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Greene County
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STEPHEN JACKSON
Mr. Jackson is the son of Edmund and Ann Jackson, and was born in Yorkshire, England, April 17th, 1849. In 1854 his parents came to the United States and located upon Long Island, where his father purchased a third interest in the race course. He went to Kankakee county, Illinois, in 1855, where Stephen lived until he was fourteen years of age, and then went to work with the civil engineer corps of the Danville & Great Western R.R., as rodman, and in three years held the position of civil engineer. In 1862 he went to Louisville, Ky., and ran the wrecking train for Gen. Rosencranz to Nashville, until 1863. He then enlisted in company F, 64th Illinois infantry, and was at the battles of Snake Creek Gap, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty and Kennesaw Mountain. He was detailed as orderly for Gen. McPherson’s staff, and was by the side of that general when he was killed at Atlanta, and himself wounded in the action. He then returned to his regiment and was at the following engagements: Kingston, Savannah, Thunderbolt, Beaufort, Columbia and Bentonville. He then returned home and resumed railroading, working upon several different roads, the last being conductor upon the construction train on the Iowa division of the Rock Island R.R. from 1870 to 1878. He then engaged in the grain, produce and general merchandise business at Avoca, Iowa, until 1882. He then came to Springfield and laid the track for the People’s Street Railway. He is now the proprietor of the North Springfield House, and is one of the best landlords in the Southwest. Mr. Jackson is a member of the I.O.O.F. and A.F. and A.M. He was married March 22, 1869, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Daniel and Eliza Hamer, of Clifton, Ill. They have three children, Arthur E., Bertha S. and Stephen H.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ROBERT JENKIN
Mr. Jenkin was born in Ontario, Canada, January 6th, 1849. His parents died when he was quite young. In 1862 he went to St. Clair, Michigan, and enlisted for the U.S. service, but the officers refused to receive him on account of his youth. He went, however, with the 8th Michigan cavalry, and stayed through the year. He went to Leavenworth, in 1866, and there learned bricklaying, remaining three years. After working at his trade one year in Texas, he went to Mississippi and engaged in cotton raising two years. In 1872 he came to North Springfield, this county, and followed his trade till 1876. On October 30, 1880, he was married to Miss Mary A. Blankenship, daughter of W.S. Blankenship, by whom he has one child, named Inez Gordon. Mr. Jenkin is one of the leading business men of North Springfield. He owns a brickyard that turns out 750,000 bricks per year, and also operates as a building contractor. He is also bookkeeper for the street railway company, looking after their interests generally, and is connected with various other enterprises of the town. He owns a handsome and elegantly furnished brick residence, belonging to which there are six acres of ground. As a citizen of thrift and enterprise, Mr. Jenkin takes front rank, and the style in which he lives bespeaks the social position his family holds.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS F. JESSUP
This gentleman is the son of Eli and Sarah (Lattimore) Jessup, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, March 4, 1843. His parents were natives of North Carolina, and after coming to this county, his father carried on the business of tanning, running a yard where the wagon factory now stands, and also owned eighty acres of land where North Springfield was afterward built up. Eli Jessup died in this county, and his wife died in Texas in 1879. Thomas was educated in the common schools of this township, and began learning the carpenter’s trade in 1858 under Capt. Smith, of Springfield. In 1860 he went upon a farm and was farming when the war broke out. During the years 1861-2, he was in the employ of the government in the stock and teaming department. In 1863 he enlisted in company E, 6th Missouri, State troops, and was stationed most of the time in the county. He moved to Cole county the same year, and in the fall of 1864 was captured by Gen. Price’s army and released in a few days. He came back to this county in 1868, and this has been his home ever since. Mr. Jessup was married July 20, 1864, to Miss Frances, daughter of the Hon. J.W.D.L.F. Mack, a very prominent citizen of Greene county. She was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February 15, 1844. Their union has been blest with six children, five are living, viz.: Effie L., Edward F., Pearl, Lottie and Thomas F. Mr. and Mrs. Jessup are members of the Christian church, and Mr. Jessup is a member of the Greenback party.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

L.D. JOHNSON
Mr. Johnson is a son of John A. and Nancy Johnson, and was born in Giles county, Tennessee, November 11, 1845. His parents came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1863. L.D. Johnson was reared upon a farm, and in 1864 began clerking in a store in Van Buren, Arkansas, and in 1872 embarked in the general merchandise business for himself. He carried on the business six years, when his father died in this county, leaving eight children, viz.: Clarissa, now Mrs. Powell, Lewis D., John A., Agnes R., Neil B., Mary V., Silas M. and Nannie V. Lewis D. then closed up his own business and has since followed farming and stock raising. Mr. Johnson is a member of the Christian church, and is one of Greene’s substantial citizens.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ROBERT T. JOHNS – This gentleman is the son of William and Martha (Robinson) Johns, natives of Tennessee, who came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1844. Robert was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, March 4, 1838. He grew to manhood here in this county, receiving such education as the schools of the county afforded. At the age of seventeen, he commenced to work at milling. His father built a mill in 1855, near where the Johns Bros.’s mill now stands. He has since followed milling and farming, building his mill in 1872. Mr. Johns was married December 23, 1860, to Miss Sarah E. Wallace, daughter of Prior and Martha D. (Neil) Wallace, of this county. Her parents were natives of Tennessee. Their union has been blest with five children, all living, viz.: Montzell, Mary O., Belle R., Ida L., and Stella J. Mr. Johns has been a liberal patron of the religious denomination to which he belongs, the M. E. Church South, giving about one-fourth the cost of the church building named in his honor in his neighborhood. He has been an active member of the Methodist church for eighteen years, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He owns over three hundred acres of land, besides his milling property. No man in the county enjoys the confidence of his neighbors to a greater extent than Robert T. Johns.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

BENJAMIN  R. JOHNSON was born in Greene county, Tennessee, September 1, 1824. His parents were Benjamin and Mary Johnson, the former a native of South Carolina, and the latter of Virginia. Benjamin, jr,’s, father was a great hunter, and achieved quite a reputation for sports of the chase in Tennessee. He came with his family to Greene county, Missouri, in 1841, and settled where the subject of this sketch still resides, in Center township, where he lived till his decease in 1867. His wife, the mother of Benjamin R., also died in this county the following year. Benjamin was then seventeen years old when he came with his parents to this county, which has been his home ever since, with the exception of a short time spent in Dade county. In 1862, he enlisted on the Union side for the civil war in Capt. Redfearn’s company, 44th State Militia, and was in active service for two years, doing duty all over Southwest Missouri, and participating in a number of fights and skirmishes. He held the rank of sergeant. Mr. Johnson was married October 6, 1846, to Miss Celia D., daughter of L. and Millie Morris, natives of Tennessee. Mrs. J.’s mother had died when she was an infant, and a Mr. Douglas adopted and reared her. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are the parents of twelve children, of whom there are living at this writing: James W., Susan J., Martha C., Catherine H., Benjamin, Alexander S., Joseph R., and Emma D. Mr. Johnson owns a fine farm of 250 acres, besides the liberal gifts made to his married children. He has been a consistent member, for over forty years, of the Methodist church in which he has filled many official positions. He is regarded as one of the most substantial farmers of that part of Greene county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

WILLIAM D JOHNSON – Mr. Johnson is a son of Barton and Susannah (nee Horne) Johnson, both natives of Tennessee. The family moved to Greene county, this State, in 1839, where William D. was born April 19th, 1850. He was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools, and for some time followed the vocation of farming himself. In 1882, however, he engaged in the mercantile business at Bois D’Arc, as a member of the firm of Hoyal, Redfearn & Johnson, one of the livliest business houses in the county. Mr. Johnson was married September 12th, 1870, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Jefferson and Hannah Grantham, of Greene county. They have had six children, five of whom survive at this writing, named: Estella V., James C., William F., Maggie M., and Pearla. Mr. Johnson is a live young business man, and has the entire confidence of his neighbors and patrons.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

CAPT. WM. S. JOHNSON, U.S.A.
Captain Johnson is the son of James J. and Julia (Graham) Johnson, who were from Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish origin. His parents moved to Fulton county, Illinois, in 1835, and it was there that William S. was born, May 7, 1841. He was educated in his native county, and, upon the 8th of April, 1861, enlisted as a private in company A, 4th battalion, District of Columbia, under President Lincoln’s first call, and served three months. In August, 1862, he came to Springfield, Missouri, and enlisted in the 1st Arkansas cavalry as private, but was promoted to the first lieutenancy in October, and in February, 1863, was again promoted to the captaincy of his company. He was wounded in the right arm at the battle of Fayetteville, Arkansas, and the arm was saved by taking out a section of bone four and one-half inches in length. September, 1864, he was transferred as first lieutenant of the veteran reserve corps at Washington City, where he was also regimental quartermaster in the provincial cavalry at K street barracks. He was at the theatre when Lincoln was assassinated, and had charge of the battalion that acted as escort of the body to the White House. In 1866, he was superintendent under Col. J.M. Moore, for the building of national cemeteries in the State of Virginia, and was on duty until June 12th, 1867, when he was transferred to the regular army and assigned to duty at Fort Wayne as quartermaster. May 20th, 1871, he retired with rank of captain, mounted. January, 1871, he came to Springfield and engaged in the photograph business, and followed it until 1882. He was married December 28th, 1863, to Miss Nora Oustott. Their union has been blest with six children, three of whom are living, viz.: Wm. H., Julia G. and Harry D. The captain is a Mason, and a member of the A.O.U.W.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CAPTAIN GEORGE M. JONES.
Capt. Jones is the son of Henry F. and Mary (Waller) Jones, and was born in Shelby county, Tennessee, Oct. 19th, 1836.  His father is still living there, aged eighty-one, his mother died in 1856.  George M. grew up on the farm, receiving his education at the common schools of the county where he lived.  At the age of seventeen he went to Memphis, Tenn., and sold dry goods for the firm of Cossitt, Hill & Talmadge.  He remained with them something over three years, receiving for his first year’s service, $75.00 and board; for the second, $100.00, and the third, $150.00.  He came to Springfield, Missouri, in January, 1858, but went back to Tennessee after a short time.  In the fall of the same year he returned to Springfield and engaged in the general merchandising business, the firm being Miller, Jones & Co.  He only remained here a year when he went to Dillon, Phelps county, Missouri, and embarked in the forwarding and commission business, which he carried on until the war broke out in 1861.  In June of that year he enlisted as a private, in Capt. Dick Campbell’s company of Independents, Mo. State service, in the interest of the South.  He was next transferred to Foster’s regiment, Company A, McBride’s division, C.S.A.  He was shortly afterward made quartermaster, with the rank of captain.  On account of ill health, he was honorably discharged at Jacksonport, Arkansas, in August, 1863.  In 1864 he re-enlisted, and was for some time acting provost marshal in Chicot county, Arkansas,  He next engaged with Col. Campbell in the recruiting service until Gen. Price’s last raid in 1864.  He surrendered and received his parole at Monroe, Louisiana, in the spring of 1865, and saw the cause he had espoused forever lost, and the flag he had followed so long and so faithfully uprolled, never again to be unfurled over the land he had fought for and loved so well.  Capt. Jones went back to his native county in Tennessee, in 1865, and remained until 1868.  On the 15th of Oct., 1868, he was married to Mrs. Elizabeth (Berry) Campbell, widow of Colonel Campbell.  They were married in Lee county, Arkansas, and their union has been blest with three children, two girls and one boy.  In December, 1868, they came to Springfield, locating on the property where they now live, in the eastern part of the city.  For two or three years he was engaged in the real estate business here, but has since devoted his time and attention to his farm, a part of which lies in the city limits.  His home-place contains three hundred and fifty acres, and his farm at Campbell Station, three hundred and sixty acres.  Capt Jones has been one of the board of curators of the University, and is now upon the executive board of Drury College.  He is a member of the Masonic order, and is president of the Confederate Cemetery Association here at Springfield.  He and his wife are members of the M.E. Church south, and he has been a steward of the church for twelve years.  He was also a member of the last three general conferences of that church.  Greene county has no better citizen or truer gentleman than George M. Jones.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

CAPT. S.H. JULIAN.
Captain Julian is the son of Isaac and Nancy (Wood) Julian, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, April 4, 1822.  When he was fifteen years of age his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, and settled the farm in Cass township, where they both afterwards died.  Stephen grew to manhood upon the farm, and on May 15, 1842, was married to Miss Sarah L. Vestal, of Putnam county, Indiana, but a native of North Carolina.  They were blest with six children, Flavius C., Melcena M., Mary L., John C. (deceased), Robert F. and William R.  He built a house where he now lives, and in 1852, he took a drove of cattle across the plains to California.  He returned by the isthmus of Panama to New Orleans and reached home in 1853.  In 1857, he made another trip for the same purpose, returning via New York, reaching home in 1858.  When the war came he espoused the Union side, and raised a company of cavalry for three years’ service in April, 1862, for the M.S.M.  He commanded that company a year, and was then appointed recruiting agent for this district.  In January, 1864, he was elected captain of a battery, and was with Gen. A.J. Smith, who followed Price when that general was on his last raid into Missouri.  In the fall of 1864 his battery was ordered to Paducah, Ky., and from there to Nashville, Tenn., and was at the battle of Nashville against Gen. Hood, and followed him into Mississippi.  He was at Johnsonville, Tenn., when Lee surrendered and was mustered out at St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 5, 1865, and since that time has been engaged in farming stock raising.  In politics he is a Greenbacker, though before the war he was elected justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket, and served twelve years, and elected upon the Republican ticket in 1872, as public administrator of Greene county, serving eight years.  He owns a large ranche in Kansas, besides his property here in Greene.  He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church at Cave Spring.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver



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