Genealogy Trails
Jefferson County, Missouri Genealogy Trails


Biographies
"A"


John O. Ackerson, store-keeper, Crystal City, is deserving of more than a passing notice in the present volume. He is a native of Newark, Wayne Co., N. Y., and was born October 8, 1843, the eldest son of Paul A. and Mary S. (Olmsted) Ackerson, natives, respectively, of New Jersey and Connecticut. He received but a common-school education, and since his twelfth year has found the means of his own support, having been occupied at various callings until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the One Hundred and Sixtieth New York Volunteers, being in the service about three years, and being promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the Seventeenth United States Infantry. He was on detached service as aid-de-camp at division headquarters, and served at the siege of Port Hudson, La., being in the Department of the Gulf, going to that department with Banks' expedition from New York. At the close of the war Mr. Ackerson secured employment with the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company, with whom he remained four years, when he engaged as book-keeper of the Second National Bank of St. Louis, which position he held over four years. He then accepted the position of cashier of the Granby Mining and Smelting Company, of Granby, Mo., where he remained some four or five years. In January, 1884, his excellent business qualifications and ability led to his being placed in charge of the large retail store of the Crystal Plate Glass Company, at Crystal City, where he has since been employed. His connection with the affairs of this company has proved highly beneficial, and it is owing largely to his management that the business has increased to such an extent. October 8, 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Fowler, an estimable lady, daughter of William Fowler; she is of English parentage, and was born on English soil. Mr. and Mrs. Ackerson are the parents of four children, viz. : Blanche, Hersey, Neale and John O. Mr. Ackerson is a member of the American Legion of Honor, and holds membership in the Legion of Honor in St. Louis. He was at one time city treasurer of Granby, Newton Co., Mo.

William J. Adams,
a native of Reynolds County, Mo., was born on the 4th of July, 1849, and is the youngest of fourteen children born to William and Mary (Parker) Adams, who came from near Nashville, Tenn., to Missouri, in 1821, locating in Reynolds County. William Adams resided in Reynolds County until shortly before the breaking out of the late war, when he went to Texas and remained until the cessation of hostilities, when he returned to Missouri, where he died in 1866, at a ripe old age. When William J. was but seven years of age his mother died, after which he lived with his elder sister for a number of years. His education was that usually obtained in the common schools, and, being homeless, he was compelled to work during the summer, attending school only during the winter. At the age of twenty-five he was united in marriage to Miss Sally S. Puckett, the event taking place near Festus, April 22, 1873. She is a daughter of Robert and Eliza (Silva) Puckett, and was born August 24, 1852, They have had four children, only two of whom are living: William Herbert, born January 31, 1874; Robert Lasey, born May 10, 1875. The deceased are Allen Nelson, born August 1, 1880, died April 20. 1881; and Julia Ester, born December 26, 1883, died December 22, 1887. In 1872 Mr. Adams established a hack line from Bailey Station to Crystal City, which venture was made with but a small capital, but proved remunerative to such a degree that the proceeds enabled him to purchase forty acres of land on the present site of Festus. This tract, which was heavily timbered, Mr. Adams cleared, and in 1876 sold the first business lot in what is now the town of Festus to T. J. Loveless, who established a retail grocery thereon. After this he disposed of several other lots to those desirous of engaging in business, the proceeds of which he devoted to improvements, and has built several commodious residences. The development of the town was so rapid that in 1885 he was induced to erect a commodious hotel building, the Adams House, which he still owns and has the management of. He is also the owner of three houses and lots in the town. At present he is a member of the board of aldermen, and at one time served as school director. He and wife are members of the old school Presbyterian Church. In matters political he has always voted the Democratic ticket, but is liberal minded.

John F. Adams, bridge contractor and practical blacksmith, is a resident of New Haven, and a native of Virginia, born in 1839. His parents, George and Nancy (Anderson) Adams, were also natives of Virginia, where they were reared, married, and where the father died in 1847. The mother is still living. Our subject was reared by the filial care of a mother, and secured a fair education in the common schools. In 1859 he went to St. Louis, and from there to Louisiana, Mo., where he worked at his trade. He made a trip to his home in 1800, but soon returned to Louisiana at about the time of the breaking out of the late war. He espoused the Union cause, and, in-August, 1861, enlisted in Company H, of Henderson's brigade, and after about five months' service (the time of enlistment) he re-enlisted February, 1862, in Company C, Third Missouri Cavalry, and remained in service in Arkansas and Missouri until March, 1865, participating in all the engagements in which his command took part. He was captured at Centerville, Mo., just before Christmas, 1803, and held a prisoner four days, when he was retaken by his command. He was discharged at Macon City, in March, 1865, after which he returned to Louisiana, Mo., and resumed his trade. In 1866 he wedded Miss Martha C, a native of Indiana, and the daughter of John S. and Elizabeth Tipton. Seven children were born to this union, only one now living, viz.—Ida R In 1878 our subject left Louisiana and came to New Haven, where he has since made his home. He continued blacksmithing until about 1882, since which time he has engaged in contracting and building bridges for the county and for various railroad companies. He also runs his shop by employes. In 1880 he was chairman of the board of town trustees, and this was followed by three terms as mayor of the city. He has been a Republican in politics since the war, and cast his first presidential vote for 8. A. Douglas. He is a member of the A. 0. U. W., a member of the G. A. R., has taken one degree in Masonry, and belongs to the Baptist Church. Mr. Adams learned his trade in early life, and has followed it more or less ever since.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

William Ahrens, manufacturer and dealer in foreign and domestic cigars, of Washington, Mo., is a native of Westphalia, Germany, born in 1858; son of Ernest and Mary Ahrens, natives of Germany, born in 1822 and 1824, respectively. The father was a teamster and mail carrier. He died in 1873, and his widow in 1879. Of their twelve children only three are now living, viz.: William (our subject), August, painter in Wichita, Kas., and Augusta, in Germany. Our subject was educated in his native country, and at the age of thirteen commenced learning his trade, working as an apprentice for three years.  He afterward worked as a journeyman in Germany until 1880, when he immigrated to the United States, and for three years worked in various cities throughout the Union. In 1883 he came to Washington, Mo., established his factory and began the manufacture of cigars on his own responsibility. He manufactures about 108,000 per annum and makes ten different brands. His best, however, are "Little Billy," "Stonewall," and "Washington's Daisies." Mr. Ahrens is a first-class workman and a good business man.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Henry Alberswerth,
dealer in general hardware and farm machinery, at New Haven, is a native of Lyon Township, Franklin Co., Mo., born in 1850, and the son of Fritz and Wilhelmina (Oberwortman) Alberswerth, natives of Germany, who came with their parents to Franklin County, Mo., and were here married about 1848. They located in Lyon Township, where the mother died when our subject was quite young. The father died in 1809, at the age of thirty-four. He spent a few years in St Louis after coming to the United Slates, having a position in the post office, but passed the greater portion of his time engaged in agricultural pursuits. Henry remained with different relatives until about fifteen years of age, his entire schooling being not more than a few months. He then began for himself at such work as he could obtain until 1872, when he was united in marriage to Miss Caroline, daughter of William and Charlotte Koch, natives of Germany. Mrs. Alberswerth was born in Franklin County, and by her marriage became the mother of six children, five now living, viz : Ida, William, Edward, Amanda and Caroline. After marriage our subject first located on the old home place in Lyon Township, and this farm he afterward purchased. It consisted of 300 acres, on which he lived and fanned until February, 1885,when he removed to New Haven, and has since been engaged in the hardware business with very good success. Politically a Republican, he cast his first presidential vote for J. G. Blaine. Although not identified with any religious denomination he and family are regular attendants and supporters of the Evangelical Church.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Edward J. Alberswerth, a native farmer of Boeuf Township, and the elder of the two sons of Franz and Frederica (Fleer) Alberswerth, was born in 1859. Franz Alberswerth, a native of Hanover, Germany, born in 1836, was brought to the United States by his parents, Henry and Margaret Alberswerth, when but three years old. They located in Franklin County, six miles south of Berger Station, where they spent the remainder of their lives, and where Franz, the father of Edward J., still resides. He is one of the well-to-do pioneer farmers of the county, where he has led an industrious, though uneventful life. He has been twice married, his first wife being the mother of our subject, by whom he had two children, Edward J. and Arnold F. Mrs. Alberswerth died in 1802, and in 1864 Mr. Alberswerth married Miss Annie Fleer, a sister of his first wife, and both natives of Germany. By the latter union there were nine children, six of whom are living: George H., Augusta, Lena, Emma, Frank and Louis. Politically Mr. Alberswerth has been a life-long Republican. He and his wife are faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Edward J. Alberswerth studied German and English in the public schools, and spent two years at the Central Wesleyan College at Warrenton, after which he taught successfully three terms of school. Since then he has been engaged in farming, and has recently purchased 200 acreB of land, about ten miles south of Hermann, Gasconade County, where ho intends making his future home in the pursuit of agriculture. He is an industrious and rising young man, and bids fair to become one of the foremost farmers of Gasconade County. He adheres to the same political views as his father.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Charles Alder, farmer and stock raiser of Boeuf Township, Franklin Co., Mo., is the fifth of seven children born to John and Frances (Rogers) Alder. The father was born in Baltimore, Md., in 1790, and was of English descent. He was roared principally in Virginia, and when young learned the shoemaker's trade, which occupation he followed until thirty years of age. When about twenty-two he started for the West, but stopped at different places to work, so that he was several years reaching Missouri. In 1880, prior 10 his marriage, he settled upon the farm where Charles now resides. This is situated three and a half miles south of New Haven. Here he died in 1873. He was a man of industrious and temperate habits, nod was universally respected. He started life a poor boy. and, at the time of his death, was worth, perhaps, $20,000, owning over 300 acres of land. The mother was born iu Kentucky, and died in 1874, at the age of fifty-seven years. They wore married in the year 1882. She was a member of the Christian Church. Charles was born April 8, 1810, was reared at home, and received but a limited education, not having attended over four winter terms of school. June 16. 1873, he married Miss Augusta, daughter of Daniel F. and Wilhelmina Byersdorf, natives of Germany. Mrs. Aider was born in Gasconade County, Mo., and by her marriage became the mother of two children: Jessie and John Arthur. Our subject has passed his entire life on the farm where he was born and roared, which now consists of 270 acres. He is a Republican in his political views, and cast his first presidential vote for Gcu. Grant in 1872. He has been for many years a faithful and consistent member of the Christian Church. He has five sisters living—two in Callaway County, two in Franklin County, and one In Kansas.   All are married.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

John A. Alderson, a native of Powhattan County, Va,, was born October 22, 1825, and is a son of Wilkins Alderson, also a native of Powhattan County, who immigrated to St. Louis County, Mo., in the fall of 1836. John A. Alderson removed to Jefferson County, in 1838; the country was then very sparsely settled and wild animals and Indians found the dense forests suited for their shelter. Mr. Alderson was first engaged in hauling lead to St. Louis, a distance of fifty-five miles, and returning with loads of goods and provisions. He has devoted the greater part of his tin^us to farming, but has engaged in mining some during the winter season. He owns about 300 acres of land, which he devotes to farming and stock raising. October 17, 1847, he married Mary, daughter of Samuel B. Craig, an early settler of Washington County. Mrs. Alderson died March 6, 1861. the mother of six children, of whom but two are living: William and Solomon. June 7, 1863, Mr. Alderson married Lucy Stevens, daughter of William Stevens, of Valle Township. Of the eight children born to this union seven survive, viz. : Emma, Amanda, Walter, Berkles, Susan, Edward and Ella.

George Arnold,
dealer in farm machinery, at Kimmswick, was born in Rock Township, Jefferson Co., Mo., in 1861, and is the eldest child born to Xavier and Mary (Heinbach) Arnold. He was educated at Kimmswick and Maxville, was reared on a farm, where he remained until 1884, when he established himself in the business, as above staled, and at which he has been very successful. He is a man of good business ability, is industrious and energetic, and a promising future is open before him. He has also a farm of thirty acres on what is known as the Small Island, opposite Kimmswick, on the Mississippi River. He is a Republican in politics, and his first presidential vote Was for James G. Blaine. Xavier Arnold, his father, and a successful farmer and stock raiser of Rock Township, is a native of Mullkerche, France, born in 1837, and the second of six children born to George and Magdalena Arnold, also natives of France, but, who, in about 1842, came to the United States, and after spending about one year in Texas came to Jefferson County, Mo., settling in Rock Township, where George Arnold spent his life engaged in farming. He died at Maxville about 1876. His wife died March, 1884, aged seventy-nine. Xavier Arnold was reared in the primitive days of Jefferson County, and with limited means for an education. In 1860 he married Miss Mary, daughter of John Heinbach, who was a native of Germany, but who was living in Jefferson County at this time, The following ten children were the result of this marriage: George, John, Edward, Joseph, Florence, Louisa, wife of George Sitz; Katie, wife of Rudolph Reiser; Maggie, Caroline and Anna. Since his marriage, Mr. Arnold has lived one and three-fourths miles west of Kimmswick, where he has 140 acres, mostly the result of his own labor. He was in Col. Yerger's regiment of Enrolled Missouri Militia during the war. Politically a Republican, his first presidential vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln, in 1860. He is a member of the Catholic Church and a man well-known and much esteemed. His wife died September 1, 1884.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Monroe Allen was born in Miller County, Mo., April 1, 1843, and is the son of Joel and Jemimah (Gardner) Allen, both of whom were natives of Barren County, Ky. The father was horn August 4, 1808, and died in Franklin County, Mo., November 20, 1884. The mother was born in Miller County, Mo., and died in the same county when Monroe was but a child of four years. The family camo to Missouri in 1840, and finally located in Miller County, but from there moved to St. Louis County in 1864, and one year later moved to Franklin County, Mo., where the father died. He was a farmer by occupation, and the son of Isaiah and Rachel (Brown) Allen, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Isaiah Allen was born April 15, 1786, and died on the farm on which our subject is now living, January 17, 1860. He come from Kentucky to Missouri when his son, Monroe's father, came and located in Miller County. He afterward moved with him to St. Louis County, and from there to Franklin County. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. His wife was bora September 25, 1788, and died in Franklin County at the advanced ago of ninety-two years. Joel Allon, after the death of his wife, married Elizabeth Shelton, ua native of Tennessee. Monroe received the rudiments of an English education in the schools of Miller County, and, after moving to Franklin County, farmed one year with his father, after which he purchased laod, and began farming on his own resources; this he has continued ever since. Septembers, 1868, he married Nancy J. Reed, a native of Miller County, Mo., born April 2, 1844, and the daughter of David and Elizabeth Reed. To this union five children have been born, nil of whom are now living: Frank B., Mary O., Joseph R., Anna J. and Alice A. David Reed, the father of Mrs. Allen, was born in Cole County, Mo., in 1808, and died in Howell County, Mo., December 25, 1871. He was a farmer, and for many years held offices in Miller County, such as judge, assessor and sheriff. His wife was born in Wythe County, Va., in 1811, and died in Howell County, Mo., in 1874. The father served under Gen. Price in the late war, and was wounded at Wilson Creek. Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, of which he waa a steward. Mr. Allen now owns 180 acres of some of the best land in Franklin County, and is a successful farmer. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church, he being deacon in the same. He is also overseer in Excelsior Lodge, No. 899, A. 0. U. W., and a Democrat in politics.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

August Altheide, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Prussia, born March 25,1842, and is the fourth of nine children born to Philip and Hannah (Kampamarm) Altheide, who wore born in 1807 and 1818, respectively.  They were married in 1834, and iu 1852 came to the United States, locating in Boeuf Township, where they spent the remainder of their Uvea, dying in 1884.  the mother is still living.   When a young man the father learned the trade of fine linen weaving, and followed this occupation while in the old country, where he had several men under his control a portion of the time.   After coming to this country he attended exclusively to his farm.   August was but ten years old when he came with his parents to the United States.   He spent about three years at school in Prussia, and, after coming to the United States, only about three months in the public schools.   He had a great desire to learn the English language, and availed himself of every opportunity to further his knowledge in that direction.   In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Fifth Missouri Cavalry of " Benton's Hussars," which in November was consolidated with the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, serving in Company M, and afterward in Company D.  He opperated in Southwest Missouri and Arkansas until the spring of 1863, when he went to Columbus, Ky., spent one year, then went to Mississippi and Tennessee, and in January, 1865, was camped at Vicksburg, where he was mustered out May 24 of the Baino year.   His first important engagement was with Gen. Forrest at Ivy Town, Miss., February 22,1864, at which place he displayed much gallantry, and had his horse shot from under him.  The second important battle was at Guntown, Miss., June 10, 1804, and the third on December 28, 1864, at Egypt Station, Miss.   He was in nearly all the engagements in which his command participated, entered the rauks as a private, and was mustered out as corporal of Company D.  He then returned to Franklin County, remained there until 1867, when he spent one year as a clerk in a grocery store at St. Louis, but was obliged to abandon this on account of his health, and returned to the farm.  In 1870 he clerked for about nine months in a store at Drake, Gasconade Co., Mo., and in 1872 was elected constable of Boeuf Township, and served until the year 1876, when he was elected township collector. Since then he has been a member of the school board.  March, 1877, he married Miss Anna, daughter of Christian H. and Louisa Gerding, and a native of Boeuf Township.   Four children were born to this marriage: Alfred A. S., A. L. A., Frederick William Herman and Anna.  Mrs. Altheide was educated in Colorado, and was for several years a successful teacher.  Our subject, since his marriage, has.resided on the old home place, situated five miles southwest of New Haven, and this consists of 183 acres, all the result of diligent labor and successful financiering.  Mr. Altheide is an honest worker for the cause of education and the general upbuilding of the country, and for the comfort and advancement of his family.   He is a Republican, politically, and cast his first presidential vote for Lincoln in 1864.   He is quartermaster of the "Capt. Blaudowsky Post" G. A. R., at New Haven.  He and his wife are consistent members of the Evangelical Church.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Louis A. Ambs, the subject of this sketch, is one of the young and leading business men of Union. Franklin Co., Mo., and proprietor of the leading harness and saddle establishment In the place. lie was born In the city of St. Louis, Mo., August 16,1659, and is the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Dotzel) Ambs, both of whom were natives of Germany, the father born in 1824, and the mother in 1822. The father immigrated to America in 1644, and located in St. Louis, Mo. He was a cabinetmaker by trade, but for the last thirty years of his life was engaged In the wholesale liquor business in St. Louis, first under the firm title of Jacob Ambs & Co., and last of Jacob Ambs Distilling Company. He was quite prominent In business circles in St. Louis, and was a highly respected citizen. His death occurred In July, 1885. The mother died In February, 1881, and was the daughter of George Dolzel, who settled in Union, Franklin Co., Mo., and carried on a boot and shoe business until his death. Our subject was reared in St Louis, and received a good education in the common schools and in a private German institute. At the age of fifteen be learned the saddle and harness-maker's trade, serving an apprenticeship of four years. For the next seven years he was engaged as traveling salesman for his father's business, and two more years were passed in traveling for J. D. Sickle's Saddlery Company, of St Louis. In 1880 he married Miss Rosa Spilker, daughter of August Spilker, of St. Louis, who now makes his home with his daughter. To this union one son. Lewis Jacob, was born, July 21, 1881. Mr. Ambs located in Union in the spring of 1887, and opened up his present business. He erected a large, two-story building in Oak Street, where he bas a large and increasing business.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Valentine Anderes, a native of St. Gall, Switzerland, was born in 1838, the youngest of the eleven children born to Sebastian and Mary Ann (Mador) Anderes, the former of whom was a successful farmer. ValentineAnderes was educated in the common schools of bis native country, ond reared on a farm until ten years of age, when his parents died and he was thrown upon his own resources. He workod in cotton factories for the following four years, when he went to St Gall to learn the locksmith's trade, which he followed until seventeen years of age. He next engaged In railroading for six years, being employed as fireman and engineer on the Union Swiss Railroad, until, on account of ill health, he was forced to give up that work. He kept a hotel in St. Gall until 1869, when he came to the United States, settling at Gray's Summit. Mo., where he engaged in peddling goods until 1871, when he opened a store, which be conducted about two and one-half years, or until December, 1873, when he lost about $5,000 by fire. He subsequently engaged in farming for four years, peddled goods one year, opened store again in 1879, and met with good success. In 1881 he purchased another farm near Pacific, which ho kept improving until about three months ago, when ho opened the Continental Hotel, in Pacific, under the firm name of V. Anderes & Sons. He was married, in 1861, to Miss Elizabeth Baumgartner, a native of Switzerland, who died in 1882, having been divorced from Mr. Anderes in December, 1872. They had five children: Emil, Frederic, Bertha, Frida and Ida. In April, 1873. Mr. Anderes married Miss Ida Vallmcr, a native of Franklin County, of German descent Six children blessed this union, viz.: Otto, "Walter(deceased), Valentla, Edgar, Henry (deceased) and Blanche. Mr. Anderes is a member of the Catholic Church. He is independent In politics, but Democratic In principle.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

H. Arand, the subject of this sketch, was born in Union, Franklin Co., Mo., September 31,1856, and Is the son of C. and Anna E. (Wiegel) Arand. both of whom are natives of Germany.   The father was born in Heiglenstadt, Prussia. August 10,1825, and immigrated to America in 1850, locating in New Orleans, from which place he removed to St. Louis, Mo. He located in Union in March, 1856, and has since resided here. He is a dealer In boots and shoes, and a shoe-maker by trade. He carries a complete line of custom and hand-made boots and shoes, and is meeting with success. The mother was born in Freinhogan, Prussia, May 18, 1828, and immigrated to America in 1848, locating in St. Louis, and was here married to Mr. Arand. Their family consisted of six children, four of whom arc now living. Our subject was reared in Union, and attended the public schools until his fifteenth year, securing a fair education. He was engaged with his father in business until 1885, and on July 25 of that year he was commissioned postmaster of Union, a position he now holds.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

James Armstrong was born in Greenbrier County, Va., April 9. 1818, and when quite young accompanied his father's family to Chariton County, then Territory of Missouri, in 1819. In 1820 they moved to Laboddie Bottom, Franklin County, in which vicinity and the neighborhood of Washington young James was brought up. In 1822 his father died. In the original family of three daughters and four sons all are deceased save one daughter, now Mrs. Harvey Campbell, who lives near Washington, and the subject of this sketch. In 1840 Mr. Armstrong married Miss Cynthia Ann Hinton, daughter of Col. C. B. Hinton, a prominent citizen living near Washington. He moved to his present residence in the western part of the county (Section 84, Township 44. Range 4 west) in 1848. settling on Government land, and living on it until he bad accumulated means with which to enter it. As might well be supposed, neighbors at that time were scarce, and many hardships were undergone in establishing a homo amid such pioneer surroundings. Mr. Armstrong raised six children to be grown—four sons and two daughters. Two of the former are now living in Kansas City, and two sons and a daughter reside near the old homestead. One married daughter died in 1807. Mrs. Armstrong died in 1886. Mr. Armstrong has never held any office excopt that of justico of the peace. He was deputy collector about the year 1858. He has never taken auy active part in politics, but has exercised his right of suffrage in a conscientious manner, casting his ballots ouly for men he believed to be pure and upright and qualified for the position they were seeking, and only for measures which had for their end the advancement of the principles of good government.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

Marsters L. Armstrong, a farmer of Franklin County, and a son of James and Cynthia A. (Hinton) Armstrong, was born in Franklin County, December 26, 1845. He was reared on the farm, and educated in the primitive log scbool-house of forty years ago. Upon reaching years of manhood he clerked in a store for about two years. In 1869 he married Miss Martha E. Walton, a native of this county and the daughter of Haradco 0. Walton. After marriage Mr. Armstrong moved to Saline Comity, where he farmed until 1871, after which he moved back to Franklin County, and has made ithis home ever since. The same year his wife died, and three years later he married Mary E. Bridges, also a native of Franklin County, born January 28,1855, and the granddaughter of H. O. Walton. One daughter, Martha L., was the result of his first marriage, and three sons the result of the second marriage. They ore named as follows: Edwin E., Charles L., and Hamdcu C. After farming until 1881 Mr. Armstrong opened a store in Beemont, which he ran for about six years, having a very liberal patronage. Finding the confinement irksome he returned to forming, and now has a farm of seventy-two acres. He is a stanch Democrat, and for three years hold the position of deputy assessor.  He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, as was also his first wife. Be is a man of good business qualities, and, with the exception of about two years, has made Franklin County his home. In 1864 he volunteered in Company D, Forty-seventh Missouri Infanlry (United Slates army), and served until the close of the war.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

 Lucius D. Ashcraft is a native of Harrison County, Ky., and was born September 3, 1845, and is a son of Ellis and Elizabeth (Keith) Ashcraft, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Lucius D. Ashcraft was reared on a farm, and received his education in the primitive log schoolhouse of his native county. In 1873 he settled on a farm of 73 acres, in Central Township, Jefferson Co., Mo., which has since been his home; he also owns 121 acres besides, and a one-quarter interest in 80 acres of Lee Mines, this county. With the exception of seventeen months spent in the employ of the Iron Mountain Railroad, as repairer and inspector of cars in the De Soto yards, Mr. Ashcraft has always followed agricultural pursuits. June 5, 1873, occurred his marriage to Lizzie J. Lee, daughter of Archilles and Rebecca (Null) Lee, early settlers of Jefferson County, both now deceased. Mr. Lee was a cousin of the noted Robert E. Lee. To Mr. and Mrs. Ashcraft have been born five children, four of whom are living: Elba M., Etta P., Annie L. and Charles D. Mr. Ashcraft took his first degree in Masonry the night he was twenty-one years old, in Thomas Ware Lodge, No. 340, of Claysville, Ky., and is now a member of the De Sota Lodge. He is not a member of any church, but is a strong advocate of temperance. Politically, he is a Democrat. Mrs. Ashcraft has been a member of the Christian Church for the past twenty years.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888

 Joseph M. Aubuchon is a native of Washington County, Mo., and was born March 7, 1848, the third son of eight children born to Francis T. and Julia (Goza) Aubuchon, of French and American ancestry, but both natives of Washington County. Joseph M. Aubuchon received a common literary education, which was polished by a six months' course in the business college of Rice & Stuart, St. Louis. He was reared on a farm, but at the age of sixteen commenced to learn the blacksmith's trade. To this business he gave his attention until he had reached the age of twenty-five, when he engaged in retail merchandising at Palmer, Washington County, continuing about three years, removing his stock to Festus in 1878; where he carried on the same business for several years. Since 1879 he has given his almost undivided attention to furnishing sand to the Crystal Plate Glass Company, of Crystal City, as well as several other houses in St. Louis and elsewhere, in which he has been successful to a satisfactory degree. He is at present the owner of several houses and lots in Festus, also a half-interest in the business block occupied by Aubuchon & Brierton, general merchants in Festus. May 26, 1876, he was united in marriage with Miss Fannie Parkin, a native of the same county as himself. This union has been blessed with the birth of five children, viz.: Francis J., Theodore, William, Charles and Clarence. The family hold to the Catholic faith, and in politics Mr. Aubuchon is a Democrat.
History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties Missouri Goodspeed Publishing Company 1888




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