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G. WILSON HACKNEY
Mr. Hackney is the son of Wilson and Mary (Kimbrough) Hackney, and was born in Springfield, Mo., in the house where he now lives upon West Walnut street, May 29, 1855. He was educated here, and learned the tinner’s trade, following it about seven years. In September, 1881, he formed a partnership with Ernest Speaker. The firm of Hackney & Speaker is the third largest stove and tinware house in the city. Their store is on Boonville street, and is a 70 x 20 two-story building, besides a warehouse 16 x 25. They employ three tinners, one salesman and one porter. They have been very successful in business, and are one of Springfield’s substantial business firms. Mr. Hackney married Miss Ora Goffe, of this city, January 22, 1880. Their union has been blest with two children. Mrs. Hackney is a member of the Baptist church. Wilson Hackney, Sr. came to Springfield from Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1840, and was the only hat-maker ever in Springfield. He died April 12, 1863, and his widow is yet living.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HENRY R. HALL
Mr. Hall is the son of Dr. James H. and Mary (McCready) Hall, and was born in St. Louis county, Missouri. He was educated in St. Louis county and at Belleview college. He attended the law school at St. Louis, and was admitted to the bar February 28th, 1882, at Hillsboro, Jefferson county, Missouri. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in September, 1882. He was married in January, 1882, to Miss Carrie Kerr, of St. Louis. They are both members of the Methodist church. Though young, Mr. Hall gives promise of becoming an able lawyer, and, to that end, has cast his lot among the good people of Greene.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM A. HALL
Mr. Hall is the son of John and Elizabeth Hall, and was born in Tennessee, in November, 1834. His parents were Pennsylvanians by nativity, and emigrated to Tennessee in 1828, where they lived ten years, thence removing to St. Louis, where the husband and father died in 1862. In 1848, the mother, with her youngest child, was lost in a steamboat disaster on the Alabama river. William acquired a common school education in St. Louis, and resided, after his mother’s death, with his married sister – Emily Jane – wife of Mr. Mordecai Oliver, then a resident of Richmond, Ray county, Missouri. While living in Richmond, he attended the academy presided over by A.C. Redman. He opened a drug store in Liberty, Mo., in 1856, in which business he continued fourteen years, then accepting the position of cashier of the Commercial Savings Bank of Liberty. In 1872, he went to Mexico, Missouri, and engaged one year in the drug business, going thence to Springfield, where he and John R. Ferguson opened a drug store. In March, 1876, he bought his partner’s interest and has continued to build up an extensive wholesale and retail trade. In 1876 he was elected mayor of Springfield. Mr. Hall is a prominent Mason, and has served as W.M. of United Lodge No. 5, and also as eminent commander, of St. John’s Commandery No. 20, Knights Templar. Politically he is a Democrat, having cast his first vote in the interests of that party, to which he has ever since adhered. In 1856 he married Florence, daughter of Samuel Ringo, of Liberty, Missouri. Six children – four sons and two daughters – have been born to them, named: William, Samuel, Richard, Oliver L., Lizzie and Florence. Both Mr. Hall and wife have been active members of the Christian church for a quarter of a century. Personally, Mr. Hall is a gentleman of commanding presence, and his genial, social qualities and strict business rectitude, render him popular as a man and a citizen.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOSEPH W. HALL
Mr. Hall was born in Southville, Connecticut, January 1st, 1848. In April, 1872, he engaged with a civil engineer corps at Carthage, and assisted in the survey of a route to Halstead, Kansas, on which survey the St. L. & S.F. railway is located. In the following year, he went in the freight office of the railroad at Carthage, Mo., as clerk, and two weeks later was promoted to the position of ticket agent, which place he held till June 24, 1881, when he was transferred to North Springfield, and given charge of the freight and ticket depots. He is now acting in the capacity of freight and ticket agent for that station. On March 30, 1876, Mr. Hall was married to Miss Clara E. Starr, of Carthage, Mo. He is a trustworthy gentleman, and adds one more to the class of citizens that tends to give all towns prestige among strangers.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS L. HASLER
Mr. Hasler is the son of Eli and Maria Hasler, and was born in Baltimore, July 14th, 1852. His parents came to Missouri in 1858, and are now living upon a farm in Phelps county, Missouri. Thomas L. commenced firing upon an engine on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway in June, 1874, and at the end of four years was promoted to the position of engineer of a locomotive engine, which he now runs upon that road. He is a fine engineer, and enjoys the confidence of all. He was married September 3rd, 1879, to Miss Lucy E. McLean. They have one child, Thomas Allen, born December 5th, 1880. He is a member of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, also of the Locomotive Engineers’ Life Insurance Association.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

S.I. HASELTINE
Mr. Haseltine is the oldest son of Ira S. Haseltine, Greenback congressman from this district in the Forty-seventh Congress. He was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, May 1st, 1849. He was educated in the high school of his city, and at the Wisconsin State University. In August, 1871, he came to Missouri with his father, and has had charge of the railway station at Dorchester since October 1st of that year. He deals in grain and fruit, shipping over the ‘Frisco road. He was married November 23rd, 1871, to Miss Annie L. Miller, a native of London, Canada. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: Edwin I., Alfred E. and Charlotte A. Mr. Haseltine is a member of the A.O.U.W., the Grange and Brothers of Freedom.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ALANSOM M. HASWELL
This gentleman is a grandson of Anthony Haswell, a Revolutionary soldier, who, at the close of that war, started the first paper in Bennington, Vermont, and probably the first in that State. It was called the Vermont Gazette, and Mr. Haswell was its editor and publisher for about thirty-five years. His son, James M. Haswell, D.D., was born in Bennington, Vermont, February 4th, 1810. His father died when he was about seven years of age, and he went to Pennsylvania and learned pharmacy. While in the drug business, he prepared himself for college, and entered Madison University at Hamilton, New York, where he graduated in 1835. On the 23rd of August, 1835, he married Miss Jane M. Mason. Soon after his marriage he was appointed by the Baptist church as a missionary to Maulmain, British Burmah. He sailed September 10th, 1835, and arrived there the following January, and remained until his death, on the 25th of September, 1876. His widow and two daughters are yet living in Maulmain. Alansom M. Haswell was born June 29th, 1847, at Maulmain, British Burmah. His father brought him to the United States when he was two years of age, where he remained three years, and then was taken back to Maulmain, and lived with his parents until he was twelve years old. He was then brought back to this country to be educated, receiving his primary education at Boston. He graduated from Hamilton University in 1866. He then engaged in farming two years, and next moved to Springfield, Missouri, where he engaged in surveying and classing railway lands in Southwest Missouri for three years. He then farmed in Greene county until the 8th of June, 1878, when he took charge of the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad land office, at North Springfield, for Dr. E.T. Robberson, the agent. In August, 1879, he went into partnership with E.T. Robberson, and, upon Robberson’s resignation in 1881, Mr. Haswell and A.H. Sanders were appointed joint agents for about one hundred and fifty thousand acres of land belonging to the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad company, which position he still holds, besides doing a general real estate business. March 11th, 1873, he married Miss L.C. Butler, by whom he had five children, three of whom are now living. He and his wife are members of the Congregational church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FRANCIS A. HEACKER
Mr. Heacker is the son of Joseph and Frederica Heacker, and was born in Prussia, Germany, May 28th, 1843. In 1844 his parents emigrated to the United States, and located at Louisville, Kentucky, where he began learning the cigar-maker’s trade, when he was eight years of age, and has made it the occupation he has since followed. At the beginning of the civil war he was in St. Louis, where he enlisted in the three months service, at the first call for troops, in company I, 1st Missouri regiment. At the expiration of his term of service he re-enlisted in company K, first Missouri artillery, for three years, and served until August 24, 1864. He was at the taking of Camp Jackson, the battles of Wilson’s Creek, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Helena, Little Rock, and upon the Steele campaign. After the war he worked at his trade in different places, and in 1875 engaged in the manufacture of cigars at Springfield. In 1876 he moved his factory to North Springfield, where he is now doing a flourishing business in the wholesale line, employing about fifteen hands. Mr. Heacker was married December 31, 1873, to Miss Martha E. Webb, of Springfield, Missouri. They have two children, Pearle and Francis. Mr. Heacker is justly regarded as one of the substantial men of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM H. HEFFERMAN
This gentleman was born in Australia, March 6, 1847, and is the son of Stephen and Margaret Hefferman. His mother is dead and his father now lives in Springfield. William came to America when he was about four years of age. In 1861 he commenced braking upon the Illinois Central railroad, and worked at it about eighteen months. He then went on the C., R.I. & P. R.R., and fired seven years. He then went on the Hannibal & St. Joe road and fired about three months and was promoted to engineer and ran as such about six months. He then went to Minnesota and learned the miller’s trade, and worked at it four years. In 1871 he came to North Springfield and fired five years, and was then given an engine and has been an engineer upon the ‘Frisco road ever since. Mr. Hefferman was married December 25, 1865, to Miss Catharine Hickey, of Minnesota. Their union has been blest with five children, viz.: Ellen R., John F., Maud, Harry and Lilliard. Mr. Hefferman is a member of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HON. JACOB HARTLEY.
Hon. Jacob Hartley belongs to an old and prominent Missouri family and perpetuates the traditions of his ancestors by holding a distinguished position in the judiciary of his county, filling since the fall of 1908 the position of probate judge of Christian county. He resides on a beautiful estate one mile south of Ozark and finds much pleasure and diversion in fruit growing, his orchard bringing him incidentally a gratifying addition to his income.
Judge Hartley was born in Christian county, February 5, 1869, and has made his home there ever since. His parents are Thomas W. and Paulina (Berry) Hartley, who now reside near Fair Grove, Greene county, Missouri. The father, who is now seventy-five years of age, was born in Christian county and is a son of Jacob Hartley, who came to Missouri in 1832 and settled on the James river in Greene county, which section has now become Christian county. There he secured title to a farm of two hundred acres, upon which he resided until his death. His widow survived him, attaining an age of more than eighty years and passing away about 1875. They were devout Baptists, deeply interested in their church, and contributed to the development of their locality. Their son, Thomas W. Hartley, was one of five children, of whom three sisters are living, as follows: Mrs. Mary A. Black, a widow of Greene county; Mrs. Sarah J. Ray, whose husband has also passed away and who resides in Christian county; and Mrs. Martha Leach, of Greene county, Missouri.
Thomas W. Hartley has followed farming throughout life and is still active in that occupation. His wife, who in her maidenhood was Paulina Berry, was born in Stone county, Missouri, and is now about seventy years of age. She is a daughter of Patrick Berry, of Irish descent, who was a pioneer settler of that section, where he followed farming and mercantile pursuits. He was twice married and had twenty-four children. Mrs. Hartley was born to his first union and two of her sisters are yet living, namely: Mrs. Sophia J. Haguewood, of Christian county; and Mrs. Jane Williams, of Idaho. Mrs. Hartley also is an adherent of the Baptist church. She bore her husband five children, all of whom are living and of whom Judge Hartley is the eldest son and the second in order of birth. The others are: W. F. and S. W., who farm near Fair Grove, Missouri; Sophia B., the wife of Thomas Lee, of Greene county; and N. A., who married J. L. Miller, also of Greene county.
Jacob Hartley attended the common schools and the high school of Republic. He remained on his father's farm until twenty years of age and then taught for two terms in Christian county. The next two years he spent as a clerk in a hardware store and after careful private study was admitted to the bar in 1891, practicing in Ozark until he was elected to the probate court. He was first chosen to fill the unexpired term of Hon. W. K. Johnson and at the last regular election was chosen for the full term of four years. Judge Hartley has all.the legal qualifications which one connects with the ermine. He is a thorough student and a keen observer of human nature and deeply read in the law. He is fair and impartial in his decisions and his reputation is of the highest.
In Christian county Judge Hartley married Miss Anna Keltner, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. F. Keltner, both of whom died about two years ago. The father followed farming and was a member of an old Christian county family. Mrs. Hartley has living four sisters in Christian county: Mrs. D. Hays, of Ozark; Mrs. Lona Edwards, of Nixa; Mrs. Flora Kelter, also of Nixa; and Mrs. W. B. Wasson, whose husband is a physician and surgeon at Nixa. Judge and Mrs. Hartley have seven children, all of whom are yet at home: Hazel; Ralph; Paul and Howard, twins; Ethel and John, twins; and Harold.
Judge Hartley has been a resident of Ozark since 1892 and now resides on a small farm south of that town, where he spends his leisure time in fruit growing, which has proved profitable. Politically he is a republican, loyal to his party and influential in its ranks. Fraternally he is a member of the Ozark lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. Judge Hartley is ever ready to further the progress of his city and county and has participated in numerous improvements which have proved of great benefit to his community. He is a courteous, affable gentleman who has many friends who appreciate him for the pure motives which guide all his actions.
(Source: Missouri The Center State 1821-1915, Vol. III, by Walter B. Stevens, Publ. 1915.)JAMES HARRALSON – The subject of this sketch is the son of William and Catherine (Wills) Harralson, his father being one of the pioneers of Greene county, coming as early as 1837, when there were but five other families in what is now Center township. The father, William, was a native of North Carolina, born June 22, 1784. He moved to Tennessee in an early day, and soon afterwards served through the war of 1812. He died December 16, 1882, aged ninety-eight years. James Harralson’s grandfather served through the revolution of 1776, and James has a relic – a candle-stick – that his ancestor captured when Charleston was taken. James, with whom this sketch has particularly to deal, was born in Monroe county, Tenn., December 16, 1823. He came with his parents to Greene county in 1837, and they settled on the land where he resides at this writing. He attended the first school taught in that part of the county, remaining in Greene till 1856, when he moved to Laclede county, Mo., and there resided till 1863. He then returned to Greene county, and has ever since resided here, chiefly engaged in farming. He lost his personal property by the war, but retained his land. At this writing he owns 600 acres of land, and has given 400 acres to his children. Mr. Harralson was married August 9, 1849, to Miss Sarah Leeper, of the pioneer family of that name, in Greene county. She died June 9, 1876, and he was again married March 31, 1878, to Mrs. E. S. Hughes, a daughter of William and Susan McClure, who came to Greene in 1837, from Tennessee. By his first marriage Mr. H. had six children, five of whom are living. Mr. H. ranks as one of the best citizens and most substantial farmers of the county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JUDGE WILLIAM P. HAWKINS.
Judge Hawkins is the son of Henry and Anna (Majors) Hawkins, and was born July 13, 1816, in Grainger county East Tennessee.  His grandfather came to Tennessee from Prince William county, Virginia.  His father was reared in Tennessee, and his mother was a native of Sullivan county, same State.  They had ten children, viz.:  Elizabeth, Catherine, Sarah, Matilda, Priscilla, Susan, Stephen, Henry, William P., and Madison, all of whom are dead, save Susan, Priscilla, William P., and Madison.  William P., grew to manhood in the State of his birth, upon his father’s farm.  At the age of twenty he sold goods for Gen. Brazelton, at New Market, Tenn., for three years.  He was then married on the 6th of June, 1839, to Elizabeth M. Burnett, of Cocke county, Tenn.  He farmed for five years, and then emigrated to Dade county, Missouri, where he farmed two years.  He next moved to Stockton, Cedar county, Mo., and sold goods for Wm. Jones for two years.  He traveled over the country, selling goods to the Indians and the soldiers at Fort Scott in the year 1852.  In 1853 he sold goods at Caplinger’s mill.  In 1854, in partnership with James Frazier, he sold general merchandise at Stockton until the breaking out of the civil war in 1861.  The judge being a Union man suffered somewhat at the hands of the Confederates.  In 1863 he was elected probate judge of Cedar county, and became ex-officio, recorder and deputy county clerk.  He served about one year, and then removed to Ebenezer, ten miles north of Springfield, in Greene county, where he and his brother Madison sold goods for two years.  In 1866 he moved to Ash Grove, and in partnership with Joseph Aumoth and Calvin Kraft, under the firm name of Kraft, Aumoth & Co., did a general merchandising business for three years.  Then, with his son Henry, and son-in-law, C.A. Crane, he sold goods for two years in a house where the new brick store-house of Wilkerson & McCray now stands.  Since that time the judge has not been actively engaged in business.  He and his wife have been blessed with eight children, viz.:  Ada Ann, who died at Stockton, Mo.; Henry, a physician and druggist of Ash Grove; Cornelia, wife of James Smith of Texas; Swan P. Burnett, who died in August, 1853; Thomas J., of Ash Grove; Sarah, wife of C.C. Crane, lumber dealer; William J., a farmer of Greene county, and Benjamin F., a merchant of Ash Grove.  The judge is still in fine health, and enjoys the esteem and confidence of all.   He is courteous and affable, and endears himself to those who meet him.  His brother, T.J.M. Hawkins, represented Stone county in the Legislature a few years since.  Mrs. Hawkins is of North Carolina stock, and is a very estimable lady.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

THOMAS J. HAWKINS.
This gentleman was born July 6th, 1847, in Tennessee, but his parents emigrating to Missouri when he was two years of age, he grew up and was educated in Missouri.  They first stopped in Dade county, but shortly afterward removed to Cedar.  They lived in Cedar until 1864, and then moved to Greene county, where he has since lived.  He was educated chiefly at Stockton, Cedar county, and after coming to Greene he followed farming until 1874, when he served an apprenticeship in blacksmithing, and opened a shop of his own in 1876.  He has built up a good trade, and is one of the substantial men of Ash Grove.  He commenced running his shop in connection with Mr. Daniel Murray’s wagon shop in 1881, and they do excellent work, and are deservedly successful.  Mr. Hawkins was married in 1874 to Miss Sarah R., daughter of John Tyler, one of Greene’s early settlers.  Their union has been blest with one child, William L.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

REV. WM. JACKSON HAYDON.
Rev. Haydon is the son of Jarvis and Harriet Ann (Mitchell) Haydon, and was born near Lynchburg, Virginia, June 8th, 1835.  His father (Jarvis) was born in the same State, February 1st, 1797, and died there February 10th, 1852.  His mother was a daughter of John Mitchell, and was born in Amherst county, Virginia, April 13th, 1805.  She was married at sixteen years old, and died August 7th, 1850.  William Jackson Haydon was the third born in a family of six children, all but two of whom are dead.  The other surviving one, Alexander, still lives in Virginia, engaged in railroading.  The subject of this sketch received his education at Lynchburg, and Lewisburg, West Virginia, and at an early age professed religion and joined the Old School Presbyterian church  After leaving school Mr. Haydon engaged in the mercantile business at Lewisburg, and was afterwards engaged in teaching.  He came to Missouri in the spring of 1860, landing at Louisiana, where he remained for some time engaged in teaching in Pike county.  Subsequently he was engaged in merchandising in Mexico, Missouri, for about five years.  Although the war was raging, Mr. Haydon’s zeal in the Christian cause would not allow him to remain idle, and he promptly and earnestly engaged in church and Sabbath school work.  He was elected a deacon in the church, and his devotion to church work was known far and near, he assisting in the convocation and organization of one of the first Sabbath school conventions ever held in Missouri.  The superintendent of missions for the American Sunday school Union recommended Mr. Haydon for Sunday school missionary for North Missouri, and he accepted that work in “times that tried men’s souls.”  The war just over, it required great Christian courage to stand up for the cause, but Mr. Haydon, like the Apostles of old, quit his peculiar vocation in which he had been successful, and followed the Master.  He was commissioned June 15th, 1866, and has been faithfully laboring ever since.  June 27th, 1867, he married Miss Maggie C. Ford, an accomplished young lady of Monroe county, Missouri, and a descendant of one of the best families of Kentucky.  Six children have been born of this union, five of whom – Ambrose Paxson, Laura C., Bettie Ford, William Wurtz, and Leonard Mitchell, still survive.  The one deceased was named William Jackson, Jr.  Ambrose is, at this writing, a student of Drury College.  Mr. Haydon came to Springfield in December, 1868, and took charge of the missionary work of Southwest Missouri and Northern Arkansas, under the auspices of the A.S.S.U.  He went earnestly to work organizing schools, and has visited nearly all the school houses and churches in this entire region of country, from Iowa to Central Texas.  Up to date (February, 1883), he has organized in this State, Arkansas and Texas, 800 schools, and gathered in 50,000 children, besides visiting and aiding as many more, out of which have grown 125 church organizations.  In former years he has done the prodigious amount of work of presiding or addressing the people every evening in the week and three times on Sundays, traveling from five to twenty miles to reach appointments.  He organized twenty counties into county Sunday-school conventions, and was president of the Greene county convention for seven consecutive years.  April 30th, 1878, Mr. Haydon was licensed to teach the gospel by the Presbytery, and has faithfully dispensed the Christian doctrine from the pulpit since then, aiding his brethren in many revivals and meetings.  Besides his devotion to the Christian cause in general, he is also a strong temperance advocate, and was, at one time grand worthy patriarch of the Sons of Temperance for Missouri, and organized 51 temperance lodges.  He was one of the original movers in the Confederate Cemetery Association, and is still secretary of the same.  In every good work Mr. Haydon is a leader in good works, and well known as one of the best organizers in the West.  He is a member of the Odd Fellows’ fraternity, and was grand representative of the Encampment for the session of 1882, held at St. Louis.  He has taken all the degrees and passed all the chairs in that order.  So far, he has been a success, not only as a Christian worker, but as a good, ready financier.  A large, carefully-selected library – mostly works on religious subjects – has a place in his well appointed home, and his comfortable residence is ornamented with works of art and enlivened with music – the two greatest essentials to make home attractive.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

ELI E. HENDRIX – His parents were Nicholas and Sarah Ann (White) Hendrix, both natives of Tennessee. Eli, was born in Greene county, Tennessee, March 9, 1853. He came with his father’s family to Kentucky in 1856, but they all moved back in 1860, remaining till 1872, when Eli came to Greene county, Mo., where he has since resided. Farming was his principal calling till early in 1881, when he began merchandising in Bois D’Arc. Mr. Hendrix married December 24, 1876, his wife being Miss Nancy, daughter of Merideth and Eliza Jane Redfearn, old settlers of Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. H. have had three children, --Sarah Ann, William, and Maude J. Mr. Hendrix, besides his residence in Bois D’Arc, owns a farm of 103 acres, and other property, most of which he has accumulated by his own energy and industry.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

FRANK E. HEADLEY
Mr. Headley is the son of Aaron C. and Hannah (Eberly) Headley, and was born at Groveport, Franklin county, Ohio, September 5th, 1852. He was educated at the public schools of Columbus, Ohio. He came with his parents to Springfield, Missouri, in October, 1870, and he and his brothers were in the game and produce business for six months. June, 1871, found them penniless, and Frank then accepted a clerkship in the grocery house of N. Kelley at a salary of twenty dollars per month. He worked there about three years and six months, and then clerked for Sutter & Townsend for six months. He then bought out Mr. Townsend’s interest, and the firm became Sutter & Headley for four years. Then Oscar bought out Sutter, and the firm became Headley Bros. The firm of Headley Bros. is now composed of Frank E. and Oscar M. They have a house 106 x 23 feet, two-story and a basement, and employ some seven men. They do a wholesale and retail grocery business, and they do the largest retail business in the Southwest. In 1879, Frank was elected upon the Democratic ticket to the city council from the second ward, and again in 1882. His father and mother are both living in Springfield. They had five children, four sons and one daughter; the little girl died at the age of two years. The young men have had fine success, and deserve to rank as highly as any merchants in the country.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HENRY M. HECKART
Mr. Heckart is the son of John and Nancy (Pool) Heckart, and was born at Hannibal, Missouri, February 28th, 1855. In 1863, his parents moved to Marshfield, Missouri, where Henry was in the jewelry business for five years. He came to Springfield June 3rd, 1879, and now has one of the leading jewelry houses in the city. He was married December 26th, 1878, to Miss Belle Jarrette, of Marionville, Missouri. They have one child, Bessie. Mr. Heckart’s father was a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but came west, settling first in Iowa, then at Hannibal, then at Marshfield. He died July 2nd, 1882. His widow is living in Springfield. Their union was blest with four sons and four daughters, all of whom are living. Henry M. is a member of the K. of H., and he and wife are members of Grace M.E. church. He is one of the substantial business men of the city.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CHARLES HENRY HEER
Is the son of Gerhard W. and Mary E. (Klecker) Heer, and was born in the parish of Ostercappeln, province of Osnabruck, Hanover, upon the 30th of April, 1820. His father died in January, 1820, and Mr. Heer is consequently a posthumous child. He was educated in Germany in the common schools, and in company with his mother and step-father, Lewis Schneider, emigrated to America; landed at Baltimore, December, 1835. From there they went to Wheeling, West Virginia, and stayed a short time, and then went to St. Louis, Mo. in January, 1836. He soon found employment in the wholesale china and glassware house of R.D. Watson, where he remained six or seven years. In October, 1842, he, in partnership with an old schoolmate, Rudolph Hiltkamp, started a general grocery store, but sold out in 1843, and with Bernard L. Meyer, went into business on the corner of Eighth and Franklin streets. His health failing in 1844, he bought a farm in Monroe county, Illinois, where he lived two years, when he returned to St. Louis and remained there until 1847, when he again went to Illinois and opened a general store at Waterloo, and continued to sell goods until the war, when he again moved upon the farm. In March, 1868, he came to Springfield, Missouri, and purchased the lot where his fine store now stands, upon Boonville street. The building was completed in 1869, and in 1871 the firm of Heer, Farmer & Co. was organized. In 1874 C.H. Heer bought out his partners, and the firm changed to C.H. Heer & Co., C.H., Jr., being the other member of the firm. They have one of the largest wholesale and retail dry goods and boot and shoe houses in Southwest Missouri, having two traveling salesmen and about fifteen clerks in the store. C.H. Heer is manager of the wholesale department, and W.C. Hornbeak, of the retail department. Mr. Heer was married January 6, 1846, to Miss E. Beneneman, of St. Charles county, Missouri. They had seven children, four boys and three girls, viz.: C.H., Henry L. (died April, 1882), Mary E. (widow of William Crodus), Agnes (a sister of the Sacred Heart, St. Louis), Lewis H. (died April 30, 1863, at Waterloo, Ill.), and Celia Ann. Mrs. Heer died December 25, 1881, and is buried in the Catholic cemetery at Springfield. She was a member of the Catholic church for twenty-four years, and all the family are of the same faith and belong to that church. Mr. Heer was chairman of the financial committee in the city council in 1875, and has been urged to run for mayor, but declined.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FRANCES S. HEFFERNAN
Mr. Heffernan is the son of Stephen S. and Margaret (O’Day) Heffernan, and was born in Walworth county, Territory of Wisconsin, March 13th, 1846. He was educated at the country schools of his native county, and at Hamilton University, at Red Wing, Minnesota. He afterwards took a course of study at Bryant & Stratton’s Commercial College at Milwaukee. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in October, 1867, and finished the study of law in the office of Julian & O’Day. He was admitted to the bar August 9th, 1868. He was solicited to run for Congress in 1882, and received the votes of several counties, but was defeated in the convention by Robert Fyan. Mr. Heffernan was married April 29th, 1872, at Springfield, to Miss Alice Chambers, a native of Augusta, Georgia. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: Talma, John F. and Marie. Mr. and Mrs. Heffernan are members of the Catholic church. His father was from Limerick, Ireland, and came to the United States in 1832, and located in Vermont. In 1839 he went to Chicago, Illinois, and was one of the first settlers of that now great city. He is now living in Springfield, Missouri. His wife was from county Clare, Ireland, and died at Springfield, January 18th, 1871. They had fourteen children, of whom nine are now living.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DAN H. HERMAN AND BROTHER
These enterprising gentlemen, who are the leading spirits in the Herman clothing and tailoring house of Springfield, are both sons of Henry and Hannah Herman, and were born in the State of New York. D.H. Herman, the senior member and general manager, is a native of the city of Syracuse, born June 2nd, 1857, and received his education partly in his birth-place and partly in Rochester, of the same State. He came to Springfield in 1880, and went into the clothing business, as D.H. Herman’s one price clothing house. The firm name was changed, however, as above, when they opened the other establishment on the southeast corner of the public square and South street. Both houses are under the same general management, but the one on Boonville street is under the especial direction of Mr. Charles Herman. (The Boonville street branch house was suspended in the spring of 1883, that Charles Herman might become manager of a larger branch house in Lamar.) The south-side house has three floors, devoted to the respective departments of clothing and furnishing goods on the first floor, cutting and piece goods department on second floor, and manufacturing department on the third floor. The entire building is elegantly and attractively fitted up, with all the novelties in the way of modern conveniences for the display and sale of goods. As a tailoring establishment, this house is doing an immense business, and the solicitors for orders of elegant suits made by this house have done business far and near, and even taken and filled orders for five suits in the city of St. Louis itself. They work a large force of operatives in the way of clerks, book-keepers, cash-boys, tailors and janitors, and no establishment anywhere can boast of a more attentive and respectful corps of salesmen than this one. It may be said in justice to Mr. Dan Herman, that he was the first to introduce and establish the one-price system in the Southwest. They had their grand opening in March, 1883, of the newer and larger branch of the concern, and hundreds of people visited the building, delighted by the display and by the elegant music for which Mr. Herman had provided, with a cornet band outside and an orchestra of skilled musicians inside the house. Springfield may well congratulate herself on the acquisition of these live young gentlemen to the ranks of her already wide-awake business men. Young, energetic, liberal advertisers and pushing, their success on a grand scale is already assured.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DR. H. LOT HIGGINS
Dr. Higgins is the son of Henry and Elizabeth (Balthis) Higgins, and was born in Virginia in 1830. He received an academic course in education, and received his medical education at Winchester College and at the university at Baltimore, where he graduated in the spring of 1853. In the spring of 1854, he went to Wardensville, West Virginia, where he practiced his profession until 1872. In the spring of 1874, he came to Missouri, and lived four years at Graysonville, Clinton county. He then went to Iowa, and, in October, 1882, he came to Springfield, Missouri. In June, 1861, he joined the 14th Virginia regiment as surgeon, and so remained until the close of the war. He was married October 12th, 1858, to Miss Martha O. Shull. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Dr. Higgins’ father was a minister of the church of the United Brethren. He died when the doctor was a small boy. His mother died before the civil war. Of a family of six children, the doctor was the third child.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

B.F. HOBART
This gentleman is a native of Yates county, New York. He came West in 1870 and engaged for some time as a private banker at Oswego, Kansas. July 1, 1882, he moved to Springfield, Mo., and is now the popular vice president of the bank of Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEE HOLLAND
Mr. Holland is the son of John L. and Martha (Wade) Holland, and was born in Springfield, Missouri, January 6th, 1849. His parents were natives of Robertson county, Tennessee. Educational facilities being poor in Missouri during the civil war, Lee was sent to McKendree College and the Michigan State University at Ann Arbor, to be educated. He graduated in a commercial course at the Christian Brothers’ College at St. Louis, and then returned to Springfield, where he engaged in the mercantile business for about three years. He then accepted a position in the First National Bank as book-keeper, and afterward as teller. In 1879, he was elected vice-president of the bank, which office he now holds. He was married November 15th, 1873, to Miss Alice, daughter of Dr. E.F. and Elizabeth (Sproul) Robberson. This union has been blessed with two children, viz.: Ralph and James. He and his wife are members of the M.E. Church South. Mr. Holland is one of the safe, substantial business men of Springfield, and is an upright, honorable gentleman.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DAVID S. HOLMAN
Mr. Holman was born in Iredell county, North Carolina, November 13, 1824. His parents, Lazarus and Elizabeth Holman, moved to Rutherford county, Tennessee, when he was eight years of age, and remained there a few years, and in 1837 they came to Missouri. They settled in Franklin county where David received as good education as the schools of that time afforded. He was licensed to preach for the M.E. Church South by the quarterly conference in the district embracing the city of St. Louis. He preached in Oregon county, Crawford county and Lexington. He was then put up for a time upon the African mission and built a church for them. He assisted at the first services held at Kansas City. He came to Springfield and spent a year, and then went to Jasper county. His health failing he went into the nursery business there in 1860. He came to Springfield in 1864, and again embarked in the nursery business in 1867, and has followed that occupation ever since, doing a good business. He was married December 14, 1856, to Miss Mary, daughter of Ellwood B. James, Esq., of Carthage, an early settler of Jasper county, and county clerk for twenty years. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Rosa E., Sudie L., David E. and Joy S. The family are Southern Methodists, and Mr. Holman is a Royal Arch Mason.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JESSE HOMAN
This gentleman is the son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Edgar) Homan, and was born at Boonville, Cooper county, Missouri, April 7th, 1841. His father was born in Saratoga county, New York, August 21st, 1801, and his mother was born in Virginia. Jesse was educated at Boonville, finishing his education at Kemper’s College. Mr. Homan is a skillful pilot, having run for a number of years upon the Missouri river. During the war he was piloting in the interest of the government, and piloted a fleet from St. Louis up to Boonville for Gen. Lyon. Mr. Homan was married at Boonville, upon the 26th of December, 1867, to Miss Ruth Parrott, a granddaughter of Wm. B. Leftwich. She was born in Pettis county, Missouri, December 26th, 1847. Their union has been blest with eight children, six sons and two daughters. Mr. Homan moved to this county in 1869, where he has since been engaged in farming, three miles from Springfield. He is a Democrat in politics, and Mrs. Homan is a member of the M.E. church South.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM C. HORNBEAK
Mr. Hornbeak is the son of James T. and Sallie (Johnson) Hornbeak, and was born January 18th, 1835, in Warren county, Tennessee. His parents emigrated to Missouri in December, 1840, and stopped at Springfield for a short time, and then moved seven miles south of town, to where the bridge crosses the James River. There was quite a little town there, consisting of a saw and grist mill, carding machine and distillery, and Mr. Hornbeak was interested in all them. They lived here two years, and then removed to a farm, where William C. grew to manhood. He then came to Springfield and clerked in the dry goods house of S.S. and R.A. Vinton from 1856 until 1861, and also being a partner in the firm for some time. When the war began, he joined Phelps’ regiment as adjutant; then he went to St. Louis and was mustered out, and took a position in the quartermaster’s department. In January, 1862, he was appointed by Gov. Gamble as one of the bank commissioners with A.J. Edwards, of St. Louis, now one of the assistant treasurers of the United States. At the close of Gamble’s administration, he went to Davenport, Iowa, where he sold goods until 1855, when he returned to Springfield and formed a partnership with W.H. Graves in the general merchandising business. In 1871, John B. Oliver bought out Graves, and the firm became Hornbeak & Oliver, and continued so until 1874, when he went in with C.H. Heer & Co., where he now is, in charge of the retail department. Mr. Hornbeak has been a member of the city council, is connected with the public school now, and has been for nine years. He was one of the organizers of the national bank here, was one of the directors and vice president, and has been connected with various railroad enterprises of the Southwest. He is a prominent member of the Royal Arch Chapter, and was secretary of the lodge for some time. He was married June 14th, 1860, to Miss Georgia E., daughter of Hon. Mordecia Oliver, ex-member of Congress, and ex-secretary of State under Gov. Gamble. They had six children, five boys and one girl. Mrs. Hornbeak died in May, 1875, and Mr. Hornbeak was married again, to Miss T.E.R. Paul, on December 27th, 1877. They have two children, a boy and a girl. Mr. Hornbeak has been an elder in the Christian church for twenty-four years. His mother died in 1857, and his father in 1864. They had eleven children, four boys and seven girls. John, the oldest son, represented Christian county, Missouri, twice in the Legislature.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PETER HORNING
Mr. Horning was born in Portage county, Ohio, June 30th, 1842, and is the son of George and Margaret (Kerling) Horning. His parents were natives of Bavaria, Germany. Peter was educated in the common schools of his native county, and when old enough, learned the carpenter’s trade, at which he worked until 1876. He went to Winona, Minnesota, in 1859, where he worked at his trade until his removal to this county, in 1876. He settled in Campbell township, about two and one-half miles east of Springfield, where he owns a fine farm of eighty acres, well improved. Mr. Horning was married July 7th, 1864, to Miss Johanna Daley, who was born in County Kerry, Ireland, March 17th, 1842. Their union has been blest with seven children, viz.: Mary E., born July 25th, 1865, and died July 9th, 1866; Clotilda, born December 19th, 1866; George, born May 8th, 1868; Charles A., born November 21st, 1869; Nora E., born October 8th, 1871; Robert P., born September 25th, 1877, and Wm. H., born December 3rd, 1880. Mr. Horning and wife are members of the Catholic church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ALFRED HOSMAN.
Mr. Hosman was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, August 2, 1810.  His parents moved to Fayette county, Kentucky, when Alfred was about eight years of age.  They soon after moved to Scott county, Kentucky, where his father, Esias Hosman, died in 1831.  His mother died in 1843.  Alfred was the youngest child and was educated in the home schools of Fayette and Scott counties.  He was married in Scott county, December 23, 1830, to Miss Martha H. Cox, who died August 9, 1839.  They were blest with four children, one son and three daughters, viz., Sarah A., born January 1, 1831; Nancy E., born November 24, 1834; James W., born December 6, 1836; and Martha H., born June 24, 1839.  Mr. Hosman came to Missouri in 1841, where he married the second time to Miss Mary C. Boone, of Boone township Greene county, Missouri.  She was the ninth daughter of Nathan Boone, the youngest child of the famous Daniel Boone.  This marriage was blest with thirteen children, viz.:  Mary F., born July 22, 1842; Oliva A., born February 9, 1844; Daniel B., born February 12, 1845, and died February 22, 1852; Nathan B., born April 16, 1847, and died January 8, 1848; Mahala P., November 25, 1848, and died June 16, 1852; Charles L., born November 10, 1850; Sanford E., born May 8, 1853; John B., born May 5, 1855; Thomas A., born June 4, 1857; Luther A., born August 31, 1859, and died September 25, 1859; Joseph K., born September 22, 1860; and Robert L. and Belle P., born June 3, 1866.  Shortly after his second marriage, Mr. Hosman moved back to Kentucky and lived upon the old homestead, and remained there till the death of his mother, when he came back to Greene county, Missouri, and lived upon his farm till 1863, when the unsettled condition of the country during the civil war caused him to remove his family to Howard county in September of that year.  In March, 1864, he moved to Illinois, and lived near Bloomington until December, 1865, when he came back to Missouri, and lived in Springfield about two years, and then moved to where he now lives in Boone township.  He carries on farming upon a large scale, and is one of the first citizens of the county.  He is probably one of the oldest master masons in the county.  He was made a member of Benevolent Lodge, No. 58, in Fayette county, Kentucky, in 1843.  Mr. Hosman has served as School director for many years, and has been a leading member of the Baptist Church since 1850.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

DR. E. HOVEY
Dr. Hovey was born in Trenton, Oneida county, New York, September 23, 1816. He is the son of Eleazer and Sibyl (Coburn) Hovey. They moved to Indiana in 1820, where his father died. In 1826 his mother moved to the northeastern portion of Ohio. Dr. Hovey received his education at the common schools, but acquired most of it by his own exertions. He came to Texas county, Missouri, in 1840, and worked at the millwrights’ trade for ten years. It was here that he studied dentistry, and afterwards studied medicine, and practiced both in conjunction at Buffalo, Dallas county, Missouri. He soon abandoned medicine and made dentistry a specialty. He belongs to the Missouri State Dental Association, having joined in 1865. The doctor is well posted in his profession, and was at one time offered a chair in one of the St. Louis dental colleges. He went back to Ohio and remained a few months in 1850, but soon returned to Missouri, and entered into partnership with his old preceptor, at Buffalo, Dallas county. He practiced until the war commenced, and was elected a lieutenant colonel, of a regiment of Home Guards raised in Dallas county. He came to Springfield in 1862, and his family followed in 1863. He practiced his profession here until the war closed, then, on account of failing health, he sold out to his partner and returned to his home in Dallas county, Missouri. He lived there for fourteen years, and came back to Springfield in 1880. He married the first time in 1836 in Ohio to Miss Evelina Abell. This marriage was blest with two children, Mrs. Julia A. Colby and Mrs. Ellen Lewey, both of Marshfield. His first wife died on a steamboat at Louisville on their way back to Ohio and is buried at that city. In 1848 he married again to Miss Caroline E. Penniman of Ohio. By her he had three children, viz.: Eva Celestia, Romeo Hamlet and Charles Eugene, now postmaster at Buffalo, Dallas county, Missouri. Dr. Hovey was solicited to run for State Senator, but prefers private life. He is of Scotch descent upon his mother’s side, and German upon his father’s.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HUMPHREY E.  HOWELL
This gentleman was born in Wales, about forty miles from Liverpool, on the 23rd of October, 1839. He came to Newark, Ohio, when he was about five years of age. He was reared upon the farm, and received his education at Dennison University, Ohio, Columbus, Ohio, in a commercial school, and at Dartmouth college, where he graduated in 1863. He then attended the law department of the Michigan University, at Ann Arbor, and graduated from that celebrated university in the spring of 1866, and came to Springfield, Missouri, to practice his profession. He was nominated without his knowledge or consent for city attorney of Springfield, and was elected by a handsome majority. He was in office when the Gulf railroad entered the corporate limits, and acted in the city’s behalf during negotiations between the road and the city. He married September 2nd, 1864, Miss Sarah Reese, also a native of Wales. This union has been blest with four children, viz.: Maynard D., Mellila, Mary and Una, all of whom are now living. Himself and wife are members of the Calvary Presbyterian church. Mr. Howell is a gentleman of integrity, and one in whom all place great confidence as an honest man and a gentleman.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JESSE L. HOYAL
Mr. Hoyal’s parents were David and Margaret J. Hoyal, both natives of Tennessee. Jesse was born in Roane county, Tenn., June 24, 1846. In 1858 his parents moved to Lawrence county, Mo., where they continued till 1863, when they removed to Randolph county. There they remained but a short time, removing next to Cooper county, Mo., where they remained till the civil war closed. The family then moved back to Lawrence county, where the elder (David R. Hoyal) was soon afterwards killed, shot by some unknown assassin as Mr. H. was on his way to the barn. Jesse then spent a year on the plains, and, in 1868, located in Greene county, and engaged in farming and mule trading, buying mules and driving to the Southern markets. He also bought and shipped wheat, and that latter still continues to be his business in part,--he shipping over 150 car loads per year. He owns a fine farm of 200 acres, and also owns property in Springfield, all of which he has accumulated by his own efforts. Mr. Hoyal was married June 4, 1868, to Laura, daughter of A. and Susannah Leeper, of Greene county. They have had five children, three of whom still survive. Mr. H. is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also belongs to the Methodist church. He is a citizen in whose trustworthiness all who know him have confidence.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

MELVIN S. HOYAL
Mr. Hoyal is the son of David R. and Margaret E. Hoyal, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, October 29, 1844. In 1860 his parents moved to Lawrence county, Missouri, and in 1863 Melvin enlisted in the Confederate army and served until the end of the war. He spent the years 1865 and 1866 in Colorado, Montana, and Dakota. He then came to this county and engaged in farming until 1879, when he went to Bois D’Arc and embarked in the mercantile business, under the firm name of Bymaster & Hoyal. In the spring of 1882 he became one of the firm of Hoyal, Redfearn & Johnson, the leading house of the place. Mr. Hoyal was married in 1866 to Miss Harriet E., daughter of Josiah F. and Lucy R. Redfearn, of Greene county. Their union has been blest with five children, four of whom are still living; Addie C., Leonidas S., Olive and Lucy. Mrs. Hoyal’s parents were natives of Tennessee, and among the pioneers of Greene county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist


HON. WALTER D. HUBBARD
The subject of this sketch is a son of John H. and Sarah A. Hubbard, and was born in Madison county, Kentucky, October 3rd, 1840, and is of Welsh-English stock. He received a good English education in Clay and Clinton counties, this State, his father having moved to Missouri in 1845, and settled in Clinton county in 1849. He developed great mathematical talent, and before he was fifteen years old, had mastered arithmetic, algebra and geometry. He began reading law in 1859, continuing his legal studies while teaching school in the years of 1860-61. In the latter year he was principal of the public school at Plattsburg, Missouri, but gave up the school to enlist for national defense in Captain Edgar’s company of militia. He served in that company till 1862, when he re-enlisted for three years in the 6th regiment of cavalry militia. To attempt anything like a full outline of the many valuable services of Mr. Hubbard to his country during that long and bloody struggle for national existence, would far excel the space that this volume can assign for personal mention; suffice it to say that he was promoted through various gradations from private, as he first enlisted, to adjutant of his regiment and captain of a company, and was several times commended from high official sources for “gallant conduct in battle.” He mustered out his own company in May, 1866, and was retained to muster out the volunteers then serving on the plains, which duty finished, he was ordered to Springfield, Missouri, where he was finally and honorably discharged, and was “breveted” by President Johnson, lieutenant colonel of volunteers. After quitting military life he entered the law and claim office of Col. John M. Richardson, and in 1870 was duly enrolled as an attorney and counsellor at law in the circuit court of Greene county, and has actively practiced his profession ever since. In 1875-76 he was U.S. circuit court commissioner, and was a member of the common council of Springfield in 1869-70. He was elected county attorney in the fall of 1876, on the Republican ticket, that having been his political bent at all times. June 28th, 1866, he was married to Miss Emily F., youngest daughter of Maj. Gen. Joseph Powell, deceased. Scarcely yet in the prime of life, full of vigor, an efficient organizer, devoted to his profession and to his party, there remains for Mr. Hubbard a long period, the most useful part of human life, in which to labor for the benefit of self, home and country.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN P. HUBBLE
This young gentleman is the son of Martin J. and Mary J. (Powell) Hubble, and was born on Market street, Springfield, Mo., April 3rd, 1860. He was educated in the common schools and at Drury College, in this county, and in the fall of 1877 he went to St. Louis, and attended Washington University three years, one year in the law department. From 1881 to 1883 he was State adjuster for the insurance department. He was admitted to the bar by Judge Fyan, in March, 1882. He has a good practice for a young man, and “is of such stuff as men are made.”
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

BENJAMIN F. HUNTINGTON
This gentleman is the son of Ambrose and Parmelia (Keeler) Huntington, and was born August 2nd, 1843, at Mexico, Oswego county, New York. At the age of fourteen he was bound out to his uncle and learned the tailor’s trade, at Watertown, New York, serving seven years. In 1849 he went to California by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He lived in California about fifteen years, following at his trade and mining. In 1866 he came to Springfield, Mo., where he has since lived, working at his trade. He has been very successful in building up a good business. His shop is on the north side of College street, in the old Presley Beal property, one of the landmarks of Springfield. He employs several hands and carries a fine line of goods, both imported and American. He was married to Miss Ellen E. McElhany, Their union was blest with one daughter, now dead. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., Harmony Lodge No. 71, and his wife is a member of the M.E. church. Mr. Huntington is one of the substantial business men of Springfield, and is regarded as an upright, honorable citizen.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN HULSE
Was born in England, September 14th, 1850. When he was one year old his parents brought him to America, remaining one year and then returning to England. In 1866 the subject of this sketch came back to this country, and a few weeks later his parents also came. He lived with them till he was twenty-five years old, then, on the 15th of April, 1875, married Miss Parilee Huff. After his marriage he began farming, and continued till 1879, when he commenced to “fire” on an engine of the ‘Frisco, and is still so engaged. He is the father of two children, named Ethie and Hugh. Mr. Hulse is a member of ‘Frisco Lodge, No. 81, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, and is secretary of that lodge.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE M. HUSTON
Mr. Huston was born in Somerset, Ohio, July 8th, 1849, and is the son of J.E. and Annie Huston. At the age of fourteen he went to Lancaster, Ohio, and entered the shops of the C. & M.V. railway, where he learned the machinist’s trade, working four years. He next went to Columbus, Ohio, and worked in the shops of the P.C. & St. L. railroad, where he remained two years. In the spring of 1872, he came to Missouri, and engaged in the St. Louis and San Francisco shops at North Springfield until 1879, when he commenced firing on a locomotive. He fired a year, and then took an engine, which he has shown himself abundantly able to handle. He is a member of Pacific Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Locomotive Engineers’ Mutual Life Association and the “’Frisco” Locomotive Engineers’ Health Association. He was married December 20th, 1880, to Miss Annie Payton, daughter of B.F. and Cordelia Payton, now of Joplin, Mo. They have one child, Cordie, born October 16th, 1881.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler


J.H. HUDGINGS.
Was born in Monroe county, Tennesssee, February 26, 1851.  His parents were William and Mary Hudgings, and they came to Greene in 1854, where the subject of this sketch grew up and was educated.  Early in life he began farming, and that has been his vocation since.  In 1874 he came in possession of the place where he now resides, three and a half miles southeast of Ash Grove.  The farm contains eighty acres of fine land under good cultivation, and well improved.  He was married January 5, 1873, to Miss Judith Spraggins, who was born February 7 1854.  Her parents were William and Sophronia Spraggins, who were natives of Alabama.  Mr. and Mrs. Hudgings were blessed with two children, Ethel, and Marcia A.  Mr. Hudgings and wife are members of the Baptist church, and stand well in the regard of all who know them.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver


DR. JOHN HYDE
This gentleman is the son of Abijah and Eunice (Green) Hyde, and was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, April 10th, 1836. Here he grew to manhood, was educated at the Western Reserve Seminary. He taught school from 1855 to 1859, reading medicine in his leisure hours. He completed his medical studies at the Medical Institute, at Baltimore. He practiced for a time in his native county, but in 1863 gave up the practice and began the study of law. He entered the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, that year, and graduated in 1864. The same year he commenced the practice of law at Warren, Ohio, and continued until 1868, when he moved to Gainsville, Ozark county, Missouri, where he again took up the practice of medicine. He did a good practice and in 1871 opened a drug store in connection with his profession. In 1875 he added a general stock of merchandise to his store, and he owns the store at present. He gave up medicine then, and in 1871 and 1872 he was county school commissioner of Ozark county. He was prosecuting attorney from 1874 to 1876, and from 1876 to 1880 was county treasurer. All of which offices he filled with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents. In 1881 he moved to North Springfield, where he is engaged in the fancy dry goods and millinery business. Dr. Hyde was married in 1865 to Miss Amelia E., daughter of Aaron W. and Mary Wood, of Warren, Ohio. They have had four children, only one now living, Nellie E. Dr. Hyde is a member of the Methodist church, and a most worthy citizen.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler



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