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St. Genevieve County, Missouri

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Hon. Charles W. Hamm, presiding judge of the county of Ste. Genevieve, was born April 1, 1822, in Darmstadt, Grand Duchy of Hessen, Germany, and is the son of Louis and Cathrine Hamm nee Vite, both natives of Germany. C.W. Hamm learned the tailor’s trade, and married Miss Cathrine Kline in 1844. He did business in Frieberg, I.O.W., until 1849, when he left for America, settled in St. Louis, and removed to Ste. Genevieve in 1851, where he engaged in his trade. Some time after he formed a partnership with John N. Boverie. They had a large clothing and tailor establishment under the firm name of Hamm & Co. Mr. Hamm was married twice, losing his first wife and also five children born to him. He was married again, in 1873, to Mrs. Barbara Knierienn. In 1879 Mr. Hamm became the exclusive owner of the store, and followed his business until the spring of 1888, when he closed out and retired from active business. He is a Democrat, politically, and was alderman of the city for nearly ten years. In 1880 he was elected judge of the county court, and has since been twice re-elected as presiding justice.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Charles A. Herter, of C.A. Herter & Sons, a successful business man of Ste. Genevieve, was born in Strassburg, Germany, August 28, 1838, and is the son of Henry and Josephine (Herter) Herter, both natives of Germany. Henry Herter was a brewer by occupation, and followed this in his native land until 1844, when he removed with his family to America, and located in Trumbull County, Ohio, where he became a partner in a brewing company at Warren. Five years later he removed to Beaver County, Penn., and two years later (1852) he moved to St. Louis, where he acted as foreman in a packing house. In 1854 he removed to Ste. Genevieve County, and established a brewery at New Offenburg, also later engaged in mercantile pursuits and farming. He is now seventy-four years old, and has served as justice of the peace and notary public at New Offenburg. Charles A. Herter remained with his parents until grown, and later became a partner with his father. In 1872 he erected a store and engaged in mercantile pursuits, which he continued until 1881, when he removed to Ste. Genevieve and established his present business. In 1863 he married Miss Mary Grither, a native of Ste. Genevieve, and a daughter of John and Rosala (Huber) Grither. Their union has been blessed by nine children, three sons and six daughters, of whom seven are still living. The family worship at the Catholic Church, and are highly respected. Mr. Herter is a Republican in politics, and has served as alderman of Ste. Genevieve.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Dr. Charles S. Hertich, a well known representative citizen of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., was born in Ste. Genevieve, March 25, 1821. His father, Joseph Hertich, was a native of Switzerland, and immigrated to America about 1796, when he was twenty years of age. He was accompanied by his mother, a brother and a sister, and after landing in Baltimore the mother died from the effects of the voyage. He then, with his brother and sister, settled in Danville, Ky., where he was engaged for some time in teaching school. In 1810 he removed to Ste. Genevieve, bringing by pack train a stock of merchandise. The trip was full of peril, as they had to travel through unbroken forests inhabited by numerous tribes of Indians. At Ste. Genevieve he engaged in merchandising, which he continued until 1815, when he retired from active business and opened a school called the “Asylum” near Ste. Genevieve. It became a prosperous and well known institution, for from it graduated some of Missouri’s most prominent men. Hon. Lewis Vital Bogy, late United States Senator from Missouri was a graduate of this institution; Hon. Augustus C. Dodge, United States Senator from Iowa, and afterward minister to Spain, was another graduate; Gen. George W. Jones, of Iowa, was another, and Hon. B.J. Hall still another. The school was noted for its moral and mental culture, being under the personal supervision of Mr. Joseph Hertich, a man of marked ability as a tutor, and a fine linguist, being equally conversant with the French and German languages. In 1815 Mr. Joseph Hertich married Miss Marcelite de Villars, a daughter of the then French governor of Louisiana. She was a native of the city of New Orleans, born in 1782. Their marriage resulted in the birth of six children who were named as follows: Joseph Paul (deceased), Clara A. (widow of Hon. Augustus C. Dodge, who was previously mentioned in this sketch), Charles S., Louis Villars (deceased), Henry (deceased) and Marcelite (deceased). Charles S. Hertich, whose biography forms the principal part of this sketch, received a thorough education under the instruction of his father, and after finishing he engaged in merchandising in Wisconsin with H.F. Dodge, of that State, but in about a year he returned to assist his father in teaching at the “Asylum” in Ste. Genevieve County, Mo. He was then only nineteen years of age, but was beyond the average youth in educational attainments. He decided upon studying medicine, and began his studies under the supervision of Drs. Lowe and Hickok, of Burlington, Iowa. He then went to St. Louis and entered the office of Dr. M.L. Pallen, and at the same time attended lectures at the St. Louis Medical College, from which he graduated in 1847. He then began to practice at Burlington, Iowa, but on account of ill health was obliged to abandon the same. In November, 1846, he married Miss Mary L. Rozier, daughter of Ferdinand and Constance (Roy) Rozier, and to them were born six children – four sons and two daughters now living. In 1848 Dr. Hertich went to Long Prairie, Minn., having been appointed by President Filmore as United States Surgeon to the Winnebago Indians. In 1851 he located in Ste. Genevieve, where he began the practice of his profession, and soon became known as one of the leading physicians of the country. During the late war Dr. Hertich was appointed as the United States government post surgeon of Ste. Genevieve, and served as such through the war. The Doctor is a pleasant, affable gentleman, and is well known in Ste. Genevieve as a man of sterling merit. As a citizen or physician he has a name and record which is unimpeachable. In May, 1878, he suffered a severe stroke of paralysis, which left his whole right side helpless. To the Doctor and his wife were born these children: Charles J., M.D., of Bloomsdale, Mo.; Villars J. (deceased); Bartholomew J., a pharmacist, at Ste. Genevieve; Augustus C., an attorney at Ste. Genevieve; Clara, Mrs. Frank Roeder, of St. Louis; and Blanch, Mrs. Felix Le Compte, who is at home. The family worship at the Catholic Church, and are universally respected and esteemed.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Charles J. Hertich, M.D., a native of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., was born in 1849, and is the son of Dr. C.S. and Mary (Rozier) Hertich. The father is a native of the county, and was educated by his father, who was a school teacher by profession. He studied medicine in St. Louis, and graduated from Pope’s Medical College of that city. He accepted a government position, and practiced medicine in Minnesota among the Winnebago Indians for about two years and then went to Burlington, Iowa, where he remained but one year. Since that time he has been a resident of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo. He is now retired from active life, and is residing in Ste. Genevieve. Charles J. Hertich was educated at Notre Dame, Ind., and for a period of about three years was a disciple of Esculapins under his father. He then went to St. Louis, where he attended the St. Louis Medical College, graduating from the same in 1872. Upon his return to Ste. Genevieve he entered into partnership with his father, and this connection lasted for about twelve years, when his health began to fail and he moved to the country, locating in French Village, Mo. About a year later he took up his residence in Bloomsdale, where he has since resided. Here his health is somewhat better. In 1878 he was united in marriage to Sarah Vivian, who was born at Valle Mines, Mo., in 1854. They have three living children: Joseph, Henry and Edith.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Lewis R. Hinkle, wagon maker at Bloomsdale, Mo., was born in 1844, and is the son of William and Margaret Hinkle. The father was born in Virginia in 1816 and died in 1860. He was a farmer by occupation, and he and wife became the parents of four sons. The mother was born in 1817 and is still living. In 1873 Lewis R. Hinkle was married to Lavinia Ramsey, who was born in Hamilton County, Tenn., in 1849. Their union has been blessed in the birth of four children: Easter, Cordelia, Gideon and Gilbert. From the time of his marriage up to 1880 Mr. Hinkle was a resident of Lawrenceton. At the latter date he moved to Bloomsdale, where he erected a shop and has since resided. He is a successful business man, and in his labors is assisted by his wife, who keeps the books.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Joseph Hoffman, member of the firm of Hoffman & Sucher, dealers in agricultural implements, wagons, buggies and general farm machinery, etc., at Ste. Genevieve, was born in Baden, Germany, October 15, 1855. He is the son of Joseph and Bricka (Huck) Hoffman, who came to America in 1857 and settled in Ste. Genevieve County, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. Here they passed their last days, the mother dying in 1862 and the father in May, 1880. Joseph left home at the early age of ten and learned the blacksmith trade of his brother-in-law, at Perryville, Mo. In 1882 he married Miss Elizabeth Roth, a native of Ste. Genevieve County, and a daughter of Ignatius Roth, who is an old settler of the county. Three sons are the result of this union, all now living. The present firm of Hoffman & Sucher was established in 1883. They have a large and profitable business, and are men liable to succeed in any enterprise. The family worship at the Catholic Church, and Mr. Hoffman is a Democrat politically.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

M. William Hoffman, merchant at St. Mary’s, was born in St. Louis in 1859, and is the son of Paulus and Catherine (Schnuerr) Hoffman. The father was born in Germany in 1832, and came to America in 1852, landing in New York City. He then went to Cincinnati and Louisville, but remained there but a short time, when he went to St. Louis, and was there married in 1855. He followed the occupation of a cooper. In 1860 he located in Ste. Genevieve County, where he continued to work at the cooper’s trade. He died in 1864. His wife was born in Alsace, and was the mother of five children, only one, M. William, now living. He attended the schools of Ste. Genevieve County until he was twelve years of age, when he entered the News and Advertiser printing office in Ste. Genevieve County, and helped to print the first number of the Fair Play, working in that office about two years. In 1873 he went to Grand Tower as foreman and publisher of the Advocate. He remained there about five months, when he returned to Ste. Genevieve and attended school a short time. In 1874 he came to St. Mary’s and entered the store of Rozier & Lawrence as a clerk. He became a partner in 1880. He was married in that year to Miss Rosa C. Rozier, daughter of his partner. Three children were the result of this union: Emily M., Frank J. and Mary L. In 1878 he opened a saddle store in St. Mary’s, under the management of his brother, Frank, who died in 1881. After that he continued the business in his own name, and in the year following he withdrew from the firm of Rozier & Co. and opened a clothing store in St. Mary’s, where he had a successful business. In 1884 he sold his saddler business and purchased the store known as Geo. Bond & Co. He has a good stock of general merchandise and enjoys a fine trade. His wife was born in Perry County, Mo., in 1861. Mr. Hoffman is the owner of a good, comfortable home, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Henry Hohmann, a well known citizen of Ste. Genevieve, and manufacturer of soda, seltzer and mineral waters, is a native of Saxony, Germany, born February 18, 1840. At the age of twelve he came to America with his parents, Jasper and Barbara Hohmann, who settled in Milwaukee, Wis., where the father died February 9, 1886, at the age of seventy-eight years. The mother still resides there and is seventy-five years old. Henry Hohmann, at the age of thirteen, began life for himself. In 1854 he started for the Green Bay country, and in order to get there walked the entire distance of 150 miles. He here spent some time among the Indians, and in 1861 he went to Chicago, when, after remaining one year, he moved to St. Louis, Mo. In 1864, at Hermann, Mo., he married Miss Caroline Bebion, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, who came to America with her parents in 1850. They landed at New Orleans, and two years later came to St. Louis. The same year of his marriage Mr. Hohmann enlisted in the State militia. He remained in St. Louis until 1871, when he removed to Ste. Genevieve and at once engaged in his present business, erecting at that time the fine brick building occupied by himself at the present.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Judge Roman Huck, farmer and stock raiser of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., was born in Baden near the River Rhine, Germany, in 1833. He is the son of John X. and Johanna (Long) Huck, and also a step-son of Joseph Doll, all of whom are natives of Baden. John X. died in 1835, when the Judge was a year and a half old, and two years later his widow married Joseph Doll, who, in 1847, immigrated with the family to America. They had a long and tedious voyage, being about eighty days on the water, and during that time several on board died of cholera. They landed at New Orleans, and from there went to Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., locating five miles south of Ste. Genevieve, and here settled on government land. Judge Huck was educated in the old country, and through his own efforts has become a good scholar in the English language. He attained his growth on the farm, and in 1856 married Miss Louisa Bauman, a native of Ohio, born near Dayton in 1834, but who was at the time of her marriage residing in Ste. Genevieve County, Mo. To Judge Huck and wife were born eight children: Josephine (Mrs. John Kiefer), Francis X., William (who died November 28, 1887), Henry J., Katie (Mrs. I. Roth), Bridget, John (who died in 1877), and one who died in infancy. Judge Huck is the owner of 260 acres of land with good improvements and everything handy and convenient. He was elected public administrator in 1878, and in 1882 was elected judge of the county court, serving two terms. He was in the militia, and was twice commissioned, first as lieutenant and second as captain. He was discharged in the fall of 1865. He is a Republican in his political views, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church. Francis Joseph Doll, step-father of Judge Roman Huck, left Baden, Germany, May 7, 1847, and with his family took passage to New Orleans May 15, where they landed July 24. They then took a steamer and landed at Ste. Genevieve, Mo., August 1, where for some time they endured great hardships. Here they rented land for some time, but finally purchased property four miles south of Genevieve, where they lived in a miserable little house of only one room, the roof almost touching one’s head and covered with clapboards, weighted down with logs to keep the wind from blowing them away. In this manner they lived for two years, or until Mr. Doll raised a wheat crop of 170 bushels, which he sold for 45 cents a bushel and with the proceeds succeeded in making his home a little more comfortable, but for the two subsequent years they were obliged to eat corn bread in the place of wheaten bread. The first two winters after coming to this country were mild enough but the winter of 1849-50 was bitterly cold and it was all they could do to keep the wolves at bay, that swarmed through the woods and killed the sheep and hogs of the settlers. To educate his children Mr. Doll found was a difficult task, as schools at that time were few and far between, and children had no such advantages as they have at the present day.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Frank J. Huck, farmer, assessor and native of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., was born on the farm on which he now resides, March 25, 1847. He is a son of Florian and Mary U. (Fischer) Huck, who were both natives of Baden, Germany. The former was born May 4, 1818, and the latter, January 22, 1822. Florian Huck came to the United States when he was eighteen years of age and landed at New Orleans, where he followed his trade of shoemaking for some time. Later he went to Philadelphia and Kaskaskia, Ill., and from there removed to Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., in 1840. Here he met and married Miss Fischer in 1844. She and her parents came to the United States about 1830 and settled in Kentucky, and afterward in Missouri in 1833. Frank J. Huck is the second of ten children. He assisted his parents on the farm, and at the death of his father in 1875 he assumed control of the homestead, and there, with his mother, has since resided. In 1873 he was united in marriage to Miss Walburg Grass, a daughter of George and Mary (Siebert) Grass. Mr. and Mrs. Huck are the parents of two sons and four daughters. They are members of the Catholic Church, and Mr. Huck is a Democrat. In 1882 he was elected assessor of Ste. Genevieve County, and has been re-elected twice. His brother, Joseph, served as sheriff and county collector for several terms, and died while in office. The Huck family are widely known and highly respected.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Anton Hunold, manufacturer of and dealer in cigars, tobacco and smoker’s goods at Ste. Genevieve, is a native of Lippe Detmold, Germany, born January 1, 1855, and is the son of Joseph and Louisa Charlotte (Karlls) Hunold, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was a weaver in his native land, and died in 1875 at the age of forty-nine. His son, Anton Hunold, at the age of twelve began learning the cigar maker’s trade, and also engaged in the molder’s trade in his native land, his wages going to aid in supporting his widowed mother. In 1879 he came to America, and for three years he engaged at cigar making in the city of New York. In 1882 he removed to Red Bud, Ill., and remained there engaged in the manufacture of cigars until 1887, when he removed to Ste. Genevieve and established his present business. He has built up a large and profitable trade, and his goods have met with a ready demand in the home market. He is a member of the Catholic Church, is chorister in the same, and is a Democrat in his politics.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

George Hurst, proprietor of the Star livery and feed stable near Meyer’s Hotel, Ste. Genevieve, and the son of George and Anna Mary (Palmer) Hurst, was born March 19, 1851. The parents were both natives of Baden, Germany, and came to America about 1840. They settled in Ste. Genevieve County, and here the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. The mother died in 1872, at the age of fifty-six years. George Hurst, at the age of nineteen began clerking for John L. Boverie, and clerked for him for a number of years; also clerked for Rozier & Jokerst several years. In 1877 Mr. Hurst married Miss Mary J. Berry, a native of St. Francois County and the daughter of Joseph Berry. Four children have been born to this marriage, only two now living, a son and daughter. In 1881 Mr. Hurst went to Harrisonville, Ill., and engaged in general merchandising for himself. In 1883 he returned to Ste. Genevieve, having sold his store interest at Harrisonville. In 1886 he established business himself in his present business, and enjoys a large and profitable trade. He is a member of the Catholic Church, is a Democrat in politics, has been alderman of the city two terms, and has also been deputy sheriff.
Source: History of Southeast Missouri (1888). Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

 

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