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CHARLES S. NEISWANGER
This gentleman is the son of Isaac and Elizabeth S. (Askew) Neiswanger, and was born at St. Clairville, Ohio, April 14, 1849. In 1868 he went to St. Louis, Mo., but soon after came to Springfield where he was in the drug store of Milner & Co. for two years. He then went back to St. Louis, where he graduated in the St. Louis College of Pharmacy, and also took a private course in chemistry at Washington University under Professors Leonhardt and F.E. Nipher. He returned to Springfield in 1880, where, upon January 11th, of that year, he was married to Miss Hayes. They have one child, Helen. Mr. Neiswanger’s father is a noted veterinary surgeon, of St. Clairville. He and his wife reared a family of four boys and four girls, all of whom are living. Neiswanger Bros. have one of the best appointed retail drug stores in Southwest Missouri, and do the largest retail business in the city. Charles S. and his wife are members of the Calvary Presbyterian church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN W. NELSON
Was born in Montreal, Canada, March 19, 1842. His parents were William and Martha Nelson, the former being still alive and residing in Ray county, Missouri, though the latter died in 1856. He was but five months old when his parents came to Missouri, and located in Ray county, where – besides the father – four brothers and two sisters still reside. He began “firing” on the H. & St. Joe R.R. in 1859, continuing until 1861, when he enlisted for the war in company E, 13th Mo. infantry, serving therein till captured by Gen. Price at Lexington. Being paroled, he remained at home till his exchange in January, 1862, then entered the 3rd Mo. cavalry as sergeant, and marched from Chillicothe to Pea Ridge, via Springfield, participating in the battles of both those places and at Prairie Grove. In May 1864, he re-enlisted in the 13th Mo. and served till mustered out at Leavenworth, Kansas. Going then to Rolla, Mo., he began working for the St. L. & S.F. R.R. company, and was brakeman on the first regular freight than ran to Lebanon. In 1870 he began “firing” on the same road, and in 1874 was given charge of an engine, since which time he has served steadily as engineer. Mr. Nelson was married October 15, 1866, to Elizabeth Charles, by whom he has had four children, two of whom are still living. He is a member of the Springfield lodge No. 218, I.O.O.F., the Temple of Honor, and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN GLENN NEWBILL.
The eldest son of T.G. Newbill is a native of Southwest Missouri, his birth-place being in the northeast corner of what is now Webster county.  His childhood was passed on his father’s farm, two and one-half miles west of the city of Springfield.  He was educated principally in the district school and schools of Springfield, and studied three years under the tutorship of Dr. Wm. V. Allen, formerly of Bates county, Mo.  For several years, while prosecuting his studies, he alternately worked on the farm and taught in the public schools of Greene and Bates counties.  Returning in 1876 from a two years’ trip to the Pacific coast, he afterwards engaged in the business of journalism.  At present he is the editor of the Springfield Express, one of the leading and most reliable Democratic papers in the southwest, in which capacity he has labored with untiring energy since the establishment of the paper on the 1st day of April, 1881.  He is also secretary of the Democratic Central Committee of Greene county.  He was married on the 4th day of the preceding January, to Miss Carrie Leona Rhoades, daughter of B.T. and Ottilie Rhoades, of Montgomery county, Illinois.  Mr. and Mrs. Newbill are the parents of one child, Albert Glenn Newbill, born to them February 1st, 1882.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

TYREE GLENN NEWBILL.
Father of the subject of the preceding sketch, was born in Franklin county, Virginia, May 17th, 1882.  He was married December 1st, 1846, to Nancy A. Johnson, only daughter of James M. and Elizabeth Johnson, and in the following year removed to Southwest Missouri, locating on the farm now owned by Dr. H.H. Lea, in the northeast corner of the territory now known as Webster county.  Three years afterward he removed to Greene county, where he purchased the fine farm of Samuel McClelland, two and one-half miles west of Springfield.  Here he engaged largely in agriculture and stock-raising, and was one of the foremost men in the county in the importation and breeding of the different kinds of fine stock.  In the spring of 1854 he took a drove of cattle and wagon train across the plains to the Golden State, returning home by way of Panama and New York in the following autumn.  As will be seen elsewhere in this work, he was twice elected president of the Southwest District Agricultural and Mechanical Association for the two years prior to the war, at which time that association stood in the front ranks of similar institutions of the kind in the West.  He was also prominently connected with the association as a member of the board of directors from its inception up to that time.  In the political campaign of 1860 he was a staunch supporter of Douglas, but in the late war he took the side of the Lost Cause.  In the early part of the winter of 1860 he went to Bell county, Texas, to close up his stock business there, after which he was never nearer his home in Greene county than when confined for a few weeks as a prisoner of war in the old McDowell college, St. Louis, in the summer of 1863.  After his release he again went South to engage in cotton speculation, where it is supposed he lost his life in the month of December, 1864, the date of his last letter to his family, as nothing was ever learned of his whereabouts afterwards.  His wife and six children are living, five in Greene and one in Bates county.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

LEWIS A. NEWTON
This gentleman is the son of Henry W. and Mary (Coleman) Newton, and was born June 16th, 1832, in Caroline county, Virginia. He was reared upon the farm, and attended Richmond College for three years. After completing his education he returned to the farm and lived there until 1859, when he moved to Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, where he taught school two terms, and then went to Owensburg, Kentucky. He returned to Lawrenceburg soon after, and upon the 30th of September, 1860, was married to Miss Eliza V., daughter of Edwin Martin. Their union was blest with nine children, four boys and five girls. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in October, 1860, but soon went to Cassville, Barry county, and followed his profession of teaching. In the spring of 1862 he returned to Springfield, and accepted the position of first clerk in the quartermaster’s department, which position he held until November, 1865. In January, 1866, he went with Capt. R.B. Owens to Fort Riley, Kansas, and took charge of the abstract department. In November, 1866, he came back to Springfield, Missouri, and engaged in prosecuting claims against the government. He was elected upon the Democratic ticket to the office of county collector, in 1874, and served two years. In 1869 he was city assessor, and a member of the council in 1871, and has been a member of the school board as one of the directors. Mr. Newton is a Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist church. His father died in 1852 and his mother in 1876. They had seven children, four boys and three girls, of whom Lewis A. is the oldest.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOB NEWTON
This gentleman was born in the State of Delaware, July 26, 1826, and came to St. Louis, Mo., in 1838. In 1849 he crossed the great plains to California, leaving St. Louis in March and reaching California in the following September. The train he was with took the first merchandise to Salt Lake. In 1851 he returned to St. Louis, and in 1854 he re-crossed to California and freighted goods for John Howe, with a large wagon train. He returned to St. Louis January 8, 1855, and upon the 5th of October, 1855, again started to California, going by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He came back to St. Louis in 1856, where he remained until 1868, when he came to Springfield, and brought his family the year following. He was engaged in the general merchandise business until 1872, and then embarked in the general produce trade, which he still carries on. He was elected to the city council in 1869, for the fourth ward, upon the Democratic ticket. He has always taken an active part in the building up of the city, and was a leading spirit in the erection of the opera house. He was married in September, 1856, to Miss Minerva C. Ault. They were blest with five children, all sons, three of whom are now living. Mr. Newton is a Royal Arch Chapter Mason, St. John’s Commandery, No. 20. His father died when he was but an infant, and his mother died in St. Louis soon after her removal to that city. Mr. Newton is one of the staunch business men of Springfield, and has done much to advance her commercial interests.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DANTON H. NICHOLS
Mr. Nichols has the reputation of being one of the most popular officials of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company. Thrown upon his own resources at the age of seventeen, with a fair education, having attended the Illinois military academy two and a half years previous, he came to Missouri and engaged in braking on a freight train, and has since held various positions on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, which he filled satisfactorily to the company, and thereby gained their confidence and respect, which inducted them to appoint him superintendent of the A. and P. division of the road in 1875, and in 1881, promoted him to master of transportation, which position he holds at present. He is the son of Mathias H. and Sylvia S. Nichols, born in Allen county, Ohio, August 14, 1849. On the 8th day of September, 1874, he married Miss Katie Cummings, daughter of Daniel and Mary Cummings, of St. Louis. They have three children, Mamie, Sophia and Danton. Mr. Nichols belongs to St. John’s commandery, No. 20, Knights Templar. He is also past master of Wentworth lodge, No. 113, A.O.U.W. Socially, Mr. Nichols is an affable and agreeable companion. His motto, to which he has rigidly adhered in business, is to do that which his sense of right demands, leaving the consequences to take care of themselves.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DR. A. J. NORRIS
Dr. A. J. Norris – This gentleman was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, June 24, 1836. When he was but six years of age he walked three miles to school. The doctor says his teacher knew the front part of the spelling book, but stuttered so badly the scholars could hardly understand him. He also states that in four days he mastered the alphabet, which had been cut out of the book and pasted upon a shingle for his especial benefit. He was then sick and lay upon a bed of pain for four years and arose a cripple for life. He then went to school a short time, and at the age of seventeen he began teaching school, which he followed for fifteen years. When the civil war came on he enlisted in the 19th Kentucky Volunteers, United States Infantry, and served for nine months when he was discharged for disability. He then entered the secret service and served as a spy for eighteen months. He then assisted in raising a battalion of cavalry, known as the Hall’s Gap Tigers, with which he served until the close of the rebellion. He was in several hard fought battles and skirmishes, including the sanguinary battle at Perryville. At the close of the war he attended school in Illinois and resumed the occupation of teaching. He went to Kansas in 1867 and taught school in Council Grove, read medicine, and in 1870 went to Fayetteville, Arkansas, where he read law three years, taught school and prosecuted claims against the government. He then turned his attention to one branch of the medical profession, viz.: Ophthalmia. The doctor moved to Ash Grove, Greene county, Mo., in 1876, where he fitted up a hotel, known as the Empire House. To use his own words, he is “an oculist, hotel-keeper, livery stable boss, notary public, real estate and insurance agent, a Greenbacker in good standing, practices law for exercise and preaches for fun.” He is a whole-souled, genial gentleman and one of the substantial citizens of Greene county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist


WILLIAM S. NORFLEET
Mr. Norfleet is the son of David and Elizabeth (Shackleford) Norfleet, and was born March 10, 1826, in Wayne county, Kentucky. His parents emigrated to Polk county, Missouri, in 1838, and at the age of eighteen William came to Springfield, and went to school to J.A. Stephens, who was killed by Zagonyi’s men in their charge into Springfield, in 1861. He lived here until 1848, and studied medicine in the office of Dr. Shackleford. In the fall of 1848 he went to Sarcoxie, Jasper county, and practiced his profession for a time. In the spring of 1850, he went to California, and returned in the winter of 1854, to Springfield. He next purchased a farm on Grand prairie, four miles northwest of the city, where he dealt largely in stock. He sold the farm in 1863, and in 1868 he bought another farm upon Kickapoo prairie, a mile and a half southwest of Springfield, where he lived until September 15, 1881, when he moved into Springfield. He suffered greatly during the war at the hands of the soldiers, his stock driven off, and himself kept a prisoner for a week in the court-house. Mr. Norfleet was married May 13, 1858, to Miss Elizabeth C. Shultz, a native of Tennessee. Their union has been blest with seven children, five of whom are now living, three sons and two daughters. He is a Mason, and his wife is a member of the M.E. Church South. His father sold goods for a while at Ebenezer, this county, but was a farmer most of his life. He died in Texas, in 1868, and his mother died in 1862 at Ebenezer. They reared four boys, all now living, William S. being the oldest. Mr. Norfleet is one of Greene’s affluent citizens and a thorough gentleman.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

AARON NUTT – Mr. Nutt is the son of Moses and Catherine (Haley) Nutt, and was born in Burlington county, New Jersey, Feb. 22nd, 1810. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. His parents moved to Pennsylvania, and in 1822 they moved to Clermont county, Ohio. When Aaron was about fourteen years of age his father was killed by the falling of a tree while chopping in the woods. Aaron was then bound out and learned the blacksmith’s trade. In 1831 he worked at his trade at Cincinnati, and for about two years followed steam-boating. In 1836 he went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, and worked at his trade. In 1838 he went to the Choctaw Nation, where he followed his trade until 1852, and was said to be the best blacksmith in the nation. In 1852 he moved out upon the farm where he now resides, and is one of Greene’s most substantial citizens. He was one of the charter members of the first Odd Fellow’s Society in this county. Mr. Nutt was married Jan. 11th, 1853, to Miss C. Blackman, daughter of Stephen and Matilda (Campbell) Blackman. Their union has been blest with eight children, five of whom are now living, viz.: Stephen R., Kate, Lizzie, Lucy and Moses. His first wife died in 1871, and in 1876 he was again married, to Miss Nannie Hammonds.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

WALTER A. NOLEMAN
Mr. Noleman was born May 25th, 1848, in Jefferson county, Illinois. In 1868 he commenced firing on an engine on the Illinois Central railroad, and worked at it four years. He then ran a switch engine in the yards at Centralia, Illinois, several months. He then removed to Stone county, Missouri, and engaged in sheep raising two years. He next went to firing upon the St. L. and S.F. railway, and was promoted engineer upon that celebrated road, and is now running an engine. Mr. Noleman was married to Miss Elizabeth M. Thompson, of Centralia, Illinois. Their union has been blest with one daughter, Sarah Ann. Mr. Noleman is a member of ‘Frisco Lodge, Division No. 5, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler





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