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HENRY T. RAND
Mr. Rand is a son of John H. and Irene (Trumbull) Rand, and was born at Manchester, New Hampshire, November 4, 1848. He grew to manhood in his native town, and in 1865 entered Dartmouth College, from which he graduated in 1869. The same year he accepted a position as civil engineer upon St. Louis & San Francisco railroad, and remained in the offices at St. Louis a year. He then engaged in merchandising at Pacific City, being postmaster and city clerk. In 1873 he located at North Springfield where he has since been engaged in the grocery business, doing a business of twenty thousand dollars a year. He is the present secretary of the school board. Mr. Rand was married April 30, 1871, to Miss Sarah O., daughter of William C. Inks, of St. Louis county, Missouri. They have four children, Florence J., Willie M., Harry T. and Walter H. Mr. Rand is a member and trustee of the Congregational church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS RATHBONE
This gentleman is the son of John and Sarah Rathbone, and was born in England, July 19, 1827. At the age of thirteen, he was apprenticed for seven years to learn the tinner’s trade. After completing his trade he worked at it in his native town until 1852, when he came to the United States and located at Williamsburg, N.Y., where he worked at his trade. In 1858 he moved to Springfield, Mo., where he worked at his trade and farmed until 1875. He then went into the stove, hardware and tinware business, doing the leading business in the place, carrying a large stock, and is one of the best practical tinners in the Southwest. During the war he served in the Home Guards, and was in the fight against Gen. Marmaduke. He and his teams were pressed into service when Fremont retreated to Sedalia, and had many narrow escapes upon his return. He is a member of the Temple of Honor, No. 23, and has filled the various offices connected with it. He was married in 1847, to Miss Sarah Warr, of his native town. Their union has been blest with four sons and one daughter. Mr. Rathbone is one of the best citizens of the county, and enjoys the friendship of a large circle of acquaintances.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

RICHARD F. RAWDON
Mr. Rawdon was born in Warren, Ohio, August 29, 1845. At the age of sixteen he commenced railroading, doing his first work at braking upon the Atlantic and Great Western railroad in Ohio, which he followed about six years. In 1869 he came West and braked on the ‘Frisco road for six months, and then went into the engineer corps, and was on the survey from Pierce City to the Arkansas river in the Indian Territory. He then went to St. Louis and braked upon the Missouri Pacific road for six months, and was then promoted conductor, and ran a train five years. When the Missouri, Pacific and ‘Frisco separated, he came on the latter road, and has been running a train ever since. For the last two years he has been running a passenger train, and is considered one of the most reliable upon the road. Mr. Rawdon was married to Miss Kate Griffith, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Their union is blest with three children, viz.: George, Alice and Charles.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES H. REA
Mr. Rea was born in Franklin county, Illinois, June 29th, 1845. His father, Thomas Rea, was a native of Bedford county, Tennessee, born June 11th, 1811, and died in Franklin county, Illinois, in April, 1861. His mother was Miss Thenia Brashers, born in Tennessee, July 14th, 1811, and is still living in Franklin county, Illinois. James was educated in the common schools of that county, and began farming at an early age. In Feb., 1862, he enlisted in company K, 30th Illinois infantry, and afterwards in company A, 136th Ill. infantry, and served until mustered out in Oct., 1864. He was at Chickamauga, Moscow, the siege of Vicksburg and Lookout Mountain, besides many minor engagements. He was wounded at Chickamauga. At the close of the war he returned to Illinois, where he lived until the fall of 1877, when he moved to this county. Mr. Rea was married Jan. 7th, 1865, to Miss Nancy Eubanks, of Franklin county, Ill., born Jan. 14th, 1843. Their union has been blest with eight children, viz.: Emma D., born Nov. 16th, 1865; Harvey, born Oct. 11th, 1867; Rosanna, born April 6th, 1870; Benjamin F., born Aug. 7th, 1872; Thomas E., born Sept. 19th, 1874; Harry, born Aug. 10th, 1876; Maurice V., born Feb. 29th, 1880, and Abram, born May 24th, 1882. Mrs. Rea was the daughter of John D. Eubanks, M.D., born in July, 1800. He was a chaplain and surgeon in the Mexican war, and died at Tampico, Mexico, in December, 1847. Her mother was Annie Smothers, born in Tennessee, July 16th, 1801, and died in Franklin county, Ill., Aug. 15th, 1875. Mr. Rea lives five miles east of Springfield, on the Martin Ingram place, where he carries on farming and deals largely in live stock.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JESSE O. REDFEARN –
Mr. Redfearn is the son of Josiah and Lucy K. (Bennett) Redfearn, old settlers of Greene county, the former a native of Tennessee, and the latter of North Carolina. Jesse was born in this county, April 10, 1856, and was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools. Like his father, he, too, became a farmer, and continued in that vocation till 1882, when, moving to Bois D’Arc, he engaged in the mercantile business with Messrs. Hoyal and Johnson, the firm style being Hoyal, Redfearn & Johnson. Mr. Redfearn was married December 21, 1877, to Miss Catherine H., daughter of Benjamin R. and Celia D. Johnson, of Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. R. have had three children, named respectively, Bertha C., Carrie J., and William R. Mr. Redfearn has amassed what he possesses by his own industry and thrift, and owns, besides other property, a well-improved farm of sixty-five acres.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JOHN REYNOLDS (Deceased)
Mr. Reynolds was the son of David D. and Polly (Kelly) Reynolds, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, November 28, 1824. His parents were natives of that State, and emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1834, and settled in Pond Creek township. At their house was held the first religious services in that part of the county. It was here that John grew to manhood upon the farm. He was married October 31, 1850, to Miss Hannah E., daughter of William and Sarah (Squibb) Likens, of this county. Their union was blest with six children, four of whom are now living: William F., James H., Thomas B. and Susan J. Mr. Reynolds was one of the prosperous farmers of his neighborhood, owning a farm of two hundred and thirty-four acres. He was a member of the Methodist church, and was a quiet, peaceable citizen. He was a member of the Home Guard, and was the first man murdered in that part of the county. He was killed in his own house on the night of November 22, 1861. About eight o’clock a party of men, three or more, came to his house and one of them came in, saying, “We’ve come to hang you for voting for Lincoln!” Mr. Reynolds hit him upon the head with a shovel and put him out, and, while holding the door he was shot through the window, dying in a few seconds. His widow is yet living, and reared her little ones under difficulties which only a fond mother and noble woman could surmount.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

B. C. RICE
Was born in Polk county, Missouri, December 16, 1844. His father, Jonathan Rice, wm a native of Logan county, Kentucky, and came to Polk county, this State, in about 1880. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of his native county, and at an early age began farming. In 1868, he enlisted in company L, 16th Missouri cavalry, of Confederates, under Col. John Allen, and was on Price's last raid through Missouri, and participated in the battle of Big Blue, and other engagement*. After the war, he returned to Polk county and went to farming on the old homestead, and also engaged in buying mules for the Southern market Mr. Rice came to Walnut Grove in 1878, and clerked for B. Y. Acuff and J. Brown till August, 1880, when he opened up a drug store for himself, the Arm being Rice A King. The firm was dissolved by mutual oonsent in October, 1882, and Mr. Rice made a trip to Texas, returning in December following. Mr. Rice was married December 6, 1880, to Miss Barbara McMohen, daughter of James McMehen, one of the most prominent citizens of the northwest part of Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. Rice have one child, a boy named James B., born May 12, 1882. Mr. Rice is a Freemason in good standing, and his wife belongs to the M. E. Church South. They have many warm friends, and are highly esteemed by all who know them. Mr. Rice has been quite successful in business, and retains the confidence of the people among whom his business career has been known.

W. D. RICE.
This gentleman ia the son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Porter) Rice, and was born in Polk county, Missouri. February 11, 1867. His father was a native of Logan county, Kentucky, born in March, 1801, and died in I860, in Polk county, Missouri, upon the old homestead. His mother was the widow of James Chastine, who was married to her in Kentucky. Mr. Chastine was one of the early settlers of Greene county, and entered the land where Walnut Grove is now located. He died about the year 1838, and Mrs. Chastine was married to Mr. Rice in 1839. She died November 6, 1880. W. D. Rice was educated at Morrisville Institute, and taught school in Polk and Greene counties about two yean. He then followed civil engineering in Texas for two years, and returned to Greene county in January, 1880, and went into the drug business in Walnut Grove. He followed it about six months, and then embarked in the general merchandise business of Brown & Rice, and at once took the lead in the business of that place. Mr. Rice was married about June 5, 1881, to Miss Maggie, daughter of Josiah Brown, Esq., one of the prominent citizens of this county. Their union has been blest with one son, born March 28, 1882. Mr. Rice is one of the substantial business men of the county, young as he is, and already ranks well in the mercantile world.

WILLIAM S. RIGGS
Mr. Riggs was born February, 26, 1829, in Maury county, Tennessee. He was educated in his native county, and in 1855 he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled six miles north of Springfield. Here he was engaged in farming until 1867, when he moved into the city, where he has since been engaged in carpentering and hotel keeping. The hotel is one the corner of Boonville and Water streets, is a two story frame, 52 x 31, and contains thirteen rooms and basement. Mr. Riggs was married in March, 1856, to Miss Emily McCracken. Her family were among the earliest settlers of the county. They were blest with three sons and one daughter. Mr. Riggs’ parents were natives of North Carolina. His father died in 1849 and his mother is yet living in the county. They had seven sons and two daughters, William S. being the second child.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DAVID M. RITTER
Mr. Ritter is the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Miller) Ritter, and was born in St. Joseph county, Indiana, February 10, 1843. His grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution, and was one of the men who threw the tea over board in Boston Harbor. David grew to manhood upon the farm, and in July, 1862, he enlisted in the 21st Indiana battery, and was at the battles of Rome, Gainesboro, Carthage, Hoover’s Gap, Cattle Gap, Chickamauga, Nashville and Columbia, besides many smaller engagements. He held the rank of corporal, and was mustered out June 26, 1865. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1866 and located upon Leeper prairie, where he lived two years, and then came to the farm upon which he now lives, containing two hundred and seventy acres, well watered and stocked. It was fourteen hundred bearing apple trees, one thousand of which were of his own planting. Mr. Ritter was married May 30, 1872, to Miss Josephine, daughter of Joseph and Lucinda Martin, of Greene county. Her father was a soldier in the Mexican war. Mr. and Mrs. Ritter have three children, Howard J., Clara L. and Ethel.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

DR. EDWARD A. ROBERTS
Dr. Roberts was born and brought up in the State of Georgia. In May, 1866, he came to St. Louis, from there to New Orleans, but returned to St. Louis, July 11, same year, and passed through the terrible cholera ordeal of that year. In August took the cholera – after partial recovery became a patient of St. Luke’s hospital (Episcopal) and remained one month until fully restored to health. November 1, 1866, he was appointed superintendent and resident physician of St. Luke’s hospital, where he remained over six years, resigning December 1, 1872. He was then appointed visiting physician upon a salary, but after four months he came to Springfield where he has practiced his profession. In 1877 he was appointed alms-house and jail physician and holds that position for 1883. He was a member of the city council from the third ward upon the Democratic ticket during the years of 1876-7-8 and 9. He was the Democratic candidate for mayor in 1881, but was defeated by James Abbott, by thirty-five votes. He was also defeated in 1882 by Geo. S. Day. He is now councilman from the third ward, elected April 3, 1883. In 1882 he was appointed city engineer and street commissioner. He is a member of the board of health, and is chairman of the Democratic county central committee. The doctor has always taken an active part in public enterprises, and is one of the most useful citizens of the county. He was married February 28, 1868, to Miss Minnie B. Coleman. They were blest with two children, Roberta Lee, born July 4, 1870, and Susie, born June 1st, 1875. He and his wife are members of the Episcopal church, and he has been junior and senior warden of the church at Springfield. Dr. Roberts’ parents were natives of Virginia. His mother died in 1852, and his father died in 1856. They had a family of ten children, Edward A. is the oldest.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

BENJAMIN J. ROBERTSON
This gentleman was born in Greencastle, Indiana, February 13, 1844. At seventeen years of age he joined company G, 63rd Illinois volunteer infantry, and served one year as second sergeant. He was then promoted to quartermaster sergeant. In 1863 he was advanced to rank of first lieutenant and regimental quartermaster, which he held till the close of the war. He served through the siege of Vicksburg, also at Black River, Champion Hill, Chattanooga, the campaign before Atlanta and Sherman’s march to the sea. He returned to Illinois after the war, and was employed over two years in the office of the Illinois Central railroad at Tuscola. Next he was engaged in the American Express company’s office at Mattoon. A year later he began braking on the C. & A. R.R., and continued nine months, when he was made freight conductor, and ran a train five months. The machine shops at Bloomington were his next field of labor, where he remained three years. In September, 1879, he went to Pierce City and began braking on the Kansas division of the “’Frisco” line. He was again given charge of a train in May, 1881, which he has conducted since then. His removal to North Springfield was in 1880, where his family now reside. Mr. Robertson was married March 30th, 1868, to Miss Mattie Blake, of Charleston, Illinois, and has at this writing a family of four children.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN B. ROBINSON
This gentleman is the son of Charles and Sarah (Barham) Robinson, and was born in Stokes county, North Carolina, March 2, 1810. His parents were natives of that State, and his grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution. The parents of John B. moved to Lyon county, Kentucky, the same year he was born. It was here he grew to manhood upon the farm and received his education. For some time after he was grown he drove the stage between Russellville and Bowling Green, Kentucky. In 1837 he came to Polk county, Missouri, and engaged in farming. In 1844 he moved to this county and settled upon the place where he now resides. He is one of the pioneers of the county and has seen many changes come to the people and the face of the country. He owns a fine farm of four hundred acres, and has accumulated it all since coming to the county. Mr. Robinson was married in 1840 to Miss Louisa E., daughter of Geo. H. and Susan (Gee) Irwin, of Polk county, Missouri. Her parents were natives of North Carolina, and her father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was at the battle of New Orleans. They have had seven children, five of whom are now living, Geo. W., James F., Sarah S., Mary L. and Martha J. They are all married and living in Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have been members of the Baptist church for over forty years. He is regarded as one of the best citizens of the county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

EDWIN D. ROBINSON, M. D.

The professional gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a native of this State, and was born in Chillicothe, November 2d, 1854. His parents were Edwin and Eliza (nee Cravens) Robinson. He grew up in the town of his birth, and there acquired his elementary education. Subsequently he attended Central college at Fayette, Missouri, and in 1875, commenced the study of medicine under Dr. Ross of Springfield. He entered the Missouri medical college, of St. Louis, in 1877, graduating with the degree of M. D. in 1879. Soon after he located for practice at Bois D’Arc, this county. In 1881, he entered Bellevue hospital medical college of New York, graduating from there in March, 1882. After practicing three months in the hospital department he returned to Bois D’Arc, where he is enjoying a fine practice and taking a leading rank among the M. D.s of the Southwest.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

 JAKE ROTHSCHILD
This prince of Springfield’s merchants is the son of Leopold Rothschild, and was born February 12th, 1850, upon the beautiful and historic Rhine, in Germany. He was educated in that country, and in August, 1868, he came to America, landing in New York. He soon after removed to St. Louis, but only lived in that city a short time, and then went to Marshfield, from where he moved to Springfield, and opened one of the largest stocks of clothing ever brought to this part of the State. He is well and favorably known all over the country, having traveled several years for wholesale houses of Cincinnati and Chicago.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JUDGE M.J. ROUNTREE
Judge Rountree is the son of Joseph and Nancy (Nichols) Rountree, and was born March 24th, 1820, in Maury county, Tennessee. He received his early education from his mother, an intelligent, cultivated lady, and from the common schools of his section. At the age of twenty he went to work upon a farm by the month, working in the summer and going to school in the winter. In December, 1829, the parents of our subject moved to Missouri and settled upon Wilson’s creek, within two miles of Springfield. Judge Rountree was married upon the 7th of March, 184_, to Miss Mary Winton, of Polk county, Missouri. They have had eight children, four of whom are now living. Their first born died in infancy. Sarah F. died in her nineteenth year, Bentley J. is a traveling salesman, Joseph W. is in the nursery business with his father, Mary E. at home with her parents, Thomas J. a tobacconist at Carthage. In 1845 he bought a small farm three and one-half miles southwest of Springfield, where he lived about six years, when he sold out and bought a place of two hundred acres southeast of Springfield, where he lived until the war closed. He then sold his farm, and went to Springfield temporarily, but soon purchased an eighty acre tract of land east of the city, and started a nursery in 1867. In 1870 he traded for the house where he now lives on East Elm street, which is upon a four-acre lot. He was a justice of the peace for four years. In 1872 he was elected judge of the county court, and held that position six years. In 1880 he was elected upon the Democratic ticket to the mayoralty of the city of Springfield. Judge Rountree is a self-made man, and no man in this county stands better in the estimation of his fellow-citizens than he.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

BENTLEY J. ROUNTREE
Mr. Rountree is the son of M.J. and Mary L. (Winton) Rountree, and was born in Greene county, Mo., January 2, 1849. He was educated here in this county and remained at home upon the farm until the civil war. In 1864-5, he was in the quartermaster’s department at Springfield, under Capt. C.B. Owen, as post messenger. When the war closed he went to school for two years, and then acted as salesman for his father in the nursery business. He was married September 30, 1868, to Miss Eva Hovey, daughter of E. Hovey, of Springfield. They were married at Buffalo, Mo. They have three children, Hattie, Minnie and Herman. From 1872 to 1874 Mr. Rountree was in the drug and grocery business, and was also a teacher of music for some time. From 1875 to 1879 he was traveling salesman for H.D. Brown, dealer in musical instruments, etc. Upon the first of January, 1880, commenced traveling for Jacob Strauss & Co., wholesale saddlery, etc., St. Louis, and so far has done well. Mr. Rountree belongs to one of the most respected of the pioneer families, and deserves the success with which he has met.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOSEPH ROUNTREE
Joseph Rountree was the son of Thomas and Eva (Sturgess) Rountree, and was born in Orange county, North Carolina, in April, 1782. He was the youngest of a large family, and received a good education for that early day, being very proficient in mathematics, and a good scribe. He taught school for many years in North Carolina, Tennessee and Missouri. He moved to Maury county, Tenn., in 1819, where he lived for about ten years, and then with several friends came to Missouri, and traveled about for nearly a year, looking for suitable lands upon which to locate. The family selected Greene county as their future homes, and in 1830 Mr. Rountree brought his family and located three miles south of Springfield, upon the afterward famous Wilson’s creek. He owned several hundred acres of choice lands in different parts of the county. He and another gentleman went to Boonville, Cooper county, and got a lot of fruit trees and set them out, and grew the first orchards in the Southwest. He next built a large store-house and stocked it with general merchandise in 1833, and sold goods for three years. He then sold the building to some parties at Springfield who moved it to where the court-house now stands. It was used for many years as a land office. Mr. Rountree taught school in the old log school house, three miles southwest of Springfield for two sessions, and it was probably the first school house built in this part of the State. Mr. Rountree was married in Caswell county, North Carolina, in 1806, to Miss Nancy Nichols, by whom he had ten children, six boys and four girls, two of whom died in infancy. Those who lived to be grown or nearly so, were Junius M., living in Greene county, aged seventy-three; Zenas M., Lucius A., Louisa A., wife of Dr. Slavens, of Dallas county, Mo.; Caroline, who died when quite young; Judge M.J., Almus L., of California, who has been sheriff of Santa Cruz county for many years; Allen J., who died in his twenty-second year, and Almarinda C., the late wife of Wm. Massey, of Springfield. Mr. Rountree died upon the 26th of December, 1874, at his home on Wilson’s creek, near Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WM. JONES ROUNTREE
This gentleman is the son of Almus L. and Delina (Mitchel) Rountree, and was born October 17th, 1847, on the farm now owned by Z.M. Rountree, near Springfield, Missouri. He was reared by his grandfather upon the farm, and was educated at the public school of Springfield. At the age of seventeen he accepted a clerkship in the store of Massey, McAdams & Co., of Springfield, where he remained until March, 1865, when he enlisted in company F, 14th Missouri volunteers, U.S.A. He was mustered out at Leavenworth, Kansas, the same year, and returned to Springfield, where he attended school until 1867. He then engaged with Massey, McAdams & Co., and sold goods for them for eighteen months. In the fall of 1869 he went to California, and returned in 1870 and took a position as clerk in the St. Louis and San Francisco freight and ticket office, where he continued until 1873. In the spring of 1874 he went to Texas, and was chief clerk on the Houston and Texas railroad. He was next appointed agent at Calveras, Texas, where he remained until 1876. He returned to Springfield in the fall of that year, but soon afterwards went to Joplin, Missouri, where he sold groceries for nine months, when he returned to this city and took the position of conductor on the popular Gulf railroad. Mr. Rountree is a member of the I.O.O.F., K.T. and Brotherhood of Railway Conductors. He was married September 15th, 1876, to Miss Fannie E. Massey. They have three children, viz.: Frank M., John F. and Etta. The Rountrees are some of Greene’s earliest and best settlers.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

NEWTON M. ROUNTREE
Mr. Rountree is the son of Z.M. and Elizabeth (Massey) Rountree, and was born Nov. 5th, 1838, on his father’s farm three miles northeast of Springfield, Missouri. He was educated in the county, and in 1860 entered the store of Massey & McAdams, as clerk, and in 1864 became a partner in the house and so remained until 1869. From 1869 to 1871 he was of the firm of Keet, Massey & Co., and when the firm reorganized in 1871, it became Keet, Rountree & Co., and so continues. Mr. Rountree was married in 1867 to Miss Grabella, daughter of Hon. Charles Haden, of this county. Their marriage is blest with three sons and two daughters. Mrs. Rountree is a member of the Christian church. They are both of the pioneer families of the county, and none are more honorable or more highly respected in Greene county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ZENAS MARION ROUNTREE
Squire Rountree is the son of Joseph and Nancy (Nichols) Rountree, and was born June 8, 1812, in Orange county, North Carolina. He remained with his parents until April, 1832, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled on a farm three miles southwest of Springfield, on Wilson’s creek, and there followed shoe-making, which trade he had learned in North Carolina. He moved into Springfield in 1834, and started the first shoe shop in the town. He followed his trade until 1835, and then entered the store of Fulbright & Carter, as clerk, and next sold goods for D.D. Berry. On the 24th of August, 1837, he married Elizabeth Massey, who was but fifteen years of age at the time. After his marriage he entered lands in different parts of the country, and made his home and reared his family upon Grand prairie. They were blest with eleven children, five boys and six girls, two of the girls are dead. In 1861 Mr. Rountree, commonly and familiarly called “Uncle Buck,” moved to St. Louis, and was there appointed by Sample Orr, as first clerk of the register of land’s office, at Jefferson City. He retained that position until 1862, when he returned to Greene county. Mr. Rountree was elected justice of the peace in 1857, and served until 1861. He was again elected in 1878. In 1880, he was elected city recorder, and served for one year. He is at present a justice of the peace in this township. His father died in 1874, and in 1876 “Uncle Buck” moved upon the old homestead where he now lives. No man in the county is more respected than he, and he has promise of many years yet to live.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

J. CHRIS. RULE
John Christopher Rule is the son of Raymundes and S.J. Rule, and was born in Baltimore, Md., November 20th, 1844. In the fall of 1866, Mr. Rule came to Springfield, Mo., and opened a saloon, where he remained until 1872. In May, 1875, he opened a saloon on Commercial street in North Springfield, where he is still doing business. He was married June 9th, 1869, to Miss C.W. Heffernan. Their union has been blest with seven children, six of whom are now living.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HENRY C. RUBY

Henry C. Ruby was born in Sangamon county, Illinois, July 15, 1842, receiving his education in the common schools of that county, where he grew to manhood. His parents were S. S. and Mary Ruby, the former a native of Knox county, Indiana, and the latter of Franklin, Kentucky. His first business venture was that of mining in Dade county, Mo., in 1874, where he was quite successful. He continued there till 1880, then came to Ash Grove and opened a first-class restaurant and boarding house. In July, 1867, he married Miss Elizabeth Simpson, who was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, September 5, 1842. They have four children, two sons and two daughters, named, Mary L., born January 4, 1869; Clyde, born November 8, 1872; Myrtle, born January 22, 1878, and Charles, born February 6, 1882. During the civil war Mr. Ruby enlisted in the government service in September, 1861, joining company I, of the 7th Ill. Cavalry, under Col. W. P. Kellogg, and served till mustered out, November 3, 1865, during which time he was once taken prisoner. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and himself and wife both belong to the C. P. Church, of which denomination Mr. R. is a local preacher.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JOHN G. RUSSELL
Mr. Russell is the son of James and Lucy (Bent) Russell, and was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, Nov. 6, 1830. He was educated at St. Louis and at Yale college, but was called home by the death of his father before he completed the college course. He held several minor positions in St. Louis, and in 1863 became one of the firm of Park, Russell & Co., or Oak Hill Fire Brick Co., and so remained until 1875. He came to Springfield in the fall of 1879, and since 1880 has been one of the proprietors of the Queen City Mills. Mr. Russell was married Nov. 8, 1853, to Miss Pauline Parker, of St. Louis, formerly of Rocheport, Boone county, Missouri. They have had nine children, six girls and three boys, five girls and one boy living. Mr. Russell is a member of the Knights of Honor, and he and his wife are members of the Calvary Presbyterian church. His father died in St. Louis county, in 1850, and had been for many years a judge of the county court. He was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, and emigrated to Cape Girardeau county, Missouri, in 1825, and moved from there to St. Louis county. Mr. Russell’s mother died in 1870.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler



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