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WILLIAM PALMER
Mr. Palmer was born in Boone county, Missouri, May 16th, 1848, and is a son of James W. and Sarah Palmer, who now reside at North Springfield. In 1869 William began firing on an engine upon the I. and St. L. railroad, but in a few months went on the O. and M. railroad, and fired four years. He was then promoted engineer, and ran a train several months. Then he went back to the I. and St. L. railroad, and ran an engine until 1875, when he came back to North Springfield. July 6th, 1875, he went to work for the St. L. and S.F. railroad, and was soon given an engine, which he ran until November 5th, 1882. He is now running an engine on the K.C., S. and M. railroad. Mr. Palmer was married July 19th, 1875, to Miss Mary A. Foltz. Their union has been blest with two children, Nettie and John.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DR. WILLIAM H. PARK.
Dr. Park is a son of John and Elizabeth (Waggoner) Park, and was born January 8th, 1825, at Milton, Pennsylvania.  When he was about six years of age his parents moved to Tiffin, Ohio.  He was educated at Tiffin and at the Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio.  In the spring of 1855 he graduated from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia.  He was appointed resident physician at the alms house of the city of Baltimore, Md., but soon after returned to Tiffin, Ohio.  In August, 1862, he was commissioned as surgeon of the 49th Ohio Regiment, Col. W.H. Gibson.  He was mustered out at Victoria, Texas, in Nov., 1865.  He was at the battle of Shiloh, Stone River, Liberty Gap and Chickamauga.  He was captured and taken to Atlanta, and afterwards confined at Libby Prison and at Andersonville.  Afterward he was at the battle of Nashville and went with the army to San Antonio, Texas.  In May, 1866, he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon Leeper prairie, near Bois D’Arc, and was one of the first to settle upon that celebrated prairie after the war.  He followed his profession and at one time owned about seven hundred acres of land.  He came to Springfield in September, 1881.  He is now of the firm of T.E. Crank & Co., druggists, of North Springfield, and at Golden City.  He was married Nov. 9th, 1858, to Miss Clara Rupert, of Bloomsburg, Penn.  They have had six children, one son and five daughters.  His wife is a member of Calvary Presbyterian church.  The doctor’s father died at Tiffin, Ohio, in August, 1868, aged eighty, and his mother died July 12th, 1881, aged eighty-four.  In 1850 Dr. Pakr went to California and returned in 1853.  He was mining and merchandising while there.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

RODOLPHUS G. PARKER
Mr. Parker is the son of Joseph and Catherine (Adams) Parker, who were natives of Maine. His ancestors upon his mother’s side, the Stillsons, were the original settlers of Deer Island, now a noted summer resort upon the shore of Maine. R.G. Parker was born in Hancock county, Maine, January 21, 1830. In 1845 his parents moved to Ottawa county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood, and was educated at the common schools and at Oberlin College. In 1853 he graduated at Bryant & Stratton’s commercial college, Cleveland, Ohio. His father was a ship carpenter, and R.G. began learning it as soon as large enough to handle tools, and has followed the trade most of the time since. He taught school for a short time when a young man. In 1855 he went to Kankakee, Ill., where he was foreman upon the first store building put up in the place. In 1857 he took up a claim in Dakota county, Nebraska, where he worked at his trade until 1859, when he went to St. Joseph, Mo., and in 1860 went to Pike’s Peak freighting. He returned to Ottawa, Ohio in the fall of that year. In 1865 he moved to Odell, Ill., where he remained until 1870 contracting and building, also owning a half interest in a boot and shoe store. In 1870 he came to Springfield, and worked at bridge building for the Frisco road, and has been with them ever since, save two years. He is now shipping clerk in the bridge department. Mr. Parker was married December 27, 1860, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Barzilla and Elizabeth Dean, of Ottawa county, Ohio. She died at Rolla, Mo., in 1872. They had six children, three of whom died in 1872 with diphtheria, within eleven days. Those living are Talba C., Frank B. and Clara J. Mr. Parker married the second time, October 22, 1876, to Mrs. Susan C. Hardin, formerly a Miss McBride, of Tennessee. Her parents were neighbors and friends of Andrew Johnson, who made her father’s wedding coat.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

W.D. PARKER
This gentleman was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, county of Middlesex, November 21, 1849. He is a son of Robt. J. Parker, of Toronto, Canada West, who was a successful surveyor for many years in Canada and Michigan. He died in 1865. W.D. Parker was educated in the best public schools of his native province, and was employed as clerk in a store in Strathroy, Ontario, for four years. He then took a course of telegraphy, at the telegraphic school at that place, which he completed in August, 1870. Since then he has been engaged in operating for the Dominion Telegraphic Company, and for ‘Frisco Railway Company, now being under the employ of the latter. Mr. Parker was married in 1878 to Miss Frances A. Steer, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Steer, of Middlesex, Ont. They have one child, Ferdinand Bruce.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN G. PERRYMAN,
John Perryman is the son of Benjamin and Sarah (Wood) Perryman, and was born December 13th, 1821, in Rutherford county, Tennessee. His father was a Tennessean and his mother a native of Virginia. They had nine children, viz.: Thos. J., Jacob G., Owen Wood, Benjamin F., Jane, Louisiana, Martha and Harriet, four of whom are now living. John G. is the oldest of the nine children. He came with his father to Greene county, Missouri, 1837, and settled in the northern part of the county upon Grand Prairie. He lived with his father upon the farm until he was twenty years of age, when he learned the blacksmith trade, and carried on the business for fifteen years in this county. He then abandoned it for farming and stock-trading, which he has carried on until the present. In the year 1871 he bought the old Hosman homestead, adjoining Ash Grove, where he now lives. Mr. Perryman married the first time, August 10th, 1848, to Miss Mary Lemon, by whom he had six children, four of whom lived to be grown, viz.: Jacob L., Owen Wood, Sarah and James G. His first wife died in November, 1860, and is buried at Cave Spring, this county. He married the last time Cassandra Gresham, of Dade county. By this union he was blest with seven children, viz.: Mary, Burton, Nancy, Emma, George, Walter and Lura, all of whom are now living. Mr. Perryman owns one of the best farms in his section, well stocked, in a high state of cultivation, and the best orchard in the township. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church at Ash Grove. He is regarded as one of the Greene’s most substantial citizens, and is a gentleman of integrity.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

J.G. PETTITT, M.D.
Dr. Pettitt is the son of Dr. B.M. Pettitt, and was born at Auburn, N.Y., June 10th, 1846. His father was a graduate of Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and afterwards studied homeopathy, and was one of the first and oldest homeopaths in the United States. He is still living. J.G. Pettitt was educated at Monroe Collegiate Institute, near Syracuse, N.Y. He followed the avocation of civil engineering for seven years, on the A. and P. R.R., now the ‘Frisco. He studied medicine with his father, and took two courses of lectures at Rush Medical College, Chicago, leaving the senior class to enter the army. He was in the 6th New York Cavalry, Col. Harris. He practiced medicine two years in New Mexico, and came to Strafford late in the summer of 1879, where he has since practiced his profession at Strafford and Cedar Gap as surgeon of the railroad. Dr. Pettitt was married June 25th, 1871, to Miss Anna M., daughter of Col. R.M. and Mary M. Jones, of this county, formerly of Giles county, Tennessee. Their union has been blest with three children, two girls and a boy.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEONARD B. PERKINS
Mr. Perkins was born in Parishville, St. Lawrence county, New York, March 12, 1840, his father bearing the Christian name of Cyrus G., and his mother, Martha A. He remained at home and attended school until he was fourteen years old, then went to Lowell, Massachusetts, and worked in a cotton factory for a year or two. Returning home, he learned the painter’s trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years, following that vocation till the commencement of the war. He enlisted for U.S. service in April, 1861, going to Albany, where he was sworn in for three months. He next enlisted in the 6th New York infantry for two years, which period he served out, participating in all battles in which his regiment was engaged. After returning home, he married Miss Emma L. Dervey, on June 4, 1863. Three children have been born to them of this union, only one of whom survives at this writing. After his marriage he lived six months in Washington City, going thence to Alexandria, Virginia, where he remained three years. Subsequent to this he was in Baltimore, and his native county, Iowa, Woodstock and Muscatine, in which latter place he had charge of the largest creamery in the world. He next went to Kansas, where he remained a short time, coming to North Springfield, this county, in June, 1880. Here he opened a restaurant, and in the spring of 1882, erected his brick house. He is a member of St. Mark’s lodge, No. 63, A.F. and A.M., and also of Independence lodge, No. 77, I.O.O.F., of Baltimore, Maryland.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DR. CHARLES E. PIERCE
Dr. Pierce is the son of Samuel W. and Mary O. (Loomis) Pierce, and was born at Lafayette, Ind., September 15, 1853. He was educated at Battle Ground high school and at Valparaiso, Indiana. In 1874 he entered the E.M. College at Cincinnati, and graduated at the winter term, January 22, 1878. He then went to Shelby county, Tennessee, and followed his profession until 1880, when he went to Arkansas and remained until January, 1883, when he came to Springfield, Mo. He was married January 16, 1883, to Miss Grace A. Young. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. His father, Samuel W., was a son of Rufus and Polly Pierce, and was born in Springfield, Ohio, July 9, 1828, and died at Lafayette, Indiana, January 28, 1860. His parents were married July 4, 1852, at Lafayette, Indiana. They had four children, viz.: Charles E., George T., born August 14, 1855; Otho, born March 8, 1858, and died July 23, 1858, and Mary Olive, born March 23, 1860.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PETER PIPER
Mr. Piper was born June 18th, 1810, in Pickaway county, Ohio, and is the son of Philip and Sarah (Gay) Piper. His parents were both natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Piper removed to Vermillion county, Indiana, in 1838, and followed farming until 1872, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, where he has since resided. Mr. Piper has been married five times. His present wife was Miss Jane, daughter of Jesse Hines, Esq., of Kentucky. Although Mr. Piper is in his seventy-third year, he is hale and vigorous as a man twenty years his junior. He has seen many changes come over the land since his youth, and yet has promise of many years to come. One of his sons is a prominent farmer near Ash Grove.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

L.T. PIPER
Mr. Piper was born in Washington county, Virginia, August 30, 1837. He is the oldest of a family of eight children, three boys and five girls, five of whom were born in Virginia, and three in Missouri. He was brought to Missouri by his parents, who settled near the head waters of the Dry Sac river. Here Mr. Piper grew to manhood, receiving such education as the schools of that day afforded. He has always enjoyed the best of health, and never had but one accident happen him in his life. When he was about fourteen years of age, a wagon ran over his leg, breaking the bone. He was taken home, and his leg set by his father, without the aid of a physician. He was not able to resume active work for about three months. He was, at the beginning of the war, in Capt. Piper’s company, afterwards commanded by Capt. John A. Mack. After the battle of Wilson’s Creek, he went to Rolla and joined Capt. C.B. Holland’s company. In 1862 he joined Capt. Geo. A. Dillard’s company E, 72nd regiment, under Col. Holland, who was promoted, and the regiment was then commanded by Col. Henry Shepard. They were in the battle of Springfield, upon the 8th of January, 1863, when the town was attacked by Gen. Marmaduke. Mr. Piper served until the close of the war, participating in all the actions of his regiment. After being honorably discharged he returned to his old homestead, where he still resides. He was married January 1, 1866, to Miss O.M. Pipkin, of this county. They have had five children, three of whom are still living. He is one of the best citizens of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

SAMUEL PIPER (deceased)
Mr. Piper was born October 11, 1802, in Washington county, Virginia, where he grew to manhood and received his education. He was married to Miss Sarah Smith, of his native county. She was of German descent; her ancestors were early settlers of Virginia. They had eight children, seven of whom are still living. Mr. Piper emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in the fall of 1839, and upon the first of January, 1840, settled on section 6, township 29, range 20. His children were George S., Mary E., Theophilus C., Sarah A. (deceased), L.T., Harriet, Nancy A. and Margaret C. Mr. Piper endured all the hardships incident to a pioneer’s life. He frequently made trips to St. Louis by wagon for goods, supplies, etc. During the civil war his sympathies were strongly with the Union, though too old to take active part. In 1874 he was stricken with paralysis, and after three weeks died at the advanced age of seventy-two. He was one of the old landmarks of the county, and a man who enjoyed the confidence of all.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE S. PIPER
Mr. Piper was born in Washington county, Virginia, July 16, 1828, and is the oldest child of Samuel Piper, a prominent farmer of that county. George S. was brought to Greene county, Missouri, by his parents when he was twelve years of age. He grew to manhood upon the farm, and has since made that his vocation in life. Mr. Piper married March 4, 1856, to Miss Margaret J., daughter of Henry C. Morrison, of this county who came to Ebenezer, Greene county, Missouri, about 1830. Their marriage has been blest with twelve children, eight sons and four daughters, seven of whom are yet living, six sons and one daughter. Mr. Piper has one hundred and ninety acres of land in the farm upon which he lives. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the enrolled Missouri militia, in Captain George A. Dillard’s company E, Col. C.B. Holland. Being absent on a sick furlough he was not at Springfield when the town was attacked by General Marmaduke upon the 8th of January, 1863. When the war closed Mr. Piper was honorably discharged, and is now one of the most substantial citizens of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FELIX R. PORTER
This gentleman is the son of William C. and Judith R. (Owen) Porter, and was born in Weakley county, Tennessee, March 7, 1841. His parents moved to Springfield, Missouri, in June, 1856. They lived some little time in town, but his father soon purchased a farm three miles east of Ebenezer, this county. It was here that Felix was educated and grew to manhood. At the commencement of the civil war he enlisted in the Confederate service under Capt. Bradford, whose company was then attached to Gen. Price’s body-guard. After the battle of Pea Ridge he was taken sick, but in the fall of 1862, he joined company A, 3rd Missouri cavalry, Col. C.E. Green. The regiment was attached to Gen. Marmaduke’s brigade upon the 12th of January, 1863. They surrendered at Shreveport, La., June 7, 1865. Mr. Porter was in the battles of Helena, Little Rock and Poison Springs. At Little Rock, he had his gun shot from his hands, and was wounded in the left leg. At Poison Springs he was wounded in the right shoulder. He was married January 17, 1867, at Smithville, Arkansas, to Miss Sadie Fields. Their union has been blest with two sons and two daughters. He was elected by the city council in 1873, to the office of street commissioner, and has been to a considerable extent engaged in mercantile business. He was elected justice of the peace upon the Democratic ticket for Campbell township, in 1882. His father was born in Rockingham county, North Carolina, in 1803, and came to Williamson county, Tennessee, in 1811, where he married and reared a large family, all sons.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM G. PORTER

Mr. Porter is the son of William C. and Judith R. (Owen) Porter, and was born January 30th, 1829, in Williamson county, Tennessee. In 1836 his parents moved to the western portion of that State, and in May, 1856, came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon a farm ten miles north of Springfield. William G. soon after purchased a farm of his own several miles east of Springfield, where he lived until after the civil war. Just before the battle of Pea Ridge a detachment of Gen. Curtis’ men and some of Gen. Price’s pickets had quite a little fight at his place. Mr. Porter had a small stock of merchandise which the soldier unceremoniously appropriated to their use, besides taking everything of value in the house. He is the oldest tobacconist in the Southwest, having followed it since coming to the State. He was married in Weakley county, Tennessee, February 5th, 1850, to Miss Mary A. Stubblefield. Their union was blest with five sons and two daughters, all of whom are living save one son. His father was born in Rockingham county, N.C., in 1803, and was taken to Tennessee in 1811. He died at his home in Arkansas in 1878, and his wife died in 1881. They had a large family, all of whom were boys.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

BENJAMIN B. PRICE
This gentleman is the son of the Hon. William C. Price, and was born in Springfield, Missouri, January 1st, 1848. He was educated at Salisbury institute at Batesville, Arkansas, and at Mountain Home, Arkansas. He studied law in St. Louis in his father’s office, and at Springfield. He was admitted to the bar in February, 1873, before Judge Geiger, and was also admitted at Mountain Home, Arkansas, in 1875, and at Dallas, Texas, in 1881. He was for several years probate judge of Ozark county, Missouri. He returned to Springfield in February, 1882, and formed a law partnership with Thomas W. Kersey. December 8th, 1882, he was married to Miss A.H. Beal, of Ellis county, Texas. Mr. Price is a member of the I.O.O.F.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ISAAC PRICE
Mr. Price is a son of William and Matilda Price, and was born in Grundy County, Tennessee, September 17, 1849. In 1858, his parents moved to Rockport, Arkansas. His father dying there, he and his mother moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1862. In 1863, when he was but fourteen years of age, he enlisted in company M, 2nd Missouri artillery, and served until the end of the war. In the winter of 1865 he was put into the cavalry, and sent to the plains, where he fought Indians in many skirmishes. After the war he went to work in the Pacific Flour Mills, St. Louis, and then worked a while for the Missouri Pacific railroad. In 1872 he commenced working for the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, and has now been foreman of the paint shops of that road for eight years. Mr. Price is a member of the A.O.U.W., and is a Select Knight. He is a self-made man, having been left fatherless when he was twelve years of age. He was married in 1872 to Miss Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Mary Mangan, natives of Ireland. Their union has been blest with six children, five of whom are living.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE PRICE
Mr. Price was born in Grundy county, Tennessee, July 1, 1844. He came to Missouri in 1861, and soon after his arrival he enlisted in the 2nd Missouri artillery and served until the close of the war. In 1866 he commenced upon an engine on the Missouri Pacific railroad, and worked upon that road until 1870. He then came on the St. L. & S.F. R.R. and fired until 1876, when he was promoted to engineer and has been running as such ever since. July 4, 1869 he was married to Miss Mary A. Maugan, of Jefferson county, Missouri. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: Mary A., Matilda J. and Eunice V. Mr. Price is a member of the following benevolent societies: Springfield Lodge, No. 218, I.O.O.F.; Pacific Division No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and of the Locomotive Engineers Mutual Life Insurance Association.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM T. PRIGMORE
This gentleman is a Missourian, born in Jasper county, March 15, 1854. He is a son of Dr. L. Prigmore, who resides at Rolla, Missouri, and mother is also still living. In 1871 he began “braking” on the St. L. & S.F. R.R. and has been in the employ of the same road, off and on, ever since. July 29, 1879, he was promoted to the position of freight conductor which he has held ever since. Mr. Prigmore was married June 13, 1877, to Miss Norah S. Robberson, of Dixon, Missouri. He is a Free Mason, and a member of Arlington Lodge, No. 346, A.F. & A.M., at Dixon.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PLEASANT T. PROPHET
The subject of this sketch is a son of Arnton and Jemima (Brigham) Prophet, and was born in McMinn county, Tennessee, August 31, 1835, where he continued to reside till 1852, when he moved with his parents to Greene county, Missouri, and settled at the head of Clear creek. Here he engaged in farming till 1881, when he sold his farm and embarked in the mercantile business at Bois D’Arc, of which place he is one of the leading business men, as well as a highly respected citizen. He joined the M. E. Church South, at twelve years of age, and has constantly adhered to the faith since then, filling creditably the several functions of steward, secretary, class-leader, and trustee of the church. He was one of the original members in the organization of the church of Clear creek. He was married in 1858, to Miss Nancy Barrett, of Greene county. She died in 1862, having had two children, one—Sarah J.—still survives her. Mr. Prophet was a second time married in 1868, to Miss Blackwell, daughter of Sylvester and Martha Blackwell, of this county. Seven children have been born to this union, all of whom are still living, and are an honor to their parents.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

REV. DOUGLAS P. PUTNAM
Mr. Putnam is the son of Rev. Charles Marsh and Abbie S. (Edgerton) Putnam, and was born at Jersey, Ohio, February 8th, 1844. He graduated from Wabash Indiana College, at Crawfordsville, Indiana, and received his theological education at Union Theological Seminary, New York city, and at Lane Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was ordained to preach in the Presbyterian church at Portsmouth, Ohio, where he was assistant pastor for one year. In 1871 he went to Monroe, Michigan, where he had charge of the church until 1881. He then came to Springfield, Missouri, and took the pastorate of Calvary Presbyterian church. In 1862 he enlisted in the 92nd Ohio infantry as a private, and served as adjutant’s clerk. There were five great-great-grandsons of Gen. Israel Putnam in the regiment, viz.: Col. B.D. Fearing, Douglas Putnam, Jr., Daniel E. Putnam, David E. Putnam, David Putnam and our subject. The first four were wounded. Our subject was married June 22nd, 1870, to Miss Jeannie H. Williamson, daughter of John A. Williamson, prominently connected with railroads in New York, but now of Lafayette, Indiana. They have five children, four girls and one boy. Mr. Putnam has in his possession several very old letters written by General Washington, General Putnam and John Hancock. They bear dates of 1776 and 1777. The father of our subject was born in February, 1802, in Marietta, Ohio, and graduated from Yale College in 1826, and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1829. He then took charge of the Presbyterian church at Jersey, Ohio, where he remained until 1869, just forty years. He died in 1870, and his wife died in March, 1878.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler



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