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JONATHAN FAIRBANKS
This gentleman is the son of Varnum and Margaret (Haddin) Fairbanks, and was born in Andover, Massachusetts, January 7, 1828. When he was about a year old his parents moved to New York, and his father, being a manufacturer, took charge of a large factory. His father died in 1832, and the family then returned to Massachusetts. Mr. Fairbanks is a fourth cousin of Fairbanks, the inventor of the celebrated scales of that name. Jonathan lived with an uncle at Sudbury, Massachusetts, until he was eighteen years of age, and then went to school for three years. First went to New Ipswich, and from there went to Wilmington, Delaware, and taught school just out of the city for several years. He next went to St. Mary’s, Ohio, and taught as first assistant there, and went to Piqua and took charge of the high school for a year. He then returned to St. Mary’s, where he remained six years as superintendent of the public schools. He again went back to Piqua where he was superintendent of the high school there for five years. He resigned his position in the fall of 1866, and came to Springfield, Missouri where he engaged in the lumber and real estate business for about ten years. Subsequently he accepted the superintendency of the public school here, to which position he had been elected in 1875. He has held the position ever since, save one year when he traveled. R.L. Goode, Esq., was in charge of the school during Mr. Fairbanks’ absence. Mr. Fairbanks has been mayor of the city, member of the council, member of the board of education three years, and president of the board two years. During the time he had been traveling he has done hard and faithful work, so hard, indeed, that his health ran down under it, and he had to desist from overwork. He taught his first school at Ashby, Massachusetts, and it was pronounced the best in the place. He was married August, 1855, to Miss Angie Bowker, daughter of Noyes and Mary Bowker. They were educated together at Sudbury, Massachusetts. By this union they have four children living, viz.: Annie P., George B. John W. and James O. Mr. Fairbanks is one of the best educators in the country and deserves his popularity.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

BENJAMIN A. FAY
Mr. Fay is the son of Lorenzo D. and Deborah (Richmond) Fay, and was born in Vermont, Sept. 16, 1832. His ancestors were from England and among the first settlers of Vermont, three of the Fays being soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Benjamin was educated in his native State, and at the age of twenty-one learned the carriage-maker’s trade, and in 1856 went to Winneshiek county, Iowa, where he worked at his trade. In April, 1861, he enlisted in company A, 1st Iowa cavalry. He did duty in North Missouri in 1861, and in 1862 he was at the battles of Lone Jack, Prairie Grove and Iron Mountain. He was also in the battle at Little Rock, and was under Gen. Steele upon Bank’s Red River campaign. He was at the engagements at Camden and Bayou Metre. In 1864 he went back to North Missouri. His company was body-guard for Gen. Fish, and during Price’s raid was body-guard for Gen. Rosencranz. They were next sent to Memphis, and after the war they went to Texas to look after government property. They were discharged in the spring of 1866, Mr. Fay having served five years. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in 1866, and worked at carpentering and building until 1869. He then worked in the ‘Frisco shops until 1877. He now has a hotel and restaurant, and from a capital of one hundred and fifty dollars he has accumulated property to the amount of ten thousand dollars. Mr. Fay was married in 1860 to Miss Kate Norton, of Iowa. They have two children, viz.: Frank and Nellie.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

EDWIN L. FAY
Mr. Fay was born at Barnard, Orange county, Vermont, August 5th, 1849. He is the son of Lorenzo D. and Lavinia B. Fay, who are natives of Vermont, and are now living at Palatine, Cook county, Illinois. They emigrated to Iowa in 1862, and settled in Butler county, but removed to their present home in 1864. Edwin L. Fay commenced railroading in September, 1867, on the Chicago and Northwestern, and ran upon that road until 1870. In March, 1871, he ran as a brakeman upon the popular “’Frisco” road for four months, and then took charge of the yards at Springfield. He next was an “extra” freight conductor for eight months, and was then promoted to the position of a regular conductor on a freight. In March, 1878, he was given a passenger train, as conductor, which responsible position he still holds. Mr. Fay was married on the 27th of August, 1873, to Miss Dot Kern, of St. James, Missouri. This union has been blest with three children, two of whom – Edith Grace and Ethel Idelle –are living. Mr. Fay is a member of St. John’s Commandery No. 20, Knights Templar, of Springfield; A.O.U.W., Wentworth Lodge No. 114, and the Order of Railway Conductors, Ozark Division No. 30, North Springfield. He was one of the charter members, and was a delegate to the national meeting at Buffalo, New York, in October, 1881, and at St. Paul, in October, 1882.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

BENJAMIN F. FIELDER
Mr. Fielder is the son of John L. and Mary (Denton) Fielder, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February 7, 1825. His parents were early settlers of Tennessee, and his father was at the battle of New Orleans. Benjamin was reared and educated in Maury and Hickman counties, Tennessee, and at about the age of twenty-one he began manufacturing cotton gins at Columbia, Tennessee, and subsequently learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed exclusively, with the exception of two years in which he was an overseer. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in November, 1855, and settled in Washington township, where he lived until the beginning of the civil war. He enlisted in the militia and was taken prisoner upon the 8th of January, 1863, but paroled in a few days. At the close of the war he settled where he now resides, three and one-half miles southwest of Springfield, where he has one hundred and fifteen acres, all under cultivation. Mr. Fielder was married October 7, 1855, to Mary Estes. They had four children, viz.: Mary A., Margaret R., William T. and Andrew J. His first wife died in April, 1863, and February 6, 1876, Mr. Fielder was married to Mary S. Barnes. Their union has been blest with three children, Emma M., Cordie B. and Benjamin F. Mr. and Mrs. Fielder are members of the M.E. church South, and in politics he is a Democrat.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JUDGE FELIX F. FINE
Judge Fine is the son of Melsor and Margaret (Sappington) Fine, and was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, Feb. 23rd, 1833. His father was born Aug. 14th, 1801, and died Nov. 19th, 1843. His mother was born Aug. 8th, 1813, and died Oct. 11th, 1882. Felix F. was educated in the common schools of St. Louis, and at the St. Louis University. He was engaged in farming and in the nursery business until he came to Greene county in November, 1867, and located three miles west of Springfield on the Carthage road. Here he carried on the nursery business extensively, and farmed until his removal to where he now lives, about four miles east of Springfield. He owns a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, well improved. In the fall of 1882 he was elected upon the Democratic ticket as one of the county judges of Greene county, which office he now holds, enjoying the full confidence of his constituency, and guarding well the county’s interest. He was married Feb. 16th, 1858, to Miss Martha L. Gesferd, a native of St. Francois county, Mo. Their union has been blest with two children, only one of whom is now living. The judge and his wife are members of the Catholic church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN W. FORSHEE
This gentleman is the son of Jesse and Mary Forshee, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, Feb. 15th, 1840. At the age of seventeen, he came to Greene county, Mo., and worked at well drilling until the war began. In the spring of 1861 he joined the Light Guard company of Springfield, and in September joined Col. Phelps’ regiment, and served in that until it was discharged. He then joined the 8th E.M.M., and served in that regiment until the war closed. He was taken prisoner by Gen. Marmaduke, but paroled in five days. He is now actively engaged in farming and stock dealing, and owns a good farm. Mr. Forshee was married October 11th, 1866, to Margaret Woodrow, of Fannin county, Texas. Seven children were born to this marriage, viz.: William A., Margaret J., Hattie I., Samuel N., Mattie, James and George T. Mr. Forshee is a member of A.F. and A.M. society, and one of the substantial citizens of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

H.M. FOSTER
This gentleman is the son of Elias W. and Sarah J. Foster, and was born in Tioga county, New York, January 10, 1831. His father was at first engaged in the lumber trade, but for the past twenty-five years has been farming and is yet hale and stout at the age of seventy-eight. His mother died in July, 1882, at the age of seventy-seven. Mr. Foster belongs to a long-lived family, his father, brothers and sisters are all yet living, and his father’s mother lived to be one hundred and four years of age. H.M. Foster was brought to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, when he was seven years of age, where he lived until 1860, and then moved to the central part of Michigan where he remained seventeen years, and in April, 1877, came to Missouri, and settled in Jackson township, Greene county. Before coming to this State, Mr. Foster was engaged in the lumber business, but here he has followed the occupation of farming. He improved a farm of eighty acres south of Strafford, which he sold in 1881, and then bought the place upon which he now lives. Mr. Foster was married January 1, 1855, to Miss Eunice, daughter of Thomas L. Moore, of Tioga county, New York. They had three children by this marriage, all of whom are dead. Mrs. Foster died June 18, 1865, and he was married the second time to Miss Alice Davis, daughter of Thomas Davis, of this county, formerly of Tennessee. Their union has been blest with three children, two girls and a boy.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

MARION A. FRAME
Mr. Frame was born at Ladoga, Indiana, August 26, 1850. In 1877 he commenced firing upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, and December, 1881, was promoted to engineer, and has run an engine on that road ever since. He was married August 22, 1872, to Miss Elvira W. Johnson. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Minnie May, Frederick A., Clara E. and Ellen. Mr. Frame is a member of Frisco lodge, B. of L.E.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM T.L. FREEMAN
This gentleman is a son of William T. and Theresa J. (Eldridge) Freeman, and was born at Shreveport, Louisiana, June 12, 1847. His grandfather, John Freeman, was a Revolutionary soldier, and one of Washington’s scouts. His father died near Stockton, California, on a ranch known as Freeman’s ranch. His mother lives at North Springfield. She has contributed largely to magazines and other literary publications, but is best known as an authoress, by her book, “Silver Lake; or The Belle of Bayou Louie.” After his father’s death the family moved to St. Louis, where he was reared and educated. They lived in St. Louis until 1868, and then moved to De Lassus, Mo., and with Col. De Lassus, built the De Lassus hotel. He then returned to St. Louis, where he was engaged in business about three years. He came to North Springfield in August, 1880, and accepted the position of secretary of the master of transportation of the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad. Mr. Freeman was married April 28, 1867, to Miss Emma Bourgeat, of Point Coupee, Louisiana, daughter of Dr. Bourgeat, of that place, and grand-niece of the Marquis De Lassus, the last Spanish governor of the Territory of Louisiana, of which Missouri was then a part. Their union was blest with one child, Julius B. De Lassus, born November 7, 1870. Mrs. Freeman died February 24, 1872. Mr. Freeman is president of the North Springfield Literary and Musical Association.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

COL. H.F. FELLOWS
Col. Fellows, whose full Christian name is Homer Franklin, was born in Wellsborough, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, July 30th, 1832. Johnathan Fellows, grandfather of Homer F., came from England prior to the Revolution, and settled first in Connecticut, where Erastus Fellows, father to the subject of this sketch, was born. They subsequently (1815) moved to Pennsylvania, where Erastus married Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson, relict of Moses Johnson, who became the mother of Col. Fellows. Homer passed his early life in Wellsborough, where his father was a hotel-keeper and farmer. He worked on the farm in spring and summer and, during winter, attended the schools of his native town. He spent one year in a general merchandise store at the age of eighteen, then taught school one term at Osceola, Pennsylvania, at the conclusion of which he entered Geneseo College, at Lima, New York, remaining one year. In 1853, he, being “of age,” started with a party to Texas, but changed his mind and went to Iowa. He had procured letters of introduction to some prominent gentlemen, including Gov. Grimes. Procuring an engagement as traveling salesman for Geer & Baum, of Burlington, he remained one year, till the firm dissolved, traveling on both sides of the Des Moines river with a team. After the dissolution, Mr. Fellows was employed in settling up the business, and in 1854, was sent by Mr. Baum with a stock of goods to Chariton, Iowa, where he remained a year, and wound up the business when Baum sold out. He then came to this State and went into the real estate business with Messrs. Scheller & Baum, in Plattsburg, where he remained till 1857, when he established two other offices, one in Warsaw, Benton county, and another in Springfield, this county, the firm then being Fellows, Todd & Robinson, he taking charge of the Springfield office. Col. Fellows was married November 18th, 1859, to Miss Vidie, daughter of Maj. R.J. McElhaney. She died at Springfield October 10th, 1869, leaving three daughters – Emma, Clara and Adah. He was again married August 18th, 1872, to Miss Minnie L. Boyden, daughter of Capt. Ezekiel Boyden, of Peoria, Illinois. During the civil war, Col. Fellows was engaged in the mercantile business at Rolla, Phelps county, but left there in 1864, to engage in the wholesale grocery business in St. Louis. He was associated with several different firms in St. Louis till the spring of 1867, when he moved to Arlington, then the Southwest Pacific R.R. terminus, where he was interested in business. When the road was completed to Springfield he moved to that point, engaging in merchandising and erecting an elevator, which was burned in 1872. In December of that year he became superintendent of the Springfield wagon factory. Two years later he and his brother bought out the concern, assuming all liabilities. They are still conducting the factory, and the reputation of the “Springfield wagon” is well and most favorably known throughout the Southwest. In 1865 Col. Fellows was a director of the Missouri Loan Bank, and also of the Occidental Insurance Company. He was Lieut. Colonel of the 63rd Missouri Militia, called into active service on Price’s raid into this State. In 1861 he was appointed register of lands by President Lincoln. He was elected mayor of Springfield in 1877, and re-elected by an increased majority in 1878. Few men have more of genuine public spirit than Col. Fellows, or are more ready to further public improvements by purse and personal action. He took a leading part in the construction of the Springfield street railway, and when the water-works question was agitated, he lead out in that enterprise, and paid for the carriages, out of his own pocket, to bring voters to the polls the day the question was carried in favor of the Perkins proposition to supply the city with water. In politics Col. Fellows is an independent Republican. He is a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and a member of the Brotherhood of Druids, and Knights of Honor. He is liberal in his religious opinions, and willing that all men should do their own thinking.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

COL. HOMER F. FELLOWS.  
In three days of money-making, when life is a constant struggle between right and wrong, it is a pleasure to lay before an intelligent reader the unsullied record of an honorable man.  To the youthful it will be a useful lesson—an incentive to honest industry,  Col. Homer F. Fellows is acknowledged by all to be one of Springfield’s most public-spirited and honorable citizens.  He has been largely  indentified with the public enterprises of that city, is a promoter of its improvements and the real founder of one pg the largest mechanical industries in this part of the State.  He springs from old Colonial stock, and is of English-Puritan extraction, two brothers of that name, John and Drane, having emigrated from England in old Colonial times.  John Fellows, grandfather of our subject, was born in the town of Canaan, Conn., where his ancestors had settled, and served in the Revolutionary War, fighting bravely for independence.   His wife, whose maiden name was Edna Diebold, was a native of Canaan, and came from French extraction.  After marriage this worthy couple moved to Luzerne County, Penn., and settling on a farm went actively to work to make many improvements in their new home.   Indians were very plentiful at that time.  About 1820 Mr. Fellows moved with his family to Tioga County, Penn., and there passed the remainder of his days, dying at the good old age of eighty-three years.  He reared family of six children: Horace, Asabel, Erastus, Merritt, Eliza and Hulda.  As a man of intelligence and as one of the first citizens of his town he was well known and held in the highest esteem.  His son, Erastus, father of our subject, was also a native of the old town of Canaan, Conn., and was but a boy when he went with his parents to Luzerne County.  He obtained a fair education for his day, and when a young man went to Cincinnati, Ohio,  where he remained one year.  Returning to the Keystone State he married a widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson, nee Cole.  Her father, Royal Cole, was born in New York State, but was of English extraction.  He served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, took an active part in several battles, Trenton, and others, and was present at the surrender of Burgoyne.  He also served in the War of 1812.  Mr. Cole was a well-informed man, a wide reader, and a universalist in his religious belief.   To this marriage was born a large family.  His death occurred at Wellsborough, Penn., where, in connection with farming, he followed hotel keeping.  From 1825 until 1865, he was proprietor of the Fellow’s Temperance House, and was known far and wide as a man of sterling worth and high moral character.  Hr was one of the early promoters of the cause of temperance, and accomplished much good by his determined stand.  He was also a strong Abolitionist, a lover of liberty, and his home was the refuge for slaves escaping to Canada.  He was ever fearless in the advocacy of any cause he believed to be right, and did not hesitate to express his views when it was necessary.  The famous James G Burney, at one time candidate for the presidency on the Abolitionist ticket, when lecturing in Pennsylvania, came to Wellsborough, but could find  no place in which to deliver his lecture. As the Abolition cause was very unpopular.  Mr. Fellows gave him the use of his dining-room, and there his lecture was delivered.  In his political views Mr. Fellows was at one time an Old Line Whig, later an Abolitionist and finally a staunch Republican.  During the latter part of his days he became a prosperous and wealthy man.  His death occurred in 1884, when eighty-four years of age.  His wife was a lady of education for her day, and an old teacher’s certificate bearing date as early as 1813, and issued to her by the directors of the district at Corymans, Albany County, N. Y., attesting her ability to teach school. Is yet in existence.  Throughout her life she took an interest in literary matters, was a great reader, and was a poetess of no mean ability, writing many poems, some of which were published.  She was a devout member of the Methodist Church, a woman of high moral worth, and a great strength of character.  By her first husband she was the mother of two children, Newton and Almira,  and her second union resulted in the birth of four children: Rachel A., Homer F., Norris W. and Mary E., all now living except the last named.  Mr. and Mrs. Fellows passed all the days of their natural life at Wellsborough, Penn.. Col. Homer Fellows, son of the above and our subject, was born at Wellsborough, Penn., and his youthful days were divided between assisting his father on the farm and attending the common schools.  At the age of seventeen he began clerking in a dry goods store in Wellsborough, and this business continued for about a year and a half.  He then taught a district school and later entered Wesleyan University at Lima, N. Y., where he continued for one year.  At the age of twenty-one , having acquired a good education for his day, he emigrated West with the intention of going to Texas.   On reaching Rock Island, Ill., he was taken sick, and this interfered with his plans.  However , he went on as far as Muscatine, Iowa, remaining there for some time, but later went to Burlington, Iowa, where he engaged as salesman for a mercantile firm, Gear& Baum.  Subsequently he became a collector for Mr. Baum, and afterward managed a store for him at Chariton. Iowa, for a year and a half.  Following this he managed a general store  for David Waynick for some time, and one for Joseph Mitchell, by whom he was sent East to purchase the stock.  In the year 1856 he went to Plattsburgh, Mo., as a member of the firm of J. S. Sheller & Co., in the real estate business, and one year later he bought out the business and established offices at Warsaw and Springfield, Mo., under the firm name of Fellows, Todd & Robinson.   This was 1857, and the firm located many land warrants in the Platt Purchase and in southwest Missouri.  Being a staunch Republican and possessing first-class qualities for the position, Mr. Fellows was Appointed Register of Lands for the district of Springfield by President Lincoln in May 1861.   He continued in this office until the Battle of Wilson Creek.  In 1861 he visited Washington on military business in the interest of Gen. Seigel, and made the personal acquaintance of President Lincoln.  Springfield then being occupied by the Confederates, the Union man remained away from the city, and Mr. Fellows engaged in general merchandising at Rolla, Mo., as a member of the firm of McElhaney, Jaggard & Co.. In 1863 he was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the Forty-sixth Missouri Militia.  The regiment was called out under gen. McNeil. Mustered into the United States service, and was on guard duty during the last invasion of Missouri by the Confederates under Gen. Price.  In the winter of 1864 Mr. Fellows sold out his interest in Rolla and engaged in the wholesale grocery business at St. Louis, the firm being McElhaney & Fellows.  Continuing in this business until 1867 he then sold out and went to Arlington, where he established a general store under the firm name Fellows, McGinty & Co.  Arlington is on the S.F.R.R. and as the road was then being opened for business, Col. Fellows established stores at convenient points on the same, one being at Lebanon, and another at North Springfield.  This business was largely wholesale.  In 1871 Col Fellows built a grain elevator, the first one erected in Springfield, and in 1872 he was induced to take charge of the Springfield Manufacturing Company, which had been organized but a few months, and which was in a bad condition financially.   Finding the concern hopelessly involved the stockholders surrendered their stock and a new company was organized as the Springfield Wagon Company.  The principal stockholders were Col. Felloes, his brother, Morris W., and Capt. Boyden.  New capital being invested, the company made the manufacturing of farm wagons a specialty, and from the start did a good business.  In 1993 the plant was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt after  one year, and the capital stock was increased from $25,000 to $50,000.  One year later it was increased to $75.000.  The plant was greatly enlarged and the business increased, so that the demand has since been equal to the capacity of the works.  This year(1893), about 3.500 wagons will be manufactured.  The reputation of the Springfield wagon for utility and service has steadily gained, so that it now commands the highest price in southwest Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas.  Its equal is not manufactured by any firm in the United States, and it comes in competition with all other wagons manufactured in this country, and ranks as the best.  The Springfield Wagon Company gives employment to seventy-five men, and as an industrial enterprise, employing labor, is a direct benefit to the city.  As a public spirited citizen, Col. Fellows has done much to further the interest of the city, and in 1881 he was the chief promoter of a street Railway between North and South Springfield, and was president of the company for three years.  In 1859 he was one of the stockholders of the first telegraph line through Springfield.  This line followed the overland stage road, and was established by Clowrey & Stebbens.  Col. Fellows built the first telephone line that came into Springfield, and it connected his office and residence.  This was in 1877.  The colonel was a liberal contributor to the Gulf Railroad, and is a subscriber to the railroad  now projected.  He was one of the organizers of the Springfield Water Works, and president of the company for three years.  Originally a Republican in politics, in 1860 he was the only man in Springfield  who openly voted that ticket, excepting John M. Richardson, a presidential elector.  He now entertains liberal views politically.   In the year1876 he was mayor of Springfield, and for many years was a member of the city council and school board.  He has ever extended a  helping hand to the cause of education, and has done much to establish good schools in Springfield.  Liberal in his views and progressive in his ideas, Col. Fellows has always assisted with his means the churches of the city without regard to domination.  Formerly a member of both the Masonic and Odd Fellow orders, he now is a member of the Knights of Honor.  He selected as his companion in life Miss Martha Alvira McElhany, of Springfield, and their nuptials were celebrated November15, 1850.   Three living children have blessed this union: Emma, widow of Charles T. Keet, resides in Springfield; Clara, wife of F. J. Curran, also resides in Springfield; and Ada, widow of George Rathburn, makes her home in Springfield.  Mrs. Fellows was called from the scenes of this life on October 5, 1869, and on August 15 1872. The colonel was married to Miss Minnie L. Boyden, of Neosho.  One son , Homer F. was born to this marriage, and he is now in the office of the “Frisco” Railroad in St Louis.  Mrs. Fellows died September 24, 1881 and the colonel has since married Mrs. Matilda(Dickard) Jackson, widow of Mr. J. C. Jackson.
(Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893. Transcribed by Bud)

JOHN R. FERGUSON
Mr. Ferguson is the son of John S. and Elizabeth (Allison) Ferguson and was born February 10, 1842, in Pike county, Missouri. He received his education at the country schools of his neighborhood and worked upon his father’s farm until he was seventeen years of age, when he took a clerkship in the patent medicine house of Coyle & Potter, in St. Louis, in 1860. He remained with the firm until the war began in 1861. He returned home and enlisted in the Federal service under Col. T.J.C. Fagg for six months. He was mustered out and then re-enlisted in the Third, afterwards the Tenth M.S.M., for three years’ service. He enlisted as a private, but was after a short time promoted to 2nd sergeant. Upon the 14th of April, 1865, he was mustered out at Macon City, Missouri. He was then appointed by Governor Fletcher to a clerkship in the office of Paymaster General William J. Dougherty, of Gov. Fletcher’s staff. He served in that capacity for two years, and then went to Ironton, Missouri, and engaged in the drug business with Dr. J.R. McCormack, who subsequently represented that district for two terms in Congress. Mr. Ferguson married in Jefferson City, Missouri May 8, 1867, Miss Virginia C., daughter of Hon. Jared E. and Sarah Roberta (Mask) Smith. Mr. Smith was at that time state register of lands. They have been blest with eight children, four boys and four girls. The oldest, a girl, died in infancy. Mr. Ferguson followed the drug business until 1868, when he was appointed docket clerk of the State Senate by Hon. G.A. Moser, secretary of that body. In the spring of 1869, he and his father-in-law, Hon. Jared E. Smith, came to Springfield and bought out the drug store of W.G. Gray & Co., and carried on the business until 1876, when he sold his interest to W.A. Hall, and engaged in farming and stock rearing. This proved unprofitable, and in the fall of 1878 he was elected upon the Republican ticket to the office of circuit court clerk. He was renominated in 1882, and re-elected. He has been a member of the city council once, and city treasurer two terms. He is a member of the Knights Templar, and Royal Arch Chapter, and of the A.O.U.W. Himself and wife are members of the Christian church. His father was a Virginian and his mother a native of Franklin county, Kentucky. They were among the early settlers of Pike county, Missouri.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

COL. HEZEKIAH FLETCHER
Col. Fletcher is the son of Abraham and Margaret (Crocker) Fletcher, and was born June 16th, 1818, in Washington county, Maine. He was educated at Washington academy, and graduated from the Worcester medical college of Massachusetts in 1848. He practiced at Grafton, Mass., for two years, and then went to St. Anthony’s Falls, now Minneapolis, Minnesota, and continued the practice there two years. He then sold goods there many years, and was one of the largest merchants of the place. During the last four years of his residence there, he was received of public moneys in the land office, having been appointed by President Lincoln. As receiver of public moneys, hundreds of thousands of dollars passed through his hands, all of which was scrupulously and accurately accounted for by Col. Fletcher. When a final settlement on his accounts was had at Washington City, there was one cent placed to his credit, which still stands on the books, the Colonel keeping it there with the gratified consciousness that “Uncle Sam” is in his debt. He was also prominent in assisting the Governor in equipping several regiments for the war. He came to Springfield, Mo., in March, 1867, and engaged in the mercantile business for about eight years, and is now in the real estate and insurance business. Col. Fletcher was married to Miss Priscilla S. Sanborn. Their union has been blest with five children, two sons and three daughters. Three are now living, one son and two daughters. His wife died in 1858, and in 1862, he was married the second time, to Miss Laura Woodbridge, of Lincoln county, Maine. One daughter was born to this marriage. Col. Fletcher’s father died in 1856 and his mother in 1859, at Minneapolis. They had twelve children, nine boys and three girls.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM J. FRAZIER
This gentleman is the son of Hon. Franklin T. and Maria J. (Crawford) Frazier, and was born in Henry county, Tennessee, September 22, 1838. His parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1847, where William grew to manhood upon the farm. In 1861 he enlisted in Captain Campbell’s company of Missouri State Guards, and was at the battle of Dug Spring and Wilson’s Creek, and was slightly wounded at the former engagement. He served out his term of enlistment, and, as his health failed, he did not enter the regular Confederate service, but went with his father to Texas, and stayed until 1865, when they came back to this State, and in 1866 they returned to Greene county. Since the war Mr. Frazier has been engaged in farming, and is a prosperous, substantial citizen. He has been both justice of the peace and constable. He is a Mason, and has been a member of the Baptist church six years. He was married July 27, 1863, to Miss Martha, daughter of Greenberry and Prudence (Tatum) Robinson, of this county. This union has been blest with two children, George T., and William F.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

HON. FRANKLIN T. FRAZIER, (DECEASED).
Franklin Tennessee Frazier was the third child of Julian and Elizabeth Frazier who reared a family of thirteen children.  He was born near Knoxville, Tennessee, March 15, 1810.  He grew to manhood upon his father’s farm, and was educated at Paris, Tenn.  He was married the first time to Maria J. Crawford, when he was twenty-three years of age.  That union was blessed with five children, viz.:  George W., Thos. M. Wm. J., James M., and Samuel L.  His first wife died June 4, 1847, and he was married the second time, April 26, 1848, to Miss Malcena Boone, daughter of Col. Nathan Boone, of this county.  By this marriage there are four children, viz.:  Constantine C., Nathan B. Laura J., and Franklin T.  Mr. Frazier was elected to the State Senate in 1858, and was one of the ablest members of that body.  He met with the Legislature called by Gov. Jackson, at Neosho, and voted in favor of the secession ordinance.  He was a member of Gov. Jackson’s staff at the battle of Wilson’s creek, and then went with the army to Arkansas, and lived at Fayetteville until 1863.  He then went to Collin county, Texas and lived there until September, 1865.  He then returned to Missouri and lived in Saline county, until 1867, and then returned to the farm he settled soon after coming to the State, and where his widow still lives.  He carried on farming upon a large scale, and no man in the county stood higher in the regard of the people than he.  He was always an unswerving Democrat, - never proved recreant to any trust committed to his care.  He died upon the old homestead, December 16, 1881, in his seventy-second year and was buried in the family burying ground upon the home place by the Masonic fraternity, of which he was a member.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

ROBERT A. FRYAN.
Mr. Fryar is the son of John and Sarah (Jack) Fryan, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, August 25th, 1820.  His father was a native of Ireland and died in 1831, at the age of eighty-eight.  His mother died in 1838.  Robert was educated in the common schools of his native county, and began farming when he was quite young.  At the age of twenty-three he learned the carpenter’s trade, which, in connection with farming, he has followed all his life.  He came to Greene county in the fall of 1851, and purchased land two miles west of Walnut Grove.  He sold out in 1853, and purchased land in Vernon county, where he lived two years, and then went to Cedar county and bought land.  He soon after removed to Benton county, Arkansas, where he remained two years, and then moved back to Greene county, Mo., and built the seventh house in Walnut Grove, and has lived there ever since.  He enlisted in the militia during the war and was stationed most of the time at Ash Grove.  He was married in 1850 to Miss Martha E. Williams.  Their union has been blest with five children, four of whom are now living.  Mr. and Mrs. Fryar are members of the C.P. church, and have a host of friends in this county.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver



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