GENEALOGY TRAILS PRESENTS
COUNTRY SCHOOLS AROUND THE RIDGEWAY MO. AREA


MURPHY SCHOOL

The land where the Murphy school was located was donated by John Murphy. The school was sometimes called the "Acadamy". About 1897 the district divided with the south group, building a school called the "Pull Away". It was located two miles south, near the Joe Shepard farm. "Lissie" Provin says there were over 100 pupils in the old school before dividing.

Some of the Teachers were:

Elsie McMurty, John Murphy, George Dyer, Cora Morris, Charley Stoner, Amy Sigler, Seul Grant, Charley Reeder, Sam McCollum, Court Vanorsdale, Louduski Hammack, Mary Wright, Ruth Wright, Clara Tanner, Mabel Norwood, Liney Jones, Bessie Hamilton, Jesse Judd, Leslie Brough, Vern Stoner, Velma Taylor, Stewart Whisler, Ester Reeder, Ruby Johnson, Nettie Miller, Kendall Longfellow, Dorothy Tuggle, Fay Moore, Leone Mcintosh, Lois Anderson, Mildred Trotter, Dolyne Kampman, Helen Damon, Ermadale Billups, Bonnie Lobba Bayless, Carol Hamilton Jincks

INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY:  MERRILL GRANT
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY

PLEASANT VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2

The land that the Pleasant Valley School was built on was one acre taken from the 80 acre farm of Frank and Sylvia Hickman. The first two school buildings burned. The last one was built in 1929 and in 1953 Pleasant Valley was consolidated with Ridgeway School District.

Some of the students in 1906 were:
Chester and Homer Henry, Avis, Gladiul and Hubert Brown, Doris and Elgin Hickman, Ruth, Lee And Leslie Opdyke, Glenn, Elsie and Phillip Pontius, Dean Leazenby and Ray Hickman.

INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY:  DOROTHY POLLEY
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY

THE ROUND GROVE SCHOOL

The Round Grove school was a log building, located 2 miles east and 1 mile north of Ridgeway,Mo. And was built in 1857. By the year 1890 a new frame building was erected. This was a gathering place for the whole community, including Sunday School and church services. The school had literary and debates and many other activities. The school consolidated with Ridgeway in 1921.

Some of the teachers were:
Arthur Whisler, Bill Billups, Floria Wright, Jean Lilly, Bertha Combs, Elsie Hamlin, Sam Mccollum, Atta Ragan, Clara Opdyke, Willis, Seul And Fred Grant, Grace Graham, Cecil Miner, Bessie Opdyke, Jean Lilly, Lilly Young, Amy Sigler, Florence Shepard, Lizzie Wymore, Mille Taylor, Alice Rhae, Laura Leazenby, Gladys Mitchell, Collie Harrison, Gemma Rakestraw, And Seba Harrison Mulnix.

Some of the pupils in 1892 were:
Jesse Whisler, Ada Billups, Pearl Provin, Millie Whisler, Seba Harrison, Orpha Whisler, Alfred Grant, Omar Loy, Lenna Provin, Omar Provin, Bill Loy, Carl Maxwell, Edgar Grant, Minnie Grant, Fred Grant, Roy Grant, And Grover Harvey.


INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY:  MERRILL GRANT, EVERTT ROBERTSON AND LOIS TRIPP STOCKTON.
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY


UNION SHOOL DISTRICT NO. 55

Union Township was organized in 1858. Land for the Union School District No. 55 was given by William Wilson. Union school consolidated with Ridgeway in 1920.

Some of the pupils in 1910 were:
Letha Sweet, Harry Foutch, Leo Redinger, Blanche Redinger, Veda Taylor, Flossie Foutch, Gladys Eaton, Glenn Taylor, Viola Carnagy And Herman Wilson.

Some of the teachers were:
Fred Benson (a graduate of the Ridgeway High School class of 1897), Walter Maple, Nellie Bartlett, Nellie Evans, Suel Grant, Altha Foster, Bea Bridges, Jesse Whisler, Bessie Robins, Madge Gutridge, Wave Redinger And Blanche Stanley.

INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY:  DOROTHY POLLEY
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY


WHITE OAK SCHOOL

There is no record of when the first school house was built. The first teacher may have been may Taylor Snelling who taught in 1884. A new building was built in 1926. In 1921 the western part of the White Oak district was consolidated with Ridgeway. The rest of the district continued to have school until the last term being 1946-1947. Fredrick Young gave the land for the school and when it closed the building and the contents were sold and the land returned to the original plot of ground surrounding it.

Some of the earlier teachers were:
Charles Stoner, Court Van Orsdale, Suel Grant, Ruth McKern And Frank Sobotka.

Some of the students in 1908 were:
Neola Craig, Albert Young, Roy Shepard, Lily Young, Austin Young, Pearl Young, Stella Jincks, Retha Booth, Harley Booth, Josie Jincks, Pearl Booth, Gladys Mitchell, Laura Mae Johnson, John Young, Harley Craig, Denny Jincks, Millard Shepard, Lyman Jincks, Bryan Young, Dewey Johnson And Andy Johnson.

INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY:  FAY YOUNG
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY


YANKEE RIDGE SCHOOL

In 1880 the teacher of Yankee Ridge School was Willis Grant, who had begun teaching at age 16. The first school house was in the cemetery yard, many years earlier before 1880.

Some of the early settlers were the families of:

Charley Fransham, John Sharp, Marinda Sharp, William Smith, Lynus Smith, John Lilly, The Mainwaring, Mccollum, Merrifield, Dan Smothers, Cordle, Ambosia, Wagoner, Stockwell, Trotter, Goldsmith, Jackson, Higgins, Young, Simpson, Etter, Rakestraw, Martin, Chapman, Mccorkle, Nels Haun, Jeffries, Morris, Emry, Maxwell,Israel, Bowman, Wier, and Richardson families.

The names of some of the teachers who taught were:

George Francis, Carrie Jackson, Sam And Brother Lennie Mccollum, Albert Spence, Ruth Wright, Mabel Norwood, Ethel Sellers, Glen Morris, Florence Fransham, Mabel Mcelhiney And Gladys Anderson.

The school consolidated with Ridgeway in 1921.

INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY:  MINNIE GRANT
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY

GRANT CENTER SCHOOL

Grant Center School was located on one-half acre of land in the exact center of Grant Township, three miles south of Ridgeway, Mo.  The land was given for school purposes by Otis Rakestraw.

Grant Center served its purpose well as an educational center.  Forty to Fifty pupils were enrolled around 1890 to 1900.  total enrollment would be in the hundreds.  Many young people completed their total formal education with the four walls of this school.  To accommodate patrons, a winter and spring term was held for several years.  Often there was a change of teachers for these terms.

The school building was a social and recreational center.  Literary events and box suppers were popular and the good times of such occasions were never forgotten by those lucky people who were present.  Grant Center was the voting precinct of South Grant Township. Men signed up for the draft in World War I at this location.

Some of the teachers over the years were: Kate Smith, Bessie Opdyke, George C. Dyer, Daisy Abber, Florence Fransham, Cora Morris, Clara Morris, Dora Wright, Court VanOrsdale, Ernest Hogan, Eva Foster, Deane Ashford, Minnie Brown, Edna Ashford, Lettie K. Powers, Berneice Dale,Ruth Dale, Archie Pugh, Goldie Haun and Zelma Dale. 

excerpt from article submitted by Avis Lair Graham
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY

LORRAINE SCHOOL

The Lorraine School building, the last of the building of the town of Lorraine, sits lonely and abandoned beside Highway 69.  Its original location was about one half mile west of the town of Lorraine.  It was moved to its present site after the district was consolidated with Ridgeway and Bethany.

In its hey day Lorraine was one of the best equipped country schools of Harrison County and many students received their education within its walls.  In the early days, students sometimes attended classes until they were in their twenties or until they were married.  Later when students finished the eighth grade, they went on to a county high school.

Lorraine was one of the last one room country schools in Harrison County to be closed.  Some of the students went to Bethany and some, along with the tearcher, went to Ridgeway.

The last day of school picnic (rain or shine) was an event enjoyed by the entire community.  One morning while "Miss Nina's" first grade students were reciting their reading class, the door opened and Junior McCollum, who was driving by stepped inside and said, "The schoolhouse is on fire!".  He then left to secure help.  The teacher and all students immediately started to work and in a short time they had moved every article of furnishings, except the stove and piano, outside. (They got the piano as far as the door but they couldn't get it through!)

Luckily it was a very windy day and wind blowing from the West kept the flames contained on the east roof until the community gathered and formed a bucket brigade.  The flames were extinguished before the fire truck arrived.  The people of the community helped carry all the equipment back inside the building and two days later when the roof was repaired, "Miss Nina" and the student put everything back in the proper place and school was resumed.

In school the students had been taught that their country's flag must never touch the ground and after the fire was out and people had time to notice, they saw two of the small students struggling to hold the flag upright against the wind.  The children said the flag was lying on a desk and it started to roll off.  They knew it must not touch the ground so they held it up.

excerpts from article written by Nina McIntosh
SOURCE: RIDGEWAY THEN AND NOW 1880-1980
EXCERPTS TRANSCRIBED BY:MELODY BEERY

 

HISTORY OF TWO SCHOOL DISTRICTS

Probably one of the oldest school houses in this cournty was Hickory Grove, which was built of logs.  It was located just one half mile east of the northeast corner of the Rose Hill Cemetery, on land owned by W.W. Campbell.  My father and his parents moved into this area in 1858 and he and some of the younger children went to this school until Marion School was erected some years later.  As far as I know all of the old records of the Marion Central School have been destroyed or lost, but I will set down some of the facts as I remember them or have gotten them from other sources.

The old schoolhouse, which burned about 1900 was built on the northeast corner of my father's farm and the year I started school, this was the only building on the lot.  The girls, when nature called, used the creek bank, which was about ten feet high and about twenty or thirty feet from the schoolhouse; and the boys used a big patch of hazel brush on the north, which furnished a nice second growth of sprouts in the fall.  Besides a cover these sprouts were used to exert discipline.  Later on the necessary two out buildings were added to the school premises.

The old school house was a one room house, with three windows on the north and three windows on the south, and the only door was on the east.  The blackboard extended the full length of the west side of the building.  The seats and desks were all home made and almost every desk was carved with the initials of some idle student.  A big old stove stood in the middle of the room, and a big patch of blue was on the ceiling.  This was caused by someone trying to thaw a bottle of ink that had frozen.  The girls sat on the north side and the boys on the south side and the greatest punishment that I ever had was being made to sit between two of the big girls.  The girls outside clothing hung at the east end of the building, north of the door and boys hung on the south side of the door.

I moved to the Marion District in 1914 and was appointed Secretary of the School Board,  In doing so I took possession of the all of the school records,, which I still have, except the last daily record of the school.  Record of the first annual meeting was on April 12, 1873 and was signed by the following: W.H. Richardson, John Heldman, William Johnson and William Taylor.  A motion was made and carried to levy a tax to pay for a three month school.

The first daily register shows the following students in attendance:  James. W. Wright, Cornelius Wright, Monroe Wilkerson, Marion Wilkerson, Alvin Hughs,John Rake, W.H. White, C.W. Henry, James Taylor, Samuel Henry, S. Rake, Mary E. Hughes, Susan Rake, Martha Rake, Serrilda Taylor and Milda Taylor.  Ages varied from age 4 to13.

The records I have of Marion (Dog Holler) District are from 1871 to 1894.  It is interesting to note the difference in the signatures of persons who have signed their names on teachers' contracts, annual and special school meetings, etc.  Some are almost impossible to read, others have the curves and shades of the old Spencerian style..to the point that it looks impossible to put on paper with a free hand in pen and ink.

At the Annual Meeting of the Board of School Directors on April 16, 1874, a site for the new schoolhouse was discussed but nothing decided.  Wm. H. Henry was elected President, Thomas T. Tharp, Secretary and they hired Ella Burwell to teach a three months' term for $23.00.  They rented a room of Edwin Opdyke for $9.00 and hired W.H. Henry to furnish a stove and wood for $1.00.

At an Annual Meeting on April 6,1875 the site for the new schoolhouse was decided upon; south of the Hickory Grove school, at or near the center of the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 28, Township 65, Range 27, land owned by W.H. Richardson. 

 At an Annual Meeting on April 2, 1878 the Board voted an order to be drawn in favor of W.H. Richardson in the amount of $20.00 for a house to be used for school purposes, for a term of two years.

At an Annual Meeting on May 14, 1878, the Board hired W.H. Richardson and H.C. Busler to build the foundation for the schoolhouse for $18.75 and Jesse Opdyke to build it for $333.00.  Peter Wyant was hired to furnish lime and dob under the sills for $1.00 and Peter Rinehart was to furnish four cords of wood at $2.00 per cord.

When the Ridgeway School was orgainized in 1880, it took in 80 acres of the area included in this school district so after this time only part of the children in the north part of town attended the Marion (Dog Holler) School.

Teachers at Marion (Dog Holler) School were: Bertha Combs, Grace Murray, Ruth Lamb, Stella Ballew and Charley Kern. From 1907 to 1921 the teachers were: Esther Lollars, Maun (Wiley) Polson, Leona Maple and Rae Redinger.

Teachers at the Marion School were: Ella Burwell, W.R. Hill, J.M. West, Lydia Opdyke, John Dunnagan, J.T. Kirk, W.A. Reeves, Melville, Hardin, C.W. Robertson, Hannah M. Sinderson, J.V. Mills, H.L. Yeater, W.S. Grant, Maude Daugherty, Cora Grant, Minnie Baldwin, S.G. Wright, Carrie Morris, Mary Kinkaid, George Crabb and May Taylor, these were the teachers up to 1894.

excerpts of article written by Elmer C.Rinehart, February 1971
transcribed by Melody Beery
source: Ridgeway: Then and Now 1880-1890



Marion School (Dog Holler)

The Marion School was located one mile North of Ridgeway on the West side of the road.The attendance in this school in the early 1900's  was usually small, between  ten and twenty pupils.

A new schoolhouse was built about 1917 or 1918. This building was moved to the school ground at Ridgeway and used as an extra classroom  and later for Vocational Agriculture work.  During  the 1924-1925 school  year, the second grade was in this building and was taught by the Senior Teachers Training  Students,  under the supervision of Miss Cassie Banks,teacher's training instructor.

submitted by: Mae Bender
transcribed by: Melody Beery
Source: Ridgeway Centennial Book 1880-1980


 
 



Return to Main Page

Return to Country Schools Main Page




Copyright © Genealogy Trails All Rights Reserved with Full Rights Reserved for Original Contributor