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Grundy County
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O. L. WEBBER, M. D.
O. L. Webber is of Pennsylvania birth, born in Center County, December 10, 1843, where he lived until he was twelve years old, when his parents removed to West Union, Fayette County, Iowa.
In this latter place he resided seven years, attending the common schools of the county until his nineteenth year, when he offered his services in the cause of the Union, enlisting in company G, of the Thirty-eighth Iowa volunteer infantry, in which he served during the war, and was mustered out at Houston, Texas, in 1865.
Returning to West Union, Iowa, he began the study and afterward practice of dental surgery, which he continued until the fall of 1869, when he began the study of medicine under doctors Boucher and Shrader, of Iowa City. Next he entered the medical department of the Iowa State University, and March 4, 1872, graduated a doctor of medicine.
The following year he located in Trenton, and established himself in the practice of his profession, and in 1874 became assistant surgeon of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company. Grundy County for the years 1879 and 1880 and during the same time was city physician of Trenton.
He is now filling his second term as coroner of Grundy County. Dr. Webber married Miss Mary S. Newcomb, of West Union, Iowa, in 1867, from whom he was granted a divorce in 1873.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

J. A. WEBSTER, M. D.:
John A. Webster was born in Athens, Ohio, November 19th, 1841. He received a common school education in Athens, which he completed at the Hatwinton High School, of Litchfield, Connecticut, residing while in that city, with his grandparents.
When sixteen years of age he began the study of medicine under Dr. J. H. Worthington, of Albany, Ohio, continued six months, and then went to Keokuk, Iowa, where he studied a short time under Dr. J. H. Sanford.
Leaving Keokuk he entered the Bellevue Hospital College, of New York City, and graduated there from in the spring of 1860, and the same year began practice in Keokuk, continuing until the breaking out of the civil war. He received his commission as assistant surgeon of the First New York light artillery in 1861, served during the war, and was mastered out in 1865.
Coming to Grundy County he lived with his mother ten miles north of Trenton, practicing medicine in that vicinity for two years. In 1872 he removed to Trenton, and soon secured a large and profitable practice in that city, and also in Grundy County. He became associated with Dr. J. Q. Patton in October, 1879, and the firm of Webster & Patton still remains. Dr. Webster was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Logan, of Trenton, in 1879.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

WETZLER, MORRIS:
Was born in Saaz, Austria, March 15th, 1842. He lived with his parents until he was thirteen years of age, when he came to America with a cousin, with whom he lived two years, in New York City, and attended school, then went to Chicago and attended Skinner's School for one year, and returning to New York City, attended the Allen Street School where he completed his education, in his seventeenth year.
For a short time afterward he kept books for his brother who was a dealer in leather in New York City. In 1861 he went to Chicago and in June following enlisted in company K, Thirty-seventh Illinois volunteer infantry, serving during the war, and participating in the battles of Pea Ridge, Neosha, Prairie Grove (in which he was wounded), siege of Vicksburg, and others.
In 1864, by the recommendation of Major-general N. P. Banks, he was promoted second lieutenant of company B, Fifth United States infantry. He resigned his commission in 1865, and on leaving the service went to New York City and after making a visit of some three or four months went to. Chicago and embarked in the dry goods business with A. B. Wolf under the firm name of Wetzler & Wolf.
They did business until 1867, and then dissolved, and he was appointed deputy sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, and filled that position until 1871, when he visited St. Louis, taking a respite from business for a year. In 1872 he went to Vicksburg, Mississippi, and engaged in the dry goods business until the spring of 1873, then went to Bowling Green, Missouri, and carried on the same business four years. In 1877 he came to Trenton and engaged in his present merchant tailoring business. In 1872 he married Miss Amelia Engel, of St. Louis. They have six children: Minnie, Alice, Josephine and Bessie, living; and two, Albert and Joachim, dead.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

WILLSON, JAMES R.:
Was born on a farm near Zanesville, Ohio, July 7, 1837. When seventeen years old he left his parents and went to Granville, Illinois, where he, with James Caldwell, bought a steam saw-mill and ran it under the firm name of Caldwell & Willson.
They were together about two and a half years when they sold out and dissolved, and he went to Iowa, rented a farm near Washington and pursued farming until 1859. He next went to Bloomington, Illinois, and was employed by E. Barber & Co., proprietors of the McLain County Mills, as an engineer, until April, 1861, when he was employed in the same capacity in the mills and elevator of E. Rogers, of the same place, and worked there one year.
On the 6th of August, 1862, he enlisted in company A, Ninety-fourth Illinois volunteer infantry, and served during the war, taking part in thirteen engagements, the most important being the battles of Prairie Grove, siege of Vicksburg, Fort Morgan, Spanish Fort, Mobile and Galveston; was wounded in a skirmish at Morganza, Louisiana; and was mustered out at Springfield, Illinois, August, 1865. Returning to Bloomington he was employed by E. Rogers & Co. as an engineer in the Normal Mills for one year, when he went to Washington, Iowa, where he was employed, in 1866, by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company as fireman. In 1868 he was changed from fireman to brakeman, and in 1869 was promoted to conductor, and in 1877 was appointed yard-master at Trenton.
He has been twice married, first to Miss Hattie J. Miller, of Washington, Iowa, January 1, 1861, who died at Wilton, Iowa, December 13, 1874. They had three children: Elmer E., Ivy O. and Louella. His second marriage was to Miss Josie A. Bennett, of Leavenworth, Kansas, on the 13th of December, 1875. They have had one child, Harry B., who died at Trenton when three years old.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

WILSON, EDLEY:
Was born near Linneus, Linn County, Missouri, January 1st, 1840. He came to Grundy county with his parents when, he was seven years old, and settled on a farm near Trenton where he was reared a farmer. His father dying when he was fourteen years old, he was the main-stay of his mother with whom he lived and worked the farm, maintaining her and the younger portion of the family, two brothers and three sisters, until attaining his majority. He afterwards owned and resided upon the farm until 1870. December 20th, 1866, he married Miss Elizabeth Colley, of Grundy County. She is a native of Pennsylvania, born near Pittsburgh, in 1850, and came to Grundy County with her parents when she was twelve years old and settled near Trenton. She was educated in the schools of Trenton, her teachers being her brother, Samuel M. Colley, and Prof. R. C. Norton. Mr. Wilson, during the late war, was a Union man and was enrolled in the State militia and held himself in readiness for duty, but was called out only once, when he participated in the engagement with bushwhackers at the forks of Grand River, and was taken prisoner and lost two horses. Leaving his farm in 1870 he came to Trenton and with his father-in-law, Peter Colley, rented the Bismark House which they kept up to 1872, then bought the National House, and on Mr. Colley retiring from the business in 1877 he became sole proprietor. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have two children, William and Minnie, both born in Trenton.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

WILSON, WILLIAM H.:
William Harvey Wilson, present sheriff of Grundy County, was born near Edinburg, Grundy County, Missouri, March 31, 1844. He lived with his parents, James and Nellie Wilson, at Edinburg and Trenton until his nineteenth year, when he joined the Federal army, enlisting in company A, Forty-fourth Missouri volunteer infantry and served one year, the term of enlistment. After his discharge he returned to Trenton and began to learn the trade of shoemaking with F. P. Buren, and afterwards worked for other persons until 1870, when he entered the store of Dr. R. N. Feather3ton as a clerk and continued with him until 1873. In 1875 he was elected constable of Trenton township and served as such until 1880, when, in November of that year, he was elected sheriff" of Grundy county and still holds that position. December 24, 1872, he married Miss Mollie E. Crouch, of Trenton. He is a member of Trenton Lodge No. 52, I. O. O. F., of Trenton. His mother died when he was very young.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

CAPT. N. A. WINTERS.
Nathan A. Winters was born on a farm near Jacksonville, Illinois, May 10, 1831. His parents were Nathan and Ruth Winters, who came to Grundy County and settled on a farm in Liberty Township in 1840, where he lived with them and worked on the farm up to his sixteenth year.
In 1847, when he enlisted in the army and served during the Mexican War under Capt. John C. Griffin and Col. William Gilpin, and was mustered out at Independence, Missouri, in October, 1848.
He returned to the homestead in Grundy County, and soon after purchased a farm in Sullivan County, where he lived and farmed until 1854, when he returned to Grundy County, and engaged in the mercantile business at Lindley, which he followed at that place and at Kirksville, in Adair County, until 1859.
That year he went to Colorado and run a pack train into the mines then known as the Gregory and the Russell claims until 1860, when he returned to Adair county and engaged in farming until the intelligence of the firing on Fort Sumter was received, when he promptly tendered his services to his country, and helped to raise the first company in the State, north of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad.
He raised a company in the spring of 1861, and was unanimously chosen captain, and went into camp in Adair County, where he thoroughly drilled his men before tendering his company to Gen. Hurlbert, division commander of northern Missouri. His company was assigned to detached duty at home, with the addition of five hundred home guards, and brigaded with the Third regiment of Iowa infantry, Col. Scott commanding.
In September, 1861, the home-guards being disbanded, he was commissioned captain, and his company assigned to the Twenty-second Missouri infantry, as company A, but being a cavalry company, was soon afterwards transferred to the Seventh Missouri volunteer cavalry as company H, serving in Missouri, Arkansas and Texas. Capt. Winters participated in many battles, and endured all the hardships of a soldier's life.
In 1864 he resigned his commission, returned home, and assisted in raising the Forty-fourth Missouri volunteer infantry, and was again commissioned and went out as captain of company K, of that regiment. While recruiting in 1864, he was injured by a collision on the Hannibal & St. Joe Railroad, after-which he was placed in the reserve corps, and acted as assistant commissary of musters at Rolla, Missouri, until the close of the war.
On his return to Grundy County he pursued farming until the fall of 1868, when he was elected sheriff of Grundy County, and elected his own successor in 1870. After serving out his second term he engaged in merchandizing in Trenton until 1880, since which time he has been a contractor, aiding to construct the Quincy, Missouri & Pacific Railroad. He has been twice married, the first time to Miss Sarah Brown, of Sullivan County, Missouri, in November, 1848, and she died March 15, 1878, leaving seven children, six sons and one daughter. On the 19th of January, 1879, Capt. Winters was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary Lonorgan, of Trenton.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

WISDOM, W.T.:
Was born on a farm in Randolph County, Missouri, May 23, 1841. His father dying when he was two years old, he was placed with his grandfather, Thomas Wisdom, with whom he lived until he was ten or eleven years old, and since that age has maintained himself. He has never had an opportunity of attending school, but by personal application and improving spare moments, has acquired a very good business education. He worked as a farm hand in Randolph and adjoining counties until his seventeenth year, 1858, when he began clerking in the store of Renfro & Arbogast, at Trenton, and was with them about one year.
He was next employed by H. Renfro, to take charge of his grocery store, and was with him until 1861, when he enlisted in company B, Twenty-third Missouri volunteer infantry, under Capt. R. A. DeBolt, and served until the battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, April 6, 1862, where he was badly wounded and left on the field, and from the effects of which he has never fully recovered.
He was discharged, October 6, 1862, and returned to Trenton and engaged in keeping a saloon which he soon after abandoned at the request of his wife. He next embarked in the mercantile business with J. C. Griffin, under the firm name of Wisdom & Griffin. Retiring from the firm one year afterward, he was variously employed until 1864, when he again engaged in the dry goods business, this time with N. Shanklin, under the firm name of Wisdom & Shanklin.
In the spring of 1865, the firm having closed out, he was employed in the store of G. W. Moberly until 1866, and from that time up to 1877 was employed most of the time in the store of J. M. Bailey. In August of that year he was appointed, and served two terms as county collector, and from May, 1879, until June, 1880, was in the dry goods business with R. E. Boyce, successor to J. M. Bailey.
In March, 1881, he established his present dry goods house. He has been twice married, his first wife being Miss Fannie E. Carter, whom ho married December 24, 1862, and who died at Trenton, November 15, 1871, and by whom he had three children; namely, Nora B., Carrie and William P. Miss Nora is a graduate of the Trenton high school, of the class of 1881. His second marriage was to Miss Mary A. Swayze, of Grundy County, in August, 1872, by whom he has three boys: Frank, Hugh and Albert.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

WYATT, BENJAMIN F.:
 Was born on a farm near Paris, Monroe County, Missouri, November 29, 1838. His parents removed to Grundy County and settled in Franklin Township in 1839, where he was reared and worked on the farm, and attended district school up to 1856, when during that year he attended the Trenton high school. He taught school in Mercer and Grundy counties, until July, 1861, when he enlisted in company C, Twenty-third Missouri volunteer infantry, as orderly-sergeant was promoted to second lieutenant March 8, 1862 and to first lieutenant May 8, 1863. He served three years and participated in a number of battles and skirmishes, and was mustered out at Atlanta, Georgia, September 22, 1864. He returned to Grundy County and soon after was employed in his brother's (J. T. Wyatt) store at a place then called Middlebury, in Mercer County, where he remained only four months. In the fall of 1865, he came to Trenton and engaged in the saloon business, which he followed until 1866, when he was deputized county clerk by R. P. Carnes, and acted as such until 1867, when he began to work at his present business of mason and plasterer. December 7, 1864, he married Miss Corlissa Reynolds, of Trenton, they have four children: Kate, fifteen years of age; Elmore E., twelve; Carrie, eight; and Ethel, four.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Geneaology Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 

JOHN NELSON WYMER:
This name was given to a son born to John and Patience Wymer, on the 18th of February, 1829, in Bristol township, Morgan county, Ohio. The family removed to Lawrence county, in the same State, in 1845, where the subject of this biography grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. On the 20th of October, 1850, John N. Wymer and Miss Celia E. Dillon were united in the holy bonds of matrimony, at the home of the bride's parents in Lawrence county. Miss Dillon was a native of Franklin county, Virginia, where the first two years of her life were spent. She was born September 20th, 1828, and, with her father's family, became a resident of Ohio, in 1830. Six years after his marriage Mr. Wymer removed to Indiana, and located in Boone County, where he continued to make his home until the close of the civil war, in which he served as a private in company A, of the Indiana State militia.
After the close of hostilities, in 1865, he came to Grundy County and settled on a farm some ten miles northeast of Trenton. He continued to cultivate his farm until March, 1881, when he disposed of it, and took up his residence in Trenton and resumed work at his trade, in which he is still engaged.
Mr. Wymer's father died in February, 1880, having reached the advanced age of ninety-five years. His mother, in her seventy-fifth year, still pursues the journey of life.
Mr. and Mrs. Wymer have four children living and two dead. Mends M., the first, was born March 3d, 1851, and died September 20th, 1854; Elected Ann, born February 12th, 1852; Mary C., born August 17th, 1854, died in 1857? John W., born July 1st, 1855; Rhuama P., born October 3rd, 1857; George W., born April 17th, 1859.
Mrs. Wymer was a member of the Baptist Church before her marriage, and Mr. W. was baptized and received into the same church in 1852, two years after that event, and both remain consistent members.
Source:  The History of Grundy County, Missouri: Birdsall & Dean, publ. 1881; Submitted to Genealogy Trails and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 


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