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REV. AUGUSTUS H. TEVIS, A.M.M.D.
The scholarly subject of this sketch is a native of Rush county, Indiana, born on his father’s farm, May 13, 1841, and was the ninth child of a family of three sons and seven daughters.  His parents were Dr. Daniel H. and Phoebe (Scott) Tevis, the former having been a physician by profession, - a self-made man, who enjoyed a large and lucrative practice.  He (Dr. Daniel H.) was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, and was quite a scholar as a linguist, being a proficient in both Latin and Greek.  The elder Dr. Tevis died in 1858, and his wife in 1862, both of whom are buried in Rush county, Indiana.  After his father’s death, the management of the extensive farming operations, embracing several large farms, left by him, all devolved on Augustus H., then but seventeen years old.  In 1860 he entered Asbury University at Greencastle, Indiana, then under the control of Bishop Bowman.  Early in the beginning of the civil troubles, however, young Tevis left college to volunteer like a true patriot and aid in suppressing the rebellion.  He enlisted in September, 1861, and became second lieutenant of company H, thirty-seventh Indiana volunteers.  He was in active service for over three years, participating in many hard battles, fights and skirmishes, including Stone river, New Hope Church, Resacca, before Atlanta, and numerous others.  At Stone river, he was slightly wounded, and soon afterwards was promoted to a first lieutenancy.  He was mustered out in November, 1864, and soon re-entered the same institution he had left to join the army.  In the close of 1868 he was graduated therefrom, and in due course was honored with the degree of A.M.  On August 6, following, he married Sallie A. Webster, daughter of Dr. E. Webster, of Connersville, Indiana.  One child has been born of this union, a bright little girl named Lora Belle.  Dr. Tevis’ first charge as pastor was that of the M.E. Church at Liberty, Union county, Ind.  Following this he was stationed at Wooster and Taylorville, and was next elected superintendent of city schools at Madison, where he served one year.  His conference then sent him to Palestine, thence again to Peru, from which latter charge he was transferred by Bishop Peck, to Carson City, Nevada, where he remained two years, and was chaplain both of the Legislature and State prison.  It was while here that he went into print as an author, and wrote his “Jesuitism, the Bible, and the Schools, “ and also his “Beyond the Sierras,” published by Lippincott & Co., of Philadelphia.  He also corresponded for various newspapers and literary journals.  Santa Barbara, California, was his next charge, and from thence he was sent to San Diego.  The ill health of his family necessitated his return to Indiana in 1879, and he having already read medicine studiously, entered the Medical College at Indianapolis, from which he soon after graduated as M.D.  He was then sent by Bishop Wiley to Springfield Missouri, where he was pastor of Grace M.E. Church till the spring of 1883, when he retired therefrom.  Besides his more solid literary attainments, Dr. Tevis has paid considerable attention to art, and is quite proficient in music and painting, and has his home decorated with a number of paintings indicative of true art, produced by himself and wife.  He has had many of his sermons published which rank him high as a theologian.  At present, he is writing a book on infidelity considered in relation to its evil effects as contrasted with Christianity, which will be completed before this work is put in press.  Had it not been for the assassination of President Garfield, Dr. Tevis would doubtless have received the appointment to the Jerusalem consulate, for which he had received the recommendation of most public men at Washington.  Zealous in his ministerial work, fully imbued with a love for mankind and a hearty desire for their spiritual and mental elevation, - always a student and given to habits of indefatigable research, Dr. Tevis is one of those rare men who constitute a valuable acquisition to any community; while the high social qualities of himself and wife render their companionship in the keenest sense enjoyable, and win them hosts of friends wherever they are known.
Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883); transcribed by S. Gruver

LEWIS F. TATUM – Mr. Tatum is the son of Rev. William and Phoebe (Barham) Tatum. His father was a native of North Carolina, and died in Greene county, Mo., in 1856. His maternal grandfather, James Barham, was a native of Virginia, and a soldier of the Revolution. He, too, died in this county, aged 103 years. Lewis F. was born in Logan county, Ky. Nov. 4, 1812, where he grew up and resided till his removal to this county in 1836. He settled on the Leeper prairie fourteen miles from Springfield, there being no house at that time between his and that town. In 1842, he moved to the farm where he now resides, and has steadily followed the vocation of farming. Though he was three hundred dollars in debt when he first came to the county, he is now out of debt, and owns a good farm of 160 acres in Center township all made by his own industry and economy. At the outbreak of the war, he joined Capt. Campbell’s company of Confederate State Guards, and although fifty years of age, he served our his term of enlistment, and was in the battle of Dry Springs and Wilson’s Creek, and at the latter had his horse killed under him. Mr. Tatum was married December 22, 1855, to Miss Sarah Robinson, daughter of Littleberry Robinson, of Logan county, Kentucky. Her grandfather, like his, was also a Revolutionary soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Tatum had eight children, four of whom—Cornelia B., Phoebe C., Jemima E., and Henry T.—still survive. They had two sons in the Confederate army—Columbus, who was killed at Glasgow, and John who died in Arkansas. Mr. Tatum is remarkably active for a man of his age. He has been a Freemason for 16 years, and was a charter member of Bois D’Arc lodge. He also belongs to the Baptist church, and is a worthy and honorable citizen, respected by his neighbors and loved and honored by his family.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

COL. JAMES B. THOMAS
Col. Thomas was born in Fredrick county, Maryland, February 4, 1806. He came West in 1833, and to Missouri in 1867, and to Springfield in 1874.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WINFIELD SCOTT THOMPSON
This gentleman is the son of Samuel S. and Mary H. (Flanagan) Thompson, and was born at Penn’s Grove, Salem county, New Jersey. He was educated in his early youth in the common schools of his neighborhood, and at the age of eighteen he entered the Methodist Seminary at Pennington, N.J., where he remained three years, teaching during vacations to help defray his educational expenses. Immediately after leaving the school he began the study of law, which he prosecuted a year before entering a law school. In September, 1864, he entered the famous law school of Albany, N.Y., and graduated from that institution in May, 1865. Upon the suggestion of his friend, Hon. Henry T. Blow, of St. Louis, he settled in Marshfield, Webster county, Mo., in November, 1865, and entered upon the practice of his profession. In 1866 he was appointed county attorney, and held that responsible position until 1870. He was then appointed attorney and general agent of the Atlantic and Pacific railroad. In that capacity he settled the land question that had arisen between the “squatters” and the railroad company, to the entire satisfaction of both. In 1875 he assisted in the organization of the Webster County Bank, at Marshfield, and was elected cashier, being one of the stockholders. In May, 1879, he sold out his banking business at Marshfield, and engaged in the same business at Wellington, Kansas, for a year. In October, 1880, he came to Springfield and was right of way agent for the Gulf railroad east of this city. He is now town site agent for all towns upon that road east of Springfield. Mr. Thompson is a member of the I.O.O.F., and has been a representative to the Grand Lodge several times. He was married September 16, 1866, to Miss Susanah W., daughter of Lazarus and Elizabeth Nichols, of Wright county, formerly of Kentucky.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

W.M.A. TOWNSEND
Mr. Townsend is the son of William and Mary (Langston) Townsend, and was born September 5th, 1832, in Logan county, Kentucky. He is one of a family of twelve children, seven boys and five girls. His father emigrated to Missouri in the winter of 1832, and settled about three miles south of Springfield, where William grew up, attending the schools in his neighborhood. In 1849, he went to California, where he lived until 1853, when he came back to Missouri, and staid three years. In 1856, he and his father took a drove of cattle across the great plains, and reached California just six months after starting. He lived there until 1871, when he returned to Springfield, Mo., where he has built up an extensive trade in the boot and shoe line, both wholesale and retail. Mr. Townsend is sole proprietor and manager. He was married on the 16th of September, 1855, to Miss Nancy L., daughter of George Rainey. They have four children, two boys and two girls. Mr. Townsend is a Mason, and a prominent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. His mother died when he was quite young, and his father died in Cassville, Barry county, Mo., at about eighty years of age. He was one of Greene’s earliest pioneers.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN THIES
This gentleman is the son of B. and Susan Thies, and was born September 23, 1832, in Rhine Province, Prussia. His father was born in 1797, and his mother in 1800, and are now dead. John was educated in the common schools of Germany, and for a short time attended English schools. In 1854 he landed in New York City and lived there until 1858. He then traveled considerably, and late in the fall of that year went to New Orleans. During the war he was forced to join the rebel militia there, but in 1863 he went back to New York and stayed until 1866. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in April, 1871, and now owns a good farm, well improved. In his younger days he worked at the tailor’s trade for a period of twenty-five years. Mr. Thies was married March 30, 1859, to Annie M. Neubig, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, July 23, 1832. Mr. and Mrs. Thies are both members of the Catholic church, and he is one of the best citizens of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM A. THOMS
Few men of the day have been more uniformly successful, or had their business qualifications more generally acknowledged than Mr. William A. Thoms. He is a native of Ypsilanti, Michigan, born December 28th, 1848. At the age of nineteen, he began learning telegraphy, in the office of the Michigan Central railroad, in his native town, in which he spent one year. He then engaged in farming, but only continued about a year and a half, when he concluded that the theory of farming was good, but to make it a success required a great deal of hard labor, and that it was too slow a business for an ambitious young man. Going to Indianapolis, he accepted a position as operator in the office of the C.C.C. and I. railroad, and from then until 1872 was constantly employed in Indiana and Illinois, part of the time as train dispatcher. In February, 1872, he came to North Springfield and accepted the position of train dispatcher on the St. L. and S.F. railroad, and five years later was appointed station agent. On the 11th of November, 1879, he was promoted to the position of superintendent of the Kansas division, holding this until 1881, when he was transferred to the Missouri and Arkansas divisions, which he has charge of at this writing. On November 6th, 1877, Mr. Thoms was married to Miss Ella Evans, of Springfield. He is a member of St. John’s Commandery No. 20, Knights Templar, and also of the A.O.U.W. Still young, in perfect health and the vigor of manhood, having a large and varied experience in railroading, his future promises to be as useful as his past has been active and successful.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN T. THOMS
Mr. Thoms was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, February 1st, 1855. February 23rd, 1880, he commenced firing on an engine upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, and January 1st, 1883, was promoted to engineer, and is now running an engine. Mr. Thoms is a member of the Good Templars Lodge and Congregational church of North Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GEORGE W. TRIBBLE
Mr. Tribble is the son of Geo. W. and Patsey (Embry) Tribble, and was born in Christian county, Kentucky, July 11, 1842. His father was also a native of Kentucky, born January 1, 1804, and is still living in Lincoln county, that State. His mother died in Madison county, Ky. When George was about nine years of age his parents removed to Lincoln county, Ky., where he was educated in the best schools of that section. He began farming when quite young, and has ever since followed that occupation. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army, under Gen. Forrest, in company A, 2nd Kentucky cavalry. After the war he returned to Christian county, and farmed there until his removal to Lincoln county, in 1876. He lived there until October 15, 1879, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled where he now resides, near Springfield. He owns a farm of eighty acres of land, well improved. Mr. Tribble was married February 20, 1861, to Mary E. Beazley. She died February 27, 1862, and Mr. Tribble was married the second time to Elizabeth J. Herndon, upon the 26th of February, 1863. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: William A., born February 1, 1862; George H., born February 4, 1864; Mary E., born April 10, 1867. Mr. Tribble is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and they are all members of the Christian church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

OLIVER HOMER TRAVERS
This gentleman is the son of Jeremiah T. and Sarah R. (Navy) Travers, and was born April 3, 1846, in Baltimore, Maryland. He was educated in that city and in St. Mary’s county, Maryland. In the fall of 1866 he came to St. Louis, Missouri, where he clerked in a commission house for about eight months. In May, 1867, he came to Springfield, and accepted a clerkship in the drug store of Murphy & Clements, where he remained eighteen months. He then entered the law office of McAfee & Phelps, where he studied, and was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1869. In 1872-3 he was elected city attorney upon the Democratic ticket. In 1876 he was nominated for the Legislature, but declined to run. He was prosecuting attorney of Greene county from 1879 to 1881. In 1881 was city attorney of North Springfield. In 1880 he made the race for the Legislature, against Walter Langston, Republican, and was only beaten by forty-six votes. Mr. Travers was married November 20, 1869, to Miss Virginia M., daughter of Dr. Wm. Parrish, of this county. Their union was blest with three children, only one of whom, Fred P., is living. Mr. Travers has been for several years high priest of the Springfield Royal Arch Chapter, No. 15, Seignior Warden of Solomon Lodge, No. 271, and Prelate of St. John’s Commandery, No. 20, and a member of the I.O.O.F. As a lawyer he stands among the first of the Southwest, and as an orator he is surpassed by no man in Southern Missouri. His father is living in Maryland, and his mother died in 1859. They had five children, of whom Oliver is the oldest.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

S. SPENCER TRACY 
Mr. Tracy is the son of Seymour and Ellen (Kelland) Tracy, and was born in Yates county, New York, July 25, 1844. His father was born in 1804, and from 1839 to 1879 did an extensive milling and grain business at Penn Yan, New York, with a mill of four hundred barrels capacity per day. Spencer grew to manhood and was educated in his native county. He began learning the machinist’s trade at the age of sixteen, and in 1862 he went to Springfield, Massachusetts, and worked in the United States armory. In 1864, he took a course in Burman’s commercial college, graduating in 1865. He was then appointed government inspector, to inspect cavalry equipments at Newark, New Jersey, which position he held until the war closed. In 1866 he went to Kansas City, Missouri, and that fall went to Galva, Illinois, where he clerked in a store for two years and then went to Van Buren, Arkansas, staying there four years, and in 1873, he moved to Greene county, Missouri, where he has since resided. He owns a farm of two hundred acres, and is one of the rising young farmers of the county. Mr. Tracy was married November 3, 1873, to Miss Jennie, daughter of Ellis C. and Parthena (Bryant) Powell, of this county. By their marriage they have five children, viz.: Maud, Ellen, Seymour, Clara and Freddie. Mr. Tracy has been a member of the A. F. and A. M. society since he was twenty-one years of age.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

SETH TUTTLE
Mr. Tuttle is the son of Horatio and Caroline (Horton) Tuttle, and was born in Seneca county, Ohio, February 4, 1836. Seth was educated in his native county and when young learned the wagon-maker’s trade. In 1851, he went to Barry county, Michigan, and there engaged in contracting, stone, brick, and carpenter work. He had a sub-contract upon the State university building, at Fayetteville, Arkansas. In 1877 he located at Springfield, Missouri, and became the leading contractor and builder in Greene county. Among some of the leading houses he has had contracts upon are Rainey’s building, Metropolitan Hotel, machine shop, and many of the best buildings in both old and new town. Mr. Tuttle moved out upon his farm in 1877, two miles from the city, which contains about five hundred and fifty acres, all in cultivation and well improved. He was appointed county superintendent of the poor farm in April, 1879, which position he has filled to the satisfaction of the people. He retired in April, 1883 to his farm. He was married October, 1856, to Nancy M. Frank, a native of Kentucky, born in 1834. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Alice, Ellen, Minnie and Charles. Mr. Tuttle is a member of the A.O.U.W., and he and his wife are members of the Christian church.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GRANVILLE W. TURNER
This gentleman was born in Edina, Knox county, Missouri, January 3, 1844. He is the son of Granville D. and Maria Turner. In 1861 he enlisted in the Federal army and served about nine months. He next engaged in bridge building on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, whose western terminus was at that time at Rolla. He has been a resident of North Springfield for three years. He is now master of bridge builders, and fills the position with credit to himself and safety to the road. He was married on June 30, 1880, in South St. Louis, to Miss Melissa Trower. This union has been blest with one child, viz.: Walter, born September 9, 1881.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN TURNER
John Turner, Esq. – The subject of this sketch is the son of John and Mary (Williams) Turner, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, April 2, 1809. His parents were natives of North Carolina, but emigrated to Tennessee in 1806, where they lived for about six years, and then removed to Kentucky in 1812, and settled in Logan county, where John Turner, sr., died. His widow survived her husband thirteen years, and died in 1825. They were buried in the Turner family burying-ground in Logan county, near the Tennessee line. They had twelve children, all of whom lived to be grown, save one little girl, who died in infancy. Their names were, Elizabeth, Archibald, Charles, Thomas, Sara, John, William, James, Henry, Joseph and Elijah. John, this subject, grew to manhood in Kentucky upon the old homestead, working upon the farm until he was sixteen years of age, when, upon his mother’s death, he went to Tennessee and lived with his relatives until his marriage. He was married November 6, 1828, to Miss Nancy Price, of Robinson county, Tennessee. By this union they had three children, viz.: Mary Jane, Nancy Fisher, and James William. His first wife died November 13, 1855, and is buried in the county of her birth. His eldest daughter married Samuel A. Doss, and the younger married J. C. Howard, of their native State. Mr. Turner, with his sons-in-law and his daughters, moved to Missouri in March, 1856, and settled in Greene count. He bought a farm three mile east of Ash Grove, from Silas Grantham in 1857, which he still owns. He was married the second time to Mrs. Nancy B. Seward, of Lawrence county, Missouri, on the 7th of December, 1856. This union was without issue. His last wife died November 2, 1881. He was elected a justice of the peace in 1857, and served four years. At the breaking out of the war, Squire Turner being above the regulation age for soldiers, took his wife, together with his and his sons’-in-law Negroes to Texas, so as to be practically out of the war. He lived in Collin county, Texas, for four years, and returned home in October, 1865. He lived upon his farm until 1877, when he rented it out, and moved into Ash Grove, where he still lives. He is now in his seventy-fourth year, hale and hearty, and has promise of years yet. He reared an orphan girl, Mary E. Casteel, who still lives with him. He began life poor, but, by perseverance and economy, he has amassed a handsome competence. He is a member of the Baptist church, and is respected by all as an upright Christian gentleman.
Green County, Mssouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist



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