Genealogytrails Harrison County, Missouri
Accidents


Allen
1863-
William R. Allen, burned to death while attempting to save some papers from his burning building.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Brooks
Unknown Date-  A few years ago, P.A. Brooks, who lived several miles west of Bethany, met with a fatal accident under the following cirucumstances:  Early in the morning he harnessed a pair of mules to do some hauling, and led them to a well to water, and in so doing looped the halter strap around his arm to hold them.  While at the well the animals became frightened, and started to run, dragging Mr. Brooks over the ground and kicking him in the face at almost every jump.  They ran quite a distance, and only stopped on reaching some timber and thick brush, which arrested them.  The gentleman who owned the team, not knowing what detained Brooks, went to look after him and saw the blood stained path made by his body being dragged over the ground.  He followed the path and soon came to where the mules were, with unfortunate man's arm still fastened in the loop and not yet dead.  He lived but a few minutes after found, dying in great agony, his face was horribly cut, and his body badly marked.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Bryant
March 1871-
J.G. Bryant of White Oak Township, was killed by the falling of a tree.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Braynt
Yesterday evening, as Mrs. George Braynt was driving her roadster down the hill toward, the canning factory bridge, the brakes refused to take hold and her car struck the rear of Charley Haley's wagon, frightening the team and causing them to run away.  The impact of the car and the jerk of the team nearly upset the wagon, and Charley was lightly thrown out but not hurt.  The tongue was broken out of the wagon, and the team came loose from the running gears a block north of the bridge.  The wagon is a wreck, but the horses were not injured.  The car was only slightly damaged.  Lucky it was no worse.  The mishap occured on the south end of the bridge. 
Source: Bethany Republican, September 25,1918

Burl
May 1860-
a son of Mr. Burl, aged twelve years, was drowned in the creek near Bethany.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Burris
August 1, 1876-
Warner Burris, a little son of Judge George Burris, was crushed to death beneath a large pile of lumber which was blown down by the wind.  This sad affair occurred at the village of Mitchellville.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Chambers
August 24, 1918
Cliff Chambers of Ridgeway had a close call last Saturday when he was down 25 feet cleaning out a well, when a large rock fell from the top and struck him a glancing lick on the back of the head.
Source: The St. Joseph Observer, St. Joseph, Mo. August 24, 1918

Dale
February 1861-
Campbell Dale drowned in Trail Creek.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Garland Edwards
Garland Edwards was very unfortunate last week when the water surrounded three of his horses.   Two of them were caught in the current and swept down the creek and drowned.
Source: Unknown Newspaper, dated June 1943

James Fisher
August 1897James Fisher, 69 years old, whose home is about four miles south of Mt. Moriah, came to the city Monday for the purpose of transacting business, and after paying off some obligations and looking after some legal business at the court house, registered at the Central House and was assigned a room in the third story facing east.  Mr. Fisher retired at a reasonable hour and nothing more was heard of him until his lifeless remains were found on the sidewalk, immediately under the window, about five o'clock Tuesday morning.  Life was entirely extinct and to appearances the body lay in a position as if it had not moved after the fall.

The accident must have happened in the early morning as the hotel attachees and others who were passing late Monday eveneing failed to notice anything amiss.  The officials were so well satisfied that it was a clear case of accident that no inquest was held.  Mr. Fisher was an old soldier and highly respected by those who knew him.  He was a farmer and shoemaker by trade, and on retiring had secured the door of his room with a shoe knife.  The sum of $9.77 was found on his person.  Mr. Fisher had but recently separaed from a second wife and was instituting divorce proceedings at the time of his death.

Mrs. Norton Butler and Mrs. Shoemaker, both living in the neighborhood, are daughters of Mr. Fisher.  Mr. Shoemaker came over in response to a telephone message and took charge of the remains, conveying them to his home.

Mr. Fisher's remains were buried at Mt. Moriah, yesterday at 10 o'clock
Source: unknown newspaper clipping dated August 19, 1897.

Foster
July 12, 1878-
Mr. Foster an old gentleman, ws found dead on the road leading from Eagleville to Iowa-supposed to have been sunstroke.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Henderson, J.F.-
Trials and hardships are the common heritage of all pioneers.  In March, 1878, J.F. Henderson, from Harrison county, Missouri, settled on Lillian creek.  February 27, 1879, he went into Hunter's Shanty canyon to cut cedar for fuel and posts.  He had nearly completed his days work when in felling a twenty two inch tee it turned on its stump as it fell, in such a way as to strike Mr. Henderson, throwing him down the steep canyon side, where he struck on a pile of brush.  His left arm was broken in two places, his left hip dislocated and the leg broken below the knee.  In this condition, with snow on the ground, he lay from sundown until after sunrised the next morning, when he was found by his wife.  Unable tomove him in any way, she went for help to the nearest residence, that of her daughter, Mrs. James Oxford. 

It was noon when, with oxen and a wagon, they came back and the bruised and broken sufferer was take a mile to the home of James Oxford.  To get help was the next thing, and remembering that three trappers had been at the mouth of Lillian creek, Mrs. Oxford started for the camp, two miles away.  One man was there, and when she told him of the accident to her father and asked him to go for help to the nearest neighbors place, on Victoria creek, eight miles distant, the trapper said:  "I know how to sympathize with you, for I lost my wife and child in a blizzard."  He started on his sixteen mile run, and came back the next morning with Isaac and Temp Merchant.

Temp was dispatched for the nearest doctor, having to go to Loup City, fifty miles down the rive.  Dr. Hawkings reached the Oxford home Sunday morning, the fourth day after the accident, under the influence of liquor, and incompetent to do the surgical work required.  Running his hand hastily over the broken leg, he said:  "Your leg is all right, but the arm will have to be amputated."  With knife and saw he cut the arm square off, took tow or three stiches from skin to skin across the freshley cut flesh, and said it was all that was necessary for him to do.

Mr. Merchant insisted that the leg was broken and must be dressed.  With reluctance, the doctor roughly tried to put the broken bones in place and bound them with splints, then left for his home.  Seven months Mr. Henderson lay in that pioneer home, unable to get from his bed, when he was moved to Mrs. Comstock's home.  Every settler from Loup City to Victoria creek vied with each other in rendering kindness to the sufferer.  Connected with this incident is the pathetic death of little Daisy Oxford, the pet granddaughter of Mr. Henderson.  A slender child of eighteen months, she sat at his bedside on the Saturday before the doctor came; rocking forward, she, in some way, caught the bail of the tea kettle, sitting on the edge of the stove, and the contents of boiling water was poured over her head and hands.  The little sufferer, under the care of Mrs. Comstock, who had been sent for, lived for nearly a week.  Mr. Eubank preached her funeral service and then remained four days, expecting to be called to preach the funeral of Mr. Henderson.  Mr. Henderson did not die but lived to express his gratitude to the old settlers who filled the office of good Samaritan to him in those days.
 source: History of Cuter Co. Neb,by G.L. Gaston and A.R. Humphrey,Lincoln Neb. Western Publishing and Engraving Co. 1919


Herron
July 1925-
NARROWLY ESCAPES DROWNING- J.W. Herron and daughter Jessie came near losing their lives in Grand River Sunday when the father stepped in a hole and went under.  Fortunately Mrs. Iva Wendall was near on the bank and grabbed the drowining girl just in time to save her life.  After which the father who could swim was able to reach shore in safety.  The Herron and Wendell families were spending the day on the river south of Akron.  Mr. Herron was leading his daughter into the water to help her get her balance.  He was walking backward not far from shore where the water was not deep, but suddenly he stepped in a deep hole which threw him under the water and dragged Miss Jessie under also.
Lamoni Chronicle
Source: Weekly Clipper, July 22, 1925
transcribed by: Melody Beery

Hill
June 1867-
Miss Nevada Hill and little daughter of Mrs. Harrison drowned June 1867 in Cat Creek near the southern boundary of the county.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Hook
March 1877-
a son of Ransom D. Hook, of Union Township, was killed by a falling pole, March 1877.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Hurst
Monday when Ralph Hurst manager of the Standard Oil station was removing some articles from an attic, he fell several feet and injured one hand badly.  An X-ray proved no bones were broken, but in spite of that it is giving Ralph considerable pain.
Source: Unknown newspaper

Lay
May 1867-
John Lay drowned at Cainsville, May 1867, body found five days later.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Leazenby
January 14, 1915-  Report of a horrible tragedy reached this city this morning in the account of the burning of a dwelling and the serious injury of a woman and small child, the latter dying soon after.  According to the brief account at hand, the farm home of Homer Leazenby, a prominent farmer residing southwest of Mt. Moriah, caught on fire last night about 6 o'clock and it with the contents were entirely consumed.  In some way Mrs. Leazenby was badly burned and their babe, a young child was burned so badly that it died that night.  We have no information as to the cause of the fire, though the circumstances seem to point to an explosion of some kind.
Source: The Leon Reporter, Leon, IA,  Jan. 14, 1915

Linville
Unknown Date-  Sometime in the seventies a young man by the name of Linville, an employee in Smith's Mill, at Bethany, while at work was caught in the machinery, which so mangled him that he lived but a few hours.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Neff
April 1903-While Donn Neff was scraping dirt into and filling up an old well on his farm south of this place, last Thursday, one horse stepped into the well, and the walls of the well gave away, almost completely covering the horse.  The horse was killed, but the harness was saved.  The animal was worth about twenty-five dollars.
TRANSCRIBED BY MELODY BEERY, SOURCE: BETHANY REPUBLICAN NEWSPAPER,APRIL 29, 1903 VOL.XXXI

Paine
December 3, 1876-
a little child of Charles Paine was accidentally burned to death in Bethany.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Plymer
1868-
Miss Delilah Plymer of Bethany, while attempting to kindle a fire with Kerosene oil, was burned to death.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Roach
November 1882-
a boy by the name of Levi Roach, accidentally shot and killed himself while hunting near the village of Martinsville.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]


Stone
April 1881- while attempting to extinguish the fire of a burning fence, a young lady, daughter of William Stone, of Martinsville was horribly burned, from the effects of which she died in about eight hours.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Stoner
July 1878-
a little child of Augustine Stoner, of Madison Township met with a violent death by running against a pitchfork with which it was playing.  The prongs of the fork penetrated the little fellow's breast, causing his death within a couple of hours after the accident occurred.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Thomas
May 26, 1870-
a little daughter of Daniel Thomas was burned to death about two miles west of Bethany.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

Thomas
August 19, 1874-
William O. Thomas, a little son of Leonidas Thomas ws crushed to death by a saw-log.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

White
December 1870-
Three year old daughter of C.J. White was burned to death at his home, east of Eagleville.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

White
January1871- 
Jackson White, accidentally shot and killed himself while hunting, January 1871.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

White
Dr. L.R. Webb, of Bethany was called Sunday to see Bill White, who was seriously hurt Friday by a horse throwing him.
Source: Bethany Republican, September 25, 1918


Unknown names
1861-
Four small children killed in a burning building in the northern part of the county.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]



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