a mechanic of Saline County, is married and has a family; He was a soldier in the Confederate Army during the civil war, and served four years with General Lee, taking part in many important battles; and F. N. the subject of this sketch.   Upon the death of his first wife Mr. Donnell was married for the second time.  The mother of P.  M. Donnell  was a noble woman and as earnest Christian, and for many years of her useful and well spent life was connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  She was about fifty-five years old at the time of her death, and came of an excellent and well known family of Tennessee.  F. M. Donnell was reared on the farm of his father some fourteen miles north of Springfield, and his early training was received on his father’s farm and his education in the district schools.  He gave his father his time and services until the opening of the Civil War, and when only sixteen years of age he entered the service, enlisting in Company E., Sixteenth Missouri Cavalry under Capt. S. W. Headley, with whom he remained for two years.  Some of the engagements in which he took part were Jefferson City, Lexington, Big Blue, besides numerous sharp skirmishes.  He was mustered out of the service in June ,1865, soon after which he emigrated to California, where he was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits up to 1888, when he returned to Greene County.  During the time he was in the west he lived in Enby and San Joaquin Counties, Cal., and was at one time the foreman of 1,500 acres, the most of which he devoted to the raising of wheat.  He has been a very successful business, and since his return to Greene County, Mo., he has been a resident of Springfield, where he was soon appointed to the position of deputy sheriff, and still later became a member of the city police force.  He has held the office of constable and in 1885 he was elected to the office of sheriff of Greene County, which position he filled with ability for two years.  At the expiration of his term of service he moved to his farm two and one half miles east of Springfield where he has been very successfully tilling the soil and raising stock for about six years, His estate comprises 120 acres, and it is without doubt one of the best improved places in the county.  He has been living in the  city of Springfield since early in 1893, where he is conducting a well appointed livery Stable, and rents his farm.  His stables are located on Oliver Street, near Boonville Street, and is one of the best appointed and located, as well as stocked, in the city.  He  has about fourteen head of horses always ready for service, and is already doing a profitable business.  Soon after the close of the war Mr. Donnell was married  to Miss Mary A. Hall, of Greene County, daughter of George Hall, and to them two children were given; Charles, who was  killed at Willow Springs in 1893, on the Gulf Railroad, leaving a widow, and George S, who is living in California, now a widower.   Mr. Donnell lost his first wife in 1872 in California after which he married Miss Mattie J. Williams of Kentucky, a daughter of Perry Williams, and by her is the father of five children; F. m. Jr.,  Cordie, Carrie. Lee, and Roy.  Mr. Donnell has always been a Democrat in politics, and in all ways has ever been a man of decidedly public spirit.   He has a neat and comfortable residence at 613 St. Louis Street, besides a number of other dwelling houses in the city, and considerable real estate of value.   
Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893, Pages 27-28, Transcribed by Bud

F.M. DONNELL
Mr. Donnell was born December 22nd, 1847, in Jackson township, Greene county, Missouri, and received his education in the country schools of his neighborhood. In 1864 he enlisted in Company E, 16th Missouri cavalry, and was in the battles of Big Blue, Jefferson City and Lexington. He was mustered out June 30th, 1865. In 1868 he went to California, and for several years he was foreman upon a farm of fifteen thousand acres. He returned to Missouri and lived a year at Sedalia, and then came back to Greene county. He was on the police force in 1879, 1880 and 1882. In November, 1882, he was elected to the office of constable of Campbell township. Mr. Donnell married Miss Jerusha Roberts, who died in March, 1879, leaving two sons. He was married the second time to Mattie J. Williams, a native of Knox county, Kentucky. Mr. Donnell is a member of the K. of P.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN M. DONNELL (deceased)
This gentleman was born in 1802, and died in 1860, upon the farm he settled in 1832 in Jackson township. He and Robert Small came together from Middle Tennessee, and were among the first settlers in that township. He was a very large farmer and stock dealer, and for many years took large droves of mules annually to the Southern markets. He was married in Tennessee to a Miss Maxwell, by whom he had thirteen children, seven sons and six daughters. Six sons and two daughters are yet living. Mr. and Mrs. Donnell brought the first stove to this county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PHILANDER E. DRYDEN
The subject of our sketch is a son of James and Mary Dryden. He is a native of Rockbridge county, Virginia. When twenty-one years old he went to Huntsville, Alabama, and there worked at the carpenter’s trade three years, then went to St. Louis, Missouri, and worked for a few months at his trade. In 1874 Mr. Dryden commenced braking on a freight train on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, and three years thereafter was promoted to freight conductor, which position he holds at present. He is a member of Ozark Division No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors, of which he was one of the charter members.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOSEPH A. DRYDEN
The subject of this sketch was born in Lawrence county, Missouri, January 13th, 1853. On the 2nd, of June, 1877, he commenced “firing” on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, running in that capacity till March, 1882, when he was promoted to the position of engineer, which he still continues to hold. Mr. Dryden is a member of Star Lodge No. 20, K. of P., and also belongs to the ‘Frisco Lodge No. 51, B. of L.F., of which he is master. Besides these, he holds membership in the Locomotive Firemen’s Mutual Benefit Association. January 28th, 1880, he married Miss Sivinnia Whitworth, of Franklin county, Missouri. They have one child, a son, named William A., born September 6, 1882.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN H. DUNCAN
Mr. Duncan is the son of Harvey and Mary (Bowden) Duncan, and was born at Georgetown, Kentucky, January 8th, 1854. He was educated at Evansville, Indiana, Canton, Illinois and McGee College, Macon county, Missouri. He came to Springfield, Missouri in March, 1876, and studied law in the office of Bray & Cravens, and was admitted to the bar upon the 20th of October, 1876. He was elected, upon the Republican ticket, city recorder, in April, 1878, and re-elected in 1879. In November, 1878, he was elected justice of the peace, and served four years. He was appointed notary public by Gov. Crittenden, January 19th, 1883. He is now a practicing attorney before the courts and has the qualifications to succeed. Mr. Duncan was married June 6th, 1877, to Miss L.A. Carson. They have two children, Hume and Leroy. His father is living at Canton, Illinois, and his mother died at Evansville, Indiana in 1861.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS J. DUNCAN
Mr. Duncan is the son of James and Elizabeth (Yeakle) Duncan, and was born in Greene county, Tennessee, March 23, 1848. His parents were natives of that county, and his grandfathers upon both sides were soldiers in the war of 1812. In 1863, before he was fifteen years of age, he enlisted in company E, 4th Tennessee regiment, infantry, and at the battle of McMinnvile, Tenn., was taken prisoner by General Wheeler. He was paroled and in the spring of 1864 was exchanged and served through the war. He was at the battles of Knoxville and Warm Springs. He learned the blacksmith trade after the war and worked at it in Tennessee until 1876, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, and located at Bois D’Arc, where he has since carried on his trade, and is doing a flourishing business. He owns a nice property in town, and is one of the charter members of Bois D’Arc Lodge, I. O. O. F. Mr. Duncan was married February 9, 1871, to Miss Mattie J., daughter of William and Mary (Lowdermilk) Chapman, of Greene county, Tennessee. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Annie B., John H., Bessie A., and Freddie W. Mr. Duncan is a good, substantial citizen and respected by all.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist


H.S. DUNCAN
Was born in Morgan county, Tennessee, July 8, 1843.  In the spring of 1846, he removed with his parents to Lawrence county, and there received his education in the common schools.  His parents were Dennis K. and Melinda (Hope) Duncan, the former of whom died in 1850, and the latter in 1865.  He entered the confederate service in 1861, and took part in many of the principal engagements of the West, including Lexington and Lone Jack.  In 1863, he was taken prisoner and sent to Richmond.  After the war he returned to Lawrence county and engaged in school teaching.  Coming to Greene county, he taught school here for two years during 1869-70.  In 1871, began merchandising, but taught again in 1872-3.  Soon after this, he began merchandising with Mr. W.T. Chandler, at Ash Grove, where his business interests still are at the present writing.  Mr. Duncan was elected registering officer of Boone township in 1872, and was mayor and member of the council when Ash Grove was incorporated.  At the election in the fall of 1872, Mr. Duncan, on the Democratic ticket, was elected to the office of county collector, by a good majority over his republican opponent.  Mr. Duncan was married October 12, 1871, to Miss Mollie C. Robbins, daughter of Harvey Robbins, deceased; Mrs. D.’ s parents were also from the State of Tennessee.  Four children have been born of this union, three of whom still survive.  Mrs. Duncan is a member of the Baptist church, and it is one of her prime objects in life to rear her children in a manner becoming to Christian parents.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

J.K.P. DUNCAN.
Squire Duncan is the son of Dennis K. and Malinda (Hope) Duncan, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, June 1st, 1845.  His father came to Lawrence county in 1846, and lived there several years, and then took a trip to Arkansas, where he died.  His mother died in 1865.  J.K.P. Duncan attended his first school in Greene county, James Van Bibber being the teacher.  He was educated principally, however, in Lawrence county and at an early age commenced farming, which has been his occupation ever since, with the exception of two years spent in Texas.  Mr. Duncan is one of the most prominent citizens of Boone township, having been a justice of the peace for eight years and deputy assessor two years.  He was a candidate for the Legislature in 1880.  He purchased the farm where he now resides in 1874.  It is two miles south of Ash Grove, and consists of one hundred and twenty acres of fine land, most of which is under cultivation.  Mr. Duncan was married December 28, 1865, to Mary E., daughter of Josiah Mason, Esq.  She was born May 7th, 1842.  Their union has been blest with eleven children, viz.:  Wm. H., born October 26th, 1866; Tennessee M., born February 23d, 1868; Josiah H., born May 25th, 1869; Mary C., born October 19th, 1870; Mattie, born February 16th, 1872; J.K.P., born June 2d, 1873, and died September 26th, 1873; Edward W., born March 26th, 1875, and died May 27th, 1877; Rosa, born July 3d, 1876, and died November 17th, 1876; Cinderilla, born November 25th, 1877, and died February 8th, 1879; Cora A., born January 6th, 1880; and Hale S., born March 21st, 1882.  Mr. Duncan and wife are members of the Sac river Baptist church.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

JAMES H. DUNCAN   Among the noted and representative men of the flourishing city of Springfield, Mo. stands the name of J. H. Duncan, who is the present prosecuting attorney of Greene County.  Perhaps no member  of the legal fraternity enjoys a more extensive practice or is more widely known than this gentleman.   He came  originally from the Bluegrass state, born in Georgetown, Scott County, January8, 1854 and is the son of Harney and Mary E. (Bowden) Duncan.  The father was also a native of Kentucky, born in Madison County and is of Scotch-Irish descent, his ancestors emigrating to this country at an early date.  For many years the father made his home in Springfield but later moved to Canton, Ill. where he resides at the present time.  Mrs. Duncan was a sister of Ex-Judge James H. Bowden of Kentucky..  She died in the year 1862.   Of the five children born to this worthy couple, only two besides our subject are now living;  Prof, S. P. Duncan, a resident of Coldwater, Kan., and probate judge of this county, is a prominent attorney of his city, and Mrs. Allie B. Gardener, wife of J.B. Gardener,  resides in Canton, Ill.  The early recollections of our subject were of his native State but when the war broke our he moved with his parents to Evansville,  Ind., from there to Canton, Ill., in 1866 where he remained for five or six years.  He was educated in the Evansville and Canton high Schools, and also attended the McGree College in Macon County, Mo., thus securing good educational advantages.  After leaving school he became a teacher and while thus occupied he took up the study of law.  Later he entered the law office of Cravens & Bray and was admitted to the bar in 1876.  The same year he began practicing his profession in Springfield and in 1878 was elected city recorder and re-elected in 1879.  For four years after this he held the office of justice of the peace, was elected assistant prosecuting attorney and later prosecuting attorney.  Mr. Duncan has been chairman of the Republican committee of Springfield, for eight years. And has ever taken an active part in politics.  He began giving his undivided attention to the practice of law in 1882, and since that time all his mind has been centered on that and his duties as a prosecuting attorney.   Since serving in that capacity he has prosecuted a large number of murder cases and is classed among the foremost attorneys of the city.   Socially he is a member of the A. O. U. W. lodge No. 402, Springfield, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  Mr. Duncan has a pleasant home at 710 West Elm street, and this is presided over by his chosen companion, formerly Miss Levie A. Carson, a native of St. Louis and the daughter of Henry S. Carson of Springfield.  Three children have been born to this union, as follows; Henry H., Harvey L., Paul D.,  Mrs. Duncan holds a membership in the Baptist Church and is a lady of intelligence and good judgment.  Mr. Duncan has ever taken a deep interest in politics, and has been a delegate to all Republican conventions and is one of the influential young men of the county.  
Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893, Transcribed by Bud



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