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Jefferson County, Missouri Genealogy Trails

Military Record


MILITARY RECORD.

The Early Wars.—Prior to the late Civil War no organized bodies of soldiers were raised in Jefferson County; but of the early pioneers Benjamin Johnston, Jr., Landon Williams, William Moss, Claiborne Thomas, William Huskey, John Ogle, Thomas Print, James Pounds and James McCulloch, Sr., served in the war with Great Britain, in 1812, from this county. When the news of Jackson's victory at New Orleans, in 1815, reached here, the old town of Herculaneum was illuminated, as was also Harrisonville, on the Illinois side of the river. It is probable that a few men of Jefferson County served in the Florida and Mexican Wars. On the approach of the war of 1861-65, between the States of the Union, it is believed that a large majority of the people of Jefferson County were in favor of State sovereignty, and were in sympathy with the Southern cause, but not to that extent as to make them in favor of secession. At the election held on the 18th day of February, 1861, to elect delegates to a State convention, to " consider the then existing relations between the United States, the people and government of the different States, and the government and people of the State of Missouri; and to adopt such measures for vindicating the sovereignty of the State and the protection of its institutions, as shall appear to them to be demanded," the Union delegates carried Jefferson County by an overwhelming majority, thus showing a strong opposition to secession. The people of Jefferson County preferred to remain in the Union, and, if possible, maintain State sovereignty and State neutrality.

Mass Meetings.—With these preferences in view, a meeting of the citizens was held at Hillsboro early in the spring of 1861, when speeches were made and a flag, with a State's rights motto inscribed upon it, was raised. Great excitement then prevailed, and the news soon spread abroad that a secession flag had been hoisted at Hillsboro. This was believed by many who were not in attendance at the meeting and who were not acquainted with the facts. After the National flag had been fired upon at Fort Sumter, and President Lincoln had issued his first call for troops, the sympathy in favor of the South grew stronger, and a call was made for a public meeting to be held at De Soto, on the 16th day of May following. A pole was raised, and on that day a flag, with a single star, emblematic of State sovereignty, was to be suspended thereon. It was understood that this meeting was to be composed of those who were in deep sympathy with the southern cause. Accordingly, on the morning of the day appointed, the citizens began to assemble at De Soto, and a company of seventy-five mounted men, from St. Francois County, were on hand. At this juncture a railroad train, with a company of Union troops, under command of Capt. Nelson Cole, arrived from St. Louis. When these soldiers began to emerge from the cars the men from St. Francois County mounted their steeds and quietly retired, and thus avoided a collision. The flag had not yet been raised, but the soldiers at once cut the pole down, and then began a search for the flag, and the meeting called for the occasion was " declared off." The flag was finally found, after a lady, who was trying to conceal it, had sat on it nearly all day. On the same occasion a detachment of Cole's company went to Hillsboro to capture the so-called secession flag that had previously been raised at the former meeting held at that place, and when they found it they declared it was not a " secession flag," and that it was good enough for them, and at once ordered it to be raised with the injunction that it should be protected. After being much worn it was taken down, and having become historic, it passed into the possession of the ladies of the vicinity, many of whom soon had a piece of it in their bed quilts.

Capt. Cole's men were the first soldiers who performed service in Jefferson County during the Civil War. No organized body of men went into the Confederate army from Jefferson County during the struggle, but it is estimated that nearly 200 individuals, from first to last, went out of the county and joined various Confederate commands, including those who went into the State Guards, where they served only a short time.

The Sixth Regiment.—The early and subsequent occupation of the county by the Federal authorities gave an opportunity for the formation of companies for the United States' service, the first one of which was organized in June, 1861, and mustered into the service as Company B, Sixth Infantry, Missouri Volunteers. The following is the roster of the officers of the company, showing names, dates, promotions, resignations, etc:

Captains—John W. Fletcher, commissioned December 20, 1861, promoted major January 2-1, 1862; Charles C. Fletcher, commissioned March 5, 1862, resigned February 5, 1863; T. L. Harrington, commissioned February 18, 1863, resigned January 31, 1865; Wesley Starkley, commissioned June 12, 1865, mustered out August 17, 1865. First lieutenants—Charles C. Fletcher, commissioned December 26, 1861. promoted captain March 5, 1862; T. L. Harrington, commissioned March 5, 1862 promoted captain February 6, 1863; Joseph F. Dutch, commissioned February 18, 1863, mustered out on expiration of term; Wesley Starkley, commissioned April 21, 1865, promoted captain; Fred. W. Yemier, commissioned June 12, 1865, mustered out August 17, 1865. Second lieutenants—Elwood W. Miller, commissioned December 26, 1861, transferred to First Missouri Artillery; Thomas J. King, commissioned March 5, 1862, promoted first lieutenant Company C, March 5, 1862; J. G. Ehomeberg, commissioned July 6, 1862, promoted first lieutenant Company I, February 2, 1863; Philip H. Snider, commissioned February 18, 1863, died of wounds, May 14, 1861.

Maj. John W. Fletcher resigned his commission on June 6, 1862. Rev. Samuel Hoffman of Jefferson County was mustered into the service as the first chaplain of this regiment, and served as such until September 7, 1862, when he resigned the office.

The Sixth Regiment of Infantry, Missouri Volunteers, was raised at St. Louis, Mo., in the months of May and June, 1861. On about July 10 it was ordered to Pilot Knob, Mo. ; from there it marched to Greenville, Mo., on a reconnoitering expedition. It returned to Pilot Knob in the month of July, where it remained until the middle of September ; from there it proceeded to Jefferson City, Mo., via St. Louis Arsenal; from there it marched to and encamped at Tipton, Mo., where it remained until the march of the noted Fremont expedition to Springfield, Mo., in October, 1861. It returned to Tipton in the latter part of November; from there it marched to Lamine; thence proceeded with the command of Gen. Pope to Johnson County, Mo. It then returned to Lamine cantonment; thence to Tipton, Mo., where it remained a few days only, and returned to Lamine again; there it was assigned the duty of guarding the Pacific Railroad from Syracuse to Jefferson City. The regiment was again assembled at Jefferson City in April; from there it proceeded via St. Louis to Corinth, Miss., where it arrived in time to participate in the engagements and skirmishes at that place in June, 1862.

On its arrival before Corinth it was attached to Gen. Sherman's division, which marched from Corinth to La Grange, Tenn., from there to Holly Springs, Miss., then back to La Grange. The division then marched to Moscow, Tenn., on July 8, 1862; from there it marched to Memphis, Tenn., where it remained until October. There it was attached to the Fifteenth Army Corps, which marched to Oxford, Miss., where it remained a few days, and then returned to Memphis, where it embarked for Vicksburg in December, 1862; it took a very prominent part in the assault on Chickasaw Bluffs on the 29th of that month, then embarked and proceeded to Arkansas Post, where it occupied a conspicuous position and suffered severely ; from there it returned to Vicksburg, and was engaged in the siege of that place; thence it moved to Jackson, Miss., and from there back to Big Black, where it encamped until September. It then moved by way of Vicksburg to Memphis, Tenn., and from there marched across the county to reinforce Rosecrans at Chattanooga, where it arrived in time to take an active part in the engagements of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Kidge on November 24 and 25, 1863. Afterward it moved to Larkinsville, Ala., and from there to Knoxville, Tenn. lu February, 1864, the regiment re-enlisted and went home to St. Louis on veteran furlough. Having returned to the field, it took its position, and was with its corps in the general advance in the beginniiig of the Atlanta campaign, and was engaged in the battles of Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro and many lesser engagements during that great campaign. After the capture of Atlanta it went into camp at East Point, Ga. In October, following, it pursued Gen. Hood's army as far as Little River, Ala., and then returned to Atlanta, and on November 15 it started with Sherman's army on the famous march "from Atlanta to the sea." It helped to capture Fort McAllister, Savannah, and other points in Georgia, Beaufort and Columbia, in South Carolina, arriving at the latter place February 17, 1805. Leaving Columbia on the 20tli of the same month, it marched toward Fayetteville, N. C, where it arrived eight days later. On March 20 it assisted in the capture of Bentonville, N. C. Afterward the regiment was present at Raleigh, when the rebel army under Gen. Johnston surrendered to Gen. Sherman. The regiment then moved via Richmond to Washington, where it participated in the grand review, after which it proceeded with the army of the Tennessee to Louisville, Ky. It left Louisville on May 24, and moved to Little Rock, Ark., arriving there July 6, 1805.

On August 17, 1865, just four years and two months from the date of muster into service, the regiment received orders to be mustered out. It then moved to St. Louis, Mo., where it arrived on the 23d of the same month, and after a very handsome public reception, was paid off and discharged. None of the Missouri regiments did more honor to the service, and none hold a higher place in the history of the war.

The Thirteenth Regiment.—A portion of Company I, of the Thirteenth Infantry, Missouri Volunteers, was raised in Jefferson County. The following is the roster of the officers of the company:

Company I.—Captains—A. G. Haile, commissioned September 1, 1861, died of wounds received at Pittsburg Landing; John Creagan, commissioned May 8, 1862, transferred to Ohio, June 17, 1862. First lieutenant, James L. Ferris, commissioned January 18, 1862, resigned March 16, 1862. Second lieutenant, John Creagan, commissioned October 1, 1861, promoted to captain, April 30, 1862.

The following is the order transferring this regiment to the State of Ohio:

Headquarters State op Missouri, Adjutant-General's Office, { St. Louis. June 17, 1862. } Special Orders, No. 80.

In accordance with General Orders, No. 18, current series, from the War Department, and instructions from the adjutant-general's oflBce at Washington, the regiment of infantry known heretofore as the Thirteenth Missouri Volunteers is hereby transferred to the State of Ohio. By order of commander-in-chief.

William D. Wood, Acting Adjutant- General.

In accordance with this order the regiment was transferred to and consolidated with the Twenty-second Ohio, with which it served thereafter.

The Fifth Cavalry.—Company G, of the Fifth Eegiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, was raised in Jefferson County in the spring of 1862. The following is the roster of the officers thereof:

Company G.— Captains—James D. Walters, commissioned April 28, 1862, resigned May 29, 1863; Thomas Thomas, commissioned June 13, 1863, Eureka, Mo., dismissed by Special Order No. 11, adjutant-general's office, Mo., January 21, 1864; John Bracher, commissioned February 18, 1864, mustered out on expiration of term, April 13, 1865. First lieutenants—Thomas Thomas, commissioned April 28, 1862, promoted captain Company G, June 8, 1863; John Bracher, commissioned June 13, 1863, promoted captain Company G, February 4, 1864; Henry T. Dugan, commissioned February 18, 1864, mustered out on expiration of term, April 13, 1865. Second lieutenants—John W. Garrett, commissioned April 28, 1862, resigned July 15, 1862; John Bracher, commissioned July 30, 1862, promoted first lieutenant, June 8, 1863; Adam Hellerich, commissioned July 6, 1863, Kolla, Mo., transferred to consolidated command.

This regiment was originally organized at Boonville, in May, 1862, as the Thirteenth Regiment of Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, with Albert Sigel as colonel and Joseph A. Eppstein as lieuteuant-colonel. When organized it consisted of Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. In February, 1863, the company of cavalry, Missouri State Militia, known as the " Schofield Hussars," commanded by Capt. Napoleon Westerberg, was attached to the Thirteenth as Company I; and at the same time the number of the regiment was changed by general order from the State adjutant-general's office to the Fifth Regiment of Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, the former Fifth having been mustered out. Five companies were then taken from the Twelfth Missouri State- Militia and so consolidated with the Fifth as to make it a full cavalry regiment. Soon after the regiment was organized at Boonville its headquarters were established at Waynesville, in the RoUa District, and remained there until the spring of 1863, when it was moved to Rolla, where it remained until the regiment was mustered out of service. This regiment dyi a great deal of scouting in Missouri, and had many skirmishes with roving bands of the enemy, bushwhackers and rebel recruiting parties. During the Price raid into Missouri, the regiment was engaged with the enemy at Jefferson City, California, Boonville, Lexington, Big Blue, Independence, Hickman Mills, Maries-des-Cygnes and Fort Scott. Its casualties in all these engagements were slight. November 15, 1864, the regiment returned to Rolla, after a forty-eight days' active field campaign, having marched upward of 1,100 miles. The last companies of the regiment were mustered out in April, 1865, at which time the recruits whose term of service had not expired were consolidated into one company, designated M, which remained in the service until July following, when it was mustered out.

The Thirty-first Regiment.—Company A, Thirty-first Infantry, Missouri Volunteers, consisting of 101 men, was raised in Jefferson County, in the summer of 1862. The following is the roster of the officers of the company:

Captains—Oscar Dover, commissioned August 25, 1862, resigned February 20, 1863; George A. Maguire, commissioned April 9, 1863, resigned February 17, 1864; Anton Yerger, commissioned March 11, 1864, refused by governor ; J. F. Hendrickson, commissioned June 16, 1864, discharged August 3, 1864. First lieutenants—John Reed, commissioned August 25, 1862, promoted captain Company I, August 1, 1863; J. F. Hendrickson, commissioned August 15, 1863, promoted captain Company A, June 16, 1864; John F. Webber, commissioned June 16, 1864, mustered out November 9, 1864. Second lieutenant—John Williams, commissioned August 25, 1862, resigned June 19, 1863.

There were also about twenty-five Jefferson County men in Company I of this regiment.

A few Jefferson County men enlisted in the Sixth Eegiment Cavalry, Missouri Volunteers, two battalions of which were mustered out of the service at the expiration of term, in December, 1864, and January, 1865, and the other battalion, composed of the veterans and recruits of the regiment, was mustered out September 12, 1865.

The Forty-seventh Regiment.—Jefferson County furnished a portion of the men composing Company B, of the Forty-seventh Infantry, Missouri Volunteers ; also the first colonel, a lieutenant colonel and adjutant of the regiment. The following is the roster of the officers of Company B:

Colonels—Thomas C. Fletcher, commissioned September 16, 1864, resigned November 18, 1864; Amos W. Maupin, commissioned November 25, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 28, 1865. Lieutenant-colonels—Amos W. Maupin, commissioned September 16, 1864, promoted colonel; John W. Fletcher, commissioned November 26, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 30, 1865. Major—John W. Emerson, commissioned October 8, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 30, 1865. Adjutants—David Murphy, commissioned August 3, 1864, promoted to lieutenant-colonel Fiftieth Missouri Infantry; Edwin E. Furber, commissioned November 18, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, April 1, 1865. Quartermasters— John W. Fletcher, commissioned August 3, 1864, promoted to lieutenant-colonel; Samuel B. Rowe, commissioned November 28, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 29, 1865. Surgeon—J. H. Stumberg, commissioned November 2, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 28, 1865. Assistant surgeon—J. M. Youngblood, commissioned October 22, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 30, 1865. Captain William J. Buxton, commissioned August 25, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 29, 1865. First lieutenant — John C. Hamel, commissioned August 25, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 29, 1865. Second lieutenant—Benjamin F. Butler, commissioned August 25, 1864, mustered out at expiration of term, March 29, 1865.

In August, 1864, Gen. Rosecrans requested Col. Thomas C. Fletcher to organize in Southeast Missouri a regiment of infantry for service in that vicinity. Col. Fletcher was then but recently from Sherman's army, where he had commanded a brigade. Procuring the assistance of experienced officers, whom he chanced to find unemployed, among whom was Maj. John W. Fletcher, who had served in the Sixth Infantry, and also in the Thirtieth, he at once set about to raise the regiment. The loyal men of Southeast Missouri responded to the call, and soon enough men enlisted to form two regiments—the Forty-seventh and Fiftieth. As soon as the Forty-seventh Eegiment was organized (early in September) the companies were sent to their respective counties, as follows: Capt. Weber to Perry County, Capt. St. Gem to Ste. Genevieve, Capts. Mace, McMurtry and Powers to Wayne County, Capt. Adair to St. Francois, Capt. Buxton to Jefferson, Capt. Dinger to Ironton, Capt. Bradley to Fredericktown and Capt. Maupin to the Iron Mountain Railroad to guard bridges. On the approach of Price on his raid into Missouri, in September, 1864, Capt. Weber's company marched to strengthen the garrison at Cape Girardeau. Capts. McMurtry, Mace and Powers bravely fought the enemy at Patterson, and fell back on Pilot Knob. Capt. Bradley also fell back to that place. Capt. Dinger's company, after being badly cut up at Ironton, joined the others at Pilot Knob, where the captain was captured. Companies A, F, G, H and I, being concentrated at Pilot Knob, participated in the gallant defense of Fort Davidson. Col. Fletcher was in command of the regiment. All the officers and men of the regiment bravely performed their duties. Col. Fletcher, Adjt. Murphy and Lieut. -Col. Maupin were mentioned in general orders of Gen. Eosecrans in the highest terms.

On the retreat from Pilot Knob to Leasbarg, a distance of sixty miles, the six companies of the regiment, with the other parts of Gen. Ewing's command, arriving at the latter place tired and hungry, hastily threw up slight works, and for two days defied the whole force of a division of the enemy far superior in numbers. Being reinforced, they pursued their march to Rolla, and there joined Gen. McNeil's cavalry force, consisting of 3,500 men, and moved on to the City of Jefferson, and contributed largely to the safety of the capital. Capt. Maupin with his company (D) had fallen back, and was sent up the Missouri River on a steamboat, on the important and dangerous mission of preventing the enemy from crossing the river. Capt. Buxton with his company (B) had marched to Franklin on the Pacific railroad, and having mounted his men, reported to Gen. Pleasanton, in command of cavalry, and did good service scouting, and participated in some lively skirmishing with the enemy's rear near Franklin. After the enemy had passed beyond the reach of infantry, the companies were again sent to their respective counties. Afterwards the regiment was consolidated, and on December 12, 1864, it started to Nashville, Tenn., and arrived there three days after the battle between Thomas and Hood; thence it marched to Spring Hill, Columbia and Pulaski, Tenn., and guarded the communications of Gen. Thomas until about March 15, 1865. On the 29th and 30th of the same month the regiment was mustered out at Benton Barracks, and the men who had made historic the mountains in sight of their dwellings returned to their homes and resumed their duties as citizens. Sundry MilUary Proceedings.—No regular engagements between the contending armies took place in Jefferson county during the war. Late in 1861, Jeff. Thompson, of Confederate fame, with his command, burned the Iron Mountain Railroad bridge across Big River, on the line between Jefferson and Washington counties. A very slight skirmish took place on the occasion. Though the county was occupied nearly all the time by the Federal authorities, an occasional Confederate scouting party passed through it. In the fall of 1864, when Price made his raid into Missouri, a small command from his army took possession of De Soto and destroyed some property, and then left without further damage. During the war some atrocious things were done by certain Union troops, among which was the killing of Duguid Pitzer, on Medley Hill, while seated in bis wagon on the way to St. Louis, and the killing of Thomas Wall, on Dry Creek, and of Ira D. Drake, on Plattin Creek, and of the two Gamel boys, who had returned from the rebel army. A stranger was also killed at Victoria, as he was passing through. He was supposed to have been engaged in the business of carrying mail to and from the Confederate army. On another occasion, when Capt. Buxton was in the northwest part of the county with his company, or a portion thereof, some of his men shot and killed Noah Wise and James B. Simpson, and seriously wounded Hiram Hilderbrand, Noah Rowe and a Mr. Davis. This took place on Big River, near the Maddox mill. All of the persons mentioned were killed and wounded for no other crime, it is said, than that of being Southern sympathizers ; and the atrocious act of inflicting such punishment was and has always been condemned by all good citizens of both contending parties.

The Eightieth Regiment of Enrolled Missouri Militia was organized in Jefferson County, and the following is the roster of the field and company officers:

Colonels—C. A. Newcomb, commissioned December 31, 1864. vacated March 12, 1865; L. J. Rankin, commissioned October 15, 1863, resigned December 8, 1864. Lieutenant-colonels—Joseph P. Hesser, commissioned October 29, 1863, discontinued June 14, 1864, for disloyalty; Anton Yerger, commissioned September 29, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Major— C. C. Fletcher, commissioned September 29, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Adjutants— J. C. Hamel, captain, commissioned September 16, 1863, resigned October 7, 1864; Fred Bohl, captain, commissioned October 10, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Quartermasters—W. J. Mitchell, captain, commissioned September 16, 1863, vacated Octobers, 1864; H. Kattlemen, captain, commissioned October 8, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Surgeon—William Evans, commissioned September 23, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company A.—Captain—William A. Jackson, commissioned June 12, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenant— John Vineyard, commissioned August 27, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—George Wiley, commissioned August 27, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company B.—Captain — David W. Bryant, commissioned March 12, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants-David W. Bryant, commissioned August 27, 1862, promoted captain May 12, 1864; George Whitehead, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—George E. Whitehead, commissioned August 27, 1862, promoted to first lieutenant.

Company C.—Captains—Henry C. Bonacker, commissioned October 22, 1863, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; Henry C. Bonacker, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants—Martin Swaney, commissioned September 11, 1862, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; Roman Spitz, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants— D. A. Sullens, commissioned September 11, 1862, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; Michael Boly, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company D.—Captain—Christian Lepp, commissioned September 19, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenant Herman Hamel, commissioned September 16, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—Henry C. Lahay, commissioned November 25, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company E.—Captain—William H. Washburn, commissioned August 23, 1862, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants— Frederick Bohl, commissioned September 9, 1863, promoted to adjutant October 7, 1864; John Williams, commissioned November 7, 1 864, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—E. H. Hoard, commissioned September 9, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company F.—Captains—Anton Yerger, commissioned September 11, 1862, promoted to lieutenant-colonel September 29, 1864; Florence Arnold, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenants—Henry Kattleman, commissioned June 30, 1863, promoted to captain and quartermaster; Eugene Armor, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants—Anton Herman, commissioned September 11, 1862, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; George Martin, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company G.—Captain—W. J. Baxton, commissioned May 16, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenant—Henry F. Dittmers, commissioned May 16, 1863, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants—Gustav Duggie, commissioned May 16, 1863, resigned July 9, 1864; John McDaniel, commissioned July 11, 1864, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864.

Company H.—Captains—Peter Fridertze, commissioned October 8, 1863, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; William J. Kirk, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865, First lieutenants—Jacob Hampel, commissioned October 8, 1863, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; Wendlin Bender, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenants— Michael Blaeis, commissioned October 8, 1863, vacated by Special Order No. 126, 1864; Philip Steuber, commissioned November 7, 1864, vacated March 12, 1865.

Company I.—Captain—William F. Ottomier, commissioned February 4, 1865, vacated March 12, 1865. First lieutenant—Joseph Bechter, commissioned February 4, 1865, vacated March 12, 1865. Second lieutenant—B. Schweitzer, commissioned February 4, 1865, vacated March 12, 1865.

This regiment was raised for home service, and was composed of good citizens generally. It has been jocosely remarked of them that " they had no duties to perform except to guard bridges and steal chickens." Some of them claim to have had to guard an iron bridge to keep it from burning even though it was raining at the time. Laying all jokes aside they were good citizens and demeaned themselves with honor.


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