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RUFUS H. LACY
Mr. Lacy is the son of John T. and Mary E. Lacy, and was born in Tioga county, New York, March 3rd, 1842. He grew to manhood and was educated in his native county, and, upon the breaking out of the civil war, he enlisted August 3rd, 1861, in company H, 3rd New York regiment, infantry, and served in the army of the Potomac. He was at Fort McHenry in 1862, and at the siege of Vicksburg in 1863. He then veteranized, and re-enlisted in the 50th New York, and served until the end of the war. He was in the battles of the Wilderness, Weldon Railroad and at Lee’s surrender. He then went to Michigan, and returned to New York in 1867 and engaged in farming. In 1877 he came to North Springfield, Missouri, and in 1879 embarked in his present business of restaurant and boarding house, where he is now doing a good business. Mr. Lacy is a member of the Temple of Honor, and an active worker in the temperance cause. He was married in 1867 to Miss Mary E. Vangorden, of Tioga county, New York.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FREDERIC W. LAKER
The subject of this sketch was born in Germany, on the 24th day of October, 1844. He is a son of Peter H., who died October 9th, 1873, and Anna M.I., who died August 31st, 1858. When Fred was an infant his parents brought him to America, with whom he lived until November 5th, 1861, then enlisted in company I, 43rd regiment Indiana infantry, and served until June 24th, 1865. After the close of the war, he came to Greene county and engaged in farming until 1873, then commenced firing on an engine on the St. L. and S.F. railway, at which he worked until September 6th, 1878; then was promoted to engineer, and has been running an engine ever since. He is king of Springfield Royal Arch No. 15, and a member of Gate of the Temple No. 425, A.F. and A.M. He is district lecturer for the 30th Masonic district of Missouri, composed of Greene, Webster and Wright counties. He is chief of the North Springfield division of the Oriental Order of the Palm and Shell. He is a member of Pacific City Division No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. On the 25th day of December, 1870, Mr. Laker married Miss Madora E.C. Kite. They have a family of five children living.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM LAMB
This gentleman is the son of John and Sarah A. (Thomas) Lamb, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, in 1839. His parents emigrated to Greene county, Missouri in 1852, and settled five miles north of Springfield, where they lived several years, and moved to Jackson township, where they now reside. William was educated in the county schools, and has made farming his occupation. He purchased the farm upon which he now lives in 1865, containing two hundred and twenty acres. He was married March 15, 1860, to Miss Martha Jane, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Forester of this county. Their union has been blest with four children, three of whom are still living, all boys. Mr. Lamb went to California in the spring of 1870, where he spent eighteen months in the mines of Nevada county. He returned home in 1872, and in the spring of 1879 he went to Colorado, and has spent every summer there since, working his mines, and returning to Missouri to spend the winters with his family upon the farm.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES LAREW.

Mr. Larew was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, April 23, 1814, receiving his education in the common schools of those primitive times.  George Larew, father of James, was a Pennsylvanian by birth, and died in Tennessee, in 1856.  James’ mother was Sophia (nee Chilton) Larew, a native of Virginia, who died previous to 1850.  At an early age James began farming and followed that calling in his native State until 1872, when he came to Bates county, Mo.  From Bates he moved to Polk county, and in 1876 removed to this county, where he has since resided with his family.  April 20, 1843, Mr. Larew was married to Elizabeth Inman, a native of Jefferson county, Tenn., born February 10, 1818.  Her parents were Jeremiah and Prudence Inman, both natives of Virginia.  Nine children have been born to Mr. L. and wife, five of whom survive at this writing.  Their names are:  Mary C., Catherine, Charles P., Ann E., and Chilton.  At this writing the family reside two miles west of Walnut Grove village, and are held in high esteem by their neighbors.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

JENNINGS W. LAMBETH – Mr. Lambeth is a son of Josiah and Rebecca Lambeth, and was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, May 8th, 1842. He was left an orphan when but three years old, and was reared by his grandmother, and received his education at the Monticello Academy, of his native State. At the age of twenty, in the spring of 1862, he enlisted for the Confederate service in the Second N. C. Cavalry, but was transferred the following fall to Gen. Lee’s command, and served under Stewart and Hampden till the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Newberne, Culpepper, Fredricksburg, and all other important movements of that active army. He was once seriously wounded, and disabled for ten months, and subsequently captured, just before the surrender. Returning home after the war, he went to Henderson, Texas, and engaged in merchandising. In 1868, he went to Montgomery county, and there married Miss Julia Bymaster. Removing thence to Lebanon, Mo., he was engaged as engineer in locating the “Frisco” R. R. to Springfield.
In 1870 he moved to Christian county, Mo., and engaged in farming and stock raising till 1882, when he sold out, and came to Bois D’Arc, this county, and began merchandising with John Bymaster. Mr. Lambeth is the father of four children, two of whom—Virgil C. and Fannie O.—are still living at this writing. He is a consistent member of the Christian church.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

B.H. LANGSTON
This gentleman was born upon a farm three miles southeast of Springfield, Missouri, and was educated in the log school houses of his native county. At the age of fourteen he enlisted in the 8th Missouri cavalry, Col. W.F. Geiger, U.S.A., and served three years, having enlisted in August, 1862. He was mustered out at Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1872 he was appointed deputy U.S. marshal, and served until 1877. He was then appointed deputy revenue collector, and in 1881 received the appointment of collector. Mr. Langston was married in 1867, to Miss Martha, daughter of John Pursley. Their union has been blest with six sons. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., K. of H. and A.O.U.W. He and his wife are members of the M.E. church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

W.W. LANGSTON
Mr. Langston is the son of Jackson P.C. and Mariel (Gallian) Langston, and was born Jan. 1, 1842, three miles southeast of Springfield, Missouri. He remained at home until the civil war, and in August, 1861, he enlisted in Holland’s company, three months’ service. He was then afterward appointed second sergeant of the 26th Missouri infantry, Col. John S. Phelps. He served with that regiment six months, and in July, 1862, enlisted in company D, 8th Missouri cavalry. He was first lieutenant, but was afterward promoted captain. They were mustered out at St. Louis in August, 1865. He returned to Greene county, and farmed upon the old homestead. In 1880 he was elected to represent the eastern district of Greene county in the Legislature, and is now deputy internal revenue collector for his brother, Bryant H. He lives upon the farm where he was born. He was married August 15, 1862, to Miss A. Ingram. Their union has been blest with two sons and four daughters. He and his wife are members of the M.E. church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CLAY L. LESLIE
Mr. Leslie is the son of A.H. and Sarah L. (Bailey) Leslie, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, August 1st, 1843. His father was born in Kentucky in 1816, and came from Tennessee to Greene county, Missouri, in the spring of 1847. He was engaged in farming, stock raising and merchandising in this county until 1866. He then removed to Marshfield and sold goods there for ten years, and then came back to Greene and settled at Fair Grove, where he is now engaged in the same business. Clay’s mother was a daughter of William Bailey, of Hawkins county, Tennessee. Her mother is still living, having reached the advanced age of nearly one hundred. Clay came with his parents to this county in 1847, and has since made it his home, with the exception of selling goods with his father at Marshfield from 1867 to 1875. He is engaged in farming and stock trading, buying and shipping large numbers from Strafford. During the war Mr. Leslie was in the Missouri State militia, company E, 72nd regiment, for eighteen months. He was at the battle of Springfield, when Gen. Marmaduke attacked the place, January 8th, 1863. He was honorably discharged the following summer. He was married in April, 1864, to Eliza J., daughter of J.G. Wharton, formerly of Saline, now Lawrence county, Missouri. They were blest with seven children, all sons, five of whom are now living. Mr. Leslie is a member of A.F. and A.M., I.O.O.F., Knights of Pythias, Grange and Brothers of Freedom, but is too far from the lodges to attend regularly.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

COL. JOHN W. LISENBY
Colonel Lisenby was born March 22, 1836, in Washington county, Tennessee, and is the son of Charles and Susan (Carr) Lisenby. He was the seventh of a family of twelve children. His father dying when he was about thirteen years of age, the remainder of the family moved to Monroe county, Ky. John W. received his education at Columbia, Adair county, Kentucky, and taught school about three terms. In April, 1859, he came to Springfield, Missouri, and soon after taught school in what was then known as the Lane school house, three miles southwest of town. He accepted a clerkship in the general store of Logan & Morton, in the fall of 1859, and when the war began was a member of the Home Guards. In 1861, he enlisted in company D, Missouri volunteers, Phelps’ regiment, and was first-lieutenant of that company, and afterwards promoted to the captaincy. He was wounded severely at the battle of Pea Ridge, March 7, 1862, being shot in the left shoulder and through both legs. This was in the six months’ service, and upon the 30th of August, 1862, he was mustered in company A, 8th cavalry, Missouri volunteers, as captain, and afterward major. His health becoming poor, he resigned his commission in February, 1865, but was promoted to lieut. colonel in a few months afterward. At the close of the war he was appointed clerk of the county, probate and common plea courts, and served in that capacity for four years. In 1873 he was elected mayor of the city, which office he filled with satisfaction to his constituents and honor to himself. He was in the real estate business here since 1865, and the firm of Milner & Lisenby did the largest business in that line in Springfield. Col. Lisenby was married to Miss Columbia, daughter of John H. Jennings, Esq., upon the 9th of May, 1865. Mrs. Lisenby died October 13, 1872. The firm of Milner & Lisenby dissolved in the early part of 1883, and the captain still carries on the business.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JUDGE CHARLES H. LIKINS.
Judge Likins is the son of William and Sarah (Squibbs) Likins, and was born June 13th, 1828, in Green county, Tennessee.  His parents were natives of that State.  They reared a family of four children, viz.:  Charles H., Hannah, Elvina, and George S., all of whom are yet living save Elvina, who died in 1875.  She was the wife of L.B. Whinrey, of Greene county, Missouri.  Mrs. Likins, the mother of this subject, died in 1840, and is buried at the old Quaker church burying-ground, in the county of her birth.  His father married the second time to Rachel Horn, also of Green county, Tennessee.  That union was blest with two children, viz.:  James and William, both living.  They moved to Greene county, Missouri, in October, 1843, and settled about six miles south of the present site of Ash Grove, upon the Sac river.  He lived there about twenty-nine years, when he moved to Lawrence county, Mo., near the Chalybeate spring, where he still resides.  Judge Likins grew to manhood in Greene county, Missouri.  He received his education in Tennessee, and carried on farming until he was twenty-two years of age, when he learned the hatter’s trade under his father, working at the trade for five years.  He then bought a mill known as the Harrelson Mill, and milling has been his occupation ever since.  He was married the first time to Miss Amanda H. Gray, November 4th, 1860.  This union was blest with but one child, Amanda H., who is the wife of John Sisk, living near Ash Grove.  His first wife died in September, 1861 and is buried in the cemetery at John’s chapel.  At the beginning of the war Judge Likins opposed secession, and became a pronounced Union man.  When Gen. Sterling Price occupied Greene county he went to Fort Scott and became a scout for Col. Judson, of the Sixth Kansas, for four months.  The next November he volunteered in the regular U.S. service in the 8th Missouri cavalry, and served until the close of the war.  He was in the battles of Prairie Grove and Little Rock, and in many small skirmishes.  He returned to peaceful life in 1865, and on the 14th of October, 1866, he was married to Miss Eliza Jane Adams, of this county  By this marriage they had four children, viz.:  Emma Elizabeth, Charles D., John L. and James W., all living except Charles D., who died in March, 1879.  His last wife died in March, 1878, and is buried at John’s chapel.
Being a leading Republican, possessing the confidence of his party and his friends, he received the nomination of that party for associate justice of the county court for the western division of Greene county.  His opponents were W.C. Garoutte, Greenbacker, and Columbus Headley, Democrat.  Judge Likins was elected by a plurality of 170.  He served two years, and was renominated and re-elected.  His opponents were C. Headley, Democrat, and -- Grenwade, Greenbacker.  His plurality was 216 votes.  Judge Liking served his county well and faithfully, making a record that will be a proud heritage for his children.  He was urged to run again, but declined because he did not wish to antagonize himself with his friends by being forced to levy the tax to pay the railway bonded indebtedness.  He is a large land-owner, and a partner in the Likins mill.  The judge is conservative in politics, and is regarded as one of Greene’s most substantial and upright citizens.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

AUGUST LOHMEYER
This gentleman is the son of Henry and Louisa (Vittenberg) Lohmeyer, and was born in Ahmsen, Kingdom of Lippe Delmold, Germany, March 2, 1846. At the age of fifteen years he learned the cabinet trade. At the breaking out of the Franco-Prussian war he enlisted in the 55th regiment infantry, and served throughout the war. He was at the battles of Varbach, Gravelotte, the siege and battle of Metz, and many smaller engagements. After the war he worked in an organ factory, and in 1872 he came to the United States. He worked at his trade in New York City, until 1876, when he went to Philadelphia, and was foreman in the street car factory of J.S. Brill. In 1877 he, with Wm. Sutton, came to Lebanon, Mo., and carried on contracting and building until 1879. Mr. Lohmeyer then came to North Springfield and worked for the Frisco railroad, as pattern-maker, until the fall of 1882. He then, in partnership with M.F. Sibley, went into the furniture and undertaking business, where they do a fine business, and the firm is one of the best in the city. Mr. Lohmeyer was married in 1870, to Miss Ernestine Klingenberg. Their marriage has been blest with three boys and two girls.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JACOB LONGCRIER.
Mr. Longcrier was born in Lincoln county, N.C., June 28, 1818.  His father, Jacob Longcrier, sr., was also a native of North Carolina, and died shortly after the civil war, closing an eventful life.  Catherine Longcrier (nee Bollich), Jacob, jr.’s mother, was a native of Pennsylvania, and died in North Carolina during the war.  Jacob was educated in the common schools of his native county, and at an early age began farming.  In 1846 he commenced blacksmithing, which he carried on in connection with farming till he came to Greene county and purchased the place where he resides at this writing, one mile southeast of Walnut Grove.  He there owns a well improved farm of 160 acres, nearly all in cultivation.  In 1862 Mr. L. went into government employ at Springfield, his engagement being for home protection, serving with the Home Guards till his engagement as a mechanic in 1862.  In the last named year, his son, Jones A. Longcrier, enlisted under General Phelps, and was at Springfield at time of the battle at Wilson’s Creek.  He was killed March 10, 1863, at the battle of Pea Ridge.  Jones was the eldest child of his parents, born October 28, 1845.  Mr. Longcrier was married February 11, 1845, to Miss Lydia Harmon, daughter of Peter and Lydia Harmon, natives of Pennsylvania, but both deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. L. have had ten children, five of whom survive at this writing, all residents of Greene county.  Both husband and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of which he is an elder, and are highly respected by many friends of the county, where they have spent many years of their useful lives and become identified with development and prosperity of the country, and especially Walnut Grove township.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

ADDISON LOVE
Was born in Buffalo, N.Y., September 7, 1857. His parents are Jesse and Margaret Love, who now live in Randolph county, Indiana. At the age of 17, Mr. Love began firing on the western division of the Fort Wayne, Pittsburg and Chicago railroad, and, with the exception of about one year, has been railroading ever since. In December, 1881, he came to North Springfield, and was engaged as fireman on an engine of the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, where he is still employed. He is an active member of the Frisco lodge No. 51, B. of L.F., and also of the Locomotive Firemen’s Mutual Benefit Association.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler


ALFRED A. LOWDERMILK, M.D.
Dr. Lowdermilk is the son of William and Martha (Rhodes) Lowdermilk, and was born in Greene county, Tennessee, June 24, 1848.  In 1856, his parents moved to Sangamon county, Illinois, taking young Alfred with them.  At fourteen years old, he started out to make his own living and learned the trade of tinsmith, which he followed till he was twenty-one years old.  He then, in 1869, entered and took a course of lectures in the Louisville Medical College.  The next year he began the practice in Vernon and Barton counties, this State, thus acquiring the means to complete his professional education.  Returning to Louisville in 1875, he took a second course of medical lectures, graduating therefrom in 1876.  Soon after this he began the practice in Illinois and continued till 1880, when he located at Bois D’Arc in this county, where he practiced actively till the fall of 1882.  His failing health there necessitated his quitting active practice, and he opened a drug store, and has done only office practice since then.  Dr. Lowdermilk has been a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge since he was twenty-one years old in which he has filled various offices.  He is also a member of the Grand Lodge.  February 13, 1866, he was married to Miss Lizzie Burton, of Scott county.  She died April 13, 1870, leaving two children – Martin and May.  Dr. L. was again married January 1st, 1882, to Miss Ellen Cravens, of Greene county.  He is a gentleman of fine business qualifications, in whom the good people of that vicinity repose entire confidence.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

JOHN LYDON
Mr. Lydon was born in Warren county, Ohio, August 25, 1853. In 1875 he went upon the St. Louis & San Francisco R.R. as brakeman, and was promoted conductor in 1877. He is a member of Pacific lodge, No. 122, Ancient Order of United Workmen. Mr. Lydon is one of the reliable and efficient officials of that popular road.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES LYDON
Mr. Lydon was born in Warren county, Ohio, August 8, 1857. December 12, 1873, he commenced firing upon an engine on the St. Louis & San Francisco R.R. He was promoted engineer August 30, 1879, and has run an engine ever since. He is a member of the Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 422, A.F. and A.M., and also of Wentworth lodge, No. 113, A.O.U.W., and Legion of Select Knights, A.O.U.W. Mr. Lydon was married January 21, 1883, to Miss Helen T. Stewart, of North Springfield. Although young in years, he is one of the best engineers upon the road.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM D. LYMAN
Mr. Lyman is the son of Asa and Sarah Lyman, and was born in St. Lawrence county, N.Y., May 19, 1823. His parents were natives of New Hampshire, but went to Ohio when William was a boy, where he learned the blacksmith’s trade. In 1843 he went to New Orleans, where he was stricken with yellow fever, and for six years after his recovery, his mind was a blank as to his early life. He then traveled in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina, where he was married to Miss A.M.C. Ward, daughter of Samuel R. and Martha E. (Brown) Ward. He then moved to Greene county, Tenn., and soon after to Grainger county, where they lived until coming to Greene county, Mo., in 1868. In April, 1862, he was incarcerated in the rebel prison at Madison, Ga., because of his outspoken Northern sentiments. After his release he enlisted in company C, 4th Tennessee cavalry, Lieut. Col. Thornburg. He was at the battles of Chattanooga, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Resaca, Big Shanty, Atlanta, Ft. Blakely and Nashville. He was mustered out July 12, 1865. He was appointed veterinary surgeon in 1863, and served in that capacity until mustered out. Since coming to this county he has lived some time in Clay township, where he owns a farm of eighty acres. In September, 1873, he removed to where he now resides, carrying on his trade. He is a member of the Methodist church, and his wife of the Christian church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler



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