Genealogytrails Harrison County, Missouri
Suicides

April 1878-
Baker
A young lady, Miss Emmeline Baker, drowned herself and illegitament child in April 1878, in a pool of water in Lincoln Township.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

April 1861-
Banta
Rice Banta of Eagleville committed suicide by taking strychnine.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]


January 1880-
Dowell
Lindsey Dowell, of Fox Creek Township, committed suicide on the 29th of January, 1880, by hanging himself with a whip lash.  He was a mere boy, only sixteen, and committed the deed in a fit of despondency, occasioned by an incurable ailment of the eyes.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

April 1873-
Duncan
F.M. Duncan, a resident of Gentry county committed suicide at the residence of William Ray, Butler township, this county, by cutting his throat with a razor.  He was laboring under a fit of temporary insanity at the time.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

April 1886-
Foxworth
The last suicide committed in the county was that of W.L. Foxworth, which occurred in April 1886.  The following from the Bethany Republican is an account of the sad affair:

"He was well educated, intelligent, and a gentlemen in every respect.  He became connected with the public schools of the county and was a popular teacher.  he taught three terms of school in the Tull neighborhood, and had begun on a fourth term the Monday before his death.  While teaching there he formed the acquaintance of Miss Fanny Tull, whose sad death last fall from consumption will be remembered.  The acquaintance ripened into friendship and then love.  They became engaged, and the day of the marriage was set.  Miss Tull was rapidly failing in health, but neither one of them seemed to comprehend that it was possible death was so soon to mar all their bright anticipations and plans for the future.  To her, with all the beautiful visions of life just dawning, hope held out the certainty of recovery and many years of pleasure and happiness with her lover and husband.  To him, that one so young, bright, fair and beautiful, should be standing so near the golden gates of Heaven, was incomprehensible.  He refused to believe or even think it.  Alas!  the rude awakening came.  The bright dream of life vanished.  Two days before the wedding was to be death claimed its victim, and all the world's glory was shut out from the lovers eyes forever.  All of his hopes and ambitions were covered up by the clods of her grave.

"After her death it was noticed by his friends that he was a different man.  He became gloomy and despondent, and brooded over his great sorrow.  He visited the grave of his lost love many times, and remained for hours communing with her spirit.  His great grief and brooding overturned his reason, causing him finally to commit his rash act.

"He taught his school from Monday until Wednesday night, when he went over to the house of Mr. Tolliver, near the Bodam mill, where he remained over night.  There he sharpened his razor, and shaved himself.  In the morning he returned to his school and taught until evening.  When he dismissed his scholars he told them he had the worst headache he ever had in his life.  He was then seen crossing the fields toward the Bodam schoolhouse, three miles away, by neighbors, and was not seen again alive.  The scholars went to school the next morning, but he did not appear.  That evening his friends became alarmed over his absence, and resolved upon a search for him the next morning. Early Saturday morning Mr. Jacob Bodam sent one of his little boys to their schoolhouse near by, to see if Mr. Foxworthy was there, and was following up himself, when the little fellow came running back with the word that he was there dead.  A large crowd of neighbors, who had intended searching for him was soon gathered there.  The body lay upon its right side, and about eighteen inches from his right arm, which was extended, lay the instrument of death, a bloody razor.  Examination showed two wounds in his neck, each beginning just below the ear on either side, and extending down to the windpipe.  Each cut must have severed the jugular vein and death was very quick.  From every appearance he must have committed the deed Thursday night, as rats had eaten into his face in two different places.  On the blackboard was written with chalk, "I am an innocent man.   Telegraph to father."  Then followed the addresses of his father  and uncle in Indiana.  No letters or papers were found upon the body to explain his act."
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]


January 1864-
McCray
an old gentleman by the name of McCray, in the northern part of the county, commited suicide by shooting himself.   No cause was assigned for the rash deed.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

1881 or 1882- 
Moore
Samuel Moore, a resident of Colfax township, shot and killed himself on account of his wife refusing to live with him.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]


February 1870-
Neece
Noah Neece, aged fifty-five years committed self destruction by hanging.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]


October 1876- 
Pinkerton
D. Pinkerton, a prominent citizen of Union township, attempted to commit suicide by hanging himself.  Accompanied by a small step son he went to the barn and from there to the smokehouse, in which the boy heard a noise like the moving of a box.  Going into the building, the little fellow discovered Mr. Pinkerton hanging by a small rope from a beam overhead, having kicked the box from under him.  The boy with admirable presence of mind cut the rope, and then ran for assistance.  Mr. Pinkerton lingered for a short time, but finally died from the effects of the hanging.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]

1868
Shackelton
One day last week a man named Shackelton, living near Eagleville, Harrison County, Missouri, was stacking his wheat, and expressed himself greatly discouraged on account of the ravages of the grasshoppers, which had considerably injured it.  He  left the stack, went to his house, took a loaded revolver, bid his wife good-bye, gave her directions about his affairs, and then went out and shot himself dead.
[Source: The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, August 5, 1868]

1880 or 1881-
Schroff
an old man by the name of Andrew Schroff, who lived a few miles from Bethany, committed suicide by shooting himself.  Cause unknown.
[Source: History of Harrison and Mercer Counties, Missouri, St. Louis and Chicago, The Goodspeed Publishing Co, 1888]




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