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Greene County
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EMIL  SANDER
This gentleman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, January 1st, 1842. He learned the trade of cabinet-maker, serving some six years apprenticeship. In 1869 he came to the United States, landing at New York city. In the spring of 1874 he came to Springfield, Missouri, and has ever since been engaged in the furniture trade. His store is at 219 Boonville street, and is a two-story and basement building, 100 x 21 feet. They carry a general stock of furniture, carpets, picture material, etc., and do a wholesale and retail business. Mr. Sander was married in New York city, to Miss Alice Ashman. She died in 1876, and in 1881 he was again married to Miss Mary Swansen, of Wright county, Missouri. Mr. Lander has been very successful in business here in Springfield, and promises to be one of the leading mercantile men of the Southwest.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DANIEL BOONE SAVAGE
Mr. Savage is a son of Thomas B. and Frances S. (Robinson) Savage, and was born April 6th, 1838, in Madison county, Illinois. He received his education at Highland, Illinois, and lived upon the farm with his father until the war commenced. He enlisted in company C, 117th Illinois infantry, as a private, but was afterward promoted corporal. He participated in the battles of Clinton, Mississippi; Fort De Russey, Louisiana; Pleasant Hill, Louisiana; Yellow Bayou, Louisiana; Lake Chicot, Arkansas; Lupelo, Mississippi; Hurricane Creek, Mississippi; Franklin, Missouri; Nashville, Tennessee and Blakely, Alabama. In 1865 he returned home and engaged in farming. In 1869 he came to Missouri and settled in Greene county. He was a member of the police force of Springfield in 1873, and deputy constable in 1874-5. In 1876 was elected constable of Campbell township, and re-elected in 1878 and served until 1880. He is now of the firm of Winkel & Savage, on St. Louis street. They have the largest meat market in the city. Mr. Savage was elected a justice of the peace of Campbell township in November, 1882. He was married November 29th, 1865, to Miss A.L. Hanptly, of Madison county, Illinois. Their union has been blest with nine children, seven of whom are living. He is a member of the M.E. church South, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias. His father was killed by a team running away in St. Louis in 1858. His mother died in 1871. They had ten children, five boys and five girls; seven are yet living, Daniel being the third son and fifth child.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN SCHMOOK
Mr. Schmook is the son of Michael and Fredricka (Zeuner) Schmook, and was born in Berlin, Prussia, August 29th, 1825. He was educated in his native city, and learned the cabinet-maker’s trade under his father, serving some four years. From April 1st, 1846, to April 1st, 1849, he served in the Prussian army in the engineer corps. In 1850 he returned home to civil life and started in the cabinet business, which he followed until 1854. In September of that year he crossed the Atlantic and landed at New York, where he lived for a year and a half, and then “came West.” He first stopped at Iowa City, where he lived until 1856, and then went to New Orleans, then to Leavenworth, Kansas City and St. Joe. Not liking the business outlooks in the places he visited, he returned to Iowa City, and remained there until 1859, when he came to Springfield, Missouri, and worked for Ebert, Hurst & Co., furniture dealers and manufacturers. He next went into business for himself. He accumulated quite a competency, and is and has been identified with all the leading industries and enterprises of the city. He has represented the third ward in the city council twice. He was married in St. Louis in 1865 to Miss Anna Kirfer. Their union has been blest with thirteen children, ten boys and three girls; five boys and one girl are living. Mr. Schmook is a substantial citizen and a public-spirited gentleman.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

VALENTINE SCHULLER
The subject of this sketch was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, February 20, 1852. He began “braking” on the “Frisco” in 1874, and was advanced to a conductorship on October 4, 1878, and has been running a train ever since. Mr. Schuller belongs to Ozark Division, No. 30, O.R.C. Nov. 25, 1879, he was married to Miss Alla D. Lawson, by whom he has one child, a son, named Verner, October 15, 1882.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

W.M. SCHULTZ
Was born in Claiborne county, Tennessee, December 7, 1845. His father – Jacob Schultz – came to this county in 1858, and settled on a large farm two miles southwest of Springfield, where he resided till his death in 1865. Here the subject of this sketch still lives, having made farming his vocation in life. In February, 1863, he enlisted in the cause of the Sunny South, joining Capt. Brown’s company, of Green’s regiment and Marmaduke’s division. Subsequent to this, he was on Gen. Polignac’s escort, and still later was transferred to Waller’s Texas regiment. He was through the Banks campaign in Louisiana, and surrendered at Marshall, Texas. Returning to his Greene county farm, he has since paid his attention to farming and stock raising, and owns a place of two hundred acres of fine land. Mr. Schultz was married June 4, 1881, to Miss L.E. Payne, a native of this county, and a daughter of Jacob Payne, one of the early settlers of Greene. One child has been born of this union, a son, named Jacob P. Schultz. Mr. Schultz is one of the steady, substantial men of the county, and does well his part in life as a tiller of the soil.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PROF. EDWARD M. SHEPARD
Professor Shepard is a son of Samuel and Mary (Dennis) Shepard, and was born at Winsted, Conn., May 15, 1854. In 1871 and 1872 he followed civil engineering on the Chicago and Northwestern, and the Boston and New York railroads. He graduated from Williams College, Massachusetts, in the class of 1878, receiving the degree of A.M. He arranged the museum at Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia. In 1878, he was called to the chair of natural science at Waynesburg College, Pennsylvania, but resigned to accept a similar call from Drury College, at Springfield, Missouri. He was married June 28, 1881, to Miss Harriet E. Ohlen, of Madison, New York, a graduate of the Vassar College in class of 1874. She was lady principal of Drury College for three years. Prof. Shepard’s father died in 1872 at Norfolk, Connecticut. His mother is living here with him. They had three children, the professor being the oldest.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FRANK A. SHIPMAN
Mr. Shipman is the son of Jesse P. and Lydia (Huber) Shipman, and was born at Findley, Hancock county, Ohio, April 13, 1858. He came to Springfield in May, 1866, where he was educated in the public schools. He clerked one year in a queensware house, and then for ten years was clerk in the bookstore of A.R. Fearn. He became a partner in the house February 1, 1882, and the firm is now A.R. Fearn & Co. They have the largest book, stationery and wall paper store in Southwest Missouri, and do both a wholesale and retail business. Mr. Shipman is a member of Grace M.E. Church. Jesse Shipman, the father of our subject, was born at Bloomington, Pennsylvania, August 15, 1827. He first moved to Ohio, from there to Chillicothe, Mo., and in 1866 to Springfield, Mo., where he died September 24, 1876. His widow is still living in Springfield. They had three sons and one daughter.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DEWITT SHOCKLEY
This gentleman is the son of Benjamin and Lilly (Beal) Shockley, and was born in Giles county, Tennessee, August 9th, 1839. His parents came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1841, where Dewitt grew to manhood and was educated. When he was quite young he began farming, settling upon a farm near the old Shockley homestead. In August, 1862, he enlisted in company D, 8th Missouri cavalry, under Col. Geiger. He was at the battles Prairie Grove and Little Rock, and participated in many skirmishes. He was mustered out of service in November, 1865, and in the same year was married to Miss Clarissa Brown. She was born in Tennessee, May 7th, 1848. She was reared in Searcy county, Arkansas, and lived there until 1862, and then came to this county. They are blessed with a family of five children, three girls and two boys. Mr. Shockley owns a farm of two hundred and ten acres of good land, and is one of the substantial citizens of the county. He and his wife are members of the Christian church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. SHOCKLEY
This gentleman is the son of B. and Lillie (Beal) Shockley, and was born in Tennessee, August 9, 1831. In 1841 his parents moved to Greene county, Mo., and it was here that Francis grew to manhood and was educated. He learned the trade of carpenter, and in 1858 moved to Dade county, Missouri. He enlisted in the Home Guards, but after the battle of Wilson’s Creek he went to Illinois. He returned in 1862 and took charge of the government carpenter shop, receiving the same pay as captain, and so served until the close of the war. Capt. Shockley was married May 7, 1854, to Miss Fannie, daughter of Washington Armor, one of the early settlers of Southwest Missouri. Their union was blest with eight children, four of whom are now living. Captain Shockley is a large contractor and builder, having built many of the largest and best business houses in the city. He built the Christian church, of which he and his wife are members. His father was a native of Georgia, but moved to Tennessee in an early day. He died upon his farm near Springfield, Mo., in 1869.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN A. SHORT
Mr. Short is a son of Elias B. and Rebecca (McCullah) Short, and was born April 23, 1852, ten miles southwest of Springfield, Missouri. He remained at home upon the farm until he was eighteen years of age. He then came to Springfield, and was a clerk in the post-office for five years. He was appointed postal clerk, or route agent, upon the St. L. & S.F. R.R. upon the 18th of November, 1876, to run between St. Louis and Springfield. He was married December 28, 1875, to Miss Mary E., daughter of Rev. T.H. Hagerty, of the Methodist church. Their union has been blest with one son and one daughter. Mr. Short is a member of the Knights of Honor, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. His parents are yet living upon the farm they settled when they first came from Tennessee. They had a family of six sons and two daughters. John A. being the third child. He is one of the most reliable officials in the postal service.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FRANK M. SIBLEY
Mr. Sibley is the son of Moses and Mary C. (Cole) Sibley, and was born at Sutton, Worcester county, Mass., Nov. 5, 1850. He grew to manhood and was educated in his native town. In 1870 he went to Hannibal, Missouri, where he was employed in the motive power department of the Hannibal and St. Joe R.R., which position he held until 1873. He then went to St. Louis and was clerk in the same department of the St. Louis and San Francisco R.R. until 1876. Then he was transferred to Springfield, Missouri, where he held that position until 1882. Then Mr. Sibley went into the furniture and undertaking business with Mr. Lohmeyer, the firm being Lohmeyer & Sibley. They do a flourishing business at North Springfield. Mr. Sibley was married in 1877, to Miss Jennie M., daughter of Washington and Jennie C. Barnharst. Their union has been blest with two children, Frank C.B. and Nellie C. Mrs. Barnharts is postmistress at North Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PHILIP T. SIMMONS
Mr. Simmons, the present able prosecuting attorney of Greene county, was born in Davidson county, Tenn., January 15, 1848, and is the son of Dr. G.J. and Fannie (Taylor) Simmons. Dr. Simmons was a native of Virginia, and moved to Tennessee when a young man, where he remained till his removal to Logan county, Kentucky, in about 1854. He was once a physician of large practice, and though still living in Kentucky, he has retired from his profession. Philip’s mother died when he was about four years old, having borne a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters, the subject of this sketch being the youngest. He received his education chiefly in Logan county, Kentucky, though he did not complete till after he had been a soldier in the civil war. He enlisted in company A, 8th (afterwards 12th) regiment of Lyon’s brigade of Kentucky volunteers, and served till mustered out at Columbus, Miss., May 16, 1865. After his return home he attended school till 1868, then began the study of law in the office of Judge J.H. Bowden. He was admitted to the bar in November, 1869, by George C. Rogers, judge of the 4th judicial district of Kentucky. In January following, he came to Springfield, Mo., and taught school for six months at Fair Grove, in Greene county. In the fall of 1870, was admitted to the practice of law in Greene county, and licensed to practice in all courts of record in Missouri. He received the Democratic nomination for prosecuting attorney in 1882, and the following November was duly elected, receiving a majority of 486 votes over his Republican competitor. February 11, 1873, Mr. Simmons was married to Miss Mary Doling, daughter of James M. Doling, of Springfield. They have five children, all of them boys. Mr. Simmons is a Free Mason, and also a member of the A.O.U.W. His wife is a member of the Christian church of Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEONARD M. SIMS, M. D.
The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a native of Polk county, this State, born January 16, 1855, and a son of B. D. and Eliza A. Sims, the father being a native of North Carolina, and the mother of Virginia. They came to Missouri in 1832, and the year succeeding the birth of Dr. Leonard M., moved to this (Greene) county, where they remained till 1870. The family then removed to Benton county, Arkansas, where the doctor grew up and completed his general education, attending Pea Ridge high school three years and the State Industrial University for one year. During the years of 1877-8-9, he taught school and read medicine, his preceptor being Dr. Clark, of Bentonville, Arkansas. In 1880 he entered the Missouri medical college, at St. Louis, graduating with the degree of M. D. in 1882. He then located for the practice at Bois D’Arc, in November of same year, where he is building up a fine practice. Few young physicians enjoy the confidence of the people to a greater extent than Dr. Sims. He is a hard student, and keeps well “read up” in his profession. He was married September 10, 1882, to Miss Mattie Bond of Greene county. Both Dr. Sims and wife are members of the Methodist church.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

GEORGE W. SITTLER
Mr. Sittler is the son of Jacob and Sidney (Cummings) Sittler, and was born August 25th, 1847, in Shelby county, Illinois. He was educated in the common schools of his native county, and at the age of nineteen he entered into an apprenticeship under Dr. Geo. H. Hannaman to learn photographic work. He served two years, and then bought the gallery from Dr. Hannaman in 1868. In 1872 he took A.R. Launey into partnership with him, under the firm name of Sittler & Laueny. In August, 1881, he sold out to his partner and went to Fort Scott, Kansas, where he remained for a short time. In January, 1882, he came to Springfield and purchased the gallery of Capt. S.W. Johnson, where he now carries on the business. He is a member of the Photographic Association of America, attends all conventions of his fellow-artists and keeps posted in all things relating to the art. He has a large gallery, and employs three assistants, one of whom, Robt. M. Root, does all kinds of crayon and water-color work, and enlarges pictures. The gallery is located on St. Louis street, just east of the square. He does quite a wholesale business in picture frames, materials, chemicals, etc. He has one of the largest trades in the business in the Southwest. Mr. Sittler is a Knight of Honor, and a Royal Arch Mason.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

SHARFF, M. & BROS.
The subject of this sketch comes of a thrifty, industrious and fore-handed Hebrew family, well know in Bavaria where the father of the subject, Simon Scharff, was a broker of prominence, but is now a retired citizen of the town in which his operations were conducted so successfully---Landan.  He was  married to Barbra Gall, and in time a family of six children gathered about their board: Bertha, Edward, Nathan, Max, Theodore, Isadore, all of whom were born in the village of Essengen, three miles east from Landan, to which latter place the family moved in 1861.  The children were reared  in that place, which consisted of 12,000 inhabitants, and there they were given excellent educational advantages and fitted in other ways for the practical duties of life.  The father of these children is living at the age of 75 years, is in good circumstances and is highly regarded in the community in which he lives, for he is of a genial and kindly disposition, affable and cordial to all.  He is proud of having reared a respectable, intelligent and well to do family of children, three of whom are residents id America: Max, Theodore and Isadore  .  The first two mentioned are successful business men of Springfield, but are also connected with interests in St. Louis, and are wide awake, pushing and intelligent men of affairs  Isadore is a professor of music, and is the principal and proprietor of a Conservatory of Music in the city of New York, and takes a high rank in his profession .   Theodore Scharff, a member of the firm of M. Scharff & Bros., remained in his native land until1881, then came to America, and in company with his brother, Max, who had come to this country in 1872, he engaged in the general mercantile business at St Joseph, La., but three months later they were unfortunately burned out, after which, with characteristic energy, they took charge of four stores belonging to the large cotton firm of V. and A. Meyer &Co. of New Orleans  One of these stores was located on Cora plantation, one on Anandale plantation, one on Doreville plantation, and the fourth and last on Araby plantation.   For ten years the brothers managed those stores successfully, and during this time accumulated sufficient means to enable them to engage in a wholesale liquor business at Springfield, Mo., in 1891, but they soon discovered that there was not enough business to be done in Springfield to maintain a wholesale house, they converted their business into retail trade, principally, although they still do a small wholesale trade also.  They are connected with the large liquor firm of L. & A. Schraff, of St Louis, cousins of the subjects of this sketch.  M. Scharff of St Louis, is manager of the Cheltenham Mercantile Co. of which the brothers became proprietors six months since.  Like the majority of their countrymen the brother have prospered in business, and carry a large and select stock of imported and domestic wines and liquors of all kinds, for family and general use.  These gentlemen belong to that class of citizens who manifest a decided aptitude for business enterprise, and who rise in a few years from a position of poverty and obscurity to one of prominence, and possession of considerable wealth.  They have made many friends during their residence in Springfield, and are considered wide-awake and honorable men, anxious to serve their patrons in as acceptable manner, and keep a creditable and quiet house, which is patronized by the elite of the city.   Theodore Scharff is a member of the A. F. & A. M. ,and the I.O.O.F., and politically is a democrat. 
(Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893. Transcribed by Bud)

HUGH M. SIMCOX.  The intelligence and ability shown by Mr. Simcox, as a representative tiller of the soil, and the general interest he has taken in the advancement of measures for the good of Greene County, Mo.,  caused him long since to be classed as one of the leading citizens of this section.  All that he has axhieved or gained has come as the result of his own efforts, and he deserves much credit for the determined way in which he faced and overcame many difficulties.  His ancestors came from Ireland and his great grandfather settled in Washington County, Maryland, where they resided for several generations.  There William Simcox, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born June14, 1704, and from there he enlisted as a soldier in the War of 1812.  In1820 he was married to Jane Marshall of Venango County, Penn., who was born 14th of February, 1804.  Her father, Hugh Marshall, Who was a Scotchman and in Hugh M. Simcox is imbued many sterling qualities of the Scotch and Irish.  To William and Mrs. Simcox the following children were born: Ellen born November 6 1821; Nancy, born February 23,1826; Martha, born March 11, 1823; Mary born October 28,1824; William born March 14,1830; James, born February 29, 1832; Jane born June 26,1834; Philetus, born February 18, 1835; John L., born October 12, 1838; Hugh M., born may 22 1841; and Lester, born December 23, 1844.  Mr. Simcox was a substantial and wealthy farmer. And lived in Venango County from the time of his marriage until his death.  He was a old time landlord and kept an old fashioned tavern where accommodations were furnished to man and beast in the old fashioned style, and “mine host” and his inn became known for 199 miles around and were decidedly popular with the traveling public of that time.  The cattle drovers made it their stopping place on their way from Ohio with their great herds of cattle, and the early Western emigrants here rested on his journey.  Mr. Simcox was a Democrat in polities, and was all his life an honored and respected citizen.  He assisted his children a great deal  and at his death owned 300 acres of good land.  He had two sons in the Civil war; John, who served throughout the war, and Hugh M. the subject of this sketch.   Mr. Simcox died September 5, 1850, his wife , Jane dying , June 12,1860.  Hugh M. Simcox first saw the light in Venango County, Pennsylvania, mat 22, 1841. And there he received a common school education and learned the calling of a farmer when young.  At the age of twenty, on the 17th of July, 1861, he enlisted in  Company K, Sixth Regiment of Calvary of the United States Army, with which he served for three years, being honorably discharged at Cold Harbor, Va., July 17, 1864, with “excellent” written in the blank for charter on his discharge.  He was in the battles of Williamsburg, Va., May4-5, 1862; Slaterville, Va., May9, 1862; Mechanicsville, Va. May 23, 1862;Hanover Court House, Va. May 27, 1862; Black Creek, Va., June 29, 1862 Malvern Hill, Va., August 6, 1862; falls Church , Va., September 5, 1862; Sugar Loaf Mountain, September 13, 1862; Charleston, Va., October 7, 1862hillsboro, Va. October 27 1862; Philomont, November 1, 1862; Uniontown, November 2, 1862; Upperville, November 3, 1862;Barbour’s Cross Roads, November 5, 1862;Amosville, November 2 1862; Sulphur Springs, Nov. 15 1862; Fredericks, December 15, 1862; Stoneman’s Raid , April 1863; Beverly Ford, June 9, Middlebury, June 18, Upperville, June 21, Fairfield, Pa. July3, Williamsport, MD., July 7, Boonsboro, MD. July8, Antietam, Md. July 9, and Brandy Station, Va.. Oct 11, 1863.  Here the record of this patriotic and faithful soldier ceases for he has no record if the other many engagements in which he participated.  He was then under gen. Grant and was in the famous Wilderness campaign.  During his career as a votary of Mars , Mr. Simcox served under Gens. Stoneman, Pleasanton and under Gen. Sheridan from the time he took command of the cavalry until his term of service expired.  He was an Orderly on Gen. Sheridan’s staff for one year and saw that famous cavalryman almost every day.  Although he was in numerous engagements he was never wounded, but on numerous occasions men were mowed down around him.  He was always ready for active duty and did not receive a furlough or pass during the three years that he was in  the service of his country and was never ill enough to do to the hospital.  After his discharge he went to Kentucky, in 1864, as an oil prospector where he remained until 1866, the following year being spent as a farmer of rented land in Iowa.  He then came to Springfield, Mo., and soon after settled on 240 acres of land un East Center Township, which adjoined his present farm on the north.  During the fifteen years that he resided on this place he made many valuable improvements in the way of farm buildings, fences, etc, and then disposed of it to a good advantage and in 1890 purchased the farm of 160 acres on which he is now living.   By industry and thrift he has prospered and he now has an abundance of this world’s goods, in the accumulation of which his amiable and intelligent wife has lent no inconsiderable aid.  He has always been a hard worker, the life of the farmer has always been congenial to his taste, and he found it no hardship after the close of the war, to take up the peaceful pursuit  of agriculture.  He has always been a Democrat in politics and his wife , whom he married , October15, 1868, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Her maiden name was Sarah A. Dale and she was born in Clarion County. Pa., on her father’s farm, October 23. 1848, and has borne her husband one daughter, Ada L., who is the wife of Dr. Greenberry Dorrell. A successful physician of Republic, Mo.. Mrs. Simcox is a daughter of Solomon and Catherine (Zink) Sale, the former of whom is descended from Dutch ancestors who settled in Clarion, Pa. where they became  wealthy farmers.  Solomon Dale and his wife were the parents of ten children: Margaret E., Issiah K., Mary M., Sarah A., Edith, Harris K., Emma L., Katy L., Cora C., and Monroe W.  Mr.___removed to Greene County, Mo. in 1867 and there he was called from life, his widow, who still survives him, being of Welsh descent.  They were earnest members of the Methodist Church and Mr. Dale was highly honored by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance.
(Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893. Transcribed by Bud)

JOEL M. SKELTON (Deceased) –
This gentleman was the son of Noel and M. (McGee) Skelton, and was born in Franklin county, Georgia, March 1, 1822. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Joel grew to manhood in his native county, where he was married February 28, 1845, to Miss Martha E. A., daughter of Tavner and Elizabeth (Wades) Rucker. Their marriage was blest with eight children: Mary E., Sarepta E., Sarah A. C., deceased, George V., Annie M. J., William J. W. R., Martha H. A. and James M. T., all of whom are married. In 1857 Mr. Skelton moved, by wagon drawn by oxen, to Greene county, Missouri, and settled where his widow now resides. He was an inoffensive, quiet gentleman, a member of the Baptist church. He took no part in the civil war, but his sympathies were with the “sunny South,” where he had been born and reared. Upon the night of November 8, 1862, he was wantonly and cruelly murdered in his own yard by two men dressed in Federal uniform. They made him dance, and otherwise subjected him to indignities, and while his devoted wife had gone to get a Union neighbor to intercede for her husband, the fiends murdered him. The shock dethroned the reason of his beloved wife, and she yet lives under that great affliction.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

J.W. SMITH.

Mr. Smith was born in Polk county, Missouri, March 20th, 1851.  He is the son of J.R. and Kiziah (Crawford) Smith, both Kentuckians.  His father was one of the early settlers of Polk county, and is a prominent citizen.  J.W. Smith was educated in the common schools of the country, and when old enough learned the blacksmith and wagon-maker’s trade, and has followed that occupation ever since.  He came to Walnut Grove in the fall of 1879 and opened a shop, since when he has done a flourishing business.  He was appointed postmaster of Walnut Grove, in July, 1881.  He is an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and a citizen in whom all have confidence as a Christian and a gentleman.  He was married October 3d, 1869, to Miss Amanda E. Kelley, a daughter of Thomas J. Kelley, a prominent Baptist minister of Greene county.  She died December 25th, 1878, leaving two children.  Mr. Smith was married the second time, July 5th, 1880, to Miss Lucina, daughter of Robert McGill, Esq., of this county.  Their marriage has been blest with one child.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S.Gruver

JULIAN D. SMITH.
This gentleman is the son of William and Sarah (Julian) Smith, and was born in Laurel county, Kentucky, March 31, 1831.  His father was native of Kentucky, born in 1801, and died in Oregon in 1866.  His mother was a native of Tennessee and died in 1876.  They emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1838, and settled upon Grand Prairie, in Center township.  Julian D. received his education in the common schools of the county, and when he was twenty-two years of age took the “gold fever” and went to California.  He stopped one winter at Salt Lake City and then pushed on to the gold fields of California.  Not being very successful in the mines he returned to this county in 1855, and commenced farming, and with the exception of two trips to Texas has been a resident of this county ever since.  He was married September 18th, 1855, to Miss L.P. Landreth, daughter of Wm. S. Landreth, one of the old settlers of Greene.  They have a family of six children, four boys and two girls.  Mr. Smith was in the militia during the war but took no active part in the struggle.  He is a Greenbacker in politics, and one of the substantial farmers of his section.  He owns a fine farm of one hundred and fifty-five acres, one mile southeast of Walnut Grove.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

JAMES E. STRINGER.
Mr. Stringer was born in Putnam county, Indiana, September 18th, 1845.  His father, Col. Thos. M. Stringer, was a native of Kentucky, born in 1822, and is now a resident of Jasper county this State.  His mother was Miss Nancy Watkins, a native of North Carolina.  James E. was educated in the common schools of his native county, and at Thorntown, Boone county, Indiana where he attended college some fifteen months.  He studied law when he was about twenty years of age, but came West in 1866 and went into the real estate business at Fort Scott, Kansas.  He removed to Lawrence county, Missouri, in 1868, and followed the same business.  He came to Greene county in January, 1881, and has been one of the leading spirits of Walnut Grove, dealing largely in real estate.  He enlisted in 1862 in the Federal cavalry under Col. Wilson, and fought until his discharge in October, 1864.  He was with Gen. Thomas in the campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta and back to Nashville.  Mr. Stringer was married December 14th, 1862, to Miss Georgie Alexander, a native of Hart county, Kentucky.  Their union has been blest with three children, two girls and a boy.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

BENJAMIN SMITH
This gentleman is the oldest engineer on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, having run the first engine on that line. He was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, February 26, 1827. When he was sixteen years old he went into the machine shops of the Housatonic railroad in his native town, and commenced learning the trade of a machinist. Two years later, after firing for a short time on the same road, he took charge of an engine, which he ran at intervals for three years, then regularly, for six successive years. He then ran as engineer on the Rock Island railroad for two years, going thence to St. Louis, where he took charge of an engine on the Missouri Pacific till 1862. Going to Memphis, he ran on the Memphis and Charleston road nine months, for the government, after which he was transferred to Nashville, Tenn., and given charge of an engine of the hospital train, which he ran on various roads in the South till the war closed, visiting several battlefields, among which were Mission Ridge, and the battle between Nashville and Decatur. After the war he returned to Pacific City, Missouri, and took the engine he had formerly run, and has been in same employ ever since. Mr. Smith was married to Martha Tyman some nine years before the civil war, by whom he has had seven children. His home is in Pacific City, where he has lived for thirty years. He is a member of Pacific division, No. 83, B. of L.E., of which order he was a charter member. Besides this he is in the Locomotive Engineers’ Mutual Life Insurance Association, and is also a member of the ‘Frisco L.E.H. Association.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE B. SMITH
Is a native of Canada, born in Quebec, May 10, 1845. He came to the United States in 1864, and accepted a position on the Chicago and Northwestern railroad, where he stayed three years, then took a train on the Union Pacific railroad, which he ran until 1870, then resigned and took a train on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, where he is at present running a passenger train. On the 8th day of November, 1876, he married Miss Florence Britton, a native of New York. They have one child, Clarence Osman Smith. Mr. Smith is a member of Ozark division, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN T. SMITH
The subject of this sketch was born May 23rd, 1797, in Franklin county, Georgia, and is the son of John and Elizabeth (Morgan) Smith. He was educated at Willington college, South Carolina, from which institution he graduated. It was his fortune while attending college to have been many times examined by that prince of statesmen John C. Calhoun. He was a schoolmate of Gen. McDuffie, who afterward became the colleague of Calhoun in the Senate of the United States. Mr. Smith was a soldier of the war of 1812, serving about six months. Soon after that war closed his parents emigrated to that part of Mississippi territory, which subsequently became the State of Alabama, and located near Huntsville. In 1818, Mr. Smith was elected magistrate and served eight years. His father gave him a tract of land and seven negroes, and he farmed until 1832, by which time he had made fifty thousand dollars. In 1833 he moved to Nashville, Tennessee, and ran a large brewing establishment for three years, and then went into the wholesale grocery business, which he followed until 1841, and in it, also, he made about fifty thousand dollars. He then went to Virginia and bought sixty-five slaves, and took them to Henry county, Tennessee, where he carried on a mule farm of three thousand acres, until 1852. He then spent two years in different States buying up land warrants, and in 1855 came to Springfield, Missouri. He was married December 10th, 1816, to Elizabeth Shotwell, by whom he had seven children, four boys and three girls, of whom two girls are now living. His first wife died in 1852, and in July, 1867, he married Willea Dantyrell. He joined the Methodist church in Alabama, in 1815. In early times he was a member of the Whig and Know Nothing parties. His father came to the United States as a British soldier, and was twice wounded, and taken prisoner in Virginia. He was the first clerk of Madison county, Georgia, and served for twenty-seven years. He died in 1818, and his wife in 1816.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HON. JARED E. SMITH
This gentleman is the son of William P. and Christian (Patterson) Smith, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, October 8, 1826. He was educated in the common schools of his neighborhood and made the best of his advantages. When sixteen years of age he engaged as a driver, receiving for his service six dollars per month. In 1846 he was married to Miss Sarah Roberta Mack, and settled upon a small farm and began business for himself, occasionally working at the carpenter’s trade. In 1851 he, with his wife and two children, removed to Springfield, Mo. He engaged in farming the first year, and then for six years in house building and cabinet making. In 1853 he borrowed capital and built a planing mill, grist mill, foundry and machine shop, in which he used the first steam machinery in Springfield. When the war came up he helped organize a company of Home Guards, who were soon changed into U.S. volunteers, and participated in the battle of Wilson’s Creek, August 10, 1861. He was soon after made captain of company D, 72nd regiment, militia, and helped in the defense of Springfield, when it was attacked January 8, 1863, by General Marmaduke. In 1862 was elected to represent Greene county in the Legislature. In 1864, was elected upon the Republican State ticket as register of lands, and held that office four years. He was also county treasurer of Greene county for two years. In 1868 he and his son-in-law, John R. Furgerson, engaged in the drug business, and in 1873 the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Smith embarked in the crockery and queensware business. In 1876 he was again elected to the Legislature, in which capacity he served his constituents well and faithfully. He has been identified with the public-spirited citizens of the county in developing Southwest Missouri, and he is justly regarded as one of Greene’s most prominent citizens.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM N. SMITH
Mr. Smith is a son of P.R. Smith, and a grandson of Wm. B. Logan, and Gen. Nick R. Smith. He was born at Springfield, Mo., June 28, 1854. He was educated at Springfield, and for four years was bookkeeper for Waldo C. Booth, one of the largest hardware dealers of Springfield. Since then he has kept books for some of the leading mercantile firms of the city. He was married January 19, 1879, to Miss Seldie Dyer, a niece of Col. D.P. Dyer, of St. Louis, Mo. Mr. Smith’s father is and has been for many years county clerk of Newton county, Missouri.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES H. SMITH
This gentleman is the son of A.G. and Helen (Fitchett) Smith, and was born at Granville, Ohio, July 22nd, 1842, and was educated at Dennison University. In July, 1862, he enlisted in the 113th regiment, Ohio volunteers, U.S.A., as a private, and resigned as captain in 1865. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in January, 1867, where he engaged in business for two or three years, and then traveled for a St. Louis grocery house for nine years. He then returned to Springfield, where he has been engaged in the grocery business ever since. He is proprietor of the Spot Cash Grocery Store, upon South street, where he is doing a flourishing business. Mr. Smith married Miss Lizzie Wall, of Duquoin, Illinois. They have one child. He is a member of the I.O.O.F, A.O.U.W. and the K. of H. He and his wife are members of the Episcopal church. His father died in 1862, at Granville, Ohio, and his mother is living at Kansas City. They had a family of four sons, John H. being the third child.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HOLLET H. SNOW
Mr. Snow is the son of William C. and Amanda (Hollingsworth) Snow, and was born in Greene county, Mo., December 13, 1847. He grew to manhood upon the farm, and in 1868 was married to Miss Mary Lee, of this county. Their union was blest with two boys and two girls. In 1871 he came to Springfield, where he worked at Schmook’s mill until 1879. He was then appointed policeman and served on the force a year; then was a deputy constable under D.V. Savage for six months, and from then until the spring of 1882, he was janitor of the public school building. On the 4th of April, 1882, he was elected to the office of city marshal, upon the Republican ticket. His first wife dying, Mr. Snow was married the second time to Julia E. Buckner. They have by this marriage one girl and two boys. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, and his wife is a member of the Christian church. His parents came from Indiana in 1844, and his father died March 28, 1865. His mother is living in Springfield. They had three girls and seven boys, Hollet being the fifth child.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ALEXANDER SNYDER
This gentleman was born March 26th, 1826, in Davidson county, North Carolina, where he remained at home with his father until he was twenty-four years of age. He emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1845, when the county was sparsely settled, neighbors were far apart, game and wild honey abounded. He built a small cabin upon the farm where he now lives, and on the 6th of August, 1847, he was married to Miss Ruth Wommack. Their union has been blest with ten children, seven of whom are now living, Sarah E., George W., Mary J., Philip C., Ben F., Laura E. and Cora E. Mr. Snyder was a member of the enrolled Missouri militia during the war. His wife died June 18, 1882. He has been a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church for about thirty-five years, and is one of the leading men of Jackson township.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

VICTOR SOMMERS
Mr. Sommers is the son of F. and Sara (Marks) Sommers, and was born at Rheim Pfalc in 1840. In 1853 he came to the United States, landing at New Orleans, and from there went to Louisville, Kentucky, where he was for several years in a wholesale clothing house. In 1868 he came to Springfield, Missouri, where he has since been in the dry goods and clothing business. The style of the firm has never been changed since he came to the city. They first located upon Boonville street, where Scott & Good now have a saloon; they then moved to where C.H. Heer & Co., now are, and in 1871, moved to where they now are at present, upon the north side of the square. Mr. Sommers was married in 1869 at Louisville, Kentucky, to Miss Bertha Bakrow. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and of the B’nai B’rith, a Jewish society. Mr. Sommers’ father died in 1867, and his mother died in 1874 at Louisville. They had one son and six daughters. Their son Victor, being one of the leading merchants of Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ERNST SPEAKER
Ernst Speaker is the son of John and Sophia Speaker, and was born in the province of Mechlenburg, Germany, in September, 1847. He came to the United States when six or seven years of age, and located at Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he learned the tinner’s trade. In November, 1867, he came to Springfield, Missouri, where he followed his trade until September, 1880. Then, in partnership with G.W. Hackney, they opened out a large stock of stoves and tinware, where they do a flourishing business at 217 Boonville street. Hackney & Speaker is one of the solid firms in the city, and they deserve the success they have met.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES W. SPENCER
Mr. Spencer was born in Crawford county, Missouri, May 6th, 1847. At the age of seventeen he began braking upon the Ohio and Mississippi railroad, and followed it for ten months. February 4th, 1865, he enlisted in company D, 154th Illinois volunteer infantry, and was mustered out at Springfield, Ill., Sept. 22nd, 1865. He then returned home and learned the carpenter’s trade, and came upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railway May 23rd, 1871, and has ever since been engaged in the bridge and building department of that road. Mr. Spencer was married May 31, 1876, to Miss Julia J. Tutan, of Tallahassee, Florida. Their union has been blest with one child, Mabel Estelle, born April 2, 1877. Mr. Spencer is a member of Springfield Lodge, No. 218, I.O.O.F.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HENRY C. SPRAGUE
Mr. Sprague is a Bostonian, and was born at the “Hubb,” November 21, 1835. He is of English descent, his parents being Thomas and Elizabeth A. Sprague. At the age of thirteen, he enlisted as a private soldier in the U.S. service, and became drummer boy in the martial band. He was in the service two years, when he returned home and then attended school for some time. On quitting school he learned the trade of pattern-making and machine building at Mount Vernon, Ohio, continuing there four years. Going thence to Iowa City, he remained eighteen months, then went to Monroe, Wisconsin, where he remained a year. Shortly after this he went on the Illinois Central railroad, and after “firing” awhile, was given an engine which he ran some five years. In 1867, he made a trip to Jacksonville, Florida, where he put machinery in a mill. From Jacksonville he went to Alton, Illinois, and worked in the machine shops for four years, during which time he was captain of a fire company. On coming to North Springfield, Mr. Sprague began working with the bridge and building department of the ‘Frisco road, and is at this writing foreman of the same. He was married March 10, 1854, to Miss Charlotte B. Truesdell, a native of Canada, born March 12, 1835. Mr. and Mrs. Sprague have four children, named Ada A., Ida I., George Bliss and Anna C.R. Sprague. George B. was born June 3, 1858, while the family was living in Iowa City. He has been, like his father, connected with the ‘Frisco railroad for several years, and is at this time conductor of a train on that line. Henry C. Sprague is a member of the Gate of the Temple lodge, No. 422, A.F. and A.M., and also of the Springfield Royal Arch Chapter, No. 15.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

H.C. SPRINKLE
Mr. Sprinkle is the son of William D. and Leah Sprinkle, and was born in North Carolina, November 4, 1854. When he was about four years of age, his parents moved to Cedar county, Missouri, where they lived two years and then removed to Sullivan, Missouri. January 1, 1871, he began braking upon a train on the St. Louis & San Francisco railroad, and in 1874 was promoted to conductor, and has been running a passenger train for two years. Mr. Sprinkle was married June 13, 1877, to Miss Belle Robberson, of Dixon, Missouri. Their union is blest with two children, viz.: Curtis H., born March 10, 1878, and Walter, born November 17, 1882. Mr. Sprinkle is a member of St. Louis Division No. 3, Order of Railway Conductors, Sullivan lodge, No. 69, A.F. and A.M., and Rolla Chapter, No. 32.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DOUGLAS STEVENSON
Mr. Stevenson was born at Branford, Canada, January 20, 1855. He went to Buffalo, New York, when he was eleven years of age, where he remained five years. He then learned the tinner’s trade at Seaforth, Canada. He came to Missouri in the fall of 1872, and began firing upon an engine, and in the fall of 1877 he was promoted to engineer, and has been running an engine upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railway ever since. He was married in 1876, and has three children, viz.: Nellie, James and Douglas. Mr. Stevenson is a member of the Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 422, A.F. and A.M., and also of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN W. STEWART
This gentleman is the son of A.D. and Mary C. Stewart, and was born in Grant county, Kentucky, June 8th, 1859. In 1876 he commenced braking upon the St. L. and S.F. railway, and upon the 26th of February, 1880, he was promoted to conductor, and has run a train ever since. Mr. Stewart was married September 11th, 1881, to Miss Emma Knight, of North Springfield. Their union has been blest with one child, born January 31st, 1883. Mr. Stewart is a member of Ozark Division, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE STONES
Mr. Stones is the son of George and Sarah (Walbank) Stones, and was born at Blackburn, Lancastershire, England, May 28th, 1836. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed for seven years to learn the trade of a bricklayer. He worked at his trade in England until 1874 when he came to the United States and settled in Greene county, Missouri. Since coming here he has been engaged at his trade and in farming. He helped to build Drury College and some of the best residences in the county, being an excellent workman. Mr. Stones was married July 28th, 1861, to Miss Mary A., daughter of James and Mary (Arnold) Lawson, of his native county in England. Their union has been blest with eleven children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Richard, Fielding, Mary, James, Sarah E., George and Hannah.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JAMES A. STOUGHTON
Mr. Stoughton was born in Charleston, Vermont, May 25, 1837. When he was twenty years of age he went to Western Texas and engaged in the cattle business for eight years. He then came to Springfield in 1867, and has been living in North Springfield since 1870. He was married January 15, 1857, to Miss Lizzie Adams. This union has been blest with three children, viz.: Frank K., Minnie and Benjamin W. Mr. Stoughton is director of the bank, superintendent of the street railway company, of which he is one-third owner, and proprietor of the large brick stable of North Springfield. He is one of the most energetic, enterprising men of the city, and is at present in charge of the “’Frisco” stockyards.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEWIS SUTTER
Mr. Sutter is the son of John and Elizabeth (Tinsley) Sutter, and was born September 7th, 1842, in Clay county, Missouri. His father was born in Lorraine, France, but his parents soon after moved to Paris, where he took the position of butler for a nobleman, and traveled all over the world with his employer. He went to Clay county, Missouri, in 1837, and followed farming extensively until his death in October, 1860. His wife died when Lewis was but three years old. She was of the family of Tinsleys, of Kentucky, that produced so much tobacco. Lewis was educated in Clay county, and remained at home on the farm until his father’s death. In February, 1862, he enlisted in company F, Missouri State militia, at Plattsburg, Missouri, and was mustered out at Springfield, April 9th, 1865. He was married July 13th, 1865, in this city, to Miss D.E. Britte. Their union has been blest with two children, one son and one daughter. Soon after his marriage he went back to Clay county, where he lived until October, 1867, and then returned to Springfield, where he has been in the grocery business ever since. He is the senior member of the large grocery house of Sutter & Bryan on Boonville street.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES SQUIBB 
This gentleman is the son of Caleb and Susan (Johnson) Squibb, and was born in Washington county, Tennessee, December 15, 1813. His grandfather upon his father’s side came from Ireland, and upon his mother’s side from England. Mr. Squibb’s father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and both of his parents were natives of Tennessee. James grew to manhood in Washington and Greene county, Missouri, where he has since lived, and is one of the most substantial, honorable citizens of the county. He has been a member of the Methodist church since he was seventeen years of age, and his wife has also been a member of that church for over forty-five years. He has filled the office of justice of the peace for fourteen years, school director for thirty years, and township clerk for five years. He has always been a strong Union man, and lost heavily during the war, Price’s men stripping him of all but his land. He owns a fine farm of two hundred and thirty acres of land, and has given eight of his children one thousand dollars each. He was married February 14th, 1837, to Miss Rachel, daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Bacon) Shields, of Washington county, Tennessee. Their union has been blest with eleven children, nine sons and two daughters.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

ANDREW C. SWINNEY
Is a brother of R. H. Swinney (see sketch) and was born in Rockcastle county, Kentucky, February 19th, 1843. He was reared in East Tennessee, and received his education partly there and partly in his native State. He began learning the mercantile business as a clerk in 1866, and the succeeding year went into business for himself in partnership with a man by whose dishonesty Mr. Swinney lost heavily. In 1873, he moved to Greene county, engaging in farming, in which vocation he has by thrift and economy again placed himself in good circumstances. In 1882, he purchased a half interest in his younger brother’s drug store, but still continues to operate his farm. He was married November 14th, 1863, and has seven children, four of whom,--Benjamin A., Vinton, and a pair of infant twins, still survive at this writing. Mr. Swinney has been a member of the Christian church since he was fifteen years old, and is a worthy and exemplary citizen.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

R. H. SWINNEY
Was born in Rockcastle county, Kentucky, August 1, 1850. His parents Robert and Lydia Swinney, were both natives of Kentucky, and his paternal grandfather served as a soldier in the Revolution of 1886, dying at the age of one hundred years. R. H. Swinney was educated at Gilmore Seminary and the University of Kentucky, and subsequently engaged in teaching and farming. In 1877, he came to Ash Grove, in Greene county, and served as principal of the school there till 1880; then after teaching two terms at Bois D’Arc, he engaged in the drug business, and still successfully follows that vocation. At fourteen years old, he joined the Christian church, and soon became leader of the choir. At twenty-five he was made an elder in the church. March 19, 1874, he married Miss Susan, daughter of Thomas G. and Elizabeth Lawrence, with whom he had been intimate in early childhood, she being a native of same county, and her parents also being Kentuckians. They have had three children, two of whom still survive. Mr. Swinney is noble grand of the I. O. O. F. lodge at Bois D’Arc, and his wife, like himself, is a member of the Christian church.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist




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