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R.S. WADDELL
Mr. Waddell is the son of Hon. John S. Waddell, and was born at Springfield, Missouri, Nov. 6, 1850. He was educated at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and returned to Springfield, where for two years he was engaged in mercantile pursuits as a clerk. In 1874 he went into the wholesale house of Keet, Rountree & Co., and has been with them ever since. He was married Dec. 3, 1874, to Miss L.D. Shipman, of this city. They have two girls and one boy. Mr. Waddell is a member of the A.O.U.W., and he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. He has been quite successful in business and is one of the substantial young men of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

THOMAS W. WADE
Mr. Wade is the son of Rev. James and Nancy (Herron) Wade, and was born in Franklin county, Georgia, November 12, 1847. His father was a native of Virginia, and mother of Georgia. His father was a local Methodist preacher for over fifty years, a man of sterling integrity and one beloved by all who knew him. He moved with his family to Greene county, Missouri, in 1850, where he lived until 1868, and then went to Arkansas and died at the age of eighty years of age in 1881. Thomas W. grew to manhood here in Green county, where he has since resided, except in 1869 and 1870, when he lived in Arkansas. During the war he was in the employ of the government for fourteen months. Mr. Wade is an enterprising farmer, and owns a good, improved farm. He was married September 15, 1860, to Miss Sarepta E., daughter of Joel M. and Martha E. (Rucker) Skelton, of Greene county. Their union was blest with eight children, Marth E., Nancy J., Mary M., Eda S., Laura E., Jula A., Ira C. and Charles W. Mrs. Skelton’s father was killed November 8, 1862, by a party of men in blue uniform who hated him for his Southern principles.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

HON. WILLIAM H. WADE 
This gentleman is the son of Isaac S. and Eleanor (Lamb) Wade, and was born in Clarke county, Ohio, November 3, 1835. His father was a native of Virginia, and was for thirty years a justice of the peace. His mother was born in Ohio, and her father was a captain in the war of 1812. William H. grew to manhood in his native county, where he was educated, finishing his education at Antioch college. He followed farming and teaching until the civil war began, and went out at the first call of troops as 1st lieutenant of a company in the 16th Ohio regiment. He was mustered out a lieut. colonel in April, 1866, having served five years and nine days. He was at the battles of Corinth, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and all the battles in the department of the Cumberland. On May, 1866, he moved to Saline county, Missouri, where he lived until 1874. He then came to Greene county, and in 1880 he was elected to the Legislature, and was re-elected in 1882. He was one of the ablest members of that body. Mr. Wade was married in 1867 to Miss Mary, daughter of William and Lydia (Price) Knott, of Clark county, Ohio. Their union has been blest with six children, four of whom are living.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JUDGE RALPH WALKER
Judge Walker is the son of Ralph and Ann (Bigley) Walker, and was born in Cloncanon House, county of Galway, Ireland, November 27th, 1831. He was educated at Ranella College Athlone, in the central portion of Ireland, and subsequently in that historic city Londonderry, where his family name became associated with the memorable defense of that place under the leadership of Governor George Walker in repelling the attacks of the forces by King James. At the age of eighteen he came to America, landing at Philadelphia in 1851, and in that year he went to St. Louis and accepted a position under his brother John, who was the agent of the Adams Express Company at that city. He continued in that position until 1854, when he accepted the first clerkship on the steamer Badger State, plying between St. Louis and St. Paul; then on the steamer Thomas Swann, from Louisville to New Orleans, and afterwards on the Edward Walsh and Michigan, between St. Louis and New Orleans. From 1858 to 1862 he was general freight and passenger agent of the Wabash railroad in St. Louis. In the latter year he made a trip to Liverpool, England, taking over the first cargo of petroleum oil that ever crossed the Atlantic ocean. In 1865 he returned to St. Louis, and in 1866 he came to Greene county and engaged in the mercantile business at Ash Grove; organized and laid out that town. In 1870 he was elected county judge by those who favored internal improvements regardless of party fealty. He served six years. In 1876 he assisted in the reorganization of the Kansas City and Memphis railroad, in which he became a director, and since the sale of that road to the Fort Scott and Gulf company he has laid out and organized the towns of Everton, Seymour, Cabool and West Memphis. He is also proprietor of the Ash Grove mines. In 1857 he was married in the city of Dublin, by the Bishop of Cork, to Frances J., daughter of Major Henry Wilson, of Her Majesty’s 32nd regiment of foot. They have had eight children, seven boys and one girl, two of whom died in infancy. His eldest son, Harry W., is at present connected with the Globe-Democrat, of St. Louis. Judge Walker is a Mason and Senior Warden of Christ’s Episcopal Church, Springfield.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM HENRY WARD
Mr. Ward is the son of William T. and Louisa J. Ward, and was born October 10, 1842, in Greene county, Mo., two miles west of Springfield. He grew to manhood upon the farm, and when the war broke out he joined the militia for a year, and then enlisted in the 2nd Missouri light artillery, battery I, as first sergeant. He was at the battles of Springfield and Nashville. At Springfield he was wounded in the left hand. He was mustered out August 10, 1865, at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. He then came home and learned the trade of stone mason, and worked at it ten years, and during the time laid the foundation for some of the principal business houses in the city of Springfield. In 1879 he moved to Christian county and ran a saw mill, and in January, 1883, he returned to Springfield, and now has charge of the large saw mill of R.A. Campbell. His first vote was cast for Lincoln in 1864, on the steamer J.D. Berry. He was married September 22, 1870, to Miss Lavinia, daughter of Henry Clay, of Springfield. Their union has been blest with three sons and one daughter. His father was born January 10, 1814, in Tazewell county, Tenn., and came to Greene county, Mo., in 1837, settling upon the place where Col. J.H. Price now lives. He then moved six miles south of Springfield, where he has lived forty-five years. His first wife was Miss Priscilla Price, a sister of Judge Wm. C. Price. She dying, he married Louisa J. Epperson, by whom he had seven children, four sons and three daughters. His second wife died March 31, 1854. Mr. Ward, Sr., was a Know Nothing before the war, and voted for Lincoln in 1864. He was one of the pioneers of the county, and one of Greene’s best citizens.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOSEPH WARD
Mr. Ward is the son of Jacob and Annie (Smith) Ward, and was born in Pennsylvania, July 8th, 1839. When Joseph was quite a small boy his parents moved to Gallia county, Ohio, where he received his education and grew to manhood. In 1861 he enlisted in company M, 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, and served four years and twenty-three days. He was mustered out at Richmond, Virginia, in the fall of 1865. He served for some time as a dispatch courier for Gen. McClellan and other noted generals. He came to Springfield, Mo., in November, 1865, and freighted goods from Rolla to Springfield. In July, 1866, he was appointed as one of the police force, and has served about five years in all. He was in the grocery business for a year, but is now on the force, and discharges his duty without fear or favor. He was married in 1867, to Miss Martha J. Beal, of this city. Their married life has been blest with two children, George S. (deceased) and Fred. He and his wife are members of the Christian church. Mr. Ward’s father died in Pennsylvania, when he, Joseph, was eleven years old, and his mother died in Springfield, in 1879. They had seven children, four of whom are now living.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

H.S. WARNER
Mr. Warner is a native of Ohio, and has been railroading about six years, and on the Frisco road for four years. He is at present car accountant.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DR. LORENZO T. WATSON
Dr. Watson is the son of Barnett and Jane (Holloway) Watson, and was born September 17th, 1833, in Monroe county, Tennessee. He is the second child of a family of twelve children. He was educated in his native county at Hiwassee College, attending five years. In 1851-52 and ’53, he taught school in Georgia, Alabama and North Carolina. He left Tennessee upon the 10th day of October, 1853, and reached Greene county, Missouri, Nov. 20th, on foot, having walked the entire distance. He taught school in Cass and Robberson townships for two years. He then studied medicine in the office of Dr. Clinton, of Ash Grove, for one year. In the fall of 1856 he went to McDowell’s College, St. Louis, and took one course of lectures. He then went to Hartsville, Wright county, Mo., and practiced medicine until the fall of 1858, when he returned to the same medical college and graduated in March, 1859. He then returned to Hartsville and practiced his profession until the war broke out, when he was appointed assistant surgeon of the 24th Missouri volunteers, Union army. He was afterward surgeon of the M.S.M. He was in the service about three years, and then came to Springfield and engaged in the mercantile business. He remained in business in the city about three years, and then moved out to his farm in Cass township, where he lived until 1881, when he came back and moved into the house where he now lives, on South street, said to be one of the first brick houses built in the city. Dr. Watson was married in August, 1865, to Miss Josephine Massey. They were blest with one child, Eddie. The doctor’s parents came to Missouri in 1851, and settled in Cass township. His father died in 1861, and his mother in 1882, at the age of sixty-nine.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

GRANVILLE H. WATTS
This gentleman is the son of Joseph and Patsey Watts, and was born in Halifax county, Virginia, July 6th, 1818. His parents were natives of Virginia, and his father was a soldier in the war of 1812. He grew to manhood in his native county upon the farm, and at the age of twenty-five he learned the saddler’s trade, which he has followed in connection with farming until the present. In 1857 he went to Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he carried on the saddlery business at Crab Orchard until 1879. He then came to this county, settling at Ash Grove, but in 1880 removed to Greenfield, and in 1881 came back to Greene and located permanently at Bois D’Arc, where he and his nephew carried on the saddle and harness business very successfully. Mr. Watts has reared two of his nephews, though never married. He has been a consistent member of the Methodist church for forty years, and is regarded by all as an upright, Christian gentleman.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

HENRY WATTS
Henry Watts is the son of Milton and Lucinda (Brown) Watts, who were natives of Virginia, and his grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. Henry was born in Scott county, Virginia, March 7th, 1845, and when twelve years of age he went with his uncle, Granville H. Watts, to Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he was reared, working on the farm and at the saddler’s trade with his uncle. He lived in that county until 1879, when he came to Ash Grove, Greene county, Missouri, where he engaged in the harness and saddlery business. In 1880 he went to Greenfield, and in 1881 located at Bois D’Arc, where they are now doing a flourishing business. He also owns one hundred and twenty acres of land, the result of his industry and energy. Mr. Watts is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is one of the most substantial citizens of Bois D’Arc.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

EDWARD L. WEAVER
Mr. Weaver was born in Greene county, Missouri, February 21st, 1837. His father was Joseph Weaver, and his mother’s maiden name was May. They were natives of Georgia, and came to Greene county, Mo., in March, 1830. Edward was educated in the common schools of this county, and when old enough engaged in mercantile business. He was for some time with Shepard & Kimbrough, and then Weaver & Wood, and afterwards as Weaver, Wood & Co. He has been identified with the business interests of Springfield for a period of about twenty-five years. In February, 1880, he retired from mercantile business and removed to his place just upon the outskirts of the city, where he has one hundred and six acres. At present he is engaged in buying and selling stock. Mr. Weaver was married February 21st, 1861, to Miss Eliza E. Smith, who was born in Springfield, Mo., July 30th, 1840. She was the daughter of Gen. N.R. and Harriet (Goodwyn) Smith. They were natives of Virginia. Gen. Smith died in April, 1858. He was one of the most prominent property owners in the city. Mr. and Mrs. Weaver have been blest with three children, two of whom are now living, viz.: Eddie S., born June 13th, 1867, and Clara V., born May 5th, 1871. Mr. Weaver is a member of the Christian church, and one of the best citizens of the county.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ALBERT T. WEIR
Mr. Weir is a native of St. Clair county, Missouri, born, December 29, 1848. He was educated in the common schools, remaining in the county of his birth till the civil war. His father was Samuel and his mother Lettie (Compton) Weir, the latter having died in 1862. Early in the war, Mr. Weir was burned out by a marauding party from Kansas, and in the fall of 1861, the youthful Albert, then but thirteen years old, enlisted in the Confederate service and fought till the surrender at Shreveport, in June, 1865, having participated in many hotly contested battles. He was on Shelby’s raid through Missouri, and was three weeks in the saddle day and night. At the close of the war, Mr. Weir spent eight months in Tennessee, and returned thence to Callaway county, Missouri. In 1869, he came to Greene county, where he engaged in blacksmithing for five years. He then purchased a farm in Boone township and has ever since followed the vocation of a farmer. He now owns two good farms, one containing 160 acres, and the other 100 acres. Mr. Weir was married December 16, 1869, to Miss Laura J., daughter of ex-Senator Frank T. Frazier, of Greene county. They have a family of three girls and two boys. Mr. Weir is at present a popular salesman in the dry goods house of Wilkerson & McCray, though he resides just north of Ash Grove. He is a Freemason of good standing, and belongs to lodge number 436, A. F. & A. M., at Walnut Grove.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JOHN R. WENTWORTH
The subject of this sketch was born August 10, 1847, in Dover, New Hampshire. He received a good practical education in his native town. When he was sixteen he went to Boston, Massachusetts, and engaged as clerk in the large shipping and commission house of Pierce & Bacon, where he worked until 1868, then came to Missouri and joined the civil engineer corps that located the present St. L. & S.F. railway. When the road was completed Marshfield he was appointed freight and ticket agent at that place where he remained until 1873, then was transferred to the office at North Springfield. One the first day of June, 1881, he was promoted to superintendent of the Kansas division of the St. L. & S.F. railway, which position he holds at present. On the 16th day of October, 1870, he married Miss Ida L. Straw, daughter of Col. J.W. & Lucy Straw, of Marshfield. They have one child, Maud E., born May 27, 1873. He is a member of Star lodge, No. 20, K. of P., also belongs to Wentworth lodge, No. 113, A.O.U.W.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

H. H. WEST
Mr. West was born in Grainger county, Tennessee, Feb. 21, 1839. He is the son of Edward and Elizabeth (Gilmore) West. His parents emigrated to Missouri, when he was in his first year, and settled in Greene county. He was educated in the common schools of this county, and was engaged in farming until the fall of 1862, when he enlisted in the Confederate army, and remained in the service until the surrender in 1865. He was in the engagement against Steele on the Saline river, and in many skirmishes, but escaped without a scratch. When the war closed, Mr. West went to Cooper county, this State, and remained three years. He returned to Greene in 1871, and has, by integrity, economy and perseverance accumulated a fine property. He owns one hundred and ninety acres of land three miles southeast of Ash Grove. He was married in October, 1872, to Miss Martha Hudgens, daughter of Wm. Hudgens, of Greene county. She died August 16th of the following year. Their union was blest with one child, Willie E. Mr. West was married the second time to Miss Laura, daughter of John Van Horn, of Jefferson county, Ohio, October 14th, 1880. She died August 12, 1881. Mr. West is a member of the Baptist church at Sac river.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JAMES T. WEST
 Mr. West is the son of Edward and Elizabeth (Gilmore) West, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, March 7th, 1844. His parents were natives of Tennessee, and were among the earliest settlers of Center township, in Greene county. James grew to manhood here, where he was educated. In 1862, when he was but eighteen years of age, he enlisted in company H, 3d Missouri cavalry, C. S. A., and served until the close of the war. He was under Gen. Marmaduke for over two years. He was in the battles of Little Rock and Cape Girardeau, and in Price’s raid. He was wounded at Jenkin’s Ferry, Ark., in 1864, and surrendered at Shreveport, La., in 1865. He then went to Pettis county where he lived until 1868, when he returned to Greene, and has since been engaged in farming. He owns one hundred and ninety acres of good land, and is one of Greene’s most respected and useful citizens. He belongs to the I. O. O. F., and is a trustee in the Baptist church. He was married Sept. 1st, 1870, to Miss Margaret E., daughter of Andrew and Susan (Redferan) Leeper of this county. Their union has been blest with four children, three of whom are now living, viz.: Albert E., Hugh G. and Stella C.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

EDWARD WEST

This gentleman is the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Thompson) West, and was born in Grainger county, Tenn., Nov. 18, 1807. His parents were natives of Virginia, and his father was a captain of a company raised for the war of 1812, but was not called into active service. Edward West grew to manhood in his native county, where he lived until 1839, when he moved to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon the place where he now resides. He was married March 10th, 1832, to Elizabeth, daughter of Hugh and Sarah (Gallion) Gilmore, of Grainger county, Tenn. She died in 1873, and Mr. West was married the second time to Mrs. Nancy Nelherton, nee Morris, of Lawrence county, Mo., upon the 18th of February, 1879. He reared a family of five sons and four daughters. Mr. West came to Greene county when game was abundant and neighbors lived far apart. He has seen many changes come over the face of the country, and to the people, and went through all the trials of pioneer life. He has been a consistent member of the Baptist church for over fifty years. He has always given liberally to the church, and his hand is ever ready to assist any deserving enterprise. He owned a farm of over six hundred acres of land, but has given it all, except eighty acres, to his children. Mr. West is yet active for a man of his age, and reads without spectacles.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

JACOB WHITE
Mr. White was born in Putnam county, Indiana, January 24, 1836, being a son of Edwin White, a native of North Carolina, who died, however, in Greene county. When Jake was about nine years old, his parents moved to Iowa, where the subject of this sketch was educated. On leaving school, Mr. White engaged in farming, which vocation he followed in Iowa till he came to Green in 1868, and settled in Boone township. In 1873 he purchased the place where he resides at this writing, four miles southeast of Ash Grove. His farm is a well cultivated tract of land. November, 1878, he married Miss Nancy J. Sparks, who was born February 24, 1837. They have one son and one daughter. Mr. White’s grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in Greene county, January 21, 1882. Politically Mr. White is a Democrat, and always votes the straight ticket of the party to which he belongs.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

WILLIAM WHITE (deceased)
Mr. White was born in Giles county, Tennessee, October 18th, 1816. He grew to manhood in his native State, and followed farming as an avocation all his life. He moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1853. Mr. White was married January 23rd, 1839, to Margaret Fry, also a native of Giles county, Tennessee. Mr. White was for many years a member of the Christian church, and one of the first to organize a class in his neighborhood. He died January 23rd, 1858, leaving five children, viz.: J. Frank, Margaret J., now the wife of J.E. Phelps; Mary C., now the wife of F.W. Norman; J.T. and Sallie M., now Mrs. E.M. Campbell.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

 JAMES M. WILHOIT
Mr. Wilhoit is the son of Andrew and Jane (Gentry) Wilhoit, and was born in Clay county, Missouri, January 12th, 1834. He was educated in Clay, and at High School in Andrew county, Mo. He lived upon the farm until he was twenty-two years of age, and then taught school in Clay county for about five years. He learned the trade of carriage and wagon-make from his father. July 2nd, 1863, he enlisted in company C, 6th Missouri S.M. cavalry, but saw no active service. He was married November 23rd, 1865, to Miss Nannie, daughter of Z.M. Rountree, Esq. They have had seven children, five boys and two girls. In the spring of 1870, he and F.J. Underwood organized the Springfield Wagon Company. In 1874, he was elected on the temperance ticket as marshal of Springfield, but has followed his trade most of the time since coming to Greene county. He took a contract to furnish meat to the Gulf railroad in April, 1882. Mr. Wilhoit has been a Mason for twenty-five years, and is a member of the A.O.U.W. He and his wife are members of the M.E. Church South. His father died in 1868, and his mother died in 1874. They had a family of seven children.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

J.N. WILLIAMS
Mr. Williams is the son of John R. Williams, who came to this county about 1833, and was born here in October, 1840. He lived in Dade county, Missouri, from 1852 to 1856, and then removed to Barry county. He returned to Greene county in 1860, and in 1861 enlisted in the 8th Missouri volunteers, U.S.A., under Col. W.F. Geiger, and served about one year. He was a non-commissioned officer of company K. He was disabled and discharged. Since coming to Springfield, he has been actively engaged in business, and for the last twelve years has been in the produce business, most of the time with J.M. Garrett, and still remains at the old stand with A. Koenigsbruck. Mr. Williams was married March 19, 1865, to Miss Matilda P., daughter of Junius M. Rountree, one of the most prominent citizens of this county. Their union is blest with five children, three boys and two girls.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN T. WILLIAMS
Mr. Williams was born in Marion, Ohio, March 25, 1845. At sixteen years old he was appointed ticket and freight agent on the Missouri Pacific R.R. at Allenton, Mo., and has been in the employ of same road ever since, the St. L. & S.F. R.R. being then under same management as Mo. Pacific. He remained at Allenton two years, when he was transferred to the general freight office at St. Louis. In 1876 he came to North Springfield and his present engagement is that of book-keeper for the bridge-building and fuel departments of the road. He is also city clerk of North Springfield, and has held that position ever since the city received its charter. November 5, 1866, he married Miss Elomise Desmoulin of St. Louis. They have three living children – Maud B., Walter J. and an unnamed infant.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM J. WILLIAMS, M.D.
Dr. Williams is the son of William and Mary (Hicks) Williams, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, May 11th, 1849. William was brought by his parents to Missouri, when he was about one year old. They settled in Webster county, where he grew to manhood and received his elementary education. When he was about twenty-one years of age he began reading medicine under the preceptorship of his brother, Dr. J.H. Williams, who is the present representative of Webster county in the Legislature. William began the practice while a student, in 1875, and in 1876-7-8 attended lectures at Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, graduating in March, 1878, with degree of M.D. He then resumed practice in Webster county, but in June, 1881, he moved to Strafford, Greene county, where he began the practice, and also engaged in the drug and grocery business. In the spring of 1882 B.W. Dillard bought one-half interest in the store, and so continued till 1883. Dr. Williams was married October 31st, 1879, to Miss Mary, daughter of John Barnard, of Webster county. Their union has been blest with one child, Oran, born August 21st, 1880. The doctor is a member of Strafford Lodge, No. 497, A.F. and A.M. He has built up a good practice since coming to Strafford, and enjoys the confidence of all.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JOHN D. WILEY
Mr. Wiley is the son of Elijah and Ann B. (Waddill) Wiley, and was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, November 1, 1832. His parents were natives of that State, and his father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Both of his grandfathers were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. John came to Greene county, Missouri, with his parents in 1837, where he grew to manhood and has since resided. His parents moved to Texas in 1858, where his mother died in 1863, and his father in 1868. In July 1862, John D. L. Wiley enlisted in company A, 8th Missouri cavalry, U. S. A. He was in the battles of Prairie Grove, Little Rock, and Ashley Station, and numerous skirmishes in Missouri, Arkansas and Kansas. In the spring of 1865 he lost his health and was discharged on account of disability in June of that year. He then returned home and has been engaged in farming. He owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres of land, made by his own industry and energy. Mr. Wiley was married, September 20, 1854, to Miss Rufina J., daughter of James and Jane (Stockton) Hughes, of this county, formerly of Alabama. Her father was a soldier of the Mexican war, and was in the Union service during the rebellion, as was four of his sons. He was wounded at the battle of Pea Ridge, and died from its effects within a few days. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley have had nine children, eight of whom are living, viz.: Nettie J., Jesse M., Martha M., Nancy E., George S., Lillie E., Lucy M., and Charles E. Mr. Wiley has been a member of the Methodist church for thirty years, and is one of the best citizens in the county.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

GEORGE J. WILEY
Mr. Wiley is the son of Elijah and Ann (Waddill) Wiley, and was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, July 27, 1829. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, as was his grandfather upon his mother’s side. His mother was a sister of Judge Waddill. His parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1837, and built the house in which the first school was taught in Center township. He moved to Texas in 1858, when he died in 1868, and his wife died in 1863. He was a strong Union man, but had two sons in the Federal army, and two in the Confederate army. George J. has lived in this county since coming here with his father in 1837. In 1862 he enlisted in the 8th Missouri cavalry, U. S. A. He served under Gens. Herron and Davidson in Southwest Missouri and Arkansas. He was at the battle of Little Rock, and upon many skirmishing and scouting expeditions. He was promoted to sergeant and served until the war closed. He then returned to Greene county, where he has since been engaged in farming. He has a good farm of two hundred acres and is well fixed to enjoy life. He was married September 24, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of James and Jane (Stockton) Hughes. Her father was a soldier in the Mexican war, and in the Federal service during the civil war. He was wounded at the battle of Pea Ridge and died from the effects of the wound. The married life of Mr. and Mrs. Wiley has been blest with twelve children, nine of whom are still living, viz.: John H., James F., Lenora A., Rachel J., George L., Margaret C., Mary E., Nancy and William. Mr. Wiley has been a member of the Methodist church for twenty years.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist

REV. JOHN H. WILSON
This gentleman was born in Boston, Mass., February 27, 1810. His parents were natives of that city, and died when he was a child. He was educated at Andover, Mass., and at Williams college in 1836. After graduating he commenced teaching, which occupation he followed in New York until 1842. He was then ordained for the ministry in the Onondaga, N.Y., Presbytery. He removed from New York to Cincinnati in 1842, and became professor of languages in Farmer’s college, for a period of fifteen years. Then he was president of Central college, Ohio, and then, about the year 1860, he was sent as a missionary to Reno county, Kansas, where he lived two years, and then went to Park college, where he was a professor over two years. He then came for Oakland farm, Campbell township, Greene county, Mo., where he still resides. Mr. Wilson was married April 5, 1841, to Clarissa, oldest daughter of Jonathan Dickinson, of Deerfield, Mass. She was born September 4, 1815. Their union has been blest with five sons and four daughters, four of the sons being dead. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Ozark Presbytery, and occasionally preaches, though over seventy-three years of age.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WINTON, George Beverly, editor; born Springfield, (Greene Co) Mo., Jan. 12, 1861; son of George Mitchell and Amanda (Faulkner) Winton; father was a minister of the gospel; paternal grandfather William Winton; maternal grandfather James Faulkner; graduated from Morrisville (Mo.) College 1881; took post-graduate course from Vanderbilt University 1881-83 and graduated from Theological department of that institution, in 1883 winning the Owen Prize Medal; received degree of D.D. from Southwestern University of Texas, Southern University of Alabama and Randolph-Macon College of Va.; entered ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1883, and engaged in ministerial work in Missouri 1883-4, in City of Mexico 1884; was professor of Latin at Pacific Methodist College, Santa Rosa, Cal. 1885-7; pastor at Sacramento, Cal. 1887-8; was Missionary in Mexico 1888-1902; president of Theological Seminary at San Luis Potosi 1889-97; editor of Evangelista Mexicano 1892-96; editor-in-chief of the Christian Advocate 1902-10; member of General Conference 1902-10; Oklahoma Annual Conference; Board of Missions; Board of Trustees Vanderbilt University; delegate to Ecumenical Missionary Conference, N.Y. 1900 and member of Federation Council, New York, 1905 and Philadelphia, Pa. 1908; member of Executive Committee of Federal Council Churches of Christ in America; author "Meodo Para el Ingles," 1902, "A New Era in Old Mexico," 1904; married Jessie McClain July 16, 1884; member of Press Club of Nashville, Tenn.; he is now pastor of Broadway Church, Ardmore, Oklahoma.
Submitted by Christine Walters
JOHN M. WOOD
Is a son of John and Elizabeth (Morris) Wood, and was born in what was then a wilderness, but now Rockford City, Illinois, upon the 19th of September, 1836. His parents soon after moved to Tennessee, where young John received his education. His father was a cotton-spinner and also ran a tanyard. John worked with his father in Tennessee until they moved to Springfield, Missouri, in May, 1853. His father bought a farm five miles northwest of Springfield, where John lived with his parents until 1858, when he accepted a clerkship in the general store of Charles Shepard, in Springfield, where he remained eighteen months. In 1860 he embarked in the mercantile business for himself in partnership with Joseph Weaver. The war coming on soon paralyzed all business, and the firm closed business. In 1864 he engaged in the grocery trade and remained in that business until 1880. He is now of the general merchandise firm of Wood & Williams. Mr. Wood joined the Christian church in Tennessee, and is now elder and treasurer of that church, and has been a member of the city council. He was married in September, 1860, to Miss Sarah A., daughter of Dr. William Shackelford of this county. Their union has been blest with six children, three boys and three girls, all living. Mrs. Wood is of the same religious faith as her husband, and the family if one of the county’s “salt of the earth.”
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WILLIAM H. WORRELL (deceased)
Mr. Worrell was born in Baltimore, Md., October 7, 1825. He lived in that city until 1846, when he moved to St. Louis, Mo. He came to Springfield in 1859 and built the house on the square with glass front, where his widow is now doing business. During the war he was a Union man, but being lame he could not bear arms but assisted in raising troops, etc. His family became well known for their kindness in ministering to the sick and wounded soldiers, and have never received any remuneration. They have received many letters from soldiers who regained health under their tender care, and the officers spoke well of their unselfish offices to the distressed. When the Confederates had possession of Springfield Mr. Worrell and family had to leave. They returned, however, with Curtis’ army, and have carried on the same business of bakery and confectionery. Mr. Worrell was married in 1848, in Baltimore, to Miss Sophia N. Henry, often mentioned in these pages. Mr. Worrell died December 27, 1878.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DR. CHARLES F. WRIGHT
Dr. Wright was born at Tiffin, Ohio, January 25th, 1849. His parents were Rev. Chas. A. and Hannah E. (Fisher) Wright, the former being a minister of the Methodist church. Charles F. received his education at Heidelberg College, leaving school at the early age of fourteen to enlist in the cause of the Union against the enemies of the government. He joined company K, 49th Ohio regulars, enlisting January 1st, 1864, as drummer boy. Subsequently he was detailed as Gen. Wood’s private orderly, and served until mustered out at Victoria, Texas, in the fall of 1865. Young as he was, he served with Gen. Sherman all through his active campaigning in the years 1864-5. In October, 1867, his parents and himself came to Springfield, this county, and Charles began studying dentistry the following year in the office of Dr. Natrass, and remained with him some three years. In the fall of 1871 he went to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and took a course of lectures in the dental college of that city, which prepared him for the practice of the profession. On completing his course, he came back to Missouri, locating first at Lebanon, Laclede county, where he opened an office and practiced dentistry for three years. He returned to Springfield in the fall of 1875, opened an office, and has done here a successful practice ever since. Dr. Wright is connected with the Kansas City Dental College, and annually delivers lectures for the benefit of students attending that institution. He has the largest and most elegant dental parlors in this part of the State, and is assisted by his brother, Silas A. Wright. December 4th, 1870, Dr. Wright was married to Miss Jennie Smith, of Lebanon, Missouri. They have one son and one daughter, named respectively, Charles D. and Lizzie B. Rev. Charles Wright, above mentioned, was born in Syracuse, New York, and died in San Francisco, California, in 1867, whither he had gone for his health. He was, for twenty-five years, a minister of the M.E. church. He was one of the first to volunteer for national defense at the outbreak of the civil war, and was first lieutenant in the 8th Ohio, and subsequently was captain in the 82nd Ohio. His family numbered five children, three sons and two daughters, of whom Dr. Charles F. was the second in order of birth. His mother (widow of Rev. Wright) still resides in Springfield. Though still a young man, Dr. Wright has built for himself a reputation and a practice in his profession that many an older practitioner might envy; and his courteous treatment of all patients, under the greatest pressure of business, has won for him many warm personal friends – a thing fully merited by such a genial gentleman as Dr. Chas. F. Wright.
Source: Greene County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

WRIGHT, T. J.

T.J. Wright, Chief of Police of Springfield, Mo.  Never has the city of Springfield been under better control---more peaceable, orderly and quiet than it is at present, and this is without doubt to the fact that a man of intelligence, determination, energy and vigilance is at the head of the police force.  This man is T. J. Wright, who has been connected with the force since 1888 and since 1892 has been at its head, owing to the fact that his far-seeing shrewdness and numerous other qualifications made him admirably fitted to fill the office in the most praiseworthy manner.  He is a product of Caldwell County, Mo. where he was born September 8 1856, son of Windfield Wright, who for many years was a substantial farmer of that county and who has now bee dead for five years.  His widow still survives him and makes her home on the old farm, where their nine children were born, and reared to honorable manhood and womanhood, the eldest son having held office in his county. The youthful days of chief T. J. Wright were spent attending school in his native county in the vicinity of Breckinridge, and in assisting to wield a hoe on the home farm. Where he learned not only methodical habits, but lessons of industry and perseverance which have since bee of material use to him.  He learned the plasterer’s trade in early manhood and followed this occupation successfully up to the time of his appointment to the police department, having at that time been a resident of Springfield four years .  He was very successful in his trade and was at one time the largest contractor of the kind in the city.  He has always manifested considerable interest in political affairs and has always supported the Democratic party.  He is very active and wide-awake; in fact, the citizens of Springfield early came to recognize that he was the right man in the right place in his capacity of chief of police.  He was appointed on the police force by Mayor Walker who saw in him an able man for police duty and he at once grew in popular favor with the citizens of the place.  In 1892 they showed their appreciation of his ability and the good he had accomplished by selecting him by a handsome majority to the office of chief.  He is a member of the I.O.O.F. Lodge, No. 218, the K. of P. lodge , No 86, and has represented the Odd Fellow Lodges of his district(consisting of nine) in the Grand Lodge of the State for the past four years.   Chief Wright was married in Springfield to Miss Lou Wilkerson, and they have a comfortable home at 510 West Division Street.  The police department of Springfield consist of ten men, four on the north side and six on the south, and the police headquarters are at No. 1 fire station on College Street.  
(Source:  Pictorial & Genealogical Record of Greene County, Missouri, Chicago, Goodspeed Brothers Publishers, 1893. Transcribed by Bud)

JACOB WOODWARD –
Mr. Woodward is the son of Edward and Mary Woodward, and was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, September 13, 1820. His parents soon after moved to Callaway county, Kentucky, where he grew to manhood. He learned the shoemaker’s trade when he was fourteen years of age, which, in connection with farming, has been his calling ever since. In 1843 he moved to Ash Grove, Greene county, Missouri, where he bought out a distillery and carried on the business for some time. In 1859 he moved to the farm where he now lives, where he has since followed farming and shoemaking. He served in the militia from 1863 to the close of the war. He owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, and has made all he has by his own industry and perseverance. Mr. Woodward was married in 1846 to Miss Susan E., daughter of Charles N. and Sarah G. Robinson, of Greene county, Missouri, formerly from North Carolina. Their union has been blest with seven children, all of whom are living, viz.: Sarah A. P., William H. S., James R., Ransom B. J., Charles R. E., John A. S., and Mary R.
Green County, Missouri; St. Louis, Western Historical Company (1883). Transcribed by Susan Geist



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