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Babcock, William Henry, lawyer, author, was born Jan. 1, 1849, in St. Louis, Mo. Since 1873 he has practiced law in Georgetown, D.C. He is the author of Lord Stirling's Stand and Other Poems; Lays from Over the Sea; Cypress Beach; The Brides of the Tiger; An Invention of the Enemy; Clan of the Chariots; The Two Lost Centuries of Britain; The Tower of Wye; and Kent Fort Manor.
[Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 Transcribed by Therman Kellar]


Barnett, George Ingram, architect, and at the time of his death the oldest member of his profession in St. Louis, wais born in Nottingham, England, March 20, 1815, and died in St. Louis, December 29, 1898. He was the son of Absalom and Sarah (Ingram) Barnett, both of whom belonged to old English families of highest respectability. His father was the senior elder of the Baptist Church in Nottingham, a position which carried with it many of the duties which usually devolve upon a clergyman. At his house the leading Baptist ministers of England often visited; among them Andrew Fuller, who married a sister, and Robert Hall, the most eloquent man the denomination has ever produced, and one of the most famous. Mr. Barnett was educated at a good school in Nottingham, and, while a school boy, saw the funeral cortege of Lord Byron arrive from London on its way to the family vault in Huchnall, Torkard Church, near Newstead Abbey. He left school at an early age, and, as a then indispensable preliminary to the profession of architecture, learned the trade of a practical carpenter. He was afterward apprenticed to Patterson & Hine, the leading architects in that part of England, and remained with them six years.
The first outside work assigned to him by the firm was the superintendence of important changes and repairs at Annesley Hall, the ancestral home of Mary Chaworth—Byron's "Mary." He came to America in 1839, and after a stay of some months in New York reached St. Louis in the spring of the following year, and resided there until his death. His first professional work in St. Louis was the drawing of a perspective view of the present courthouse for Singleton & Foster, then the only architects in the town, who had charge of the construction. Shortly afterward he was engaged by Lewis & Clark as assistant in the planning of the Church of St. Vincent de Paul, and when that was completed he opened an office of his own. Mr. Barnett in his long professional life probably did far more work than any other one architect in St. Louis. Among the more prominent structures erected by him are the present Southern Hotel, as well as its predecessor; the present Lindell Hotel, Barr's Dry Goods Store, the Equitable Building, the Third Presbyterian, the Centenary and Union Methodist Churches, and the water-works building at Bissell's Point, while his private residences, stores, etc., are innumerable.
[Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


Barney, Charles E., merchant, was born May 25, 1834, in the little city of Waterville, Maine, and died in St. Louis July n, 1898. His father was a furniture manufacturer in moderate circumstances, and the son was born to a condition of life which impressed upon him the necessity of honest effort and the practice of strict economy on his part in early childhood. When he was eleven years old he was put out to service as a farmer's boy, and a plain English education, obtained in the schools of Waterville, constituted the scholastic equipment with which he entered upon a commercial career in later years. After working on a farm until he was sixteen years old he went to Chelsea, Massachusetts, celebrated for its manufactures of tiles and pottery, and clerked for two years thereafter in a grocery store in that city. Then he went to Boston, the "Mecca" of every ambitious New England youth who goes in search of fame and fortune in the commercial world and in that city gained his first knowledge of the dry goods trade. From Boston he went to New York in 1852, and was an employee of the dry goods house of Lord & Taylor thereafter until 1859. He came to St. Louis in the year last named, and during the next year was connected with the dry goods house of C. B. Hubbell, Jr., & Co., of that city. In 1860 he transferred his services to the firm of McClelland & Scruggs, and thus began his connection with the great dry goods house with which he was so conspicuously identified during the remainder of 'his life. Changes in the partnership, which occurred from time to time, were followed by changes of the firm name successively to W. L. Vandervoort & Co., Vandervoort, McClelland & Co., and the Scruggs, Vandervoort & Barney Dry Goods Company. Under the name last mentioned this noted establishment, which has long been a leading dry goods house of St. Louis and is known throughout the entire Southwest, was incorporated in 1883. Of this corporation Mr. Barney was vice president and his connection with the house as employee, partner, stockholder and manager extended over a period of thirty-eight years.
[Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


Barnum, Theron, one of the most noted old-time hotel-keepers of St. Louis, was born in Addison County, Vermont, April 23, 1803. During the early years of his life he was engaged in agricultural pursuits, but in 1824 went to Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he clerked in a store until 1827. In that year he went to Baltimore to take the position of confidential clerk to his uncle, David Barnum, who gave to Barnum's Hotel of that city the deserved fame of being at that time "the best hotel in the United States." There he was trained to the business which made him famous as a boniface in St. Louis. In 1840 he came to that city and took charge of the City Hotel, located at the corner of Third and Vine Streets. After keeping this house twelve years he sold out and later took charge of what became known as "Barnum's Hotel," located at the corner of Second and Walnut Streets. Prior to the Civil War this was one of the widely known hotels of the West, and no hotel man of the region was more popular with the public than was Mr. Barnum.
[Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


Barret, Richard Ferral, physician, and one of the most active men of his generation also in developing the resources of the States of Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, was born in 1804 at the Barret homestead, near Greensburg, Green County, Kentucky, and died May 16, 1860, at Burlington, Iowa. Physically and intellectually a vigorous people, the Barrets of this family have been conspicuously identified with the planting and advancement of civilization in half a dozen States now numbered among the first of American commonwealths. They were among the pioneers who transformed Kentucky from "the dark and bloody ground" of the Indians into a region of vast productiveness, occupied by a brave and chivalrous people; and the "Old Dominion" numbered the representatives of this family among her early colonists. They were among the cavaliers who came to Virginia in the reign of King James I, along with the Lees, who were their near relatives. Barret's Ford, near Petersburg, was the old Virginia family seat, and there lived Robert Barret, great-grandfather of Dr. Richard F. Barret, who was a planter, and also a minister of the established church at that place. There William Barret, the father of Dr. Barret, was born and grew to manhood, and from there he went into the Revolutionary War as a captain of partisan rangers, serving with Marion's cavalry companies, with "Light Horse Harry" Lee in the Jersey campaign, and participating afterward in battles at Guilford Courthouse and Eutaw, and in other engagements. He was with the rear guard of the American Army at Greene's retreat before Lord Cornwallis, and when the fortunes of war turned witnessed the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. His name appears in Heit's record of the officers of the Continental Army, mention being made on page 76 of William Barret, lieutenant in the Third Continental Dragoons, Lieutenant Colonel William Washington commanding, transferred to Captain Baylor's Consolidated Regiment of Light Horse. Back of its settlement in Virginia the family has a long and honorable history. Wales was the ancient family seat, and Robert Barret, the most remote ancestor of whom we have any account, was master of Sir John Hawkins' flagship in 1567. From this Robert Barret the line of descent to Dr. Richard F. Barret was through William Barret, warden of the London Company, and also author of the "True Declaration, Condition. Prospects and Hopes of the Plantations"; William Barret the second; Rev. Robert Barret, rector of St. Martin's Parish, Virginia; Chiswell Barret, and William Barret, the third. W.illiam Barret, last named, married Dorothy Winston, cousin to Patrick Henry, and the children born of this union were three sons and two daughters. Richard F. Barret, youngest of these children, grew up in Kentucky, and was educated under the tutorage of Rev. William Howe, an eminent Presbyterian divine of that period. After completing his classical studies he was invited by Dr. Daniel Drake, of Cincinnati, Ohio—eminent as physician, surgeon and author, and father of Judge Charles D. Drake, later a United States Senator from Missouri—to become a member of his household and study medicine under his preceptorship. Under these favorable auspices he completed his medical studies, and after spending some time in the hospitals of Philadelphia and visiting the home of his ancestors in Virginia, he began the practice of his profession in Green County, Kentucky. There he acquired distinction as a medical practitioner, and there also he married, in 1832, Maria Buckner, daughter of Judge Richard A. Buckner, who then represented the "Green River" district of Kentucky in Congress. Having previously purchased and improved a large body of land near Springfield, Illinois, he removed to this farm in 1833 and developed it into one of the notable stockfarms of Illinois. He invested largely in government lands in Illinois, and ill 1838 began operating in what later became the State of Iowa. He was president of the Burlington Land Company, which acquired large possessions in Iowa, and he also loaned many thousands of dollars to settlers on lands purchased from the government at the Burlington and Dubuque land sales of 1838-9. He and a brother of Commodore Perry were the owners of Stonington Colony, and he was joint proprietor with Colonel Good of the town of Taylorville, Illinois. From his Illinois farm he removed to Springfield, and while residing there held the office of State fund commissioner, and was also one of the directors of the Illinois State Bank. He erected the Barret House, which became famous among Western hotels, at Burlington, Iowa, and in company with Colonel O'Fallon, Judge Scales and Governor Casey built the first railroad operated successfully in Illinois, a short line of road extending from Caseyville to the Mississippi River, and now utilized by the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad Company. He removed from Springfield to St. Louis in 1840, and the same year was associated with Dr. J. N. McDowell and Dr. J. S. Moore in founding there the first medical college established west of the Mississippi River. He served also as first city physician during the cholera epidemic of 1849, and established the first quarantine in St. Louis. .His genius for the conduct of affairs soon brought him into prominence, and he was a pioneer in various important business enterprises. In 1857 'le shipped from Vermont to Missouri the finest lot of Morgan horses ever brought into the State, and he was largely interested in promoting the agricultural and stock-raising interests of the West. He was one of the founders of the Agricultural and Mechanical Fair, a member of the banking firm of William Nisbet & Co., and in close touch, at all times during his residence in that city, not only with the leading men of affairs in St. Louis, but with the leading men of the West. When the financial panic of 1857 was precipitated Dr. Barret was in the enjoyment of an income of twenty thousand dollars a year, but the rapid shrinkage of values and an impairment of his health, which deprived him of the wonderful vigor and energy of his earlier years, caused a large proportion of his handsome fortune to disappear like the mists of the morning. He continued, however, to be an active and moving spirit in business circles to the end of his life, and died at the hotel which he had built in Burlington nearly a quarter of a century earlier, while temporarily sojourning there to give attention to business interests. In manner and appearance he was a typical Kentuckian of the old school. His figure was commanding, his manners courtly and his home a center of old fashioned hospitality. He enjoyed during his life the acquaintance of many men prominent in public life, among them Clay, Benton, Logan, Douglas, Trumbull, Browning, Walker and Grimes, and his friendship with Abraham Lincoln, born in an adjoining county in Kentucky, began in boyhood and lasted to the end of his life. He died on the eve of the Civil War, but he had noted the coming storm, and with rare prescience had forecast the character and duration of the struggle. His widow, a woman of many social and domestic graces and sterling character, survived until 1885, and passed away in St. Louis. Their son, Richard Aylett Barret, physician, lawyer and journalist, was born at "Cliffland," Green County, Kentucky, June 21, 1834. Cliffland was the home of his grandfather, a place famed for the beauty of its location and its picturesque environments. Situated on an elevated plateau, the old homestead could be seen miles away, bordered on one side by overhanging cliffs, and on the other by grand old forest trees wearing the livery of centuries. Through the valley coursed Green River, its rocky bed keeping the waters in constant turmoil, and the river, forest, cliffs and plateau combined to create a very carnival of scenic beauties. In this region, so prolific of nature's charms, Richard Aylett Barret spent the earliest days of his childhood, learned his first lessons in the new State of Illinois, and came with his parents to St. Louis when he was six years of age. His earliest education was obtained under private tutorship and at St. Louis University, and he then entered Phillips Exeter Academy of New Hampshire, where he was fitted for Harvard College. On his journey eastward from St. Louis to the academy he went by way of Pittsburg to Brownsville, Pennsylvania; thence by stage over the Alleghany Mountains to Cumberland, then the western terminus of the eastern railroad system, and from there to Washington by rail. At Washington his uncle, Aylett Buckner, then a member of Congress from Kentucky, was domiciled opposite the Treasury Department with Lincoln, Greeley, William Lloyd Garrison and "Dick" Richardson, and when he arrived in the capital city young Barret was introduced into this famous company. When his uncle and Lincoln went to Philadelphia to attend the convention which nominated General Taylor for the presidency he accompanied them, and occupied the same room with them at the old Merchants' Hotel. While in Washington he also visited "Dolly" Madison, widow of President Madison, and still cherishes pleasing memories of her sprightly and vivacious conversation, and of her feeling and complimentary allusions to members of his family whom she had known. He was introduced also to Clay, Douglas, Crittenden and other famous statesmen of that period during his stay with his uncle in Washington, and the occasion was one which proved a great educator. After fitting for college at Phillips Exeter he entered Harvard, but left before completing the course. He then studied medicine, and after obtaining his doctor's degree from Missouri Medical College sailed from Boston in 1854 on the clipper ship "Asterion" for Liverpool, arriving at the English port at the end of a voyage of nineteen days. In Europe he continued his medical studies at the universities of Bonn, Munich and Heidelberg, and obtained the additional degree of doctor of physics. During his vacations he traveled throughout Germany, France, Spain and Italy, and a volume might be written of his experiences and observations in this connection. For a time he served as secretary of legation at Paris under John Y. Mason, then United States minister at the court of Napoleon III, and was honored with the acquaintance of the French sovereign and the Empress Eugenie. Returning to the United States he studied law, and in 1859 was admitted to the bar. Soon afterward he formed a law partnership with his uncle, Aylett Buckner, and began the practice of his profession in St. Louis. He was connected in 1858-9 with a commission appointed by the government to adjust controversies relative to what was known as the Galindo land claim, near Waco, Texas, and in the winter of 1859-60, when Kentucky was giving considerable attention to the organization of its citizen soldiery, he was summoned before the Legislature of that State to translate and give an exposition of the German Landwehr law, with the operations of which he became familiar while living abroad. His father died in 1860, and the responsibility of settling up his embarrassed estate devolved upon his son. The business interests of the elder Barret were widely scattered, and for a time Dr. R. A. Barret made his home at Burlington, where he assumed the proprietorship of the Barret House, which became famous as a resort for refugee families from Missouri at the beginning of the Civil War. Espousing the Union cause when the war began, Dr. Barret was one of the men closely associated with General Nathaniel Lyon in the movements which thwarted the purposes of the secession leaders. Later he acted as attorney for the government successively in the offices of General Farrar, general superintendent of contraband and confiscated property; Colonel James O. Broadhead, department provost marshal, and General E. B. Alexander, provost marshal for Missouri. He was also acting assistant provost marshal under General Alexander. In 1866 he removed to Iowa to effect a final settlement of his father's estate, and while residing at Burlington purchased and edited the "Gazette," the oldest newspaper in the State. In 1867 he was a delegate to the Des Moines Rapids Convention, held in St. Louis, which took action resulting in the building of the Keokuk and Nashville Canal. The same year he was a member of a commission composed of Governor Gear and ex United States Senator Dodge, of Iowa, Judge Edmonds, of Illinois, and himself, which visited St. Louis in the interests of the St. Paul & St. Louis Air Line, and his services in behalf of that enterprise drew from the Burlington Board of Trade a formal resolution and vote of thanks. Returning to his old home in St. Louis at a later date, he was for a time editor-in-chief of the "Evening Dispatch," and still later editor and part owner of the St. Louis "Times." As editor and citizen he took an active interest in everything designed to promote the growth, and to increase the prestige and importance of St. Louis. He was secretary of the famous capital removal committee, appointed at a convention held in St. Louis to forward the project of bringing about the removal of the national capital to the Mississippi Valley. During the administration of his brother, Arthur B. Barret, as mayor of St. Louis, he was private secretary to the mayor, and also served in the same capacity under Mayor James H. Britton. In 1880 he purchased what had been known as the Finney mansion and the St. Louis Club property, and fitted up the Montesano Hotel, Harry Seaman, manager, a handsome improvement, which he sold in 1891, retiring at that time from active business pursuits with a comfortable fortune.
[Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


Barron, Henry, a pioneer settler of St. Louis County and prominent also as a member of the dental profession, was born November 7, 1820, in Bladensburg, Maryland, and died January 12, 1883, in St. Louis, Missouri. He was the fourth son of Zachariah Barron, and his mother's maiden name was Annie Ogle Mulikin. His mother was a great-granddaughter of Governor Samuel Ogle, one of the most distinguished of the colonial officers of Maryland when the territory now comprised in that State belonged to Great Britain. Governor Ogle entered the British Army, and while yet a young man was commissioned Captain in a cavalry regiment. In 1732, he was sent to this country by the proprietors of Maryland as Governor of that province. He subsequently returned to England and was further promoted. In 1747, he was again appointed Governor of Maryland and retained the office until his death in 1751. He was also president of the Maryland council. He lived on a handsome estate, and among its attractions was a favorite horse named "Sparks," which had been presented to him by Lord Baltimore, who received it from Prince Frederick, the father of King George III. His son, Benjamin Ogle, was Governor of Maryland after it became a State of the American Union. Dr. Barron passed the early years of his life in Maryland and was fitted for college in the private subscription schools of that State. When he was in his seventeenth year his family came west and settled in St. Louis County about a mile and a half west of the site of the present town of Clayton. After his coming to this State, he attended Marion College of Palmyra, Missouri, until he completed his academic education, and thereafter was engaged in agricultural pursuits in St. Louis County until he was twenty-three years of age.
He then went to Washington, D. C., where he was engaged for a time in commercial business, and later studied dentistry. After graduating from the dental school, he practiced in the East a year and then returned to St. Louis where he was married. Going back to Washington afterwards, he remained there two years and then returned to St. Louis, where he made his home during the remainder of his life. He was long known as a leading member of his profession, and at different times took a prominent part in the deliberations of the dental association. During the Civil War he was a strong sympathizer with the South and did not hesitate to give public expression to his sentiments.
His feelings were in conflict with those of the pastor under whom he had been ordained an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and at the instance of this pastor, the Rev. James Page, he was placed under arrest with other prominent citizens of St. Louis. No serious consequences, however, followed what seems now to have been rash and uncalled for action on the part of those in sympathy with the Federal government, and in later years Dr. Barron regarded it philosophically and without bitterness. He was reared in the Whig school of politics and acted with that party up to the time that it passed out of existence. He then became a member of the Democratic Party and clung to its principles tenaciously to the end of his life, priding himself always on voting "the straight ticket." Very early in life he joined the Presbyterian Church, was always a zealous member of that church and was first ordained one of its ruling elders in 1855.
At his death he belonged to the Central Presbyterian Church of St. Louis, of which Rev. Dr. Robert Brank was then pastor, and from that church he was carried to his last resting place in Bellefontaine Cemetery. June 15. 1847, he married Miss Elizabeth Sarah McCutchan, who survives her husband. Mrs. Barren's parents, William and Rebekah (McKnight) McCutchan came from Augusta County, Virginia, to Missouri in 1816, the trip from their old to their new home consuming four months.
[Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


BARTLETT, Willard, surgeon; born, Virden, ILL., July 27, 1868; son of Dr. A. T. and Sue A. (Brown) Bartlett; A.B., Illinois College, Jacksonville, ILL., 1892; M.D., Marion-Sims College of Medicine, St. Louis, 1895; post-graduate courses in universities of Berlin and Strasburg, Germany; married, St. Louis, Genevieve Wilson; children: Willard, Jr., Robert Wilson, Aurelius Twombly. Has been engaged in surgical practice in St. Louis since 1895. Member St. Louis Medical Society, Missouri State Medical Association. Club: St. Louis. Office: Metropolitan Bldg. Residence: 4257 Washington Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARTLING, William Joseph, real estate; born, St. Louis, Feb. 12, 1873; son of William and Anna (Cerny) Bartling; educated St. Louis University and Christian Brothers College, graduating from Commercial Department of latter in 1890; married, St. Louis, Feb. 19, 1901, Tillie Mueller; three children: Carlie, William and Marie. Began active career in employ of Henry Hiemenz, Jr., dealer in real estate, St. Louis, continuing for thirteen years; entered real estate, loan and insurance business on own account after death of Mr. Hiemenz, 1902, which he has since conducted in own name, making a specialty of south side properties and real estate loans. Member St. Louis Real Estate Exchange. Republican. Catholic. Member Million Population Club, Tower Grove Turner Hall, Shenandoah School Improvement Association. Recreations: travel(both abroad and in United States), driving. Office: 909 Chestnut St. Residence: 3319 Shenandoah Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARTON, Harry Roazelle, physician; born, Hillsboro, Md., Oct. 23, 1869; son of Francis T. and Sara Josephine Barton; educated under tutor until entered Roanoke-Salem College, Va., 1885, graduating A.B., 1899; graduated from Jefferson Medical College, M.D., 1892; under private instruction in Jefferson Hospital one year; censor to Medico-Chirurgical College, 1893; married, St. Louis, Dec. 16, 1903, Lucie Mae Goodbar; two sons: Harry Goodbar and Lucien Bonwill. Engaged in general practice in St. Louis since 1898; instructor in medicine and chief of outdoor clinic in Beau;mont Medical College, 1898. Democrat. Member M. E. Church, South. Office: Chemical Bldg. Residence: 4241 Maryland Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BARWICK, Oliver J., building contractor; born, St. Louis Mo., Mar. 21, 1873; son of James and Martha J.(Olney) Barwick; graduate of St. Louis public schools and Manual Training School; married, St. Louis, Jan. 10, 1900 Anna A. Cone. Engaged in business as building contractor in St. Louis since 1894, and since 1900 president of the Barwick Construction Co., general contractors. Member Tuscan Lodge No. 360, A. F. and A. M. Presbyterian. Clubs: Engineers, St. Louis Railway, St. Louis Architectural, Missouri Athletic, Algonquin. Office: 610 Chestnut St. Residence: 460 Algonquin Place, Webster Groves, Missouri.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BASCOM, Joseph Dayton, manufacturer; born, St. Louis, July 2, 1841; son Jonathan Dayton and Frances Ann (Newhall) Bascom; educated in old Benton Public School, St. Louis; married, St. Louis, May 31, 1877, Mary M. Frederick; one son: Charles Edward. Began business career, 1862, as an errand boy in retail clothing store in St. Louis, and in 1803 worked for A. M. Leslie (dental supplies) on Market St., between 3rd and 4th Sts.; messenger for Chicago & Alton R. R. in East St. Louis, 1863-66; shipping clerk for D. M. Richardson Match Co., Detroit, Mich., in St. Louis office, 1867-68; shipping clerk for St. Louis Railway Supply & Manufacturing Co., 1869, then collector, assistant bookkeeper and salesman until 1876; started with Mr. Broderick as partner in firm of Broderick & Bascom, manufacturers of wire rope and tramways, etc., changing in 1882 to Broderick & Bascom Rope Co., of which is secretary and treasurer; also director St. Louis Union Trust Co. Republican. Baptist. Member Merchants' Exchange, Business Men's League and Manufacturers' Association. Was vice president Old Missouri Gymnasium. Clubs: Commercial, Mercantile, St. Louis, Noonday, Missouri Athletic, St. Louis Country, Racquet, Bellerive Country. Recreations: whist, golf and athletic sports. Office: 805-809 N. Main St. Residence: 45 Westmoreland PI.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BASCOM, William Sheldon, manager Broderick & Bascom Rope Co.; born, St. Louis, Sept. 17, 1852; son of Jonathan D. and Frances A. (Newhall) Bascom; educated in public schools; married, St. Louis, Oct. 1, 1874, Jane De Vanney; children: W. S., Jr., Mrs. Frances Ann Allenberg (deceased), Florence, George, Blanche, Frank, Arthur (deceased). Was for 18 years with the East St. Louis and St. Louis Transfer Co. as office boy, bookkeeper and cashier; then for fifteen years with the Hopkins-Weller Drug Co. as cashier, and, on dissolution of that company, became city salesman, 1900, of the Broderick & Bascom Rope Co., wire rope and cordage, from which position was promoted in 1903 to that of manager. Republican. Catholic. Member Citizens' Alliance, Legion of Honor. Office: 809 N. Main St. Residence: 3627 Cook Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

BASS, George Arthur, president Hydraulic Press Brick Co.; born, Kankakee Co., ILL., Aug. 16, 1864; son of Myron H. and Elizabeth (Kelly) Bass; educated in public schools, Chicago, and Northwestern University, Evanston, ILL.; married, Denver, Colo. Nov. 16, 1898, Zitella Ebert; two children: George Fred­erick, Ruth Ebert. Began active career in Chicago in real estate and building business; went to Washington, D. C, as salesman for the Hydraulic Press Brick Co., 1895; appointed manager Washington branch, 1898; became manager Philadelphia branch, 1904, and at same time was elected second vice president, with full charge of eastern business; president same company since June, 1909. Member Business Men's League. Republican. Clubs: Bellerive Country, Noonday. Recreation: golf. Office: Central National Bank Bldg. Residence: 4377 McPherson Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BASS, Simon Sterne, lawyer; born, Baltimore, Md., May 10, 1852; son of Sigmund and Pauline (Sterne) Bass; educated in public schools, Meadville, Pa., and Baltimore, to 1865; under private tutor, Brother Gallagher, Loyola College, Baltimore, 1865-67; during same time received legal training with Archibald Sterling, U. S. district attorney, Baltimore; attended Academy of Law, Baltimore, 1877-80; came to St. Louis, December, 1880, and entered law offices of Carr & Rey­nolds; student, St. Louis Law School, 1881-83; post-graduate course, St. Louis University, 1883-85; married, Collinsville, ILL., Feb. 22, 1885, Nellie Lanham Hedden; four children: Blanch, Ruth, Ethel, Sigmund Martin. Admitted to bar at St. Louis, 1885; member firm of Martin & Bass, 1885-97, Bass & Brock, 1897-99, Zachritz & Bass, 1899-1902; now Bass & Bass. Member St. Louis and Missouri State Bar associations, Civic League. Ex-president Board of Charities, St. Louis; secretary to Mayor Noonan, for short time; special judge Court of Criminal Correction, at various times and under various judges; also provisional judge same court, 1898-99; candidate for judge Circuit Court, 1908. Democrat. Member congregation ''Shaare Emeth.'' Member Patrons' Association of Public Schools, National Geographic Society, Washington, D. C, Missouri Historical Society, Mississippi Valley Historical Society, Contemporary Club. Grand Officer, Royal Arcanum; Past Consul Commander, Woodmen of the World; member Fraternal Congress. Clubs: Westwood Country, Columbian, St. Francis Hunting and Fishing, Gilead Slough Hunting and Fishing. Recreations: golf, fishing. Office: 303-4 Times Bldg. Residence: 4396 Forest Park Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BASSFORD, Homer, newspaper man; born, Mexico, Audrain Co., Mo., 1870; son of James C. and Catherine (Osborn) Bassford; educated in public schools and Barker Academy; married. Cedar Falls, IA., 1892, Etta Overman Chase; children: James C, Wallace O'Neill, Florence Osborn. Began journalism with R. M. White, of the Mexico Ledger; became, in 1889, Sunday editor and subsequently city editor of the Kansas City Times; moved to St. Louis, 1893; dramatic and music critic of St. Louis Republic until 1907; since associate general manager St. Louis Times. Member Missouri Historical Society. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Liederkranz. Office: 102 N. Broadway. Residence: 6 Shaw PL.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BATES, Charles Woodson, lawyer; born in St. Charles Co., Mo., Jan. 23, 1864; son of Richard and Ellen (Woodson) Bates; educated in public schools and at Westminster College, Fulton, Mo., graduating, 1883, and afterward completed course in St. Louis Law School. Practiced law in St. Louis until 1888; removed to Colorado and engaged in practice until 1891, when returned to St. Louis. City counselor of St. Louis for seven years; now member firm of Bates, Blodgett, Williams & Davis. Member American, Missouri State and St. Louis Bar associations, Business Men's League, Beta Theta Pi, Phi Delta Phi. Democrat. Favorite recreations: hunting and fishing. Office: 1117, 506 Olive St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BATES, Theodore P., industrial commissioner; born, White Hall, Greene Co., ILL., Aug. 25, 1873; son of Wesley P. and Mary M. (Baker) Bates; educated in public and high schools, White Hall. In employ of Swift & Co., 1892 and 1893; handling manufacturing properties, East St. Louis, 1894-1906, and in same business in St. Louis and East St. Louis, 1906-09; sales manager for Kettle River Company's creosoting plant, wood paving blocks, etc., 1909 and 1910; industrial commissioner for Business Men's League since 1910. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Mercantile, Normandie Golf. Recreations: golf and motoring. Office: 510 Locust St. Residence: 11 Beverly PL.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BATTLE, Jesse Mercer, manufacturing chemist; born, Centre Hill, Hertford Co., N. C., Nov. 10, 1850; son of Amos Johnston and Margaret Hearne (Parker) Battle; educated at Wilson Collegiate Seminary until fifteen years of age; married, Clayton, Johnston Co., N. C, Oct. 22, 1873, Laura Elizabeth Lee; one daughter, Helen May, who is the wife of Eugene Fleming Smith, of St. Louis. Began in manufacturing of chemicals at St. Louis, October, 1875, and is now president of the Battle & Co. Chemists' Corporation; also manager Palace, Clayton, N. C. Served for four years as charity commissioner under Mayor Edward A. Noonan. Independent in politics. Universalist. Member Masonic Order, Odd Fellows, Legion of Honor, Royal Arcanum. Author: "Why I Am Not a Roman Catholic," 1908; "Tributes to My Father and My Mother," and "Some Stories of My Life," 1910. Recreation: music; plays on the violin, mandolin, banjo, guitar and piano. Office: 2001 Locust St. Residences: Clayton, N. C., and 4463 Lindell Boul., St. Louis.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BATTLE, Walter Orandin, leather; born, Tuskegee, Ala., Jan. 17, 1865; son John A. M. and Madeleine (Clitheral) Battle; educated at Shenandoah Valley Academy, Winchester, Va.; married, St. Louis, Sept. 17, 1900, Lutie K. Kimball; children: George Kimball, Helen Kimball. Came to St. Louis in 1881 and was with Withman, Gray & Kaminski until 1883, then with Third National Bank until 1896; joined in incorporation, 1896 (as successors to James Clark & Co.), of the James Clark Leather Co., wholesale dealers in leather, shoe specialties, findings, shoe manufacturers' supplies, and shoe store outfitters, of which company was director, secretary and treasurer until January, 1909, since vice president and treasurer. Democrat. Episcopalian. Club: Bellerive Country. Recreation: golf. Office: 1601 Washington Ave. Residence: 13 Washington Terrace.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAUMAN, Meyer, retired jeweler; born, St. Louis, Dec. 18, 1846; son of Louis and Marianna (Friede) Bauman; educated in St. Louis public and private schools and Jonathan Jones Commercial College; married, New York City, Sept. 11, 1872, Miriam Rosenblatt; children: Florence, Alvin Louis, Daisy Alice (now Mrs. S. P. Fischer, of Cleveland), Ellsworth Solomon, Louis Hyde. Entered jewelry house of father, 1861; was admitted to firm, 1869; business incorporated, 1882, as L. Bauman Jewelry Co., of which was treasurer, 1882-93, and president, 1893-1900; retired from active business in 1912. Republican. Member of Temple Israel. Club: Columbian. Address: care Alvin Realty Co., Century Bldg. Residence: 3737 West Pine Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAUMAN, Samuel H., wholesale jeweler; born, Wurzburg, Bavaria, Germany, June 25, 1853; son of B. H. and Esther (Goldsmith) Bauman; educated in public schools of Wurzburg; married, St. Louis, Oct. 15, 1882, Hannah Loewenstein; children: Leo, Ethel, Florence. Emigrated to St. Louis, January, 1872; salesman with the William Barr Dry Goods Co. until 1875; later in employ of L. Bauman & Co., as traveling salesman, until 1881; went into business for self as S. H. Bauman & Co., incorporated March, 1889, as the Bauman-Massa Jewelry Co., of which has since been president. Member Business Men's League. Republican. Hebrew. Mason. Office: Commercial Bldg. Residence: 41 Kingsbury Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAUMGARTEN, Walter, physician; born, St. Louis, Oct. 31, 1873; son of Gustav and Aminda (Hillegeist) Baumgarten; graduated from Smith Academy, 1889; A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1894; M.D., Medical Department, Washington University, 1896. Engaged in general practice of medicine in St. Louis since April, 1896. Office: 405 Humboldt Bldg. Residence: 4310A Maryland Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAUR, Edwin, life insurance; born Union, Franklin Co., Mo., Jan. 28, 1870; son of Anton and Marie (Lescher) Baur; educated Union public schools; Valparaiso (Ind.) Normal School, 1890; unmarried. Learned monumental business under brother and father; became agent of Union Mutual Life Insurance Co., of Portland, Me., 1893; was made cashier of St. Louis office, 1896, and manager same, 1910. Also secretary C. H. Meinhard Cigar Co. Republican. Lutheran. Member Knights of Pythias. Club: Missouri Athletic. Recreations: baseball, hunting and fishing. Office: 323-324 Commercial Bldg. Residence: Waldorf Apts., 4300 Lindell Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAUR, Robert Francis, manufacturer; born, St. Louis, Mar. 17, 1861; son of L. S. and Amelia (Nelson) Baur; educated in public schools of St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Oct. 22, 1890, Marie Griesedieck; children: Jeannette, Mildred. Began business career as clerk in grocery business for three years; then with Baur Mercantile Co., merchant millers, as clerk and manager till 1886; manufacturer of brick at Wichita, Kan., three years; in 1890 joined in organizing the Griesedieck Artificial Ice Co., and from organization has been secretary and manager of the company; secretary Orodol Chemical Co. since September, 1908; director Griesedieck Real Estate Co., Griesedieck Bros. Brewing Co.; secretary Vahlhaus Realty Co. Independent in politics. Methodist. Club: 20th Century Bowling. Recreation: bowling. Office: 110 Vine St. Residence: 2835 Lafayette Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Bausch, Robert, vice president Erker Bros. Optical Co.; born, Rochester, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1864; son of Edward K. and Amelia (Park) Bausch; educated in public schools of New York state; married, St. Louis, Aug. 22, 1903, Maude Carruthers; two daughters: Virginia May, Harriet E. Engaged in jewelry business in Rochester, N. Y., and after one and a half years associated with father, E. E. Bausch & Son, opticians, Rochester, for three years; came to St. Louis in March, 1899, and entered the house of A. P. Erker & Bro. as salesman, and has been with the same house ever since, becoming vice president, 1907, of Erker Bros. Optical Co., general opticians and dealers in optical and photographic supplies. Republican. Member Knights of Pythias. Recreation: gardening. Offices: 608 Olive St. and 511 N. Grand Ave. Residence: 518 Geyer Rd., Kirkwood, Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAXTER, Charles Otto, retired manufacturer; born, Sauk City, Wis., Jan. 3, 1857; son of Charles O. and Attilie (Neffz) Baxter; educated in public schools to fifteen; married, St. Louis, September, 1882, Mrs. Anna S. Gottschalk, daughter of Louis Holm (she died, Jan. 17, 1909). Began as errand boy for Balke, Thonssen & Co., manufacturers of billiard tables and picture molding; became salesman for the company and served as vice president, 1879-82; entered business on own account as C. O. Baxter & Co., 18S2, the firm being reorganized as the Baxter Moulding Co., 1885; opened up the Gilson Asphaltum Mine in Utah, 1887, and organized the Gilson Asphaltum Co. with headquarters in St. Louis; disposed of his interests in the company to the Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 1900, but continued as western manager for the company until Feb. 1, 1909, when retired; president St. Louis Catering Co., etc. Member Legion of Honor. Clubs: Liederkranz, City, Million Population. Recreation: motoring. Office: 914 X. Market St. Residence: 3145 Hawthorne Boul.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BAYSE, Harry Van, vice president American Furnace Co.; born, New Haven, ILL., Aug. 18, 1870; son of Thomas Butler and Jennie (Melvin) Van Bayse; educated district school, Ewing, ILL., public schools Evansville, lnd., and Cairo, ILL.; Jones' Commercial School, St. Louis; married, Dallas, Tex., Oct. 31, 1896, Agnes Robertson; one daughter, Allene. Began active career in St. Louis about 1889 in employ of the Front Rank Furnace Co.; became a stockholder in the company and had charge of sales department; associated with others from same company, January, 1900, in organizing and starting the American Furnace Co. and has charge of sales department, also vice president. Member Sheet Metal Contractors'Association. Methodist. Recreations: hunting and fishing. Office: 27th and Morgan Sts. Residence: 6959 Hancock Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEACH, Edward T., manufacturer rubber cement; born, Agency, IA., Sept. 16, 1868; educated in public schools; married at Chicago, 1892, Corinne A. Shean. Began active career in a wholesale butter and egg house at Ottumwa, IA., 1885, continuing for five years; then became connected with the Morrell Packing Co. as paymaster, in which position continued for one year; was manager and buyer ladies' cloak and suit department Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Chicago, and later with Mandel Bros.; came to St. Louis to take charge ladies' cloak and suit department for the William Barr Dry Goods Co., December, 1898, and was identified with that concern for seven years; established in 1906 the St. Louis Rubber Cement Co., manufacturers of rubber cements. Republican. Catholic. Club: Missouri Athletic. Office: 3046 Lambdin Ave. Residence: 6014 Cabanne Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEACH, Edward N., secretary Union Dairy Co.; born, Newark, N. J., Mar. 31, 1858; son of Henry O. and Emeline C. Beach; graduated from Wyman Institute, St. Louis; married, Chicago, 1888, Clare Evans; one daughter, Gladys (Mrs. C. R. Gray, Jr., of Portland. Ore.). Began business career with J. Weil & Bro., dry goods, as clerk, continuing for nine years; secretary E. C. Meacham Arms Co., fourteen years;, since 1899 with Union Dairy Co., of which has been secretary since 1904. Presbyterian. Mason, Knight Templar: member Royal Arcanum. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Glen Echo Country, Liederkranz. Favorite recreation: golf. Office: 2311 Washington Ave. Residence: 4618 Westminster Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEALL, John McCulloch, railway official: born in Davidson Co., N. C, May 29, 1869; son of Thomas B. and Elizabeth (Howard) Beall; educated in private schools, Salisbury, N. C, to June, 1883, University of North Carolina to June, 1884, and Davidson College, North Carolina, to February, 1885; married, Harrisonburg, Va., Dec. 6, 1892, Virginia Overton Harris; children: Mildred Howard, Burgess Harris, Virginia. Read law 1885. Entered railway service in auditor's office. Richmond & Danville R. R. 1886, and after two months entered transportation department; freight conductor, Richmond & Danville R. R., 1887-88; freight and passenger conductor, St. Louis, Arkansas & Texas Ry., Knoxville, Cumberland Gap & Louisville R. R., 1889-90; traveling freight and passenger agent latter road, 1891; traveling passenger agent, Richmond & Danville R. R. and Southern Ry., 1891-95; district passenger agent, Southern Ry., at Philadelphia, 1895-99; general agent, Southern Ry., at San Francisco, 1899-1901; assistant general passenger agent, Mobile & Ohio R. R., at St. Louis, 1901-04, and general passenger agent, same, since Aug. 15, 1904. Presbyterian. Democrat. Member Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Clubs: Mercantile, St. Louis (St. Louis), Chicago Athletic (Chicago). Recreation: horseback riding. Office: Fullerton Bldg. Residence: 4950 Lindell Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEAM, Jerome Christopher, Jr., railway official; born, Canton, ILL., May 10, 1867; son of Jacob C. and Mary E. (Bricker) Beam; educated in Canton public schools to 1883; married, Waco, Tex., Nov. 11, 1904, Lieith Gardner. Began railway career at Memphis, Tenn., as stenographer with assistant general passenger agent East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia system, 1885, continuing with same company in various positions until 1894; city passenger agent, Memphis, 1888-91; western passenger agent, Little Rock, Ark., 1891-92; district passenger agent, Memphis, 1892-94; Florida passenger agent, Jacksonville, April-October, 1894; became western passenger agent Southern Ry., Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 1, 1894; transferred to Chicago as northwestern passenger agent, same road, Feb. 1, 1895; to Atlanta, Ga., as district passenger agent, Oct. 1, 1901; assistant general passenger agent, same road, at St. Louis, since Aug. 1, 1907. Democrat. Methodist. Mason, Shriner. Clubs: Mercantile, Normandie Golf. Recreation: golf. Office: Chemical Bldg. Residence: 4509 Washington Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEATTIE, William John, architect; born, St. Louis, Jan. 28, 1860; son of David and Ann (Kirkwood) Beattie; educated in St. Louis public schools, Smith Academy, Washington University, being one of the first pupils in manual training school, then part of scientific department of that university; educated as an architect; married, North Vernon, Ind., Aug. 25, 1886, Margaret Alley; children: Helen, Ruth, David, Margaret, Isabella; married, 2nd, Tuxedo, St. Louis Co., Mo., June 10, 1903, Josephine Gillespie; children: Maud Alice. W. J., Jr. Started in cabinet making business, March, 1882; established the Beattie Manufacturing Co., Mar. 16, 1890, of which was president; established as architect, Jan. 1, 1909. Democrat. Presbyterian. Served in Missouri National Guard, 1876-84. Mason (32°). Office: 810 Olive St. Residence: Webster Groves.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECK, Clarence Benjamin, coal dealer; born in Kent Co., Md., Nov. 6, 1848; son of Horatio and Mary Matilda (Miller) Beck; educated in country schools of Kent Co. and at Washington College, Chestertown, Md.; married, Baltimore, Dec. 28, 1875, Mary Forman Vickers; two children: Edith (Mrs. John W. Barriger, Jr.) and Clarence Vickers. Came to St. Louis, 1867, and began as clerk in a hardware store; after a little more than a year became connected with the A. F. Shapleigh Hardware Co., with which was identified for thirty-two years; during his last years in the hardware business became interested in the coal business, in firm of Beck-Walker Coal Co., later was with the C. B. Beck Coal Co., and since 1905 has been president and treasurer St. Louis Coal Co. Democrat. Episcopalian. Recreation: hunting. Office: 1016 Syndicate Trust Bldg. Residence: 3949 Delmar Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECK, Clarence Vickers, vice president St. Louis Coal Co.; born, St. Louis, Oct. 30, 1886; son of Clarence Benjamin and Mary Forman (Vickers) Beck; educated in St. Louis public schools, graduating from high school, 1905; married, St. Louis, April 18, 1911, J. Ethel Cannett. Began business career with St. Louis Coal Co., as clerk, 1905; advanced to salesman, 1907, and vice president, 1908; also director Cluley Multiplier Co., of Chicago. Independent in politics. Presbyterian. Royal Arch Mason; member Tuscan Lodge, No. 360, A. F. and A. M.; St. Louis Chapter, No. 8, R. A. M. Member Order Kokoal. Office: 1016 Syndicate Trust Bldg. Residence: 904 N. Euclid Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECK, George F., lawyer; born. St. Louis, Jan. 13, 1871; son of Henry William and Helena (Klein) Beck; educated at the Charles Pope School, one of the public schools of St. Louis, and at the Manual Training School of Washington University: graduated from St. Louis Law School, LL.B., 1896; attended Harvard Law School, taking special studies, 1896-97: unmarried. Admitted to bar in October, 1897, and has since engaged in general practice in St. Louis. Member American Bar Association, Missouri Bar Association, Law Library Association of St. Louis, St. Louis Bar Association. Republican. Clubs: University, Harvard (St. Louis). Office: 810 Rialto Bldg. Residence: 4312 Olive St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECK, Henry William, feed and forage business; born. Hanover, Germany, Mar. 16, 1837; son of H. W. and Elizabeth (Weiden) Beck: educated in public schools to sixteen; married. St. Louis, Apr. 25. 1865, Lena Klein; four children: Jacob William, Charles John, Harry George, George Ferdinand. Came to America. 1852: lived temporarily in New York City and Cincinnati, but located in St. Louis, 1858. First position was under Mr. Hall, and while in his employ. September. 1858, returning on steamboat T. L McGill (Capt. Obe Robbins, master) from Omaha to Lexington, he sold from 1,000 to 2,000 copies of the Missouri Republican (now St. Louis Republic). The papers were three weeks old and sold at 25 cents apiece. Was connected with feed business during Civil War and for ten years afterwards maintained a tavern at 12th and Olive Sts.; established a feed and grain store, 1875, and is today the oldest representative of this business in St. Louis; president H. W. Beck & Sons Feed & Seed Co. Member Merchants' Exchange (one of its oldest members). Was vice president Lucas Market Savings Bank, 1876, until the institution was closed, paying depositors in full. Republican. Methodist. Recreations: driving and amusements. Offices: 20th and Pine Sts. and 5701 Manchester Ave. Residence: 3319 W. Pine Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKER, George William, physician; born, St. Louis, Aug. 7, 1878; son of Henry Rudolph and Julia (Hohenschild) Becker; educated St. Louis public schools; Educational Institute (Toenfeldt's); Missouri School of Mines, Rolla, Mo.; M.D., Marion-Sims-Beaumont Medical College (St. Louis University), 1904; married, St. Louis, June 26, 1907, Virginia Lecoutour; one child, George Henry. In practice in St. Louis since May 30, 1904: medical examiner John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co.; assistant police surgeon, St. Louis, since January, 1912. Republican. Presbyterian. Member American Medical Association, Missouri State Medical Association, St. Louis Medical Society. Recreations: fishing, motor touring. Office and Residence: 2115 Arsenal St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKER, Philip, life insurance; born in Monroe Co., ILL., Mar. 19, 1864; son of Charles and Katherine (Hahn) Becker; educated in public schools and Perkins and Herpel Business College, St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Oct. 10, 1887, Huldah K. Gutwald; five children: Bertha, Edna, Cecelia A., Leonora A., Huldah K. On farm until sixteen years of age; connected with retail grocery business, St. Louis, 1880-89; since identified with life insurance, and general agent and manager at St. Louis, of Great Western Life Insurance Co. of Kansas City, Mo., since 1911. Republican. Episcopalian. Mason (32°), Knight Templar, Shriner Club: Masonic. Recreations: fishing and hunting. Office: 200 LaSalle Bldg. Residence: 5736 Etzel Ave. Summer Residence: ''Meadowbrook,'' Pulaski Co., Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKER, Philip August, secretary and treasurer The Geo. F. Dittmann Boot & Shoe Co.; born, Gros-Gerau, Germany, Aug. 25, 1872; son of John Philip and Anna (Camman) Becker; educated in Washington University, St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Nov. 14, 1900, Adele Dittmann; children: John William, Virginia D. Began business career as boy with John P. Becker dry goods house, East St. Louis, 1887, and remained in employ of that house until 1895; then in business under firm name of Becker & Aal until 1900; bought stock in the George F. Dittmann Boot & Shoe Co., of which later became a director, and is now secretary and treasurer. Member Western Association of Shoe Wholesalers (executive committee), Business Men's League, St. Louis Sales managers' Association (president). Unitarian. Clubs: Union, Liederkranz, Apollo(executive committee). Recreations: tennis, motoring. Office: 1107-1109 Washington Ave. Residence: 3463 Longfellow Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKER, René L., musician; born, Bischheim, Alsace, Nov. 7, 1882; son of Edouard and Adele Antoinette (Schickel) Becker; educated in the Episcopal Gymnasium, Strassburg; studied music in Municipal Conservatory, Strassburg; married, St. Louis, May 3, 1910, Angela Landzettel; one daughter: Catherine-Angela. Arrived in America, Sept. 24, 1904; vice president Becker Bros. Conservatory of Music, June, 1905-October, 1910; has since conducted college of music in own name; organist St. Peter's Cathedral, Belleville, ILL. Democrat. Roman Catholic. Member Knights of Columbus. Composer for organ and piano. Studio: 3830 Olive St., St. Louis. Residence: Belleville, ILL.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKER, William Dee, lawyer; born, East St. Louis, ILL., Oct. 23, 1876; son of John P. and Anna A. (Camman) Becker; graduated from Smith Academy, St. Louis, 1895; A.B., School, 1901; married, St. Louis, June 10, 1902, Marguerite Louise McIntosh; children: Alan Dee and Anna Louise. Admitted to bar, 1901, and was senior partner of law firm of Becker & Troll until election of Mr. Troll as public administrator in the fall of 1904; formed partnership with Judge W. W. Henderson as Henderson & Becker, 1905; Wm. C. Marshall entered firm, 1910, and name changed to Henderson, Marshall & Becker. Republican. Unitarian. Member of St. Louis and Missouri State Bar associations. Mason (32°), Shriner. Clubs: St. Louis, Missouri Athletic, Union, City, Masonic, Glen Echo. Office: Security Bldg. Residence: 4048 Lindell Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKMAK, Henry H., vice president Schultz & Niemeier Commission Co.; born, St. Louis, Jan. 17,1865; son of George H. and Louise(Otto) Beckman; educated in parochial schools; married, St. Louis, Nov. 3, 1886; two children: Delia C, George A. Entered grain business at sixteen and was connected with one firm at St. Louis for sixteen years; then assistant superintendent of grain elevator for farmers, at St. Louis, six years; vice president Schultz & Niemeier Commission Co. since 1898, in charge of elevator at Granite City. Republican. Protestant. Office: Granite City. Residence: 2902A Sullivan Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKMANN, Edmund Camillo, wholesale leather; born, St. Louis, Oct. 30, 1861; son of Robert and Pauline (Bircher) Beckmann; educated in public schools of St. Louis; married, St. Louis, June 26, 1889, Annie Otto; children: Edna, George, Alma. Has been in the leather business in St. Louis from age of thirteen; first with Ganahl, Schallert & Co., until eighteen years old; then two years with Whitteman, Rost & Co.; then with father for three years, one year with Alfred Scannell, five years as traveler with James Clark & Co., and seven years with Otto Oters Leather Co. until they went out of business; since 1898 in business for self as wholesale leather commission merchant; was secretary and treasurer of the California Tanning Co. until 1907, since president. Scottish Rite Mason; member Missouri Lodge, No. 1, A. F. and A. M., Moolah Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. Recreations: billiards and fishing. Office: 712 N. 4th St. Residence: 3509 Shenandoah Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKMANN, William Edward, wholesale confectioners' supplies; born, St. Louis, Jan. 13, 1854; son of William C. and Eliza (Freihaut) Beckmann; educated in Wyman's City University; married, St. Louis, 1876, Louisa Seidel; children: Olivia (Mrs. Louis Alewell), Louisa (Mrs. Albert Albrecht), Gussie (Mrs. Frank Albrecht). Began business career as salesman with Goodwin, Behr & Co., soap and candle manufacturers, 1871-73; then in retail grocery business at 708 South 4th St, until 1882, when embarked in present business as W. E. Beckmann & Co., wholesale dealers in bakers' and confectioners' supplies, utensils and machinery, of which is sole proprietor. Also vice president Accomac Realty Co., and secretary and treasurer of St. Louis Bakers' Yeast Co. Member Merchants' Exchange. Office: 10-12 S. 2d St. Residence: 2217 S. Grand Avenue.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BECKWITH, Henry O., steel broker and manufacturers' agent; born in Brown Co., Ohio, Feb. 13, 1869; son of John Hull and Agatha (Smith) Beckwith; educated in public schools of Hamilton Co., Ohio; married, Wyoming, Ohio, May 23, 1893, Bertha M. Schwarz. Began business career in Cincinnati, and during last eight years of residence there was manager of the Hamilton Canal Boat Co.; came to St. Louis, and in January, 1904, with brother, J. H. Beckwith, established present business of Beckwith Bros., brokers and manufacturers' agents in iron and steel products. Republican. Methodist. Office: 1017 Chemical Bldg. Residence: 758 Goodfellow Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEDAL, William Sherwood, lawyer; born, Santa Rosa, Coahuila, Mex., Sept. 8, 1880; son of Sylvester Sherwood and Adelheid Charlotte (Wuerpel) Bedal; was brought to United States in infancy; educated Central High School, St. Louis, graduating, 1899; A.B., Harvard, 1903; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 1905; married, St. Louis, July 28, 1909, Susan Farrington Dreas; one son, William Sherwood, born Aug. 22, 1910, and one daughter, Adelheid Wuerpel, born Dec. 9, 1911. Admitted to Missouri bar, 1905; associated in practice with firm of Nagel & Kirby. St. Louis, 1905-07; with firm of Stewart, Eliot, Chaplin & Blayney, 1907-09, and member of same firm, 1909-11; member firm of Eliot, Chaplin, Blayney & Bedal since Jan. 1, 1911. Member St. Louis Bar Association. Independent in politics, nominally Republican. Unitarian. Con­ducted the Legal Aid Bureau at Self Culture Hall for two years; 1905-07; member housing and sanitation committee of Civic League; director St. Louis Pure Milk Commission. Club: Amateur Athletic Association. Recreations: tennis, walking. Office: 1711-1716 Third National Bank Bldg. Residence: 4316A Forest Park Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEDELL, Orion Willis, dentist; born, Cardington, O., Mar. 1, 1870; son of John E. and Maggie A. (Thompson) Bedell; educated in public schools of Mount Vernon, O.; graduated from Dental Department of Washington University, D.M.D., 1892, Medical Department of same, M.D., 1894; married, Dec. 25, 1900, Birdie A., daughter of Emanuel Miller of Mount Vernon, O.; children: Ethel, Everett. Entered office of Dr. W. E. Semple, Mount Vernon, as dental student, 1886; three years later became assistant in dental office at Nebraska City, Neb.; removed to St. Louis, Sept. 26, 1900; opened office as dentist, on graduation in 1902; professor of operative dentistry, dental embryology, and dental histology in Dental Department of Washington University, 1905-09. Republican. Baptist. Recreation: farming. Office and Residence: 1909 Lafayette Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEECHER, John Lyman, proprietor Hand Goods Bakery; born, Washington, Mo., Aug. 22, 1853; son of Samuel and Mary Jane (Smith) Beecher; educated in public and private schools, Newport, Mo.; public schools, St. Paul, Minn., and private schools, Pottstown and Philadelphia, Pa.; married, St. Louis, Feb. 18, 1881, Mary Elizabeth O'Reilly; children: Samuel Lyman, Daniel Adrian. Began business career as clerk with the Singer Sewing Machine Co., 1872, continuing until 1879; began Sept. 1, 1879, with Dozier, Weyl & Co., which later became Dozier Bakery, merged into The National Biscuit Co., and for many years was manager of "Hand Goods" Bakery at 205 North 6th St.; moved to 607 Pine St., 1906, purchased business (still known to the public as Dozier Bakery), Feb. 1, 1910. Democrat. Recreation: motor boating. Office: 607 Pine St. Residence: 4929 Reber PL.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEEDLE, Horace Grant, secretary to the mayor; born, O'Fallon, ILL, Oct. 20, 1868; son of Samuel H. and Ellen (Bowler) Beedle; educated in public schools of Illinois, 1874-84, business college, 1885, Illinois State Normal University, Normal, ILL., 1886-89; married, St. Louis, Apr. 4, 1899, Florence P. Children: daughter: Clyde II. Taught school, 1890-91; newspaper reporter, 1892-95; Secretary Merchants' League Club, 1896-99; in wholesale paint and white lead business, under the firm name of H. G. Beedle Paint Co., 1899-1909; secretary Election Board, 1909-11; since secretary to the mayor. Republican. Member of House of Representatives in 40th General Assembly of Missouri. Baptist. Mason (32), Shriner. Club: City. Recreations: fishing and hunting. Office: City Hall. Residence: 4130 Cleveland Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEHEN, John Joseph, president Behen Automobile Equipment Co.; born: Litchfield, ILL, Oct. 2, 1873; son of Simon and Mary (Farley) Behen; educated in public schools of Litchfield; married, Litchfield, Sept. 11, 1905, Frances S. Faught; one child: May Frances. Began as messenger boy, Wabash R. R., Litchfield, at age of fourteen, and remained in railway service until 1905; was identified with the Carnegie Steel Co., at St. Louis, 1905-11. In March, 1906, organized and became president of the Behen-Faught Motor Car Equipment Co.; president of the U. S. Pump and Tank Company, 1909-11; manager of Faught Estate September, 1906-11, as curator of estate in probate; in September, 1905, organized the Behen Automobile Equipment Co., of which is president. Was one of the organizers of the St. Louis Automobile Manufacturers' and Dealers' Association, the St. Louis Motors Accessories Association; an organizer and chairman of the Automobile Show Committee, 1908 and 1909. Recreations: golf, motoring, fishing. Office: 702 N. Kings highway. Residence: 2127 Waterman Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEHRENS, Albert A., treasurer, manager and assistant secretary St. Louis Sash and Door Works; born: St. Louis, Jan. 14, 1877; son of Charles W. and Margaret (Conrad) Behrens; educated in parochial school and business college; married, St. Louis, Jan. 18, 1898, Henrietta Steinbach; children: Etta, Albert, Edgar, Grace. Began business career in office of St. Louis Sash and Door. Works, 1894, and has continued in various positions, now being treasurer, manager and assistant secretary of the company, wholesale manufacturers of sash, doors, blinds, mouldings, etc. Club: Missouri Athletic. Recreation: home diversions. Office: Broadway and Destrehan St. Residence: 3525 Crittenden St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEHRENS, Louis H., physician; born, Gillespie, Ill., July 12, 1868; son of Henry H. and Wilhelmina (Basse) Behrens; educated in Gillespie public schools to 1882; Shurtleff College, Upper Alton, ILL., 1882-84; entered St. Louis College of Pharmacy, 1886, graduating, Ph.G., 1888; M.D., Missouri Medical College, 1894; married, St. Louis, Apr. 17, 1895, Laura F. Kraft. Engaged in general practice of medicine. Evangelical Lutheran. Mason. Recreations: flowers, agriculture, forestry. Office: Times Bldg., 423 Chestnut St. Residence: 4229 Westminster Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEINKE, Henry F., contractor and builder; born, Franklin Co., Mo., Jan. 14, 1848; son of John F. and Anna M. (Bruning) Beinke; educated in common schools and two years' course in a German school; married, Washington, Mo., Feb. 5, 1874, Mary C. Michael; five children: Frank C., Mrs. Metta C. Linder, Lydia L., Mrs. Adele L. Nesslag and Belmont W., all of St. Louis. Was apprenticed to carpenter's trade at thirteen; worked for two years at Washington, Mo., and as journeyman for brother, Herman H., one year; was employed in Kansas City, Mo., for a year, and then came to St. Louis; after two years he went to Washington, Mo., and spent thirteen years there, returning to St. Louis, 1881; has since engaged in contracting. Republican. Member German Evangelical Church. Residence: 4807 Cote Brilliante Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BELL, Nicholas Montgomery, tobacco merchant; born in Lincoln Co., Mo., Nov. 2, 1846; son of William A. and Caroline Page (Harvey) Bell; educated in schools of Lincoln Co., Mo.; married, St. Louis, Sept. 26, 1888, Maggie, daughter of Christian Peper (she died Aug. 7, 1912); children: Christian P., Marjorie. Came to St. Louis 1861; first employment was for three years in office of Ubbsdall, Barr, Duncan & Co.; emigrated to Salem, Ore., 1864, and was in general merchandise business there, in firm of J. C. & N. M. Bell, until 1868, when returned to St. Louis and has been engaged in tobacco business since 1869; now president Christian Peper Tobacco Co. (established, 1852.) Democrat; delegate from Oregon to National Democratic Convention that nominated Seymour and Blair, in 1868; member of 26th and 27th General Assemblies Missouri, from St. Louis; member National Democratic conventions of 1876, 1880, 1884, 1892, and delegate to convention of 1896. Appointed by President Cleveland as superintendent of foreign mails, March, 1885, and resigned, 1889; was author of and negotiated first parcels post treaties of United States with foreign countries, which added millions of dollars to the trade relations between the United States, Mexico, Central and South American States; author of and negotiated general postal treaties between United States, Mexico and Canada, which virtually made the North American States one postal territory, as no books or financial accounts are kept between the United States and Mexico; appointed by Governor Stone first State excise commissioner, 1893, and resigned, 1897; increased public revenue without change of taxation for State and City of St. Louis, $750,000 over preceding four year period. Director Louisiana Purchase Exposition Co.; member International Superior Jury of Awards in same. Mason (33°); member Royal Order of Scotland, Society Colonial Wars, Sons of the Revolution, Sons of the American Revolution, Odd Fellows. Club: Mercantile. Recreation: farming. Office: Main and Morgan Sts. Residence: 4442 W. Pine Boul.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEMIS, James Ward, vice president Ozan Lumber Co.; born, Jefferson, Tex., Feb. 28, 1876; son of James Hervey and Hannah (Knox) Bemis; educated in Manual Training School, St. Louis; widower. Engaged in lumber business at Prescott, Ark., 1896; resident St. Louis since 1900; was secretary and treasurer, now vice pres. Ozan Lumber Co., wholesale manufacturers of yellow pine lumber, oak, lumber and oak and cypress piling, with mills at Prescott, Ark. Also director of the Prescott & Northwestern R. R. Co. Member Southern Lumber Manufacturers' Association. Mason (32°), Knight Templar, Shriner. Clubs: Mercantile, Glen Echo Country. Favorite recreation: golf. Office: 1600 Wright Bldg. Residence: 4535 Washington Boul.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEMIS, Judson Stephen, treasurer Bemis Bro. Bag Co.; born: San Francisco, Cal., Mar. 26, 1867; son of Stephen A. and Hannah Jane (Thomas) Bemis; educated public and private schools, St. Louis; married, Murfreesboro, Tenn., Sept. 8, 1896, Miss Martha Nelson Sikes; three children: Jane Thomas, Elizabeth Thompson, Louisa Sikes. Began business career with Bemis Bro. Bag Co., 1885; became treasurer of the company, 1894, which position still holds; also director Merchants-Laclede National Bank. Republican. Protestant. Clubs: Noonday, St. Louis, Algonquin Golf. Office: 601 S. 4th St. Residence: 236 Oakwood Ave., Webster Park.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BEMIS, Stephen Allen, manufacturer and importer of bags and burlaps; born, Fitchburg, Mass., Feb. 6, 1828; son of Stephen and Mirian Thurston (Farwell) Bemis; came west with parents in 1838, and settled at Lighthouse Point, Ogle Co., ILL; educated in private schools in Chicago; married, Chicago, May 31, 1854, Hannah Jane Thomas (died Jan. 21, 1903); children: Fanny A. (Mrs. Chester Summons, Minneapolis), Mirian Farwell (Mrs. Alonzo Hull, Seattle, Wash.), Judson S., Mary Sawtelle (Mrs. T. J. McLemore), Alice R.(Mrs. Charles P. Ladd), Florence E. (Mrs. Elliot K. Ludington.) Began active career as clerk in shipping office, Chicago, 1847; after five years went to California, via Nicaragua, remained two years, then returned to Illinois and farmed in DeKalb Co. for five years; again went to California with a drove of live stock and remained until 1867; came to St. Louis and joined brother, then a member of the firm of Bemis & Brown, bag manufacturers, which later became Bemis, Bro. & Co., incorporated, 1885, as Bemis Bro. Bag Co., of which has since been vice president. Republican. Baptist. Club: Noonday. Recreation: fond of church work. Office: 4th and Poplar Sts. Residence: 5099 Westminster Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENDERSCHEID, Herman J., president Benderscheid Manufacturing Co., manufacturers of show cases; born, Germany; educated in the old country; married, St. Louis, 1870, Bertha Hahne; one son: Herman. Came to America, 1880, and worked at cabinet maker's trade in St. Louis; in manufacturing business on own account since 1893. Member Liederkranz. Office: 2812 N. 9th St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENHAM, George, St. Louis manager and general agent Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co.; born, Fort Wayne, Ind., Mar. 27, 1857; son of Byron H. and Almira A. (McKelvey) Benham (both of Ohio); removed to Norwalk, O., when 4 years of age; graduated from Norwalk High School, 1876; took special course in Cornell University; LL.B., University of Michigan, 1880; married, Norwalk, Sept. 13, 1887, Eloise Kellogg; one daughter: Kathleen Adele. Admitted to bar of Ohio by Supreme Court, 1880; in land and loan business in Minnesota and Dakota, with headquarters at Crookston, Minn., 1882-85; went to Isthmus of Panama, 1886, and reported for newspapers on De Lesseps Canal; traveled as special correspondent for newspapers on agricultural and mining developments in lower California, Mexico, 1886-87; correspondent and special writer San Diego (Cal.) Union, 1886-89; special correspondent and reporter for San Francisco Examiner, 1889-91; since April, 1892, manager and general agent for Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. at St. Louis. President Life Underwriters' Association of St. Louis, 1905, 1906; vice president National Association of Life Underwriters, 1906; president The Board of Life Underwriters of St. Louis, 1909. Member Business Men's League, Civic League, Ohio Society, Cornell Club, University of Michigan Alumni Association, Mississippi Valley Association of D. K. E., Sons of Revolution. Democrat. Member Church of the Ascension. Clubs: St. Louis, Mercantile, City, Aero, Normandie Golf. Recreations: literature, floriculture, golf. Office: northeast corner 8th St. Residence: 5858 Clemens Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENNETT, Alfred, lumberman; born, Hannibal, Mo., Apr. 26, 1877; son of Alfred and Lucetta A. (Decker) Bennett; educated in Woodland and Garfield schools and Central High School, Kansas City, Mo.; married, June 7, 1904, Florence MacCuaig, of Nebraska City, Neb.; one daughter: Dorris. Began business career as clerk in Southern Lumber Manufacturing Association, St. Louis, 1893; entered employ of Holladay-Klotz Land and Lumber Co., Greenville, Mo., 1896; director and assistant secretary and treasurer, 1899-1902; salesman Missouri Lumber and Land Exchange, 1902-03; manager St. Louis branch of Wisconsin and Arkansas Lumber Co., of Malvern, Ark., 1903-05; started for self as manufacturer and wholesale dealer in yellow pine and hardwood lumber, 1905, and incorporated business as Alfred Bennett Lumber Co., of which is president. Partner in Louisiana Central Lumber Co.; president Alfred Bennett Lumber Co., of Texas; vice president Dayton Lumber Co., of Dayton, Tex., Two Mile Land and Timber Co., of St. Louis. Member Citizens' Industrial Association, Hoo Hoo. Republican. Baptist. Clubs: Mercantile, Missouri Athletic, St. Louis Amateur Athletic Association, St. Louis Republican. Recreation: tennis. Office: Lumbermen's Bldg. Residence: Ferguson, Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENNETT, William G., contractor; born, Blanchester, O., Nov. 23, 1868; son of Henry D. and Chalista (Granger) Bennett; educated public schools and Danville (Ind.) Normal School; married, Cora Brennan, of Philadelphia, Sept. 22, 1889; children: Raulston A., Beatrice O., Dolly A., William G., Jr., Rosaline. Began active career, 1883, as rodman in employ of Sooysmith & Co., bridge contractors, New York, and advanced to position of superintendent of construction; became connected with the Edgemoor Bridge Co., 1892, as foreman in construction of buildings of Columbian Exposition, Chicago; after close of exposition served as general superintendent Columbia Salvage Co., the name later being changed to the Chicago House Wrecking Co.; removed to St. Louis, 1902, and organized the St. Louis Wrecking and Supply Co., the name being later changed to the Chicago Wrecking and Supply Co., of which was vice president and general manager until 1910; since in general contracting business. Republican. Scottish Rite Mason (32°), Shriner, Odd Fellow. Club: Missouri Athletic. Recreations: fishing and hunting. Office and Residence: 4561 Morgan Street.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENOIST, Conde Louis; born, St. Louis, Oct. 5, 1846; son of Louis Auguste (pioneer banker and financier of St. Louis) and Esther (Hackney) Benoist; educated Jesuit College, St. Louis and Kentucky; married, St. Louis, 1870, Miss Clemence C. Christy; five children: Conde A., Louis M., Lami F., Clemence P., Marie Blanche. Has devoted his attention to management and development of inherited estate. Democrat. Catholic. Recreation: traveling. Residence: 7 Lenox Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENOIST, Eugene Hunt; born in St. Louis, Apr. 2, 1853; son of Louis A. and Sarah E. (Wilson) Benoist; educated in private schools, St. Louis, 1861-63, Wyman School, 1863-64, St. Louis University, 1804-66, Notre Dame University, South Bend, Ind., 1866-68, Washington University, St. Louis, 1868-69, Seton Hall, South Orange, N. J., 1869-70, Fordham College, New York, 1870-72; married, St. Louis, Feb. 20, 1878, Elmira Lee; children: Eugene Lee, Viola Marie, William Francis, Charles Eugene Theodore, Marie Louise, Lucille Josephine. Began active career as clerk in St. Louis assessor's office under Charles Green, assessor, 1873-74; traveled in Europe, 1874-75; in real estate, steamship and brokerage business, 1876-81; with Joseph P. Whyte, as Whyte & Benoist. wholesale and manufacturing saddlery business (corporation of Heidemann-Benoist Saddlery Co.), from 1881 until the company retired from business, 1895; real estate officer of Mississippi Valley Trust Co., 1898-1905; director Mississippi Valley Trust Co. since 1905. Also vice president Denver, Enid & Gulf R. R.; president Indian Creek Land Co.; vice president Overland Real Estate Co. Was quartermaster St. Louis Light Cavalry, National Guard of Missouri, 1878-86. Catholic. Clubs: St. Louis, Bellerive. Recreation: traveling. Office: 319 N. 4th St., Room 803. Residence: 4414 McPherson Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENOIST, Howard, capitalist; born, St. Louis, Mar. 6, 1866; son of Louis A. and Sarah E. (Wilson) Benoist; educated in St. Louis University; married, St. Louis, Nov. 11, 1896, Agnes Foy; children: Louis Lannan, Elizabeth Christy, Agnes. Devotes attention principally to personal holdings and investments. Catholic. Clubs: St. Louis, St. Louis Country, Racquet, Florissant Valley. Office: Security Bldg. Residence: 4931 Berlin Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENOIST, Theodore, investments; born, St. Louis, Apr. 2, 1861; son of Louis Auguste and Sarah E.(Wilson) Benoist; educated St. Louis University; Georgetown University, Washington, D. C.; Stoneyhurst College, England; married, St. Louis, Jan. 12, 1887, Mary E. Hunt; seven children: Charles, Miriam, John Hunt, Anna Wright, Theodore, Jr., Wilson, Francois. Has given attention to management of property inherited from father and to development of same. Democrat. Catholic. Club: St. Louis Country. Office: 803, 319 N. 4th St. Residence: 4632 Berlin Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENSBERG, Ferdinand August, president Bourbon Mercantile Co.; born, St. Louis, Aug. 13, 1855; son of Gerard and Catharina (Weijers) Bensberg; lived in St. Paul, Minn., 1862-69; educated in public schools of St. Paul, Minn.; married, Covington, Ky., Apr. 25, 1892, Elizabeth Haldemann; children: Elizabeth and Marie. Entered father's wholesale liquor store in St. Louis (established 1852) in 1869, and in 1880 succeeded him as F. A. Bensberg & Co.; incorporated the business, 1895, under present style of Bourbon Mercantile Co. Democrat. Catholic. Favorite recreations: driving and horseback riding. Office: 208 Walnut St. Residence: 5854 Gates Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENSIEK, August W., undertaker; born, St. Louis, Feb. 15, 1877; son of John C. and Sophia (Birkenkemper) Bensiek; educated in St. Louis public schools and Jones Commercial College; graduated from Benton College of Law, and admitted to the Bar, February, 1912; unmarried. On leaving school in 1896, entered the undertaking business established by father, 1870, and, on death of father, Dec. 20, 1899, succeeded to the business (with brother, John C.) under present firm name of John C. Bensiek 's Sons. Member Knights of Honor. Office and Residence: 1134-1138 N. 6th St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENSIEK, John C., undertaker; born, St. Louis, Dec. 6, 1875; son of John C. and Sophia (Birkenkemper) Bensiek; educated in public schools and Jones Commercial College; married, St. Louis, June 17, 1903, Anna Michaels (now deceased). Served as deputy sheriff under sheriffs Pohlmann and Traut, and Jan. 1, 1900, with brother, August W., succeeded under present style of John C. Bensiek's Sons, to business established by father in 1870, as undertaker and embalmer. Mason, Knight Templar; member National Union. Office and Residence: 1134-1138 N. 6th St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENSTEIN, John W., lawyer; born: Soest, Germany, July 19, 1861; son of William and Minnie (Wallrabe) Benstein; educated in the old country; graduate Minden College, Westphalia; married, Cincinnati, Sept. 12, 1895, Emma M. Koch; two children: William F. and Pauline A. Came to America, 1880; collector for wholesale house, Detroit, Mich., 1880-84; studied law at Kansas City, Mo.; admitted to Missouri bar, 1889; in general civil practice in St. Louis since 1890; also investor in real estate. Christian Scientist. Recreations: music, literature, outdoor life. Office: 311 Times BIdg. Residence: Kirkwood, Missouri.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENTEN, Bernard J., clergyman; born, St. Louis, Nov. 16, 1868; son of Herman A. and Anna Benten; educated parochial school of the parish; St. Joseph's College, Tentopolis, ILL., 1871-77; St. Francis Theological Seminary, St. Francis, Wis., 1887-91. Ordained priest;hood Roman Catholic Church, June 21, 1891; appointed assistant rector of Holy Trinity Church, St. Louis, serving 1891-95; rector St. Stanislaus Church, Wardsville, Cole Co., Mo., 1895-1903; rector St. Paul's Church, St. Paul, St. Charles Co., Mo., 1903-06; organized St. Cecilia's Parish, October, 1906, and has since been rector of this church. Residence: 5418 Louisiana Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENTZEN, Julius H., secretary of Colcord-Wright Machinery and Supply Co.; born, St. Louis, Aug. 10, 1872; son of John N. A. and Louise (Adams) Bentzen; educated in public schools and commercial college; married, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 19, 1898, Ida H. Koester; children: Roy K., Edith C. Began business career with Bentzen Commission Co., wholesale produce, 1895-97; then salesman W. R. Colcord Machinery Co., of which was vice president and secretary, 1902-12; in January, 1912, company consolidated with J. W. Wright Co. and firm name was changed to Colcord-Wright Machinery and Supply Co., of which is secretary. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Rotary. Recreation: tennis. Office: 1223-1229 N. Broadway. Residence: 3931 Marcus Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BENZ, Eugene A., manufacturer of badges, banners and flags; born: St. Louis, Feb. 15, 1889; son of George E. and Jane (Toll) Benz; educated in public schools of St. Louis; married, Minnie Aufderheide, of St. Louis, Nov. 16, 1910. Began business career working in German Savings Institution, afterwards for Merchants-Laclede National Bank; after the death of his father, in August, 1908, associated in business with his brother, George E. Benz, Jr., the firm being incorporated in March, 1910, under title of Geo. E. Benz Badge and Regalia Co., of which has been president and treasurer since March, 1911. New lines have been added to the business until the company now carries a complete assortment of badges, regalia, banners and flags. Republican. Presbyterian. Mason. Clubs: Maxwelton, American Wheel, Moose. Recreations: athletic sports. Office: 1014 Pine St. Residence: 2631 Wyoming St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERBLINGER, August, vice president Essmueller Mill Furnishing Co.; born: Baden, Germany, Dec. 18, 1861; son of Frederick and Mary (Gerber) Berblinger; educated in public schools and Polytechnic School, Baden, Germany; married, St. Louis, May, 1886, Ella Kliefoth; children: Lulu, Erwin, Hilda, Oneida. Learned trade of millwright in Germany; came to St. Louis in 1880, and was employed with firm of Mutchler & Essmueller, 1880-82, then with Dehner-Wuerpel Mill Build­ing Co., 1882-85; returned to Essmueller & Barry (successors of Mutchler & Essmueller) in 1887, and became head foreman, and on incorporation of the business, 1897, as Essmueller Mill Furnishing Co., was elected vice president and superintendent. Republican. Mason (32°), Shriner; member I. O. O. F., St. Louis Liedertafel Society, Concordia Turn Verein. Clubs: Victor Skaat, Goodluck Bowling, Brookland Hunting and Fishing, Calhoun Point Hunting and Fishing. Office: 1216 S. 8th St. Residence: 3819 Juniata Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERGENDAHL, Gustavo Storm, civil engineer and contractor; born: Norway, Feb. 24, 1870; son of Johan Christian and Sophie (Shistad) Bergendahl; came to America, 1888; educated in high school in Norway and under private tutelage in America; married, June 11, 1892, Kristiane Augusta Gulbrandsen, of Christiania, Norway; four children: Augusta, Dagny, Ruth, Gustave Storm. Draughtsman until 1895 and until 1902 engineer in charge, American Bridge Co.; resident engineer, same company. 1902-06; began 1906, under G. S. Bergendahl, as engineer and contractor; president Midland Erection Co., 1907-11, since president Bergendahl-Bass Engineering and Construction Co., St. Louis and Chicago. Member American Society Civil Engineers, Western Society Engineers, Engineers' Club of St. Louis, Chicago Engineers' Club. Baptist. Mason (32°). Recreation: fishing. Office: Syndicate Trust Bldg. Residence: 4540 Dover St., Chicago.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERGER, Jacob, banker; born in Austria, Oct. 2, 1862; son of M. and E. (Blumenfeld) Berger; self-educated; married, St. Louis, Nov. 8, 1883, Bertha Silverstone; eight children: Esther, Samuel, Harry, David, Joseph, Anna, Ralph, Eveline. Came to St. Louis from Austria, in 1879; began in the office of the Prudential Insurance Co. of America, and later was for five years agent of same company; then in mercantile pursuits until 1893; from 1893 to 1899 was in the Sanitary Division of the Health Department and from 1899 to 1903 was deputy assessor and collector of water rates; agent for the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co. of California 1903-05, secretary City National Bank until 1910; since vice president Central National Bank. Member B'nai B'rith. Office: 7th and Olive Sts. Residence: 5153 Von Versen Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERGLAR, Frank B., president Rosedale Contracting and Supply Co.; born, St. Louis Co. (now St. Louis), Apr. 12, 1855; son of Henry and Margaretta (Lemke) Berglar; educated in parochial school and commercial college; married, St. Louis, 1893, Annie Whelan; four children: Frank B., Joseph H., Gertrude and Marguerite. Began active career in employ of the Sligo Iron Works at age of eleven, continuing until 1876; then associated with brother, J. H., in purchasing a farm (now one of the choice residence districts in the western part of the city), engaged in teaming business, which developed into the Rosedale Contracting and Supply Co., of which is president; also a large holder of city property. Democrat. Catholic. Member Knights of Columbus. Recreation: horses. Office: Hodiamont Ave. near Cates Ave. Residence: 6039 Maple Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERMEL, John, brewers' supplies; born, St. Louis, Sept. 12, 1859; son of John H. and Catherine (Sommers) Bermel; educated in public schools: married, Barbara Thummel; one daughter: Emma; married, 2d, Louisville, Ky., Feb. 16, 1901, Christina Gruen. First learned the harness making trade and followed it from age of seventeen to age of twenty-two; then was with Henry Bermel, grocer, 11th and Morgan Sts., for one year; with the Bridge-Beach Stove Manufacturing Co. one year, when became connected with the Charles A. Drach Electrotype Co., in which remained in various capacities, and was president, 1897-1906; now vice president and treasurer G. A. Link Supply Co. Republican. Member Knights of Pythias, T. P. A., Tower Grove Turn Verein. Recreation: walking. Office: 7 S. 2d St. Residence: 3544 Connecticut St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERNET, Christian, milling business; born, Berne, Switzerland, Oct. 4, 1850; son of John and Elizabeth (Bernet) Bernet; was brought to America, 1856; educated in common schools and business college, La Crosse, Wis.; twice married; children by first marriage: John A. (deceased) and Harry M.; married, 2d, Sarah Huttig, of St. Louis; children: Albert E., Arthur C, Fred Huttig, Milton E. and Dorothy Esther. Came to St. Louis, 1872, as representative of the La Crosse Milling Co.; entered business for self, 1874; organized firm of Bernet & Craft, flour merchants, 1886, and in 1902 formed the Bernet, Craft & Kauffman Milling Co., of which is vice president and manager. President St. Louis Merchants' Exchange; member Busness Men's League. Republican. Methodist. President Piasa Chautauqua (third term), Children's Home Society of Missouri; vice president Methodist Deaconess Association; director and member executive committee St. Louis Provident Association. Mason (Royal Arch). Clubs: St. Louis Millers', St. Louis Grain, Men's. Recreation: church work. Office: Pierce Bldg. Residence: 5557 Cates Ave
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERNINGHAUS, Julius Arnold, cashier Central National Bank; born, St. Louis, Oct. 5, 1878; son of Edmund O. and Augusta P. Berninghaus; educated in public schools of St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Mar. 31, 1903, Mabel Benedict. Entered the Mechanics-American National Bank as messenger boy in 1892, and advanced step by step until in 1902 became assistant cashier; continued until Mar. 12, 1909, when was elected cashier of Central National Bank. Independent in politics. Member St. Louis Credit Men's Association. Club: Mercantile. Recreations: fishing and hunting. Office: 7th and Olive Sts. Residence: 412 N. Union Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERNTHAL, John Jacob, clergyman; born, Frankenmuth, Saginaw Co., Mich., July 13, 1855; son of George Konrad and Margareth B. (Hildner) Bernthal; educated in parochial school, Frankenmuth, to 1869; Concordia College, Ft. Wayne, Ind., 1876; Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, 1879; married, Wyandotte, Mich., Jan. 1, 1880, Anna Calmbach, of Danville, ILL.; children: Emil, August, William, Albert, Lilly, Martha, Edwin, Marie. Ordained Evangelical Lutheran ministry, 1879; pastor Scotland, S. D., 1879-83; Lewiston, Minn., 1883-87; Wyandotte, Mich., 1887-97; St. Trinity Church, Vermont and Koeln Aves., St. Louis, since 1897. President board Concordia Seminary, also of board St. Paul's College, Concordia, Mo.; president Western District of Synod of Missouri, Ohio and Other States; secretary Concordia Publishing House. Republican. Office and Residence: 7416 Vermont Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERSCH, Arthur, insurance; born, St. Louis, July 28, 1873; son of William and Margaret (Richard) Bersch; educated in St. Louis public schools; married, St. Louis, 1902, Lula Kaltmeyer. Began business career in 1890, in office Bersch's Insurance Agency, established by father 1875; admitted as partner in 1900, and became secretary and treasurer of Bersch Insurance Agency Co. in 1906. Member St. Louis Insurance Agents' Association. Socialist. Office: Pierce Bldg. Residence: 3808 Sullivan Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERSCH, Julius Richard, insurance; born, St. Louis, Apr. 18, 1867; son of William and Margaret (Richard) Bersch; educated in public schools of St. Louis; married, Denver, Colo., 1889, Maud Miller; children: Robert, Ruth. Entire active career in insurance business with father, now vice president Bersch Insurance Agency Co. Member Royal Arcanum. Democrat. Office: Pierce Bldg. Residence: 3862 Botanical Ave.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BERSCH, William, insurance; born, Baltimore, Md., Nov. 14, 1831; son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Kranz) Bersch; came with parents to St. Louis, 1836; educated at St. Louis University; married, St. Louis, 1856, Margaret Richard: children: William, Jr., Albert, Edmund, Emma (Mrs. Jacob Guhman), Clara, Julius R., Arthur, Maude, Ida (deceased). Began active career in wholesale dry goods business, continuing until 1875; then embarked in insurance business, which carried on alone until 1900; admitted sons Julius R. and Arthur to partnership, under style of Bersch's Insurance Agency; now president Bersch Insurance Agency Co. Member St. Louis Insurance Agents' Association. Republican. Office: Pierce Bldg. Residence: 2118 John St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BESCH, Conrad George, sand and materials; born: St. Louis, July 7, 1867; son of Philip and Julia(Hoerner) Besch; educated in public and private schools, St. Louis; married, St. Louis, Feb. 15, 1905, Matilda Cramer. Engaged in brokerage business, 1893, continuing for three years; then in real estate business, 1896-98; treasurer and manager Mound City-Sand and Gravel Co., 1898-1905; treasurer Union Sand and Material Co. since 1905; director Tower Grove Bank. Republican. Protestant. Clubs: Glen Echo, Country, Mercantile, Liederkranz, St. Louis Athletic Association. Recreation: golf. Office: Liggett Bldg. Residence: 3522 Crittenden St.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


BETTIS, James Ramsey, manufacturer of paints; born, Camden, Oneida Co., N. Y., Nov. 10, 1849; son of Reuben and Mary Clark (Peck) Bettis; educated in common schools of Camden and Oswego, N. Y., 1856-67; married, Rochester, N. Y., 1877, Emma Frances Husband; children: James R., Jr., Marion Frances, Emma Eleanor; married, 2d, Webster Groves, Mo., October, 1900, Anne May Hime. In printing business in Camden, Itica and Rochester, N. Y., Chicago, and St. Louis, 1866-72; superintendent Democrat Lithographing and Printing Co., 1872-76; salesman, Snider & Holmes and Central Type Foundry, jointly, 1876-79; publisher, Arkansas Daily Democrat, Little Rock, Ark., 1879-90; vice president and manager, C. B. Woodward Printing Co., 1891-93; co-proprietor, with L. Ferguson, of the Thomas Manufacturing Co., manufacturers and jobbers of paints until 1911; now president Zouri Manufacturing Co.; also director Webster Groves Trust Co. President Arkansas Editorial Association, 1885; president 1889, and still member, National Editorial Association. Member Engineer Corps, St. Louis, 1872-75; served in Captain Ellerbee's Company during strike riots of 1877. Independent Democrat. Congregationalist. Clubs: Mercantile, Algonquin. Recreation: study of astronomy. Office: 2030 Pine St. Residence: Webster Groves, Mo.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

BETTS, John Frederic, stock and bond broker; born, Louisville, Ky., Mar. 9, 1871; son of John Frederic and Elizabeth (Potter) Betts; educated in public and high schools of Louisville; married, Wheeling, W. Va., 1901, Mary Belle Howell; children: Mary Howell, infant son (deceased) and John F., Jr. Began as clerk in leaf tobacco business, with Head & Head, Louisville, Ky., 1890; buyer for same firm until 1895; connected with Drummond Tobacco Co., St. Louis, 1895-99; in stock and bond business as member of Drummond, Betts & Co., 1900-02; since Jan. 1, 1903, conducting brokerage business under own name. Member St. Louis Stock Exchange. Republican. Episcopalian. Office: Security Bldg. Residence: 5150 Westminster Place.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)





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