Ray County Missouri

Biographies

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W.B. CARPENTER, M.D.
This gentleman was born in Madison county, Virginia, on the 13th day of September, 1827. He received a classical education, and began the study of medicine at the age of nineteen years. He completed the course, graduating from the Medical University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, in the year 1849, and the following spring commenced the practice of his profession in the Shenandoah Valley, of Virginia, and continued it there, until 1856. He came to Missouri on the 29th day of April, 1856, and located in Lafayette county, where he lived about two years, and then, going to Carroll county, practiced medicine there, for some five years. In February, 1865, he came to Russellville, Ray county, where he located permanently, and has ever since practiced his profession there. He has a fine residence, good barn, orchard, etc., and is very well situated to live comfortably and happily. Dr. Carpenter was married in the year 1852, to Miss Martha C. Winsborough, a native of Virginia, and daughter of William and Julia Winsborough. Six children have been born of this union, named as follows: Emma V., Thomas W., Alice G., Minnie Lee, Joseph and Archie. Dr. Carpenter was a member of the I.O.O.F. in Virginia, and is now a member of the Millville Lodge, of the order of A.F. & A.M. Mrs. Carpenter is a member of the Christian Church. Dr. Carpenter is a successful, able and popular physician, and a highly respected and valuable citizen.
Ray County History 1881

HON. JACOB TRIPLER CHILD
Jacob Tripler Child was born in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January 19, 1833. His father, Ezekiel Child, was a descendant of one of the Quaker families that came with William Penn to America. Some of them still live in Philadelphia, where they first settled. He was a natural mechanic, and spent much of his time in perfecting locomotive steam
engines. He died of cholera, at Richmond, Virginia, in 1856. The mother of the subject of this sketch, Susan I.. Child (whose maiden name was Tripler) was of a Danish family of pioneers that settled in Delaware at a very early day, but afterwards removed to Richmond, Virginia. Ezekiel and Susan h. Child had six children. The eldest, John T. Child, is a citizen of Wilmington, North Carolina; L. T. Child, of Worcester, Massachusetts; Jesse Child, of Richmond, Virginia; Elizabeth L. is now the wife of W. C. Tripler, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Susan is the wife of Colonel James W. Black, a lawyer of Richmond, Missouri, and Jacob T., the subject of this sketch, who is the fourth son. Jacob T. Child received a common school education, and when fifteen years of age, entered the office of the Richmond (Virginia) Whig, where he served an apprenticeship of five years, at the expiration of which time, he was employed in the same office for three years, thus becoming an adept in the profession. In 1856 he, in company with a party of young men, emigrated to Kansas. During the border ruffian troubles, he left that slate and went to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he engaged with the editor of the Cycle. In 1857, he established the triweekly Journal, which in a short time, he converted into a daily—the first in the Missouri valley. In 1861 he sold the 'Journal, and edited the Gazette a short time; after which he founded the Evening- News, a strong democratic paper. He then removed to Richmond, Missouri, and purchased the Northwest Conservator, the name of which he changed to Richmond Conservator, of which he is still (1881) the editor and proprietor. The Conservator has never failed to appear at the appointed day each week—not even on July 14th, 1869, when a tornado unroofed the building. At the beginning of the late civil war, Jacob T. Child accepted the appointment of major, in Governor Stewart's regiment, which, however, did not go into service. He was then appointed adjutant of the 35th Missouri volunteers, and served on the lower Mississippi, under General Grant. He was next promoted to be captain of company F, which position he resigned on account of ill health. He afterwards organized a company of Missouri militia (Papaws), and was chosen first•lieutenant, engaging in active service until the close of the war. In 1874, he represented Ray county in the twenty-seventh general assembly, and served creditably on several important committees. At the close of his term, he was elected mayor of the city of Richmond. Colonel Child has always taken an active part in politics, and has been a delegate to every democratic state convention since his identification with that party. Like many of our great men, he is not renowned for his oratory, but has wide influence with his party, intrepidly using the columns of his paper to advance those measures of state and national politics, which he believes to be conducive to the general welfare of the people. He has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for more than twenty years is now president of the Missouri press association, and has held many other important offices. Jacob T. Child was married April 23d, 1861, to Elizabeth Rebecca McRoberts, o Kentucky, whose father was Major Andrew McRoberts, one of the pioneers of the mountains, and resided at Cumberland Gap, where he was celebrated for his courage, strength and endurance. He and his wife, with whom he has lived for more than fifty years, reside with their daughter in Richmond, Missouri. Colonel and Mrs. Child have five children, four sons
and one daughter. He is a member of the Christian Church, and is deeply interested in everything thai has a tendency to promote the cause of education and religion in the community in which he lives, and his future is full of promise.
Ray County History 1881

LOUIS G. CLEMENTS

Louis G. Clements. Though by no means old in years, our subject is an old settler in Ray County. In fact, he has passed his entire life within its limits, having been born June 2, 1839, not far from his present farm, in township 50, range 28. He is a son of William and Harriet Ann (Gregory) Clements, natives of Amherst County, Va., the father having been born about 1803, and the mother in 1807.
The father of our subject spent the days of his boyhood and youth alternately upon a farm, in the schoolroom, and at the bench of a carpenter, he having learned that trade. He married in his native county and his wife bore him eight children, one of whom died young. In 1829 he journeyed with his family in wagons from Virginia to Ray County, Mo., where he bought one hundred and sixty acres near the farm now owned by our subject. Upon the home there established he remained until his death in 1852. The mother of our subject survived her husband but a few months, dying in the same year. Thus these seven children, being deprived of both parents, were thrown on their own resources.
Our subject at once began to support himself by working upon a farm, and received $9 per month for his services, continuing to work for others for a number of years. In 1857, while yet a boy, he crossed the plains to California, driving a team of cattle the entire distance for others in order to pay his way. After his arrival in the State he located in Sacramento Valley and remained there two years, when he returned by way of the two oceans and resumed his labors as a hired man upon the farm. In 1888 he had accumulated enough money to purchase his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he has improved until he has a good property.
A few years after his return from the West Mr. Clements married Mary, daughter of Henry and Emeline Hill, who bore him four children: Lydia A., Minnie, Lutie, and one child who died young. Death deprived Mr. Clements of his wife, and later he married Sarah F. Graves, daughter of Thomas and Lydia Ann (Adams) Graves. Our subject is a Democrat in politics, and his sympathies are with that party. All that he has undertaken has been done earnestly, and though early thrown upon his own resources, he had a hard fight against adverse circumstances, he worked hard and well without being discouraged, and is now beginning to reap the good results of his faithful labor. His many friends believe in his ability, and point to what he has accomplished as proof of the mettle of which he is made.

AARON B. CONROW
Aaron B. Conrow. Confidence is the basis of business, and they who live up to the mark of integrity serve as lights for the paths of others. The reputation of our subject is that of a just and upright man, doing as he would be done by. He is now engaged in pork-packing in Richmond, and is one of the public-spirited citizens of this thriving place. The third child of Aaron H. and Mary (Quesenberry) Conrow, our subject was born n Ray County, Mo., October 28, 1858. He passed his boyhood days in Richmond, where he attended the public schools and afterward prosecuted his studies in the old Richmond College.
Entering the hardware and grocery store of Capt. John P. Quesenberry as clerk, our subject labored with energy and fidelity in that position for three years, when he took an interest in the business, the firm name being changed to John P. Quesenberry & Co. This partnership continued for four years, when our subject sold out his interest and started in the same line of business alone, but one year later disposed of his stock to his brother, W.S. Conrow. The Richmond Transfer Company then, in 1887, came into his possession by purchase, and this enterprise he conducted with success. He also superintended the management of a fruit farm of forty acres just north of the city, which he has recently sold.
November 17, 1881, our subject married Miss Ellen Menefee, daughter of La Fayette S. and Mary H. (Colgan) Menefee, of Richmond. Mrs. Conrow was born in Camden, Ray County, and removed to Richmond with her parents when an infant. Mr. Conrow served for one term very efficiently and satisfactorily as a member of the City Council, and is a prominent Democrat. He is a member of Richmond Lodge No. 57, I. O. O. F. He and his wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They have a handsome homelike residence on Main Street.
PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD of Clay, Ray, Carroll, Chariton and Linn Counties, Missouri, 1893

AARON H. CONROW
Aaron H. Conrow was born June 19, 1824, near Cincinnati, Ohio. He spent part of his boyhood days at, or near Pekin, Illinois, and from that place, with his parents, moved to Missouri, and settled in Ray county. Here, by dint of his own energy, he obtained a pretty thorough education, teaching school part of the time in order to get means to complete the same. In this he was very successful. He then chose the law as a profession, and by rigid economy and sedulous application, succeeded in making an eminent lawyer. On the 17th of May, 1828, he was married to Miss Mary Ann Quesenberry, daughter of David H. and Lucinda Quesenberry, of Richmond, Missouri. From this union resulted the following children: David, Benjamin, William S., and Mamie. He was appointed by the governor, judge of the first probate court established in Ray county. From January, 1857, to January, 1861, he was circuit attorney of the fifth judicial circuit of Missouri; an office that had previously been filled by such eminent lawyers as Hamilton R. Gamble, Abiel Leonard, Charles French, Robert W. Wells, Amos Rees, Thomas C. Burch, Peter H. Burnett, George W. Dunn, and others, but by none of them more zealously and efficiently than by the subject of this sketch. He was a brilliant and successful advocate, a fine judge of law, and never descended to even the slightest artifice to gain the advantage of an opposing brother lawyer. He was above all littleness, open, candid, ingenuous. He was the preceptor of three young men who afterward became able and prominent lawyers; one of them is now a circuit judge, and the biography of another, who lives in Richmond, appears in this volume. Aaron H. Conrow was ever the fast friend of education, and no man contributed more liberally than he, in proportion to his means, to the support of institutions of learning. He was ever a safe counselor in matters of moment relative to the town and community in which he lived. In 1860 he was elected to the state general assembly - a democrat worthy to be trusted. He was in the general assembly at the beginning of the war, and sided with the south. He was instrumental in recruiting and equipping the first company organized in Ray for the defense of what he believed to be right. He ranked as colonel in the Missouri state guards, a military organization he had helped to create by his vote in the general assembly. He was by a majority of his comrades elected to represent his district in the confederate congress, and in that capacity, as in all others, served with singular zeal and promptness. He was present at the first meeting and at the final adjournment of that body. At the close of the war the amnesty agreed upon did not extend to members of the confederate congress, and fearing that if he fell into the hands of the successful party his life would be taken, he went to Mexico, and soon after arriving in that country, he was brutally murdered by a band of Mexican soldiers on or about the 25th of August, A. D. 1865. Ray County History 1881

AARON B. CONROW
Aaron B. Conrow. Confidence is the basis of business, and they who live up to the mark of integrity serve as lights for the paths of others. The reputation of our subject is that of a just and upright man, doing as he would be done by. He is now engaged in pork-packing in Richmond, and is one of the public-spirited citizens of this thriving place. The third child of Aaron H. and Mary (Quesenberry) Conrow, our subject was born n Ray County, Mo., October 28, 1858. He passed his boyhood days in Richmond, where he attended the public schools and afterward prosecuted his studies in the old Richmond College.
Entering the hardware and grocery store of Capt. John P. Quesenberry as clerk, our subject labored with energy and fidelity in that position for three years, when he took an interest in the business, the firm name being changed to John P. Quesenberry & Co. This partnership continued for four years, when our subject sold out his interest and started in the same line of business alone, but one year later disposed of his stock to his brother, W.S. Conrow. The Richmond Transfer Company then, in 1887, came into his possession by purchase, and this enterprise he conducted with success. He also superintended the management of a fruit farm of forty acres just north of the city, which he has recently sold.
November 17, 1881, our subject married Miss Ellen Menefee, daughter of La Fayette S. and Mary H. (Colgan) Menefee, of Richmond. Mrs. Conrow was born in Camden, Ray County, and removed to Richmond with her parents when an infant. Mr. Conrow served for one term very efficiently and satisfactorily as a member of the City Council, and is a prominent Democrat. He is a member of Richmond Lodge No. 57, I. O. O. F. He and his wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They have a handsome homelike residence on Main Street.
PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD of Clay, Ray, Carroll, Chariton and Linn Counties, Missouri, 1893


WILLIAM S. CONROW
William S. Conrow, son of the late Honorable Aaron F. Conrow, was born in Ray county, Missouri, May 4, 1855. He was educated at Richmond College. After leaving school he adopted the law as a profession, and entered upon its study under the instruction of Captain James L. Farris, attorney at law, Richmond, Missouri. In 1877, he was admitted to the bar, and began the practice of his profession in partnership with Captain Farris. In April, 1878, he was elected city attorney of Richmond, and re-elected in 1879, and again in 1880. April, 1881, he was elected city recorder, an office he now holds. These positions of trust, bestowed by his fellow-townsmen, evince the confidence they have in young Conrow. He is a talented young man, and if he continues prudent, persevering, and pains-taking, will succeed in life. Ray County History 1881, Page 568


MATTHEW J. CREEL
Matthew J. Creel was born, August 18, 1833, in Culpepper county, Virginia. When about sixteen years of age, he went to learn the carpenter’s trade,, and served an apprenticeship of four years. In 1855 he emigrated to Van Buren county, Iowa, and two years later came to Ray county, Missouri. He was extensively engaged in farming till the outbreaking of the civil war. After the close of the war, he embarked in the mercantile business, and followed it for about ten years. Abandoning mercantile life, he resumed his trade, and has since worked at it in the city of Richmond, Missouri, continuously. He has been a member of the M.E. Church South for many years, all the time one of the most active and untiring workers in behalf of his church, and of religion generally. He takes a warm interest in the Sunday-school work; leads in the Sunday-school singing, and is also leader of the church choir. His wife is also a member of the M.E. Church South, and is a pious, unassuming Christian woman. He was married, Mary 10, A.D. 1859, to Miss Mary E. Branstetter, of Richmond, Missouri. They have eight children: Sallie P., Myrtie E., Henry L., Sterling Price, James P., Edard B., Mattie H., and John E.
Ray County History, 1881

H. R. CRENSHAW
H. R. Crenshaw is a prominent citizen of Knoxville, Ray County, whose life has been one of activity and not altogether free from trials and reverses; yet he has been successful, both in securing a competency and in establishing himself in the respect and confidence of his neighbors and friends. His parents were R. A. and Patsy (Rogers) Crenshaw, the father having been born in Montgomery County, Ky., on the 28th of November, 1813, settling in Ray County, Mo., in 1837 or 1838, upon a farm of six hundred acres, two miles southwest of Knoxville, and following farming for half a century. He and his estimable wife were the parents of eleven children, of whom three boys and one girl are living, and the remainder deceased. For a period of eighteen years he was a Justice of the Peace.
Our subject was born October 28, 1839, in Jackson County, Mo.; he received a common-school education, and after growing up was for many years a farmer, but in 1891 he removed to Knoxville, where he became a merchant. December 31, 1862, he married Miss Nancy C. Yoakum, who has borne him two children: R. M., born January 23, 1869; and Elizabeth C., born March 13, 1867, and who died September 8, 1869. Robert M. Crenshaw, the son of our subject, was married October 8, 1890, to Lula Fowler, one of seven children of Micah and Elvira Fowler, her father being a general farmer and stock-raiser, who lived with his family near Elmira, Ray County, Mo., upon a farm of twelve hundred acres. The father of Mrs. Robert M. Crenshaw, besides being a farmer, was also a merchant at Lawson, Ray County, a dealer in groceries, hardware, etc. He and his wife were members of the Christian Church, and acceptable followers of the teachings of that body. Mr. Fowler is a Democrat, and an unfaltering supporter of the nominees of his party.
Robert M. Crenshaw and wife had one child born to them September 21, 1891, who died August 18, 1892. The beloved mother of the child lived but a short time after its birth, she having died November 13, 1891. Robert was educated in Missouri, at Richmond and Sedalia, and lacked but a single term of graduating when he left school. He worked for several years with his father upon the farm; also taught school from 1887 to 1891, and then became a partner in his father's store at Knoxville, Mo., receiving a one-half interest in the same. His fellow-citizens elected him Mayor of Knoxville, a position he held for a year; and he is now serving a term as Postmaster of that city.
In politics Robert is a Democrat, and a very active and useful worker in that party. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South for six years, and is a Sunday-school teacher in that body, a position he has filled for several years. Our subject, H. R. Crenshaw, has been a member of the same church as his son for thirty years, his wife also being a member, and both being most acceptable and worthy helpers. Our subject is a Democrat, and has been loyal to that party ever since he reached manhood.
PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD of Clay, Ray, Carroll, Chariton and Linn Counties, Missouri, 1893

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