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BABBITT, Byron Fenner, lawyer, U. S. commissioner; born, Corry, Pa., Apr. 4, 1874; son of Charles O. and Susan (Thayer) Babbitt; graduated from Corry High School, 1893, Corry Business College, 1894, Washington University Law School, St. Louis, LL.B., 1899; married, St. Louis, Nov. 6, 1901, Nellie A. Bagnell. Came to St. Louis from Corry, Pa., Nov. 6, 1895; resided with uncle, late Judge A. M. Thayer, U. 8. circuit judge, 8th Circuit; was his private secretary and also later private secretary to Judge Elmer B. Adams, U. S. circuit judge, for four years; studied law under Judge Thayer and at law school. Admitted to bar, 1899; appointed U. S. commissioner in January, 1901; reappointed Jan. 1, 1905, by Judge Adams, and again appointed Jan. 1, 1909, by Judge Dyer. Member American Bar Association, St. Louis Bar Association. Republican. Episcopalian (St. George's Chapel). Club: Masonic. Recreation: golf. Office: 1605 Pierce Bldg. Residence: 4477 Berlin Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BABLER, Edmund Adam, surgeon; born, Appleton City, Mo., Oct. 11, 1875; son of H. J. and Sarah Saloma (Luchsinger) Babler; educated at El Dorado Normal and Business College and graduated from Missouri Medical College (now Medical Department Washington University), M.D., cum laude, 1898; unmarried. Was for two years interne St. Louis City Hospital; since 1900 engaged in general surgical practice. Surgeon Deaconess Hospital; visiting surgeon City Hospital; medical director International Life Insurance Co. Member City Hospital Alumni Medical Society, St. Louis Medical Society (corresponding secretary), Missouri State Medical Association. Associate editor St. Louis Courier of Medicine, American Medical Association. Republican. Methodist. Clubs: Arcadia, Missouri Athletic. Recreation: chess. Office: 1204, 915 Olive St. Residence: 4826 Delmar Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BABLER, Jacob L., first vice president International Life Insurance Co.; born, Monroe, Wis., May 3, 1872; son of Henry J. and Saloma (Luchsinger) Babler; educated in public schools of El Dorado Springs, Mo., and Law Department, Washington University; unmarried. Began in life insurance business, 1902; was appointed manager New York Life office at New Haven, Conn., 1904; transferred to Buffalo, N. Y., 1905, and was manager and agency director for company in that city for three years; appointed manager territory west of Missouri River for North American Life, of Newark, N. J., Feb. 1, 1907, and continued with the company until 1909; organized the International Life Insurance Co. of St. Louis and is now it’s first vice president, also general manager agencies. Republican; former member Republican State Central Committee. Methodist. Member Knights of Pythias, B. P. O. Elks. Recreations: motoring and baseball. Office: Syndicate Trust Bldg. Residence: Marquette Hotel.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BACHMANN, Otto, optician; born, St. Louis, July 22, 1880; son of Francis Xavier and Mary (Hunckler) Bachmann; educated in public schools of St. Louis; married, Nov. 18, 1905, Miss Katherine Moerschel; two children: Irma Ida, Jacob Moerschel. Began active career with the Erker Bros. Optical Co., and continued for seven years, learning the business; became connected with the Western Optical Mfg. Co. in 1900; was it’s secretary and treasurer from Sept. 15, 1905, to Dec. 14, 1910, when acquired sole ownership in the business and became president of the company. Member Credit Men's Association. Catholic. Independent Democrat. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Century Boat, Liederkranz (director), Million Population. Recreations: tennis and golf. Office: 1002 Olive St; factory: 703-709 Holland Bldg. Residence: 3444 Halliday St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BACON, Gary Harrison, grain commission; born, Louisville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1869; son of Byron and Fanny Young (Montgomery) Bacon; educated in public schools of Louisville and Chicago; married, St. Louis, June 22, 1893, Leva Sherry. Began business career as settling clerk with E. W. Bailey & Co., Chicago Board of Trade, 1886-93; then went to Louisville, Ky., and engaged in stock and bond brokerage business as the representative of New York companies until 1902; came to St. Louis and acquired an interest in the Sherry Bacon Grain Co., grain receivers and shippers, of which was at first vice president and is now president. Member St. Louis Merchants' Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade, Kansas City Board of Trade, Sons of American Revolution, Society of Colonial Wars. Presbyterian. Mason (Scottish Rite). Club: Traffic, of St. Louis. Recreation: reading. Office: 213 Chamber of Commerce. Residence: 5875 Cates Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BACON, Frederick Hampden, lawyer; born, Niles, Mich., May 5, 1849; son of Nathaniel and Caroline S. (Lord) Bacon; graduated from Niles High School, June, 1866; studied in literary department, University of Michigan, two year; married, Niles, Mich., July 18, 1882, Clara J. Cleland; children: Ethel E., Clare Marie. Engaged in practice of law since 1871, and in St. Louis since 1874; practices alone. Author of "Bacon on Benefit Societies and Life Insurance," a standard legal text book. Lecturer Benton Law School since 1898. Republican. Presbyterian. Member St. Louis Bar Association, St. Louis Law Library Association. Mason (33°), Knight Templar, Shriner. Club: Mercantile. Office: 211 N. 7th St. Residence: 5217 Raymond Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAER, Julius Adler, vice president Stix, Baer & Fuller Dry Goods Co.; born in Germany, Sept. 1, 1861; son of Lazarus and Ernestina (Weil) Baer; educated in public and high schools at Sulzburg in Baden, Germany; came to United States, 1878; married, Fort Smith, Ark., Apr. 16, 1890, Freda Adler; one son: Arthur Bernard. Began business career at Fort Smith, 1878, and was connected with store of J. Adler until 1880; conducted general store, Magazine, Logan Co., Ark., 1880-85; opened store, "The Boston Store," Van Buren, Ark, 1885; also opened two stores at Springfield and Nevada, Mo.; sold out these two stores, 1888, in order to devote all his time to the Boston Store of Fort Smith, Ark., remaining there until 1892, when he came to St. Louis and joined in organizing Stix, Baer & Fuller Dry Goods Co., of which is vice president. Republican. Mason. Clubs: Columbian, Mercantile, Westwood Country, Triple A. Recreation: fishing. Office: cor. Washington Ave. and 6th St. Residence: 11 Washington Terrace. Summer Residence: Oden, Mich.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAER, Samuel Harold, vice president and treasurer Blanke Baer Chemical Co.; born, Fort Smith, Ark., Jan. 4, 1876; son of Herman and Louise (Mergentine) Baer; graduated Michigan Military Academy, Orchard Lake, Mich., 1892; University of Michigan, B.S. in chemistry, 1896; A.M., Ph.D., University of Leipzig, Germany, 1898; married, St. Louis, Dec. 30, 1903, Ann Louise Brown. Was member of firm of Mergentine & Lamm, New York, 1898-1906; in 1906 became secretary and treasurer, and Jan. 1, 1912, was elected vice president and treasurer, Blanke Baer Chemical Co. (successors to The Arkwright Co.), manufacturers of flavoring extracts and essences, essential oils and colors, canned fruits, fountain fruits and syrups, and Dr. Arkwright Specialties. Secretary of Flavoring Extract Manufacturers' Association of the United States; member American Chemical Society, Society of Chemical Industry of London. Member Eureka Lodge No. 243, A. F. & A. M., New York. Clubs: Million Population, also University of Michigan and Chemists, of New York. Recreations: literature and tennis. Office: 212 8. 7th St. Residence: 5575 Waterman Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAER, Sigmund, secretary and treasurer Stix, Baer & Fuller Dry Goods Co.; born in Baden, Germany, July 5, 1862; son of Lazarus and Ernestina (Weil) Baer; educated in public and high schools in Germany; married, Fort Smith, Ark., Aug. 28, 1890, Marie Pappenheimer; children: Lewis and Sidney. Came from Germany, 1879, to Fort Smith, Ark., arriving in America with less than $100 in his pocket. Began business career on a salary of $3.00 a week, and today is in the management of one of the largest business concerns in the country, employing about 2,000 persons. Was a member of firm of Baer Bros. & Fuller, at Fort Smith, and is still director of the Boston Store there; came to St. Louis, 1892, and was one of the organizers of the firm of Stix, Baer & Fuller Dry Goods Co., incorporated, 1897, and has been secretary and treasurer of the company from the time of its organization. Republican. Clubs: Columbian, Mercantile, Westwood Country. Recreation: European trips. Office: corner Washington Ave. and Broadway. Residence: 5314 Waterman Avenue.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAGNELL, William, contractor, lumberman; born, Province of Quebec, Can., Apr. 14, 1843; son of Captain William and Amelia Bagnell; educated in public schools of Toronto, Canada; married, Kansas City, Mo., 1889, Sallie A. Adams, daughter of the late Andrew Adams and niece of the late Judge Washington Adams of the Supreme Court of Missouri (both of Boonville, Mo.); children: William (died in infancy), Effie A. (Mrs. W. S. Culbertson, of Louisville) and Robert A. Came to United States in 1864, and has ever since been located in St. Louis and engaged as a contractor in railroad construction under firm name of Bagnell Bros.; since 1889, president of the Bagnell Timber Co., dealers in railroad material. Also director Mississippi Valley Trust Co. Episcopalian. Member A. F. & A. M. Clubs: St. Louis, St. Louis Country (life member), Noonday. Favorite recreations: golf, fishing and hunting, horseback riding. Office: 427 Title Guaranty Bldg. Resi­dence: 12 Westmoreland Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAIER, Frank William, Grand Treasurer Knights of Honor of Missouri; born, Peoria, ILL., Feb. 16, 1856; son of Henry and Marie (Glaenzer) Baier; educated in Peoria Grammar School, Pekin (ILL.) High School, and graduated from Polytechnic College, Bayreuth, Germany, 1873; unmarried. Began in jewelry business as apprentice in Pekin, ILL., 1873; came to St. Louis, May, 1876, and entered employ of J. Son & Co., then at 318 N. 4th St., succeeded the firm in business in 1886, remaining at old stand until 1900, when removed to 205 N. 8th St.; since retired from business in own name. Member Red Cross Lodge No. 54, Knights of Pythias, St. Louis Council No. 6, Legion of Honor, and St. Louis Lodge No. 13, Knights of Honor; has held various offices in these lodges and is now Grand Treasurer of Knights of Honor of Missouri. Favorite recreation: baseball. Office: 612 N. Broadway. Residence: 3447 Shenandoah Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAILEY, Howard, dealer in live stock; born, Scott Co., Ky., Oct. 24, 1861; son of Leonidas and Susan H. (Cooke) Bailey; educated Georgetown College, Ky.; married, June 7, 1905, Louise Salmon. Has interest in a number of St. Louis enterprises; since 1898 vice president Maxwell & Crouch Mule Co., located at National Stock Yards, St. Clair Co., ILL.; director and stockholder "09" Ranch & Cattle Co. of Texas. Clubs: St. Louis, Glen Echo. Recreations: farming, golf. Office: National Stock Yards, 111. Residence: St. Regis Apartments.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAILEY, Warren, dealer in live stock; born, Georgetown, Ky., Oct. 22, 1859; son of Leonidas and Susan H. (Cooke) Bailey; educated at Georgetown College, Ky.; married, Jan. 5, 1897, Rena, daughter of James W. Morrison, of Fayette, Mo.; one daughter: Carolyn S. Came to Missouri in 1886; has interest in several enterprises in St. Louis and elsewhere in this and other states; since 1898 president of the Maxwell & Crouch Mule Co., operating at the National Stock Yards, St. Clair Co., ILL., and is actively engaged in that business. Member Business Men's League. Clubs: St. Louis, Bellerive, Recreation: golf. Office: National Stock Yards, ILL. Residence: 4048 Westminster Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Bain, George, merchant and manufacturer, was born May 5, 1836, in the ancient town of Stirling, Scotland, and died in St. Louis, October 22, 1891. His parents were Robert S. and Charlotte (Brown) Bain, and his father was the last of the governors of Stirling Castle, at one time a favorite abode of the kings of Scotland. His earlier education was obtained in a classical school in Stirling and completed at Montreal, Canada, to which city his parents removed when he was about fifteen years of age. After living at Montreal about three years, he went to Portland, Maine, his father's family having, in the meantime, removed to Picton, Canada, on the north shore of Lake Ontario, where the elder Bain occupied a responsible position in the government service. At Portland George Bain became connected with an importing house, in which he filled a position of trust and responsibility for two years. Leaving Portland about the time he attained his majority, he came West as far as Chicago and established the commission house of Bain & Clark, which failed soon afterward as a result of the monetary panic of 1857.
Immediately after the Civil War, in the year 1865, he came to St. Louis as the representative of a Chicago commission house to found a branch establishment in that city. About the same time he also established a commission house in New Orleans, in which he became a partner. A year later he became a partner also in the St. Louis house, which conducted its business under the firm name of Updike, Field & Co. In 1867 the connection between this and the Chicago house was severed, and the St. Louis firm became Updike, Bain & Co. Soon afterward Mr. Bain disposed of his interest in the New Orleans house and reorganized the St. Louis house, which then became George Bain & Co. Until 1870 the business was conducted under this name, and Mr. Bain was actively identified with the trade in the city as a commission merchant. In the year last named, however, he severed his connection with the commission house, and during the remaining years of his life was identified with the manufacture of flour in St. Louis, contributing in no small degree toward making it one of the great milling centers of the United States.
He was twice re-elected thereafter, serving from 1890 to 1894. A natural fondness for the law and its practice has caused him to apply himself to professional labor with the zeal of a devotee, and, as a result, he has drawn about him a large clientele, and in the prime of life finds himself favored with a lucrative and constantly growing practice. He has had little ambition to hold public office and has never filled any public positions outside of those in the line of his profession. However, his interest in the conduct of public affairs is keen and, believing firmly in the principles of the Republican party, he has participated in many canvasses and is a much sought after campaign speaker. In 1873 Mr. Bain married Miss Rosa Brunson, and one son, now a promising young man, has been born to them.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BAIN, Robert Edward Mather, passenger agent; born, Chicago, ILL., Aug. 9, 1858; son of George and Clara (Mather) Bain; educated at Washington University; married, St. Louis, Nov. 3, 1880, Mary Valle; children: Marie Zoo (Mrs. C. B. R. Fitz William), Catherine (Mrs. E. C. Bennett), George Valle, Marguerite Desloge (Mrs. Charles Henry Adams, of New Orleans), Lucie Clara. Was clerk in Atlantic Mills, 1875-79; broker in foreign exchange, 1879-82; foreign insurance and freight agent, 1882-84; freight and passenger agent, Anchor Line, 1883-85; passenger agent White Star Line, etc., 1884-96; general Southwestern passenger agent, White Star and Holland-America Lines, for entire southwestern United States, 1897-1903; since Feb. 1, 1903, Southwestern passenger agent, International Mercantile Marine Co. Vice president Colonial Leaf Tobacco Co.; was captain of Bain Zouaves, 1879-86; member Missouri legislature, 1884-86. Member Business Men's League, Civic League, Missouri Historical Society. Amateur photographer; traveled through lower Egypt, Palestine, Turkey, Greece and Italy, taking photographs for purpose of illustrating "Earthly Footsteps of the Man of Galilee," also illustrated "Child's Bible," "Romance of Palestine," etc., and is contributor to various photographic journals and annuals. President St. Louis Photographic Society, 1895-1901. Inventor. Chairman of Group Jury and member Department International Jury of Award of St. Louis World's Fair. Recreation: gardening. Office: Century Bldg. Residence: 3801 Flora Boulevard
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAIRD, William Edward, associate city counselor; born, Cornersville, Marshall Co., Tenn., Oct. 7, 1876; son of William E. and Martha Elizabeth (Gordon) Baird; prepared for college at Webb School, Bell Buckle, Tenn., 1892-95; A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1899; LL.B., Columbia Law School, New York, 1899, 1902; A.M., Columbia University, 1902; married, Moberly, Mo., Apr. 22, 1909, Anna Seelen. Editor of Columbia Law Review, 1901-02; admitted to St. Louis bar, 1902, and since engaged in practice in St. Louis; in December, 1910, appointed associate city counselor. Lecturer at St. Louis University Institute of Law. Assistant to general counsel of Louisiana Purchase Exposition Co., September, 1904, to May, 1905. Member of St. Louis, American and Missouri State Bar Associations, Law Library Association, American Historical Association, Legion of Honor. Presbyterian. Club: City. Office: City Hall. Residence: 3945 Lindell Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAKER, Alfred Edward, treasurer P. C. Murphy Trunk Co.; born, Jefferson City, Mo., Dec. 10, 1865; son of Dr. John and Amelia (Steele) Baker; educated in public and private schools; married. St. Louis, June, 1893, Mary E., daughter of P. C. Murphy; children: Jules Alfred, Hugh Edward, John Joseph, Thomas C., Mary Catherine. After leaving school in 1883, went to Stewart Co., Tenn., where was in the office of the LaGrange Iron Works, 1884-89; went to Montana, 1889, and was connected with the Granite Mountain Milling Co. at Granite Mountain, Mont., until 1893; also conducted from 1889, a general merchandise business at Rumsey, Mont., and Anaconda, Mont., and remained connected with that business until 1900. Since 1893 a resident of St. Louis, and since October, 1893, treasurer of the P. C. Murphy Trunk Co., manufacturers of trunks, traveling bags, etc. (established I860, incorporated 1892.) Office and Factory: 13th and Papin Sts. Salesrooms: 707 Washington Ave. Residence: 938 Catalpa Street.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAKER, Allen H., dealer in grain and mill feed; born, Calvers, Tex., Dec. 20, 1871; son of William and Amanda (Harris) Baker; educated in public schools of Texas, and College of Texas, at Tehucany, Tex.; married, Fort Smith, Ark., Oct. 5, 1896, Marie McLoud; two children: Marie E. and William Allen. President Allen Baker Commission Co., grain and mill feed, since 1900; managing director truck department Brown Automobile Co. Member St. Louis Merchants' Exchange. Republican. Catholic. Office: 1057 Pierce Bldg. Residence: 4539 Washington Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAKER, Charles Andrew, real estate; born, Dayton, O., Apr. 29, 1856; son of John O. and Sophia Dorothea (Schriefer) Baker; graduate Dayton High School, in class of 1874; married, Fargo, N. Dakota, Sept. 11, 1884, Mary W. Hime; children: Herbert Oliver, Edith May, Ralph Irving. Came to St. Louis, 1878; was salesman for Graham Paper Co. for twenty years; gave up position in 1898 to push the sale of Webster Park and other suburban property in vicinity of Webster and Kirkwood; now engaged in general real estate business as the agent and one of the directors of Webster Park Realty Co.; secretary and treasurer Sherwood Forest Realty Co., West Webster Realty Co. Republican. Congregationalism Member Civic League. Clubs: Mercantile, Algonquin Golf. Office: 903 Wright Bldg. Residence: Rosemont Ave., Webster Park.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAKER, George Arnold, Jr., president Stephens Lithographing and Engraving Co.; born, Helena, Mont., Aug. 21, 1866; son of George A. and Eleanor (Street) Baker; educated in public schools and Smith Academy, St. Louis, graduating, 1883; married, St. Louis, Nov. 2, 1892, Grace Heath. Began business career as clerk for E. C. Meacham Arms Co., St. Louis, 1883-90; since 1890 with Stephens Lithographing and Engraving Co.; in 1894, with associates, purchased the business and is now president of the company. Clubs: St. Louis, New England. Favorite recreations: horseback riding and driving. Office: 422 N. 2d St.  Residence: 501 N. Clara Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAKER, George Reason, banking; born, Tippecanoe, Harrison Co., O., July 4, 1875; son of John Wesley and Rebecca (Phillips) Baker; educated in common schools; married, Lancaster, Mo., Dec. 22, 1898, Heleena Figge; one son, Lorenzo E., born Mar. 28, 1900. Became connected with the Farmers' and Merchants' Savings Bank of Lancaster, Mo., 1893, and advanced to cashier; appointed representative of National Bank of Commerce, St. Louis, 1903, and was in charge of the World's Fair department of the bank, 1904; assistant cashier since Jan. 1, 1907. Secretary Group No. 1, Missouri Bankers' Association, 1902. Member American Institute of Banking, St. Louis Credit Men's Association. Methodist. Mason. Clubs: Masonic, Midland Valley Golf. Recreation: golf. Office: National Bank of Commerce. Residence: 6911 Kingsbury Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Bakewell, Paul, lawyer; born, St. Louis, Aug. 21, 1858; son of Robert Armytage and Nancy (de Lanreal) Bakewell; educated at St. Louis University (LL.D., October, 1904), and graduated from law school of Washington University, LL.B., 1879; married, St. Louis, Apr. 30, 1884, Eugenia Stella McNair; children: Marie, Eugenia (Mrs. Charles V. H. Roberts), Paul, Jr., Edward, Claude, Nancy, Vincent. Admitted to bar at St. Louis in May, 1879, and since continuously engaged in practice as specialist in patent, trademark and copyright law. Member of St. Louis Bar Association, Missouri State Bar Association, American Bar Association. Trustee St. Louis University. Democrat. Roman Catholic. Clubs: St. Louis, Noonday, Sunset Hill Country; Lawyers (New York). Recreations: shooting, fishing and horseback riding. Office: La Salle Bldg. Residence: St. Louis.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALDWIN, Edward S., lumber; born, Memphis, Tenn.; son of James W. and Rose Ann (Nicholas) Baldwin; came with parents to St. Louis and attended school at Carondelet, later student in private school of Dr. McAnally; graduated Bryant & Stratton Commercial College; married Jessie Buchanan, of Memphis; children: Gertrude Kyle, Irene Mildred, Charles Sidney, Rose Lethenia. Began under uncle, George Baldwin, in stove, range and furnace business; became connected with the Clarkson Christopher Lumber Co. and was made manager at Elmore, Ark.; returned to St. Louis, 1890, and entered employ of the Bonsack Lumber Co., of which is superintendent. Member Christian (Disciples) Church. Republican. Mason. Member Royal Arcanum. Office: Angelica St. and Wharf.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALDWIN, Frederick Amos, professor pathology, etc.: born, Kalamazoo, Mich., May 14, 1877; son of Charles E. and Dora J. (Warren) Baldwin; educated in public schools of Jackson, Mich. 1885-93; Medical Department, University of Michigan, M.D., 1898; Department of Literature, Science and Art, same, A.B., 1902, Sc.D., same, 1904. Served in Medical Department of University of Michigan, as assistant in histology, 1896-97, assistant in pathology, 1898-1902, instructor in pathology, 1902-04; assistant city pathologist and bacteriologist, St. Louis, 1904-07; professor pathology and therapeutics, Medical Department, Baylor University, Dallas, Tex., 1907-10; professor pathology, bacteriology and medicine, American Medical College, St.Louis, since 1910, also secretary same; secretary National University of Arts and Sciences. Member St. Louis. Missouri State and Southern Illinois Medical societies, Nu Sigma Nu, Sigma Xi college fraternities. Recreations: baseball, football and tennis. Office: 4500 Olive St. Residence: 3509 Morgan St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALDWIN, Richard Brackett, manager A. C. Lawrence Leather Co.; born, Boston, Mass., Feb. 18, 1873; son of W. H. and Mary Frances Augusta (Chaffee) Baldwin; educated in Boston public schools and Boston Latin School; married, Chicago, July 14, 1900, Belle Roberts. Began active career in leather business with Arey, Maddock & Locke, continuing from 1890 to 1898; since with the A. C. Lawrence Leather Co., first as manager at Chicago until October, 1903, and since then as manager of the St. Louis office. Republican. Recreations: hunting, fishing and farming. Office: 705-707 Lucas Ave. Residence: Kirkwood, Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALL, Frank O., safe deposit officer Mississippi Valley Trust Co.; born, Staplehurst, Neb., Apr. 3, 1886; son of Rev. Albert Dilworth, D.D., and Mary A. (Maeder) Ball; graduated at De Soto (Mo.) High School, 1903; unmarried. Began active career with Jefferson County Bank, De Soto, continuing May, 1903 to June, 1906; has been connected with the Mississippi Valley Trust Co. at St. Louis since June, 1906, and safe deposit officer same, since Apr. 12, 1911. President St Louis Chapter American Institute of Banking. Republican. Methodist. Mason; member Lambskin Lodge No. 460, A. F. & A. M.; St. Louis Chapter No. 8, R. A. M.; St. Aldemar Commandery No. 18, Knights Templar; Moolah Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. Club: Amateur Athletic Recreations: baseball and tennis. Office: Mississippi Valley Trust Co., 4th and Pine Sts. Residence: 2244 Red Bud Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALL, James Moores, physician, oculist; born. West Union, Iowa, Sept. 4, 1862; son of Dr. James Moores and Martha (Glover) Ball; educated in public schools of Waterloo, Iowa; Iowa State university, Iowa City, M.D., 1884; post-graduate instruction in New York and in Europe; married, York, Pa., Oct. 14, 1890, Naomi Marshall; children: Logan Marshall, Mary Josephine. Engaged in practice of medicine since 1886; practice confined to ophthalmology since 1890; professor diseases of the eye, American Medical College; oculist American Hospital and Christian Centenary Hospital; member numerous medical societies. Author of Ball's Modern Ophthalmology. Episcopalian. Office: 4500 Olive St. Residence: 4374 Washington Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALL, Otho Fisher, editor Interstate Medical Journal; born, Waterloo, Iowa, June 20, 1875; son of Dr. James Moores (Sr.) and Martha B. (Glover) Ball; educated in public schools of Iowa; took special science course in University of Wisconsin, and graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, St. Louis, M.D., 1897; married, St. Louis, Feb. 19, 1901, Leonora Montgomerie Clague. Engaged in practice of medicine until 1902; assistant editor, 1897-1903, since 1903 managing editor of the Interstate Medical Journal, also secretary and general manager Interstate Medical Journal Co., its publishers (incorporated 1901). Member various medical societies and social and local literary clubs. Club: University. Office: Metropolitan Bldg.
Resi­dence: 5337 Cabanne Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALLARD, James Franklin, manufacturer proprietary medicines; born, Ashtabula, O., July 16,1851; son of James and Elisa (Heath) Ballard; educated in public schools, Almont, Mich.; married, Vincennnes, Ind., June 24, 1878, Emma Hill Hadley; children: William J., Berenice C. (Mrs. H. H. Clark, Jr.), Nellie E. Came to St. Louis, 1874; was connected with Richardson & Co., wholesale drugs, until 1882, when established the Ballard Snow Liniment Co., of which is proprietor. Director Mechanics American National Bank, of St. Louis, United States & Mexican Trust Co., of New York. Member Business Men's League (St. Louis). Clubs: St. Louis, Mercantile, Noonday (St. Louis), Salmagundi, Drug and Chemical (New York). Office: 500-502 Washington Boulevard. Residence: 4420 Washington Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BALLARD, John O., grain commission; born, Logan Co., O., Dec. 31, 1872; son of Theodore R. and Elizabeth (Depew) Ballard; educated in public grammar and high schools and course in business college; married, St. Louis, Dec. 24, 1895, Lydia W. Harting; one daughter: Elizabeth. Identified with the grain business in St. Louis since 1893; started with Ballard Messmore & Co., and is vice president and treasurer of the company; also secretary and treasurer St. Louis Grain Clearing Co. Member St. Louis Merchants' Exchange. Democrat. Methodist. Mason (32°), Knight Templar. Clubs: St Louis, Bellerive Country, Glen Echo Country. Recreation: golf. Office: 520 Merchants' Exchange. Residence: 5171 Waterman Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Balmer, Charles, professor of music, composer and artist, was born in Muehlhausen, Province of Thueringen, Germany, September 21, 1817, and died in St. Louis, December 15, 1892. He was the eldest son of Gottfried and Eva (Heyse) Balmer, and his father was a gentleman of means and culture, whose homestead was in the suburbs of Muehlhausen. When the son was six years of age he showed such remarkable talent for music that his father concluded to begin his systematic education by sending him to the conservatory at Goettingen. The director of the conservatory at first refused to take so young a pupil, but after witnessing his accomplishments consented to take him into his own family and give him the benefit of special instruction. Under this tutorage he learned to play on the piano, organ, clarinet and violin—the last named being his favorite instrument—making such rapid progress that at nine years of age he received a prize medal from Louis Spohr for playing one of that great maestro's compositions in concert. At ten years of age he began playing first violin in the orchestra at the conservatory, and two years later an episode occurred in this connection, which he remembered to the end of his life. He was playing in the orchestra when Kullack, the noted composer and pianist, came to Goettingen to give a concert. The orchestra was engaged to accompany him in the production of one of his own compositions, and the preliminary rehearsal passed off satisfactorily. At the public performance, however, the pianist had the misfortune to lose his place, and a clash between the piano and the orchestra was imminent, when the young Balmer, who was at the head of the violins, but who was a good pianist as well, shot a quick glance at the piano music, and, pointing with his bow to the place, prevented the threatened fiasco, no one but the leader of the orchestra noticing the act.
While he had saved the pianist from humiliation, he had committed a breach of discipline, for which he was called to account and punished by the leader after the performance; but the punishment was deprived of its sting by Kullack, who embraced the little fellow and presented him with a fine goldpiece as a token of his appreciation of the service rendered him. Years of close study and hard work followed this event, and when he was sixteen years old he was made assistant conductor of the orchestra. In 1836 his father immigrated to the United States with his family, and upon their arrival in this country they came at once to St. Louis. There they purchased a large lot on the old Bellefontaine Road and established a beautiful homestead, which continued to be the family residence until the death of Mrs. Balmer, in 1875—her husband having passed away in 1846. When they moved into their new home it was isolated in its situation on the prairie; now the grounds then connected with it are a part of the city, and the gardens, rustic bridges, artificial lakes and other attractions of the place have been blotted out of existence by the growth of the metropolis. Charles Balmer did not come at once to St. Louis, but stopped first for a time with friends at New Orleans, who wished him to utilize his musical knowledge in that city. Later he visited Mobile, Alabama, and Augusta, Georgia, and spent two years in those cities. In 1838 he was called to New Orleans to assist Madame Caradori-Allen, a celebrated vocalist, as violin and piano artist, and traveled' with her through the States, visiting all of the principal cities of the country.
On this concert tour he came to St. Louis, and there visited his family, for the first time since he had parted with them immediately after their arrival in this country. He came to St. Louis at a time when various charitable institutions and other public buildings were being erected, and, to add to the funds needed to forward some of these enterprises, he was solicited to remain there and arrange a series of benefit concerts. He consented to do this, and thus became identified with the musical history of St. Louis, of which he was thereafter so large a part. He engaged in teaching, gave concerts, organized choruses and quartettes, and soon created an orchestra, to which the first citizens of St. Louis were proud to be admitted as members and patrons. The romance of his life may be said to have begun in this connection. In order to produce great works like Haydn's "Creation," Newton's "Saul and David," Handel's "Messiah," and other oratorios, he summoned to his assistance Miss Therese Weber, to sing the soprano parts at these concerts. Miss Weber was also an accomplished pianist, and there was a little rivalry between them from time to time, Mr. Balmer playing the accompaniments to Miss Weber's vocal solos, and she the accompaniments to his violin solos. Each of them had their ardent admirers and champions, and it was finally proposed that their respective merits should be put to the test of a piano duet on two pianos. This is said to have been the first piano duo ever played in St. Louis, and to have 'been played on the only two grand pianos then in existence in the city.
The concerts given under Professor Balmer's direction contributed to the advancement of various church, charitable and other enterprises, and Christ Church, the Second Presbyterian Church, the Orphan Asylum and the Mercantile Library were each his debtors in that connection. In 1840—May 1st—Christ Church was dedicated, and a fine musical programme was rendered on that occasion. Miss Weber sang two of the solos on the programme, and sang for the last time, that night, as Miss Weber. It was after the concert that Professor Balmer proposed to her, and in July following they were married. In 1846 he purchased the business of Sheppard & Phillipps, and, associating with him his brother-in-law, Henry Weber, founded the music emporium which, at the end of more than half a century, is still in existence, and is still conducted by the Balmer & Weber Music Company. Thereafter, as before, he continued to be a conspicuous figure in the conduct of charity concerts, and in all the musical functions of the city. Foreign artists who came to the city called on him for advice and assistance, and many of the most famous were, from time to time, his guests. Henry Vieuxtemps enjoyed his hospitality in 1843, and Ole Bull was a visitor at this home in 1844.
On the occasion of Ole Bull's visit to the city Professor Balmer played his accompaniments on the piano, and, being obliged to transpose one of his compositions, did it so well that the great violinist presented him with a handsome ruby ring, and embraced him affectionately in token of his appreciation of the service. This ring, a cherished memento of the greatest violinist of his day, is now in possession of Professor Balmer's daughter, Mrs. Therese Balmer Smith. In 1845 Professor Balmer organized the first male chorus in St. Louis, and in 1846 the Oratorio Society, of which he became conductor. The same year, in company with Leopold de Meier, and later with other notable musical artists, he gave memorable performances in St. Louis. When President Lincoln was buried at Springfield, Illinois, in 1865, he was called upon to conduct the music at his funeral, and the baton used on that occasion is still cherished by the family as an interesting relic of a memorable occasion.
For forty-six years he held the position of organist at Christ Church, and during all that time he was one of the most devoted and helpful friends of the church. His business partner retired from the firm in 1851, but Professor Balmer retained the old firm name in honor of his former partner, his wife and father-in-law. His father-in-law was Henry Weber, formerly counselor at the court of Frederick William III, King of Prussia, a gentleman of great learning, a noted linguist and a correspondent and friend of such distinguished men as Goethe, Humboldt, Raumer and Longfellow. Mr. Weber, who translated Longfellow's poems into the German language in the rhythm of the original, was also a fine musician, and composed masses, songs and organ offertories. On his deathbed he composed his own funeral hymn, prepared it for a male quartette and copied it in a clear, firm hand. It was sung at his funeral, and the words, as printed, were cut on his monument in Bellefontaine Cemetery. He died at St. Charles, at the age of eighty-nine years. One of the great musical societies organized by Professor Balmer was the Philharmonic Society, which began its existence in 1859, and was composed of the remnants of former societies. He was chosen president of this society and held that position for many years. After it ceased to exist as a regular organization on account of the dishonest practices of one of its officials, the members were held together in a social way, and during the war period, at the summons of Professor Balmer, gave the opera "Martha" for the benefit of sick and wounded soldiers, which proved a great success financially, and received unstinted praise on account of its artistic merits. So much a part of the musical life of St. Louis was Professor Balmer that he greatly endeared himself to people of all classes with whom he was brought into contact. He lived a long and useful life, and on the occasion of the celebration of his golden wedding anniversary, in 1890, messages and letters of congratulation came to him from all parts of the world.
His remains now rest in Bellefontaine Cemetery, and his last resting place is marked by a magnificent monument, erected by his wife, and crowned with a bust of the distinguished composer and artist, remarkably lifelike in appearance.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BALSON, William Lewis, president Balson Realty & Building Co.; born, Bridgeport, Dorsetshire, Eng., Oct 8, 1842; son of Lewis and Susan (Wheadon) Balson; educated in national schools of England until eleven years of age; came to America with parents in 1853, and attended public schools of St. Louis, and night schools; married, St. Louis, Dec. 23, 1866, Ella Schofield, whose father, William Schofield, came from Manchester, Eng., 1845; nine children: William S. (who died 1903), Ella E., Susan C., Edith M., Mary J., Ethel C., Lewis E., Eva and Olive A. Was in employ of U. S. Government about two years at Fort Leavenworth and Jefferson Barracks; learned carpenter's trade; entered building business in spring of 1866, in which has since continued, adding real estate business about 1880; incorporated under title of Balson Realty & Building Co., of which is president Democrat. Mason. Recreations: reading and home life. Office: 5899 Delmar Ave. Residence: Webster Groves, Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAMBER, Samuel Edward, secretary Hess & Culbertson Jewelry Co.; born, Batavia, O., Oct. 17, 1876; son of Henry and Justine (Favre) Bamber; educated in public schools of Cincinnati, O.; married, St. Louis, June 10, 1901, Louise Jenkins; children: Ruth Marie, Louise Justine. Came to St. Louis in 1893, and was with the Merrick, Walsh & Phelps Jewelry Co. as salesman until 1897; then was salesman with the Hess & Culbertson Jewelry Co. until 1902, when became secretary of the company. Republican. Was a member of Company G, 1st Missouri Volunteers, during the Spanish-American War, and served one year in Cuba. Baptist. Mason (32°), Knight Templar, Shriner; member Knights of the Maccabees of the World, Woodmen of the World. Club: Missouri Athletic. Favorite recreation: baseball. Office: 501 N. 7th St. Residence: Kenwood Springs, St. Louis Co.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BANISTER, Fred Arthur, real estate; born. St. Louis Co., Missouri, Nov. 28, 1861; son of John B. and Miriam (Voisey) Banister; educated in Webster School, St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Nov. 28, 1888, Nonie E. Morton; children: Marian, Edward W. Began business career as secretary to Gaius Paddock, president of the Paddock Hawley Iron Co., continuing for ten years; was for two years with E. S. Guignon & Bro., real estate; since then real estate and financial agent on own account. Member Business Men's League, St. Louis Real Estate Exchange. Republican. Episcopalian. Mason (32), Knight Templar, Shriner; secretary Masonic Temple Association. Member Legion of Honor. Clubs: Mercantile, Glen Echo, Oasis Fishing and Hunting. Favorite recreation: automobiling. Office: 1422- 1424 Syndicate Trust Bldg., 915 Olive St. Residence: 4542 W. Pine Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARCK, Carl, physician; born, Karlsruhe, Germany, July 29, 1859; son of Herrman and Ems (Riester) Barck; educated in public school till 9th year, gymnasium and lyceum until 18th year, and in Universities of Freiburg and Berlin till 22; M. D., University of Freiburg, 1880; married, St. Louis, June 26, 1891, Maud Schroeder; children: Amy, Edna. Engaged in practice of medicine since 1882; practice confined to diseases of the eye and ear. Professor of ophthalmology, St. Louis University; member of various medical societies, America and abroad, St. Louis Academy of Science. Member Ethical Society, etc. Recreations: chess, mountaineering. Office: 202-207 Humboldt Bldg. Residence: 3301 Shenandoah Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARCLAY, George Reppert, vice president Simmons Hardware Co.; born, Sacramento, Cal., Dec. 27, 1854; son of George R. and Julia Johnson Barclay; educated in public schools of Allegheny City, Pa., and Marietta, O.; married, St. Louis, Oct. 19, 1881, Lillie I. Swain; children: George F., Julia (Mrs. John D'Arcy), Thomas S. Began business career as clerk in the local freight office of the North Missouri R. R. Co., Oct. 1, 1870, remained with that company in various positions until March, 1875, when resigned to enter employ of Simmons Hardware Co., with which company continued, successively, as entry clerk, chief clerk of correspondence department, and manager of credit department; elected director, Jan. 1, 1898, office of assistant treasurer; and in 1904 elected to present position as vice president of the company. Was member of Company Q, 1st Regiment, National Guard of Missouri. Episcopalian. Clubs: Mercantile, Algonquin Golf, Triple A, Officers of 1st Regiment, N. G. M. Recreation: traveling. Office: 9th and Spruce Sts. Residence: 4305 Morgan St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


John Barclay, the first American ancestor, came to this country in 1684, and settled first at Plain field, East Jersey. He was one of the "original proprietors" of East Jersey, and was at different times commissioned as surveyor general and receiver general. Later he removed to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and was the founder and first senior warden of St. Peter's Episcopal Church in that town. His grandson, Rev. David Barclay, became a missionary of the Presbyterian Church, and was for fifty years an active clergyman. He was the paternal great-grandfather, after whom the subject of this sketch was named; and Robert also was a family name.
From Mr. Barclay's father's maternal ancestry came the Scotch blood of the Bruce’s, Stewart’s, and that of the Erskine’s and Gordon’s. The mother of his first American ancestor, John Barclay, was Catherine Gordon, daughter of Sir Robert Gordon, a second cousin of King James I of England. But Mr. Barclay prided himself most on his American ancestors, they having been prominent in civil, religious and military service in the early days of our country's history, especially in colonial times. Many were distinguished as officers, ministers and missionaries, as well as authors.
Mr. Barclay attended private schools in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, until he was fourteen years of age, when, rather than prepare for and accept a collegiate education, he preferred to learn a trade. Selecting that of a printer, and wishing to become a journalist, he went into the office of the "Genius of Liberty," a Democratic newspaper in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, where he learned not only the printer's trade, but the principles of the Democratic Party so thoroughly that he never forsook them. Here he also acquired his love of reading and his taste for politics and for general historical research.
In 1846 he left home for the first time, and served his last year as a printer and bookkeeper in the city of Philadelphia.
Leaving that city in 1847, he became clerk on an Ohio River steamboat, owned by his brother-in-law, Captain Thomas Gregg, remaining with 'him until the latter's death in 1849, after which he entered the steamboat trade on Southern rivers. Through his business and social intercourse with Southern people at that time he acquired a love for them and their institutions, adopted their habits and principles, and ever after espoused their cause.
In March, 1850, he visited his relative, Mr. John S. Watson, of St. Louis, who induced him to forsake river life and become a resident of that city, offering him a position at once as bookkeeper for the firm of Wilgus & Watson (Asa Wilgus and John S. Watson). This he accepted and retained until the dissolution of that firm, and continued the same with its successors, John S. Watson & Co., until their interests were sold to Thos. R. Cooper & Co., T. R. Cooper being the practical printer, and D. R. Barclay the business manager of the new firm. This co-partnership existed but one year, and that enterprise closed permanently in 1853. Mr. Barclay then opened a general collecting agency, at the same time devoting all his spare hours to preparation for a future professional career, either as a journalist or a lawyer. During all these years he had been a great reader, especially of the current events of the period, and of American and political history, so that in his later years he was regarded as an authority on the political and general history of his country. He had also been reading and studying law under the direction of his friend, Judge Alexander Hamilton, and in March, 1854, was admitted to the -bar of St. Louis. He did not begin the practice of law, however, until January1, 1855, and then confined himself almost exclusively to office work, seldom appearing in the courts as counsel. The result of these years of application afterward appeared.
In 1857 he began his work known as "Barclay's Digest of the Decisions of the Supreme Court of Missouri," the first edition of which was published June 1, 1859. A second edition was issued in December, 1868. "Barclay's Digest" is still considered a valuable and necessary acquisition to every law library, and bids fair to perpetuate the name of its author.
In 1860 he became more interested in politics, and accepted the nomination of the State Democratic Convention for the office of Representative from St. Louis, but was defeated, and but for the sake of his party would have rejoiced in his own defeat, for he was not an office-seeker.
When the Civil War began, in 1861, he openly espoused the cause of Southern rights, and fearlessly avowed his Southern sympathies. After the capture of Camp Jackson, May 10, 1861, by the Federal troops and Home Guards under Generals N. Lyon and Frank P. Blair, and after the subsequent capture of the Federal camp and soldiers under the command of Colonel Mulligan at Lexington, Missouri, by General Sterling Price, of the Southern army, Mr. Barclay, at the solicitation of many friends in both camps, interested himself in their exchange. General Price had refused to negotiate for an exchange, declining to recognize the Camp Jackson prisoners as opponents to Federal authority or violators of militia law, many of them having then entered the United States service. But there were many who believed he might be influenced to change his views by a special appeal, and Mr. Barclay and Major Henry W. Williams, being close personal friends of General Price, were solicited to secure an authorized conference with him and make an effort to accomplish the much desired exchange. After some delay permission was secured from Colonel Curtis, then in command in St. Louis, for Mr. Barclay and Major Williams to visit General Fremont's camp at Springfield, Missouri, and get his consent to proceed further on this business. This was reluctantly given, and by order of Geo. E. Waring, major commanding Fremont's Hussars, these gentlemen were provided with an escort and a pass across the Federal lines to visit the camp of General Price at Wilson's Creek, Missouri, October 31, 1861. After their interview with General Price he consented to an exchange of prisoners on condition that Mr. Barclay would pledge himself to act on his (General Price's) behalf as commissioner of exchange. This pledge was given and faithfully kept and the exchange effected, but it marked Mr. Barclay still more strongly as a Southern sympathizer, and subjected him to many unpleasant experiences. Nothing but his peculiar position in other respects, his serious and more imperative obligations, and other circumstances not proper to be here mentioned, prevented him at that time from offering his services and life, if need be, to the cause he loved so well.
The following December 12, 1861, Major General Halleck issued General Order No. 24, for the assessment of many prominent citizens of St. Louis, male and female, as Southern sympathizers. Mr. Barclay was one of these, and also one of the twenty-five on that list, who on December 26, 1861, signed a protest to General Halleck against the execution of that unjust order. The order, 'however, was soon after executed, and Mr. Barclay's law and miscellaneous library and other personal property sold under it at public auction. This loss and his inability to take the iron-clad oath then necessary in order to practice law in Missouri resulted in the abandonment of his profession, and in an entire change of his pursuits.
In 1862, on February i8th, Mr. Barclay was arrested as a Southern sympathizer by order of Provost Marshal General Bernard G. Farrar, and confined in the Myrtle Street Prison, being one of the first civilians placed therein. After two months' imprisonment without trial, no special charges having been made against him, he was released without oath, bond or parole by Assistant Provost Marshal Colonel Thos. C. Fletcher, April, 1862. The following month he went to Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and remained at his father's until August, when he went to Toronto, Canada, and remained until April, 1863, the military authorities requiring his absence from the District of Missouri. Resolved then to return home at all hazards, he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, to await orders from St. Louis. Here he was arrested by General Burnside's order, April 20, 1863, but released by him after only two days' surveillance. But General Curtis and Provost Marshal Franklin A. Dick demanded terms for his return which he could not possibly accept, and again he went to his father's home in Pennsylvania to await events. Meantime Colonel James O. Broadhead became provost marshal general, and on more reasonable and generous terms authorized his return. These he accepted, and arrived once more in St. Louis July 2, 1863.
Mr. Barclay's first effort to resume active business after the close of the war, in 1865, was the purchase from Thomas Marshall, Esq., of his abstracts, records, maps, etc., compiled from the records and surveys of St. Louis city and county, and the opening of offices for the "investigation of real estate titles and conveyancing." He soon after employed as an assistant Mr. H. W. Williams, and entered into partnership with him January 1, 1868. For four years this business was a great success, when Mr. Barclay sold his interest in it to Mr. Williams and retired from the firm. Some of the most beautiful and perfect abstracts of titles ever filed for record in St. Louis County were from the hands of these experts, Barclay & Williams.
Mr. Barclay still desired to enter the field of journalism, and in April, 1872, the long sought for opportunity came, when he purchased a one-third interest in the St. Louis "Evening Dispatch," and the following October bought the entire interest of Mr. W. H. McHenry, becoming the sole owner, whereupon he organized a stock company and became its president. For a time success seemed certain, but reverses came, and on February 16, 1876, he dissolved all connection with that journal. After this he never entered into any permanent business.
Mr. Barclay was baptized in infancy in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, but never connected himself with it. His preference was for the Episcopal Church, and on April 24, 1873, he and his son, Robert, then a pupil at the Episcopal High School of Virginia, were confirmed together by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Johns, in Christ Church, Alexandria, Virginia, the historic church in which General Washington worshipped.  For many years Mr. Barclay was a vestryman in Trinity Parish St. Louis. He was also a trustee of St. Luke's Hospital, and of the "Missouri Institution for the Education of the Blind."
All who were connected with him in these institutions will remember his enthusiastic efforts for the erection and support of St. Luke's Hospital, and for the rebuilding of Trinity Church after its destruction by fire, and, also for the general welfare of that parish, as well his never-ceasing interest in the Institution for the Education of the Blind. He was a public-spirited man and always active in charitable work and philanthropic enterprises.
He was not fond of secret societies, but at the solicitation of his second wife, who was the daughter, of a Mason and an Odd Fellow, he, soon after their marriage in 1854, joined the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and regularly attended Wildey Lodge No. 2 for one year only, but retained his membership in the order for ten years.
Mr. Barclay was twice married. His first wife was Miss Sallie Virginia Watson, of Van Buren, Arkansas, to whom he was united December 24. 1851. She died in St. Louis, December 14, 1852. His second wife to whom he was married June 20, 1854, in St. Louis, was Mary Melinda Hill, a widow (with one son Shepard) the only daughter of Elihu H.  Shepard and Mary Thomas Shepard. By this marriage he became the father of four children — one son and three daughters; Mary Esther Barclay, Robert Barclay (now a practicing physician in St. Louis); Lucy Eleanor, wife of Edmond L. McClelland, Esq., of Washington, D. C. and Annie wife of Julius Howard Pratt, Ph. D., of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, all of whom and their mother survive him.
Mr. Barclay was a man of generous impulses and unlimited hospitality. At the close of the Civil War, in 1865, many young Southerners came to St. Louis to seek their fortunes, and not a few of them remember with grateful pleasure his personal kindness and the genial welcome and generous hospitality which always awaited them and their friends at the Barclay homestead
He was a faithful friend, a bitter foe, a ”royal host” and a zealous partisan, fearless in the defense of his friends and his principles.  He was handsome, of fine form and presence, courteous and dignified in manner, and of cultivated and refined tastes, gentle in nature, truthful in spirit, and in every sense of the word a gentleman.
He died after only a few days’ illness at the residence of his son, Dr. Robert Barclay, in St. Louis, September 11, 1886. “After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well.”
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARCLAY, Robert, physician, specialist; born, St. Louis, May 8, 1857; son of David Robert Barclay (lawyer, journalist, author of Barclay's Digest, and proprietor and editor of the St. Louis Dispatch) and Mary Melinda (Shepard) Barclay, daughter of Capt. Elihu H. Shepard (soldier in four American wars, lawyer and teacher); of British and Norman ancestry on paternal side, and of Revolutionary ancestry on maternal side; attended schools of St. Louis, Mo., and Alexandria, Va.; A.B., Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., 1880, A.M., 1883; M.D., College of Physicians and Surgeons (Medical Department, Columbia University), 1883; married, Hartford, Conn., October, 1886, Minnie Genie, daughter of Thomas and Agnes (Gibson) Hamilton (both of distinguished Scottish ancestry); they have three sons: Robert Hamilton (with electrical department, Kansas City Terminal R. R. Co.), Shepard Gibson (member editorial staff, New York Sun) and McClelland (commercial artist and special marine painter, New York and Washington, D. C). Mrs. Barclay died Dec. 22, 1908. She was especially gifted as a musician and composer, and served as musical director of the St. Louis Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. Dr. Barclay has engaged in practice in St. Louis since October, 1885, as specialist in diseases of the ear, nose and throat; has served as chief, in his department, in St. Louis City Hospital, Missouri Pacific Railway Hospital, St. Louis Baptist Hospital, Missouri Baptist Sanitarium, St. Mary's Infirmary, South Side Dispensary, Maria Consilia Deaf and Dumb Institute, St. Philomena's Industrial School, House of the Good Shepherd, etc. Among improvements devised by him in surgical instruments, may be named a special pattern of shaft-and-handle for any instrument for operating in the depth of long narrow cavities; also an improved and shortened aural operating-speculum. Vice president St. Louis Medical Society, 1906. Contributor to medical periodicals, encyclopedias, society proceedings, etc. Chief articles: "Medical Treatment of Acute Diseases of the Middle Ear,'' Hare's System of Practical Therapeutics, 1892; '' Closure of the Ear by Growths of Bone,'' in the St. Louis Medical Review of 1894; "Can You Cure Deafness Caused by Catarrh" ("A Reply"), in The Laryngoscope of 1897; "A Practical Suggestion Respecting the Removal of Foreign Bodies from the Larynx; illustrated by a Case of Cockleburr upon the Vocal Cords," in The Medical Fortnightlv of 1905; "A Method of Radical Relief of Cases of Deafness Long Abandoned as Hopeless," Journal of Missouri State Medical Association, 1907; "Relief of Chronic Deafness by Tympanic Resection," in The Railway Surgeon, 1907; "Some Practical Problems in Ear, Nose and Throat Practice," Journal of Missouri State Medical Association, 1912; etc. Main Office and Address: 3894 Washington Boul. Supplementary Office: 3100 S. Grand Ave., corner Arsenal St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARCLAY, Shepard, lawyer; born, St. Louis, Nov. 3, 1847; son of Capt. Elihu H. Shepard, of pioneer American settlers; educated St. Louis public and high schools; A.B., St. Louis University, 1867; LL.B., University of Virginia, 1869; Paris, and University of Berlin, 1870-72; (LL.D., University of Missouri, 1897, St. Louis University, 1904); married, St. Louis, June 11, 1873, Katie Anderson. Practiced law, St. Louis, 1872-82; elected circuit judge, St. Louis, 1882; elected Justice Supreme Court, Missouri, 1888; chosen chief justice, 1897; resigned, 1898, and resumed practice; appointed judge St. Louis Court of Appeals, 1901; returned to practice, 1903; now member firm of Barclay, Fauntleroy & Cullen. Member Business Men's League. President University of Virginia Alumni, Beta Theta Alumni. Life member Missouri Historical Society. Clubs: University, Noonday, Bellerive, Schiller Verein. Mercantile, Alma Mater. Office: 214 N. 6th St. Residence: 3844 Delmar Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

Barclay, Shepard, lawyer and judge, was born November 3, 1847, in St. Louis.  Captain Elihu H. Shepard, his grandfather was a pioneer American settler, who came to that city in 1823 from Ney York State.  Judge Barclay’s education began in the public schools of St. Louis.  From the High School he went to the St. Louis University, and was graduated there in the classical course in 1867.  He then commenced the study of law at the University of Virginia under the tutelage of Professor John B. Minor, the noted author of the “Institutes,” and in 1869 he attained his degree of law there, and was also graduated in the School of Medical Juris-prudence.  Judge Barclay, during his university career, was elected final president of the Jefferson Society by a unanimous vote.  In 1869 he started to Europe, where he remained until 1872, attending two terms in the University of Berlin, in the study of the civil law, under the guidance of Drs. Gueist and Bruns.  He spent also a considerable time in Paris in 1870, and saw the close of the empire of the third Napoleon.  During his stay abroad he witnessed some of the great events of the last Franco-Prussian War, and wrote accounts of them, which appeared in one of the St. Louis journals.  On returning home in 1872 he commenced the practice of law, and during the early days of his law practice wrote for the press in St. Louis as editorial contributor.  In 1873 he was married to Miss Anderson, daughter of Honorable Charles R. Anderson, a well know citizen of St. Louis.  In the same year Honorable William C. Marshall and he formed a law partnership, which continued until 1882, when Judge Barclay was elected circuit judge in St. Louis by a majority of 5,040.  His associates on the circuit bench at that time were Judges Amos M. Thayer, Elmer B. Adams, George W. Jubke and William H. Horner.   
From 1877 until after his election to the judiciary he participated in organizing the local military force in St. Louis, which became the Third Regiment of the National Guard of Missouri.  It was at the time regarded as a very efficient body of citizen soldiery.  The regiment was commanded by Colonel James G. Butler, and one of the best companies therein was the Lafayette Guard, of this the subject of this sketch was for many years captain.
In 1888, near the close of his term of service on the circuit bench, he was elected judge of the Supreme Court of Missouri.  His first opinion as supreme judge is reported in the 97th Missouri Reports, page 26, and his opinions appear thereafter in more than forty-five volumes of the official decisions.  In 1897, Judge Barclay was chosen chief justice of the court by his associates on the bench, and in June of that year the University of Missouri at Columbia conferred upon him the honorary degree of doctor of laws.
Before going on the bench Judge Barclay served for several years as secretary of the Missouri Historical Society.  In 1882 he was elected secretary of the Conference of Judges of Missouri, an association formed by members of the judiciary of the State for the purpose of considering and reporting to the Legislature upon omissions, uncertainties and incongruities in the statue law-a duty imposed on the judges by Section 3272 of the Revised Statues.  He filled that office for more than fifteen years, and until his resignation as judge.  He also filled for a long period the office of vice president of the American Bar Association, an important national organization of members of the bar from all parts of the United States.
In 1898 he resigned his office as chief justice of Missouri to practice law in St. Louis, in conjunction with Messrs. J. E. McKeighan and M. F. Watts.  Since the termination of that association in 1901 he continues in practice on his own account, and maintains the high place in his profession which his record on the bench established.
In deference to the wishes of the subject of this sketch we have given merely the unvarnished facts of his career to the present time, and have not essayed any eulogy of his public services, or of his personal qualities; but we may be pardoned the remark that the record he has already made is probably in itself sufficient evidence of his ability as a lawyer and judge, as well as of the regard in which he is held by his fellow-citizens of St. Louis, and of Missouri.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARDENHEIER, Charles William, wine and liquor merchant; born, St. Louis, Nov. 4, 1869; son of John and Elizabeth (Schaub) Bardenheier; educated in St. Louis public school, Christian Brothers College, and Bryant & Stratton Business College; married, Centralia, ILL., June, 1896, Flora Kohl; one daughter, Fernanda. After leaving school, in 1881, entered employ of his father, in the wholesale wine and liquor business; learned wine making in Europe, 1888-89; vice president John Bardenheier Wine and Liquor Co., 1895-1905, since president. Catholic. Recreations: hunting and fishing. Office: 210-214 Market St. Residence: 5159 Fairmount Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARDENHEIER, John Henry, wholesale wines and liquors; born, St. Louis, Aug. 15, 1873; son of John and Elizabeth (Schaub) Bardenheier; educated in St. Louis public schools, Christian Brothers College, and Bryant & Stratton Business College; married, Nov. 28, 1906, Louise Lagomardino. In 1889 entered the wine and liquor house of John Bardenheier, thoroughly learning the business, and was sent by father to California, where, among the Italian-Swiss colony in the wine sections of that state, studied the processes of making, and especially of keeping, native wines; on return reentered the house and in 1895 when business was incorporated as the John Bardenheier Wine and Liquor Co., became secretary of the company, continuing until death of father, June, 1905, when, with three brothers, succeeded to the business, becoming vice president of the company. Catholic. Member of the Eagles, Knights of Pvthias, Travelers Protective Association. Office: 210-214 Market St. Residence: 6059 Kingsbury Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARDENHEIER, Joseph Anthony, wholesale wine and liquors; born, St. Louis, Dec. 21, 1880; son of John and Elizabeth (Schaub) Bardenheier; educated in St. Louis public schools, Christian Brothers College and Bryant & Stratton Business College; unmarried. Entered wholesale wine and liquor house of father (who established it in 1873) in 1894, and in 1895, when business was incorporated as the John Bardenheier Wine and Liquor Co., became assistant secretary of the company, so continuing until death of father in June, 1905, when succeeded, with three brothers, to the business and became secretary of the company. Office: 210-214 Market St. Residence: 5102 Maple Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARKER, Harry Clark, lawyer; born, Hartford, Kan., July 18, 1880; son of Rev. Joel Arlington and Alice R. (Smith) Barker; descended from English ancestry, landing in America about 1752; educated Fairbury (Neb.) High School, graduating, 1898; student University of Nebraska, 1898-1900; continued studies in McKendree College, Lebanon, ILL., but left that institution in senior year to enter business; read law in office of C. C. Collins, St. Louis; entered Law Department, Washington University, and graduated degree of LL.B., 1904; married, Webster Groves, Mo., May 29, 1906, Grace Lawrence Ferguson; one child: Harry C, Jr.(deceased.) In practice in St. Louis since 1904; member firm of Carter, Collins, Jones & Barker since 1905. Member St. Louis Bar Association, St. Louis Law Library Association, Beta Theta Pi college fraternity. Club: City. Office: 1016, 506 Olive St. Residence: Webster Groves, Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARKER, William Shirmer, physician; born, St. Louis, Oct. 18, 1863; son of Dr. William S. and Virginia (Shirmer) Barker; educated in St. Louis public schools; Ph.B., Washington University, 1887; M.D., Missouri Medical College, 1890; studied in Post-Graduate and Polyclinic schools in New York; married, St. Louis, Nov. 3, 1891, Mary E. Sprague; children: Sprague, Paul Shirmer, Ruth Lincoln, Elizabeth, Philip Charles, Virginia, Theodore. Engaged in general practice of medicine in St. Louis since 1890, with special work in diseases of children; member staffs Bethesda and Foundling hospitals. Member City Hospital Medical, St. Louis Pediatric and St. Louis Medical societies. Presbyterian. Office: 3502 N. Grand Ave. Residence: 3855 Delmar Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARKLAGE, Louis, stock and bond broker; born, St. Louis, Feb. 11, 1863; son of Frederick and Margaret (Henger) Barklage; educated in public schools and Polytechnic HighSchool, St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Apr. 26, 1893, Eugenia Ludwig. Began active career as clerk in Continental Bank, 1879; entered office of Wernse & Dieckman, stock and bond brokers, 1881, and has ever since been associated with that firm. Member St. Louis Stock Exchange (president, 1910, and now director). Mason; member Tuscan Lodge No. 360, A. F. & A. M. Club: Union (charter member). Recreations: fishing and traveling. Office: 317 N. 4th St. Residence: 6185 Kingsbury Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARLOW, Stephen Douglas, secretary of the Collier estate; born, St. Louis, June 13, 1845; son of Stephen D. and Lucy A. (Dickson) Barlow; educated in public schools and Washington University; married, Rolla, Mo., Sept. 29, 1883, Missouri Williams; one daughter: Margaret D. After leaving school, entered firm of W. H. Markham, wholesale iron dealers, continuing for six years; first assistant comptroller of St. Louis during the administration of Nathan Cole, Mayor; then became secretary and treasurer of the Kellogg Bridge Co., of Buffalo, N. Y.; afterwards first assistant comptroller during Mayor Henry Overstolz's administration until ill health necessitated a change of climate; for ten years thereafter was accountant with different iron manufacturing companies, for three years secretary and treasurer of the St. Louis & Suburban Railway Co., then for a time with the Mercantile Trust Co.; became secretary of the Collier Estate, 1900. Republican. Favorite recreations: literature and music. Office: 711, 105 N. 7th St. Residence: 5502A Maple Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Barlow, Stephen Douglas, distinguished as railway official and public man, was born in Middlebury, Vermont, February 4, 1816, and died in St. Louis August 8. 1895.  His father was Jonathan K. Barlow, member of a New England family, which has had numerous eminent representatives.  His mother was Miss Honor Douglas before her marriage, and was an aunt of the late distinguished Illinois Senator and statesman, Stephen A. Douglas.  Reared mainly in New York State, Stephen D. Barlow obtained his early education in the common schools of Genesee County, and completed his education at the Wesleyan Seminary, near Rochester, New York.  He read law in the office of a prominent attorney of Batavia, New York, and was admitted to the bar in 1839.  The same year he came to St. Louis, arriving on November 12th. Shortly afterward he was appointed assistant to General John Ruland, clerk of the Circuit Court of St. Louis County, and in 1842, after the creation of the Court of Common Pleas, he was made chief deputy to James W. Walsh, clerk of that court.  Two years later the county court appointed him county clerk and recorder of deeds to fill out the unexpired term of a deceased official.  In 1847, he was elected to this office by the people, and in 1848 entered upon a six years’ term, which expired in 1854.  While serving the people with conspicuous ability as a county official, he had also been active in promoting railway and other enterprises of importance to the city, and when, in 1853, the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company was permanently organized, he was made its secretary and treasurer.  Upon the expiration his term as clerk and recorder he turned his entire attention to railroad affairs, and by successive re-elections continued in the position of secretary and treasurer of the railroad company until 1859, when he became president. For seven years thereafter he remained at the head of this corporation, and was known as one of the ablest of the old-time Western railway managers.
In 1868 the Iron Mountain Railroad and its franchises were sold to satisfy a claim which the State of Missouri held against it for aid rendered to the enterprise. A reorganization of the company followed this sale, and for a few years thereafter Mr. Barlow was not officially identified with the corporation. In 1873, however, he resumed connection with it as assistant to Honorable Thomas Allen, president. Later he became local treasurer of the company, and after the purchase of the road by Jay Gould in 1878, which resulted in its consolidation with the Missouri Pacific system, he was retained as secretary of the Iron Mountain branch and commissioner of lands in Missouri. Both these offices he continued to hold until the day of his death. During his long and active connection with the railway interests of Missouri he was much in the public eye, and in that sense was a public man for more than forty years. As a city and county official he also rendered many years of faithful and efficient service to the people, and the force and influence of his constructive genius was felt in almost every department of the city government. As early as 1857 he served as a member of tire Board of Public Schools, and was several times re-elected to that body. As its president particularly he contributed greatly to the upbuilding of the splendid public school system of St. Louis. During the years 1865-6, while a member of the Missouri Legislature, he obtained a charter for the Public School Library Association, which founded the present public library, and was its first president. In 1866 he was appointed a member of the board of managers of the State Asylum for the Insane, at Fulton, Missouri.
In 1867-8 he served as a member of the Board of Water Commissioners of St. Louis, and in 1869 was elected city comptroller, serving until 1871. While acting in that capacity he formulated the "Cole-Barlow charter," which was enacted by the Legislature. After the adoption of the existing "scheme and charter" he was elected a member of the first city council provided for therein, and served until 1879, being chairman of the committees on ways and means, and railroads. He was originally a Whig in his political affiliations, but early joined the "Free Soil" movement, being one of the small number of Missourians who took a bold stand against the extension of slavery. He naturally became a supporter of the Republican Party, and was a steadfast but conservative member of it to the end of his life. From 1842 until his death he was a member of St. John's Episcopal Church of St. Louis, and during the later years of his life was senior warden of its vestry. September 12, 1839, he married Miss Lucy A. Dickson, of Perry, New York. His widow and four children are the surviving members of his family. These children an. Stephen D. Barlow, Margaret D. Turner, wife of Charles H. Turner, president of the St. Louis & Suburban Railway Company; Agnes Houser, wife of D. M. Hottser, president of the Globe Printing Company and publisher of the St. Louis "Globe-Democrat"; and Andrew D. Barlow, present United States consul general in Mexico.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARNARD, George D., manufacturing stationer; born, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 6, 1846; son of Henry L. and Elizabeth Robinson (Curtis) Barnard; educated in public school and half through high school, at New Bedford, Mass., leaving school because of death of father; married, Alton, ILL., 1874, Mary L. Tindall. Began in stationery business as employee in 1860; came to St. Louis, September, 1868, and was clerk in manufacturing stationery house until 1872, when with two others started in manufacturing stationery business; partners died in 1876 and 1877; business later incorporated as George D. Barnard & Co., of which is president, and since 1895 has occupied the entire large factory building (345x212 feet) where is now located. Also vice president Art Metal Construction Co. Member Merchants' Exchange (ex-vice president). Vice chairman Committee on Fall Festivities; one of original World's Fair Committee of 200; chairman of many committees to raise money for public purposes. Mugwump, with Democratic tendencies. Episcopalian (Church of the Ascension). Clubs: Mercantile, St. Louis, University, Noonday, Round Table, St. Louis Country, Glen Echo. Recreations: motoring and traveling. Office: Vandeventer and Laclede Aves. Residence: 45 Portland Place. Summer Residence: Lake Geneva, Wis.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNES, Algernon Sidney, retired physician; born, Mont Albion, Miss., Mar. 8, 1831; son of John (M.D.) and Caroline (Clark) Barnes; came to St. Louis, 1841; educated in private schools of St. Louis, and graduated from medical department, University of Missouri, 1855; married, St. Louis, Apr. 26, 1859, Susan C. Bailey; children: Algernon Sidney, Jr., M.D., Percival Clinton, M.D., and Ida M. Crossed the plains with ox-team, 1850, walking from St. Joseph, Mo., to Salt Lake, and from Salt Lake to the gold mines of California, where joined a company of Texas rangers and dug gold for over two years; returned to Missouri, studied medicine, and engaged in practice at St. Louis, from 1855; now retired. Entered Government service, at beginning of Civil War, as surgeon, and served until close of war. Member American Medical Association, Mississippi Valley Medical Association, Missouri State Medical Association, St. Louis Medical Society; member Military Surgeons of National Guards of United States. Republican. Methodist. Mason; member Legion of Honor. Residence: 6312 Washington Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNES, Algernon Sidney, Jr., physician; born, St. Louis. May 18, 1871; son or Algernon S. (M.D.) and Susan C. (Sheekley-Bailey) Barnes; educated in Smith Academy, Perkins and Herpel Business College, St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, M.D., 1892; special course University of Pennsylvania, 1892; married, St. Louis, June 7, 1893, Florence I. Bethune; one son: John Algernon, born July 15, 1908. Practiced general medicine, 1892-97; in 1897 took up specialty of ear, nose, throat and chest diseases, as office assistant with late Dr. J. C. Mulhall; since then has practiced alone as specialist in ear, nose, throat and lungs. Professor microscopy, St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1893-95; assistant to professor nose and throat, Beaumont Hospital Medical College, 1895-97. Member St. Louis Medical Society, Missouri State Medical Association, American Medical Association, Obstetrical Society, Philadelphia, Pathological Society, Philadelphia; chairman Scout Masters Association, Boy Scouts of America, in St. Louis; chairman Tiny Tim fund; vice president Men's Club of Maple Avenue Methodist Church; delegate to Central Council of Social Agencies. Member American National Red Cross, St Louis Society of Social Hygiene, Social Service Conference, Washington University Association, Civic League. Republican. Clubs: City, St. Louis, Railway. Recreations: gymnastics and boy's work. Office: 210, 705 Olive St. Residence: 5589 Vernon Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Barnes, Baron S., who was for many years conspicuous in St. Louis as a member of that body of traders known as the Chamber of Commerce, was born September 21, 1844, in the city of Utica, New York, son of Amos and Julia (Bush) Barnes. He was educated in the schools of Utica and trained to commercial pursuits. Coming West in his young manhood, he became a resident of St. Louis in 1876, and at once became actively interested in the grain trade in that city. Admitted to membership in the Chamber of Commerce he embarked in business as a grain, broker, and for more than twenty years was continuously engaged in that branch of trade. In his operations as a member of the Chamber of Commerce, he evinced rare judgment and evidenced that keen sagacity which results from a careful study of markets and trade conditions, a broad survey of the sources of supply and accurate estimates of the demand for the cereal products of our country. While he was a fearless operator in the sense of backing his judgment by his investments, he was, at the same time, careful in reaching conclusions, and as a result of this conservatism and his long experience, he was seldom found on the wrong side of the market. Successful in the accumulation of a fortune and known among 'his associates and acquaintances as a business man of high character and superior capacity, he was recognized also as a gentleman of cultured tastes, a lover of good literature and of the best things in art. His home on the heights west of St. Louis, on what is known as the Bonhomme Road, is one of the most beautiful of St. Louis residences, and evidences the artistic tastes of its late owner in its furnishings and embellishments. Upright in business, sincere in his friendships, hospitable in his entertainments, and genial in his intercourse with his fellow men, he was esteemed alike in business and social circles, a popular and useful citizen. He served in the Union Army in the Civil War as a member of the One Hundred and Fifth Illinois Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, and as a soldier discharged faithfully every duty and performed every obligation resting upon him. In politics, he was a Republican, and he was identified with fraternal organizations as a member of the Masonic order of the Knight Templar degree. He was married at Oskaloosa, Iowa, June 4, 1890, to Miss Eva Salisbury, and three children were born to them. The children are Edith Margaret, Baron Anderson and Annis Louise Barnes. Mr. Barnes died June 16, 1899, and the esteem in which he was held by the Merchants' Exchange, of which he had so long been a member, was evidenced by a series of resolutions adopted by that body, which gave expression to the following sentence: "His death removes from the ranks of business men of St. Louis one who will long be remembered for his high qualities of mind and heart. A courteous, generous gentleman, upright and honorable in all his dealings with his fellow men, and ever ready to respond to any worthy call for the relief of suffering humanity, or for the benefit of mankind."
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARNES, Charles Wardell, real estate; born, New York, June 5, 1845; son of George and Mary Louisa (Wardell) Barnes; educated in public school, New York, boarding schools at White Plains, N. Y., and Suffield, Conn., and private school, New York; married, St. Charles, Mo., Apr. 22, 1879, Lucie Belle Portmess; children: George, Margaret Ellen, Shepard, Charles W., Jr. Clerk in tea brokerage firm, New York, 1860-61, shipping and commission firm, 1861; went to China, via Aspinwall,Panama and San Francisco, to Shanghai (107 days); was with Olyphant & Co. at Shanghai, Kinkiang, Hankow, Hong Kong and Canton in various capacities until May, 1872; reached Shanghai when it was surrounded by the Tai-ping rebels, and joined the Shanghai Volunteers in defense of the settlement, in conjuntion with English, French and Indian troops. Returned to New York and entered U. S. Sub-Treasury, 1873; came to St. Louis, June 30, 1875; treasurer Crystal Plate Glass Co., 1875-95; since 1900 engaged in real estate and loan business. Also vice president Buxton & Skinner Stationery Co. Member Real Estate Exchange. Republican. Episcopalian. While in China visited many parts of the empire, also Japan; made acquaintance of Generals Forrester and Burgevine and of Colonel (Chinese) Gordon, commander of the "Ever Victorious Army," and of Li Hung Chang (then known as General Li). Club: Mercantile (from start). Office: 722 Chestnut St. Residence: 3754 Westminster Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Barnes, Robert A., merchant, banker and public benefactor, was born November 29, 1808, in Washington, D. C., and died in St. Louis, April 2, 1892. His father was Jesse Barnes, of Charles County, Maryland; and his mother, Mary Evans, of Prince George County, same State. He was of English descent, his paternal ancestor having emigrated in the year 1662 from the County of Suffolk, England, settling in Maryland near the present site of Port Tobacco. His father died when he was thirteen years of age, and he was placed under the care of an uncle, Richard Barnes, of Louisville, Kentucky, with whom he lived for several years. At that early date the advantages of literary training were meager, embracing only a common school education, which he received; but in after years by extensive reading he became well informed on all ordinary subjects, fitting him for the intercourse of cultured society. In equipment for his career the lack of early literary training was amply supplied by a strong character, a vigorous intellect, and especially by sound, common sense, which is nothing but sound judgment applied to the questions of daily life as they arise, and which was one of Mr. Barnes' most marked characteristics.
On May 17, 1830, he removed to St. Louis, which he made his permanent home. In his marriage, January 28, 1845, ne became connected with one of the most prominent families of the city, his wife, Louise de Mun, being the third daughter of Jules de Mun and Isabelle Gratiot.
Mr. Barnes chose for his career commercial pursuits; and in his later life, retiring from his business as a wholesale grocer, he became a capitalist, three-fourths of his fortune of $1,000,000 consisting of cash and convertible securities, and at the time of his death having on deposit $500,000 in cash, and an additional one-quarter of his estate being in choice stocks and bonds. This immense fortune was the product of his own labor and skill, having begun business life without capital and without influential patronage. He was a born financier. In the principles, aims and methods of business life there are few examples that would be fuller of sound instruction to young business men than his.
He laid the foundation of his fortune and gives the secret of its growth in what he is reported to have decided when he entered on that first employment in St. Louis: "If I am ever going to get ahead I must some time begin to get ahead, and now is the time to begin; and I determined that year to save $100, which I did and put at interest and felt myself a capitalist; and every year during the rest of my life I always came out ahead." Several years before his death he placed in the hands of trustees $27,000 in bonds for the benefit of the St. Louis Methodist Orphans' Home, but with the strict injunction that it was to be kept secret while he lived; and a similar injunction was imposed in reference to his purpose, necessarily confided to one of his trustees, to devote his estate to the founding of a hospital, which was formed and provided for by will ten years before his death. His benevolence was not, however, merely sentimental, and therefore indiscriminate and unintelligent. He seldom, if ever, gave to the itinerant beggar unless he was also a helpless cripple. He believed everyone not mentally or physically disabled ought to earn his own living, and could if he was anxious to do it, and if lie would not work he ought to starve.
The bequests of his will, with few exceptions, were in the line of benefactions to the poor and friendless. In those made to nephews and nieces there appears the thought and purpose to limit the amount to each, so as not to release them from self-help, while enough to lay the foundation of :a fortune if they had the ambition and energy to earn it. The beneficiaries were orphan asylums and private hospitals and institutions for the care of friendless old men and women, and the remainder, estimated at $1,000,000, for the erection and maintenance of a hospital "for sick and injured persons, without distinction of creed."
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARNES, Rollin H., physician; born, Fredericksburg, O., July 22, 1872; son of Dr. William T. and Almeda (Greer) Barnes; educated public schools of Ohio, Ohio Wesleyan University, Medical Department Wooster University and Marion-Sims Medical College, St. Louis, graduating from the latter with degree of M.D., April, 1897; unmarried. Has practiced at St. Louis since 1897; professor proctology, St Louis College Physicians and Surgeons, 1905-09; professor proctology, American Medical College, since 1910; publisher and editor of The Proctologist. Member American Proctologic Society, American Medical Association, Missouri State Medical Association, St. Louis Medical Society, Medical Association of the Southwest, Ohio Valley and Mississippi Valley Medical Associations; ex-president Alumni of Medical Department, St. Louis University. Republican. Member Ohio Society of St. Louis, B. P. O. Elks. Office: Rooms 219-223 Metropolitan Bldg. Residence: 612 N. Grand Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNETT, George Dennis, architect; born, St. Louis, Oct. 7, 1863; son of George L and Elizabeth (Armstrong) Barnett; educated at Christian Brothers College; married, St. Louis, 1889, Nellie R. Haynes; children: George H., Theodosia. Started with father, who was one of the most prominent architects in the United States, 1880; and was with him until 1885, when took position of head draughtsman for City of St. Louis. In 1889 organized firm of Barnett & Haynes, architects, which changed, 1894, to present style of Barnett, Haynes & Barnett, firm architects of Liberal Arts Bldg., Louisiana Purchase Exposition; Hotel Jefferson, New Roman Catholic Cathedral, Star Bldg., Marquette Hotel, Hamilton Hotel, etc., St. Louis; also New Illinois Athletic Club Bldg., New Southern Hotel, Chicago; Mark Twain Hotel, Hannibal, Mo.; Colonial Hotel, Springfield, Mo.; New Joplin Hotel, Joplin, Mo., etc. Member American Institute of Architects. Democrat. Catholic. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Illinois Athletic, Cabanne. Recreations: reading and study. Office: 313 N. 9th St. Residence: 5530 Delmar Avenue.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNETT, Tom P., architect; born, St. Louis, Feb. 11, 1870; son of George I. and Elizabeth (Armstrong) Barnett; graduated from St. Louis University, 1886; married, St. Louis, 1890, Lillian Armentrout; children: Leontine, Tom, Doretbia, George. Engaged in practice of architecture in St. Louis since graduation, as member of firm of Barnett, Haynes & Barnett, architects for many notable structures, including the Hotel Jefferson, New Cathedral, Star Bldg., Marquette Hotel, also for churches, hospitals and residences; Liberal Arts Bldg. at the World's Fair; St. Louis Cathedral, etc Republican. Catholic. Member American Institute of Architects, St. Louis Artists' Guild. Clubs: Mercantile, Missouri Athletic, Amateur Athletic Association (St. Louis), New Illinois Athletic (Chicago). Recreations: golf and landscape painting. Office: 949 Century Bldg.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNHART, Gary Lee, retired; born, Independence, Mo., May 2, 1846; son of Robert and Susan (Randolph) Barnhart; educated in academy, Weston, Mo.; married, Kansas City, Mo., Dec. 28, 1876, Ann E. Woodson; children: Cara Meade, Robert, Randolph, Everard (all deceased), and Susan Randolph, Sallie Carter and Francis Lee. Vice president of the Barnhart Mercantile Co., 1875-1910. Member Kentucky Society. Democrat. Methodist. Mason (32°). Recreation: farming. Residence: 5817 Bartmer Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNHART, William Randolph, wholesale grocer; born, Streetsville, Can., Mar. 8, 1850; son of Robert and Mary Susan (Randolph) Barnhart; moved with father to Weston, Mo., 1853; educated in public and private schools, Weston; married, St. Louis, Sept. 17, 1884, Fannie Greenwood Woodson; children: Woodson, William Randolph, Jr., Nancy Elizabeth, Robert Everard, Fannie Carter, Mary Randolph. Clerk in drug store, Leavenworth, Kan., 1868-70; salesman and commercial traveler for wholesale grocery house, 1870-75; established business for self, 1873, in grocers' specialties; president Barnhart Mercantile Co. since 1883. Also president Globe Realty Co., and director of Randolph Realty Co. Member St. Louis Merchants' Exchange, Business Men's League. Democrat. Methodist (Southern). Member Kentucky Society. Office: 200 S. Commercial Ave. Residence: Kirkwood, Missouri.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARNS, William Eddy, editor St. Louis Lumberman; born, Vevay, Ind., Aug. 29,1853; son of R. M. and Susan S. (Smead) Barns; preparatory education at high school, Greensburg, Ind.; B.S., Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, ILL., 1872; married, Bloomington, Nov. 1, 1875, Miss M. M. Rowe, who died Nov. 1, 1877, leaving one son, Frank Rowe; married, 2d, Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 26, 1880, Louise Goode Gillett; one child: Helen Gillett. After graduation became city editor Daily Republican, Decatur, ILL., 1872-73; correspondent Chicago Inter Ocean, 1874; associate editor Central Christian Advocate, St. Louis, 1875-84; editor of The Age of Steel, St. Louis, 1886-1902; editor St. Louis Lumberman since 1886; also president of the Journal of Commerce Co., publishers St. Louis Lumberman. One of founders Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo (lumbermen's organization); secretary House of Hoo-Hoo; secretary Federal Rate Regulation Association; for years secretary St Louis Lumbermen's Exchange; member Jury of Awards (forestry) Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Member American Economic Association, Missouri Historical Society. Secretary Forestry Commission for State of Missouri. Republican. Clubs: Mercantile, St. Louis Railway. Author: The Labor Problem, 1888; Nobody Knows, 1889. Favorite recreations: aquatic sports and literature. Office: 1103 Wright Bldg. Residence: 4919 McPherson Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARON, Jules, physician and coroner; born, St Louis, Aug. 11, 1859; son of Jules C. and Euphrasia (Dubief) Baron; educated in public schools of St. Louis, Washington University and St. Louis Medical College, M.D., 1881; special courses in universities of Berlin, Paris and Vienna, 1881-84; married Frieda Rahner; married, 2nd, St Louis, May, 1903, Josephine Hecker; one son: Jules, Jr. Engaged in general practice of medicine in St. Louis since 1884; coroner City of St. Louis since November, 1904. President Banner Clay Works. Member St. Louis Medical Society, Missouri State Medical Association. Republican. Mason (32°), Shriner; member Knights of Pythias. Recreations: hunting and fishing. Offices: 3357 California Ave. and City Hall. Residence: 3357 California Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARRETT, Jesse W., lawyer; born, Canton, Mo., Mar. 17,1884; son of Harry H. and Jeannette A. (Bushman) Barrett; educated in common and high schools, Canton; B. Litt, Christian University, Canton, 1901, A.B., 1902; LL.B., Law Department Washington University, 1905; married, June 19, 1912, Miss Ethelyn Louthan, of Canton, Mo. Admitted to Missouri bar, 1905, and has since practiced in St. Louis; was with firm of Harlan, Jeffries & Wagner, 1905-08; associated in practice with Milton M. Dearing (then assistant U. S. attorney in charge of naturalization), 1908, but partnership was dissolved, 1909, when Mr. Dearing removed to California; has since practiced alone, confining attention to civil causes; served 1908-09 as special assistant U. S. attorney in conduct of revenue prosecutions. Member St. Louis Bar Association, Thayer Law Club. Active worker in progressive civic movements and has done considerable work in social service. Republican; vice president Young Men's Republican Association of Missouri. Member St. John's Methodist Church, South (member board of stewards; ex-president Men's Club). Vice president Arlington Chapter of Protected Home Circle; member Phi Sigma Kappa college fraternity. Clubs: City, Lewis County (vice president and ex-president). Office: 906 Third National Bank Bldg. Residence: 5205 Vernon Avenue.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARROLL, Joseph Rollinson, merchant; born, Brooklyn, N. Y., Mar. 22, 1867; son of Henry Ballard and Adelia (Rollinson) Barroll; educated in public grammar school, Chicago; married, Chicago, Dec. 10, 1890, Katharyn E. Thorns, of Baltimore, Md.; two children: Joseph Rollinson, Jr., Eugenia Vassar. Entered employ of Wilson Bros., Chicago, as stock clerk, 1883, and was promoted to department manager and foreign buyer at age of 20, making first trip to Europe before 21 years of age; came to St. Louis, 1898, as house manager to assist in organizing the business of Butler Bros., wholesale general merchandise, then being established in this city. Director Merchants-Laclede National Bank, American Automobile Insurance Co. Democrat. Episcopalian; vestryman St. Peter's P. E. Church. Vice president Business Men's League; member board directors St. Louis Symphony Society: member Civic League, Society for Relief of Tuberculosis, Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association, St. Louis Academy Sciences, National Geographic Society. Clubs: St. Louis, Noonday, City, Aero, Automobile (director), Bellerive Country (director), Round Table, Contemporary. Favorite recreations: golf and fishing. Office: Butler Bros., 18th and Olive Sts. Residence: 4603 Berlin Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARRON, Sterling Price, vice president and general manager American Asphalt Association; born, St. Louis, July 14, 1865; son of James C. and Jane (O'Brien) Barron; educated at Elleardville and Cote Brilliant schools, St. Louis, and at Sedalia Seminary, Sedalia, Mo.; married, East St. Louis, ILL., Nov. 10, 1886, Margaret Ralls Foster; children: Osmond Martin, Helen Dorothy. Began business career as stenographer for the Famous Shoe and Clothing Co., and after that was stenographer and correspondent, successively, for George P. Plant Milling Co. and E. G. Scudder & Bro.; then secretary of the Gilson Asphaltum Co. until 1902; since vice president and general manager of the American Asphalt Association, miners of Gilsonite and Bitumenite. Democrat. Catholic. Member Royal League, United Commercial Travelers. Office: Wainwright Bldg. Residence: 6321 Berlin Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARROWS, John Chester, insurance; born, New York, July 23, 1858; son of Rev. N. (D.D.) and Isabel (Gibson) Barrows; prepared for college at military school; entered Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., 1876, graduating A.B., 1880, A.M., 1884; married, New York, 1887, Emma Louise Adams. Since 1886 in general insurance business; general agent for the Accident and Liability department of the Aetna Life Insurance Co. of Hartford, and general agent of the Title Guaranty and Surety Co. of Pennsylvania. Episcopalian. Member Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Clubs: Mercantile, Glen Echo, Sunset Hill Country. Recreation: golf. Office: Pierce Bldg. Residence: 5735 Von Versen Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARRY, James, heating and ventilating engineer; born, Newhall, Mo., Feb. 26, 1869; son of William and Elizabeth (Mulholland) Barry; educated in public schools of Newhall, Mo.; married, Belleville, ILL., Feb. 26, 1895, Louisa Courar; children: James, Veronica, Anna May. Began business career with M. E. Herbert, heating contractor, St. Joseph, Mo., for six months; then was for two and a half years as steam fitter with Haxton Steam Heater Co., Kewanee, ILL., and afterward for twelve years superintendent with Karr Supply Co., heating contractors, Belleville, ILL., and represented same firm as superintendent in St. Louis, 1900-03; in April, 1903, with Fred Elliott, established the Elliott & Barry Engineering Co., heating engineers and contractors. Democrat. Catholic. Member Knights of Columbus. Office: 705 Olive St. Residence: 5729 Chamberlain Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

Barrows, John C., who for a score of years has been one of the leading representatives of insurance interests in St. Louis, was born July 23, 1858, in the city of Rome, New York. His parents were Rev. Dr. N. Barrows and Isabella (Gibson) Barrows, and his ancestors landed at Salem, settled by John Endicott, in 1628, and next to Plymouth, the oldest town in Massachusetts. He was reared in New York State and educated at Trinity College of Hartford, Connecticut, from which institution he was graduated in the class of 1880. Immediately after his graduation from college he went to Philadelphia, Penn., and taught school there until 1884. In 1885 he embarked in the insurance business in New York City, and from there came to St. Louis in 1888. Since then, he has been A leader in that city in building up and popularizing that branch of insurance known as accident insurance, and he is now head of the firm of Barrows & Karst, managers of the accident department of the Aetna Life Insurance Company, of Hartford, Connecticut. His business career has been in all respects a successful one, and while building up a comfortable fortune he has also gained high standing in the business circles of St. Louis. Politically he is identified with the Democratic Party, and he is a member of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal Church of St. Louis. February 17, 1887, Mr. Barrows married Miss Louise Adams, of Huntington, Long Island, New York.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARTH, J. David, president J. D. Barth Coal Co.; born in St. Clair Co., ILL., Nov. 30, 1867; son of John and Catherine (Koob/ Barth); educated in country school and at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton, Mo.; married, Marshall, Tex., May 27, 1899, Lorena Cole; one daughter: Margaret Cole. Early life spent in railway service; secretary and manager Consumers' Electric Light & Power Co., and De Soto Telephone Exchange, De Soto, Mo., 1891-96; secretary and treasurer Willis Coal & Mining Co., 1896-98; sales agent Sorento Coal & Mining Co., 1898-1901; in 1901, purchased the Sylvester Coal Co.; in 1908 organized J. D. Barth Coal Co., of which has since been president. Also secretary and director Consumers Electric Light & Power Co., De Soto, Mo., and director De Soto Telephone Exchange. Democrat. Episcopalian. Mason (32°), Knight Templar, Shriner. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Glen Echo Country. Recreations: golf, automobiling. Office: Victoria Bldg. Residence: 4222 Maryland Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARTHOLDT, Richard, congressman; born in Germany, Nov. 2, 1855; son of Gottlob and Caroline Louise (Wagner) Bartholdt; came to the United States in boyhood; classical education; learned printing trade; married Caecilie Niedner, of St. Louis, June 27, 1880. Editor-in-chief St. Louis Tribune, 1885-92. Member St. Louis School Board, 1888-92 (president, 1891-92); member Fifty-third to Sixty-second Congresses (1893-1913), Tenth Missouri District; Republican. President Inter-Parliamentary Union for Promotion of International Arbitration. Residence: 4066 Flora Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

BARTHOLDT, Richard, a Representative from Missouri; born in Schleiz, Germany, November 2, 1855; attended the public schools and Schleiz College (Gymnasium); immigrated to the United States in April 1872 and settled in Brooklyn, N.Y.; learned the printing trade and became a newspaper writer and publisher; moved to Missouri and settled in St. Louis in 1877; was connected with several papers as reporter, legislative correspondent, and editor, and at the time of his election to Congress was editor in chief of the St. Louis Tribune; member of the St. Louis Board of Education from 1888 to 1892, serving as president from 1890 to 1892; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third and to the ten succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1893-March 3, 1915); chairman, Committee on Immigration and Naturalization (Fifty-fourth Congress), Committee on Levees and Improvements of the Mississippi River (Fifty-fifth through Fifty-eighth Congresses), Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds (Fifty-ninth through Sixty-first Congresses); in 1911 was appointed by President Taft as a special envoy to the German Emperor to present a statue of Baron Steuben as a gift from Congress and the American people; was not a candidate for renomination in 1914; engaged in literary pursuits; served as chairman of the Republican State convention at St. Joseph, Mo., in 1896; elected president of the Interparliamentary Union at the conference held in St. Louis in 1904, and for many years was president of the arbitration group in Congress, which he founded in 1903; died in St. Louis, Mo., March 19, 1932; his body was cremated and the ashes interred in Concordia Cemetery.
Missouri (Source: Biographical Directory of the US Congress 1774-Present)


BARTLETT, James A, fire insurance; born, Boston, Sept. 11, 1834; son of Hosea and Abbie (Tilden) Bartlett; educated in public schools of Boston; married, St. Louis, Jan. 7, 1857, Margaret M. Wineland; children, Andrew W., Abbie T. (Mrs. Joseph Campbell), Hattie G. (deceased), James A., Jr., Warren G. Resident of St. Louis since 1851; began business career as clerk in mercantile house and in 1858 entered the insurance business as clerk for the Marine Insurance Co., with which remained many years, becoming successively secretary, vice president and president until 1891; organized the present firm of Bartlett & Miller, in 1870, general fire insurance business. Recognized as the dean of fire insurance men in St. Louis. Republican. Unitarian. Office: Pierce Bldg. Residence: 2654 Terrace Lane.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)



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