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St. Genevieve County, Missouri

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Joseph Bader. Prominent among the prosperous and intelligent young business men of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., may be mentioned the name of Joseph Bader. He is a native of the county, born in 1860, and is a son of Lewis and Mary (Oberle) Bader. The former was born in Baden, Germany, and came to America when a young man. Here he married, and followed the occupation of farming. He died when Joseph was quite small, and his widow afterward married again. Joseph resided with her until he was nineteen years of age, when he began learning the blacksmith’s trade, and worked at that calling in French Village, Mo., for about three years. In 1881, with a small capital, he began doing business for himself, and by industry and good management is now worthy of credit. In 1883 he was married to Margaret Byer, who was born in the county in 1863, and by her is the father of two children: Frank and Josie. Mr. and Mrs. Bader are members of the Roman Catholic Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Hon. William H. Bantz, probate judge of Ste. Genevieve County, is a native of Maryland, born at Frederick March 6, 1841, and is the son of Nimrod J. and Mary A. (Harding) Bantz, both worthy people of Maryland. They immigrated to Missouri in 1848, locating in Ste. Genevieve County, where Mr. Bantz engaged in agricultural pursuits, and here both passed their days. William H. Bantz at the age of ten years was sent to Frederick, Md., where he entered the Frederick College, and there remained four years. He then returned to Ste. Genevieve, and attended the academy at that place. In 1863 he was appointed enrolling officer for the northern part of Ste. Genevieve County, and in September, 1864, he enlisted in Company K, Forty-seventh Missouri Volunteer Infantry, United States Army, and was honorably discharged at the close of his term of enlistment. He then returned to the farm, where he remained until 1876, engaged in agricultural pursuits during the summer and teaching school during the winter seasons. In 1870 he was appointed census taker for Jackson and Union Townships, and in 1872 he was appointed justice of the peace for Ste. Genevieve. In 1876 he married Mrs. Bennie D. Madison, widow of Patrick H. Madison, and daughter of Antoine and Emily (Durocher) Beltrami. Her father was born in Italy, and came to America when about eighteen years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. Bantz no children have been born, but they have, however, an adopted daughter, Pearl C., who was born in 1878. In 1882 Mr. Bantz was elected judge of the probate court of Ste. Genevieve County, and was re-elected in 1886. In 1883 he was elected a member of the board of public educators. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the G.A.R. Mrs. Bantz is a member of the Catholic Church, and is held in high esteem by all its members.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Tlapek & Bartels. Frederick Bartels, carpenter, was born in Prussia in 1846, being the son of Frederick and Dora Bartels, also natives of Prussia. The father died soon after the birth of Frederick, and the mother then married Henry Otte, of Prussia. Frederick lived a short time with his grandmother, and then returned to the home of his mother. He attended school until in his fifteenth year, when he was bound out to learn the carpenter’s trade, paying $25, and clothing himself for the first three years, receiving nothing but his board for his work. After completing his apprenticeship he remained with his preceptor until near his time to enter the army, when he came to America in company with his half brother and sister, August and Dora Otte, landing at New York City in October, 1865, and from there they came to Ste. Genevieve County, where Frederick worked at his trade in that and adjoining counties until 1871. He was married to Miss Louise Greither, of Ste. Genevieve County, and located in St. Mary’s, where he continued to work at his trade. Three children have been born to their marriage: John, Robert and August. Mr. Bartels has had charge of the work of most of the buildings in St. Mary’s. In 1885 he engaged in the lumber trade in company with John Tlapek in St. Mary’s. They deal in all kinds of building material and are the principal lumber merchants in St. Mary’s. They are also builders and contractors and enjoy a fine patronage. John Tlapek, of the firm of Tlapek & Bartels, lumber dealers and contractors, was born in Bohemia, Austria, in 1846, and is the son of John and Magdaline Tlapek, all natives of Bohemia, who reared a family of five children – four sons and one daughter. Three of the sons are living in America. John, Jr., attended the schools of Prague being coming to America, and finished his education at the De Soto Seminary. In 1864 he engaged as clerk in a store in St. Louis, and in 1865 he came to St. Mary’s and engaged in trade in company with his father. He has followed various occupations in the different parts of the State, and has now, in connection with his lumber business, a planing mill and three farms near St. Mary’s. In 1875 he married Miss Rose M. Bogy, of St. Mary’s, and to them was born one child, John J. Mr. Tlapek is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Catholic Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Christian Baum, manufacturer of and dealer in boots and shoes at Ste. Genevieve, was born in Sachs Weimar, Lauchroeden, Germany, January 7, 1836, and is the son of Casper Baum, a native of Germany, who died in Germany in 1854 at the age of eighty-nine, and the mother died when Christian was but a child. Christian Baum is the youngest and only surviving child in a large family, of whom seven sons grew to manhood. At the age of fourteen he began learning the shoemaker’s trade, and in 1858 he came to America, landing in the city of New Orleans, and from there he proceeded by boat to Ste. Genevieve, where he began working at his trade. In 1860 he engaged in business for himself, and now carries a fine stock of boots and shoes. He is doing well at his business, and has a good run of custom. He has been twice married. His first wife, Miss Caroline Klein, became his wife in 1860. She bore him four sons and three daughters. She died in 1877. April 7, 1878, Mr. Baum married Mrs. Louisa Schneider, the widow of John Schneider and a daughter of Zafer Ringwold. Six children – two sons and four daughters – were born to this union. Mr. Baum is a Republican politically, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

William Baumstark, the well known and genial proprietor of the Myers House, at Ste. Genevieve, Mo., was born in Baden, Germany, October 15, 1855, the son of Boniface and Teresa (Wiptler) Baumstark. William Baumstark came to America in 1879, landed at New York May 27, and at once came to Ste. Genevieve County, where he engaged in sheep raising for some years. In 1883 he came to the city of Ste. Genevieve and found employment in the Cone Mills. One year later he married Mrs. Mary Myers, the widow of Martin Myers, whom she married June 3, 1873, and by whom she had four children. Mr. Myers died in 1880. He was a native of Germany, and came to America when seven years of age, locating in Milwaukee, Wis. In 1882 Mrs. Myers erected the fine brick building known as the Myers House, and managed the same until her marriage to Mr. Baumstark. She was born in Ste. Genevieve, September 13, 1854, and is the daughter of Nicholas and Clara (Schneider) Wehner. (See sketch.) To this union have been born two children. Mr. and Mrs. Baumstark are well known and much esteemed by all who meet them, and both are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Charles H. Biel, one of the well known business men of Ste. Genevieve, was born in Gaudersheim, Germany, November 17, 1838, and is the son of William and Henrietta Biel, both natives of Germany, and the father a shoemaker by trade. Charles H. Biel learned his father’s trade, and in 1853, at the age of fifteen, he came to America, located in Iron County, near Iron Mountain, and here worked at his trade for some time. He then moved to Perryville, where he remained until 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, Missouri Cavalry, Confederate army, and served six months. He then returned to Perryville, and here clerked and attended school in the winter, and was also engaged in agricultural pursuits from 1864 to 1870. In 1879 he settled in Ste. Genevieve, where he has since resided. January 4, 1864, he married Miss Caroline Falkner, who bore him three daughters. Mrs. Biel died in 1870, and October 14, 1879, he married Mrs. Amelia Anderson, a daughter of Karl Friedrich Schoenfeld, a native of Berlin, Prussia, and Doradea (Lutz) Schoenfeld, a native of Baden, Germany, born June 9, 1826. She came to America in company with her two sisters and landed at New Orleans Christmas eve, 1853. The same year she married Mr. Anderson, who was sheriff and collector of Ste. Genevieve County. Mr. Biel has held various civil positions, serving as coroner, constable and deputy sheriff. He has also served as a member of the board of education in Ste. Genevieve.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Charles Blackledge, farmer and a successful stock dealer at Avon, was born April 27, 1856, the son of Hiram and Mildred (Coffman) Blackledge. Hiram Blackledge was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, October 9, 1811, and was of Scotch descent. He attended the high schools of New Lisbon, and graduated from Jefferson College, Penn. He read law with Andrew Stewart, of Uniontown, Penn., and practiced law in company with him. While Mr. Stewart was in Congress Mr. Blackledge took charge of the whole business of the firm. In 1844 he located in Ste. Genevieve, and here practiced his profession a few years. He was married in 1846, and afterward located on a farm in Saline Township. Here he remained a few years, and then returned to Ste. Genevieve and followed the banking business as cashier until his health failed and he retired from active business. He returned to his farm, and there died June 7, 1881. His wife was born November 5, 1822, in Albemarle County, Va. She is the daughter of Col. Joseph and Mary (Yancy) Coffman. Her father was a native of Lancaster, Penn., born in 1785, was married in 1811, and followed the milling business in connection with farming. He was the contractor and builder of the turnpike road, running from Scottsville to Charleston in the State of Virginia. In 1832 he moved on a farm in Ste. Genevieve County. His wife was the daughter of Charles Yancy, of Albemarle County, Va., who was born in 1791. To Mr. and Mrs. Coffman were born eight children: Ralph, Elizabeth (Mrs. William Watsman), Charles, John, Jane (Mrs. Bernard Pratte), Mildred, Mary and Joseph. The mother of these children died in 1836. The Colonel had accumulated considerable property – several thousand acres of land and 120 slaves. He represented Ste. Genevieve County in the Legislature, and was a delegate to the national convention of 1844. He died in 1855, honored and respected by all who knew him. His daughter, Mildred, was educated in Ste. Genevieve College, and was married in 1842 to W. Smith, of St. Francois County. He lived but eight months, and she returned to her father’s home, where she remained until her second marriage, to Mr. Blackledge, in 1846. When her father died he willed her a farm of 700 acres in Ste. Genevieve County, and 2,000 acres in Scott and Mississippi Counties, also a number of slaves. At the breaking out of the late war she owned 50 slaves. By her marriage she has become the mother of three children: Mary (Mrs. C.W. White), Charles and Dr. H.T. Blackledge. Mrs. Blackledge sold all but 400 acres of her land in Ste. Genevieve County and divided the proceeds among her children. Her son Charles attended the public schools of Ste. Genevieve and also the Missouri State University. At the age of eighteen he took charge of his mother’s farm, and has since had control of it. He was married January 6, 1886, to Miss Ada Parkhurst, of St. Louis, born in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1856. To them was born one child, William H.N., whose birth occurred May 3, 1887. Charles Blackledge is a young man of push and energy, and is a member of the Farmers’ Alliance, holding the office of vice-president in the same.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Frederick Bolle, member of the firm of Wehner & Bolle, proprietors of the City Mills at Ste. Genevieve, was born in Hanover, Germany, August 13, 1845, and is the son of Christian and Elizabeth (Burmann) Bolle, both natives of Hanover, Germany. The father was a merchant and grain dealer in his native land, and died in 1863 at the age of seventy-two. The mother is still living, and is eighty-three years old. In 1866 Frederick Bolle came to America, landed at New York, and went from there to Louisville, Ky. He then went to Bowling Green, and from there to Belleville, Ill., where he engaged in the milling business, having learned the trade in his native country. In 1878 he moved to Ste. Genevieve, began working in the Cone Mills, and there remained until 1883, when he became a member of the present firm. In July, 1879, he married Miss Teresa Wehner, a daughter of Nicholas and Clara (Schneider) Wehner, of whom a sketch is given. Four children were born to this union, one son and one daughter now living. Mr. Bolle is a member of the Catholic Church and a Republican in politics.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

John M. Boyd, merchant and farmer at Avon, was born December 14, 1845, and is the son of Elliott C. and Sarah (Counts) Boyd. The father was born in Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., January 21, 1821, was married in 1840, and was by occupation a farmer. After marriage he settled on a farm in Saline Township, and soon had 320 acres of good farming land. From 1869 to 1871 he in company with his son, John M., engaged in merchandising. He was clerk of Saline Township for a number of years, and served in the Union army six months. He died February 10, 1888. His wife, Sarah Counts, was born November 1, 1818, in Grainger County, Tenn. To them were born nine children: Louisa O., Ruth C. (Mrs. William Evans), T.E. (Mrs. Jesse McFarland), John M., Aaron B., Henry E., Joel M., Nicholas E. and Martha M. (Mrs. A.J. Gordon). Mrs. Boyd died July 29, 1879. John M. Boyd received a common-school education, and assisted his father on the farm. In 1869 he and his father began merchandising at Avon. May 11, 1870, he married Mary J. White, a native of Knoxville, Tenn., born in 1846. She came to Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., with her parents when a child. By her marriage was born one child, Clarence A., born April 26, 1874. Mr. Boyd has a good trade in his business at Avon, and owns, besides his store and residence there, a good farm of 300 acres. He is also a dealer in stock and farm produce in connection with his business. He was appointed postmaster at Avon in 1869, and still holds that position.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

William H. Boyd, merchant at Coffman, was born at Avon, Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., in 1856, and is the son of John and Martha (Counts) Boyd. John Boyd was born in Kentucky, April 1, 1814, and located with his parents in Ste. Genevieve County when about five years of age. He was among the early settlers of the county, was married in 1840, and is a farmer by occupation. He is still living, and is a resident of Saline County. His wife was born in Tennessee, in April, 1824, and came with her parents, when a child, to Ste. Genevieve County, Mo. She became the mother of twelve children: Sarah J. (wife of A.V. Allen), Elijah, Thomas M., Louvina (wife of N.C. Sebastian), Telitia A. (wife of John M. Pinncy), William H., Margaret L. (wife of Pink McCarver), Aaron C., Frank, Ruth (wife of P.J. Pander), George W. and Artemisa (deceased). William H. was educated in the common schools, and finished at Carleton Institute, at Farmington. He then engaged in farming a short time, but in April, 1881, he began merchandising at Coffman, and was appointed postmaster of the same place in the same year. Also in August of that year he married Miss Jennie Cozens, a native of Ste. Genevieve County, born in October, 1861. To this union were born three children: Ralph, Ethel and Bertha. Mr. Boyd is a young man of energy and push, and bids fair to be one of the leading merchants of the county. He secured the trade of the Farmers’ Alliance of Saline Township on April 23, and is doing well at his business.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Albert A. Boyer, contractor and builder, and also undertaker, at Ste. Genevieve, was born in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., September 28, 1846, and is the son of Antoine G. and Zoe (Thomure) Boyer, both natives of Ste. Genevieve, and of French and English extraction. The father is a contractor and builder, and has for many years followed the trade in Ste. Genevieve. He was born in 1825. The Boyer family is known as one of the oldest families in the county. Antoine Boyer and Miss Zoe Thomure were married at Ste. Genevieve in 1845. To them were born nine children, of whom five sons and one daughter are now living. Albert Boyer left his home at the age of twelve years and began business as a clerk. In 1871 he went to St. Louis, began working at his trade, where he remained until 1875, when he returned to Ste. Genevieve. In 1885 he established his present business. In January, 1887, he married Miss Elizabeth Weiss, a native of Ste. Genevieve and a daughter of Charles Weiss. To this union one son was born. Mr. Boyer is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Catholic Church. His wife is a member of the Lutheran Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Hon. Theodore P. Boyer, ex-member of the State Legislature from Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., was born in the county where he now resides in 1852, and is the son of Edward and Josephine Boyer. Edward Boyer was born and reared on the farm now owned by his son Theodore P. He was born in 1822, and is still living. The mother was born in Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., in 1834. After her death the father again married, and this wife also bore him one child – Laura, who married and became the mother of one child, who, though only four years of age, speaks English and French. Hon. Theodore P. Boyer in his younger days taught school for about ten years. He was justice of the peace for about eight years, and in 1884 was elected to the State Legislature from Ste. Genevieve County, Mo. He owns 133 acres of land, a portion of which was used by the Indians as a burial place for their dead. Mr. Boyer was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Parker, who was born in 1858.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

William V. Brown, farmer, and one of Ste. Genevieve County’s leading men, and son of James S. and Mary (Varner) Brown, was born March 7, 1823. Being the eldest child his services were required at home about the time he should have attended school, and as a consequence his education was limited. In 1841 he married Miss Evaline Hunt, and located on a farm in Perry County. His wife died in 1845, leaving a son eighteen months old. In 1845 Mr. Brown married Miss Susan Beard, of Ste. Genevieve County. After remaining in Perry County until 1851 he sold his farm and located in Ste. Genevieve County, on a farm he had purchased from his father. Shortly after coming to Ste. Genevieve County his second wife died, leaving three small children. In 1853 Mr. Brown married Miss Sarah Black, who died the following year. After getting along the best he knew how with his motherless children for three years, he married Margaret Jennings, who bore him six children. She died while her children were small, and Mr. Brown struggled along with his children, doing his own work, etc., one year, and was then married to Deliah Castnon, of Perry County. He has five children now living: LItha (widow of Geo. Beard), Florence (wife of James Cleveland), Alice (wife of Geo. Rankin), Henrietta (wife of M. Rond), Luther and William V., Jr. Mr. Brown has always taken a great interest in the public schools, and has given his children good educational advantages. His youngest son is being educated at Farmington, Mo. Mr. Brown has a good farm of 333 acres, well improved and stocked. He makes a specialty of raising fine chickens and hogs. He also devotes some of his time to the raising of horses, and now owns a good running horse. Mr. Brown is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also a member of the Farmers’ Alliance, and is a man whose hospitality is known throughout the surrounding country. He had one son, Elias, who was born in 1844, and died September 23, 1873. He was drafted in 1863, and served until the close of the war. He was assistant officer in discharging the Illinois and Indiana troops at Mobile, Ala.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

R.V. Brown, Jr., farmer, of Ste. Genevieve County, and son of Judge R.V. Brown, of Perry County, was born December 17, 1861, and was educated in the common schools. He worked on the farm of his father until his marriage, which occurred April 30, 1884, to Miss Louisa B. Coffman, of Ste. Genevieve County, and with the usual energy of the Brown family began business for himself on a farm. He now has 168 acres of good farming land, and is a dealer in fine stock, owning a fine Kentucky bred jack, Black Knight, and a fine horse. He is one of the leading and enterprising farmers of the county, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born two children: Ada and Carrie. Mrs. Brown was born in Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., October 18, 1862, and is the daughter of Joseph and Emily (Madison) Coffman. Joseph Coffman was the son of Col. Joseph Coffman, one of the earliest settlers of Ste. Genevieve County. Joseph and Emily Coffman located on a farm after their marriage, and there raised a family of six children, Louisa B. being the fourth. He died in 1875, and his wife in December, 1886.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Andrew F. Bryson, another farmer and stock raiser of Union Township, and a professor of music, was born in Franklin County, Mo., in June, 1849, and is the son of James H. and Eliza (Carns) Bryson. James H. was educated in South Carolina, and grew to manhood on the farm, but in after years worked in the gold mines of Georgia for eighteen years. He was born in 1804, and in or about 1843 or 1844 was married. After this he started west and landed first at Memphis, then at Franklin and Crawford, and died at the last named place in 1886. He was justice of the peace and stock trader for about twenty-two years. Mrs. Bryson died in 1874, and both she and her husband were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. To their marriage were born ten children, of whom Andrew F. was the third child. He was educated at the Sullivan and Bourbon schools, and began farming when a boy. He was also quite fond of music, and made a study of the same, finding his main support in the musical art. In 1880 he married Miss Minerva G. Burks, of Ste. Genevieve County, and the daughter of J. Burks. She was educated in the home schools, and attended Carleton Institute, at Farmington. To this union was born one child – Lenno, whose birth occurred October, 1883. Mr. Bryson is a Republican in politics, is a member of the Templars and Farmers’ Alliance, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Charles Burgert is a native of Baden, Germany, born November 17, 1847, and the son of Bartholomew and Victoria (Busom) Burgert, who came to America in 1854 and settled in Ste. Genevieve, where the father followed his trade, that of a tailor. He died February 7, 1888. In 1865 Charles Burgert began learning the blacksmith’s trade, and followed this in various places. In 1878 he established himself in his present business, and in 1885 he erected the fine, brick business building he is now occupying. He has a good run of custom, and is doing well at his business. October 8, 1878, he chose Miss Emily Will for his companion during life. She was born February 11, 1859, and to them were born four children, one son and two daughters now living. Mr. Burgert and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. The family is well known throughout the neighborhood, and is respected by all.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Ellis J. Burks was born in Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., November 12, 1862, and received his education in the county schools, and also attended Carleton Institute, at Farmington, and the Baptist College in the same place, and to-day is one of the enterprising young men of Ste. Genevieve County. He is a son of John and Harriet (Griffith) Burks, and grandson of Thomas and Nancy Burks, who were the parents of six children, John Burks being the second child. He was born in Kentucky in 1811, and received his education in the subscription schools of Missouri. In 1842 he married Minerva Murphey, who was a native of the same State. She died in 1843, and in 1851 Mr. Burks married Miss Susan Fitzpatrick, who bore him two children: Thomas and Jasper, both of whom died in infancy. She died in 1855, and in 1859 Mr. Burks married Mrs. Harriet (Griffith) Murphey, and to them were born seven children: Minerva (Mrs. F. Bryson), John M., Ellis, Virginia (Mrs. James Wyatt), Missouri Bell, Sarah V., and one who died in infancy. By her previous marriage Mrs. Burks became the mother of three children: Charles R., Ellen (Mrs. William McClintock) and Mary Ann Murphey (Mrs. J.P. Jennings). Mr. Burks has a good farm, and has divided considerable property among his children. He can remember the time when wild animals roamed over the spot where fields of grain are now waving, and when the boys of the country wore buckskin trousers, and when life seemed more enjoyable than the present. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and a Democrat in politics.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

 

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