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Band of Hope.—A temperance society organized in St. Louis, April 14, 1861, by H. D. Moone, and which was an offspring of the Chapter of Temperance and Wisdom. The youth of both sexes were admitted to the band, pledging themselves to abstain from profanity and the use of intoxicating liquors and tobacco. Its first president was one of the youths who joined the order, but Mr. Moone later became president and held that office for twenty-eight years. The parent society grew rapidly into popular favor and its membership has ranged from three hundred to five hundred at different periods of its existence. Father John Libby, famous in his day as a temperance worker, was for many years superintendent of the society and had under his charge in all more than five thousand children, who graduated from the organization as they grew up. He was succeeded as superintendent by J. W. Barnes, who still holds the position. The Band of Hope, celebrated its thirty-third anniversary in 1894, in which five hundred children were participants, and another notable anniversary celebration was held April 14, 1898.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

Bank Clerks' Association of Missouri.—An association organized in St. Louis, May 22, 1871, with William Shields, of St. Louis, for first president; O. E. Owens, of St. Louis, vice president; James T. Howenstein, of St. Louis, corresponding secretary; George D. Barklage, of St. Louis, recording secretary; C. D. Affleck, of St. Louis, treasurer. The objects are "to promote social acquaintance and personal friendship among its members; afford relief to the aged and disabled, and benefit the families of deceased members; and aid members who are out of employment to secure situations." Membership is limited to persons between eighteen and forty-five years of age holding positions in bank or banking house, clearing house or trust company in Missouri—honorary membership being extended to bankers, officers and directors of banks, on the payment of an annual fee of $10. The monthly dues from active members are fifty cents; on the death of a member an assessment of $2 is made upon every active member, and within thirty days of the death, the sum of $1,000 is paid to the beneficiary of the deceased. In case of sickness or temporary disability of a member, an allowance of $25 a month may be made, if desired, provided the aggregate go not over $100. The annual meeting is held the third Tuesday in May. In the year 1899 over $3,000 was paid out in sick benefits, and there was a considerable permanent fund belonging to the association. The original charter having expired, it was rechartered in 1897.
[Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: a compendium of history; Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

Commercial Club.—One of the most prominent, active and influential clubs of St. Louis, whose chief objects are somewhat indicated by its name, but whose social and personal attributes have much to do with the high position it maintains among other similar associations of the city. It was organized in 1881, with Gerard B. Allen as president; E. O. Stanard, vice president; Joseph Franklin, treasurer; Newton Crane, secretary, and Edwin Harrison, E. C. Simmons and S. M. Dodd, who, with the officers, composed the executive committee. Its purpose is to "advance by social intercourse, and by a friendly interchange of views, the commercial prosperity of the city of St. Louis." Its select and exclusive character is protected by the limitation of membership to sixty active members, with such honorary members as may be added from time to time—nominations for membership are made by the executive committee, and, if approved by them, are reported to the club and balloted for at the next meeting for election. Three negative votes exclude a candidate. The entrance fee is five dollars. Any member submitted by the unanimous vote of the executive committee may be placed on the honorary list by the unanimous vote at any meeting; and any member, seventy years of age or over, who has been a member for a period of not less than ten years, may be placed on the honorary list by the unanimous vote of the executive committee. In the admission of members due regard is had to the branches of business in which they are engaged, so that the various commercial interests of the city shall be represented. The annual dues for members are fifty dollars, honorary members being exempt. Meetings are held monthly, except during the summer, and any member absenting himself from three consecutive meetings shall be considered to have withdrawn from the club, and his name shall be stricken from the roll, unless, upon report of the facts, the club shall otherwise order. Members may invite a friend, with the permission of the executive committee, to attend a meeting of the club, but no guest shall be present on more than one occasion, except by special invitation of the club itself. In 1898 there were fifty-six active members and ten honorary members, and twenty-one members have died since the first organization.
The club is constituted without regard to politics, and does not deal with party disputes as a general rule; but this rule, which is implied rather than expressed, does not debar it from an active interest and participation in important public questions on which there is unanimity of opinion among its members. It took an energetic part, soon after its organization, in the movement for a reconstruction of the streets of St. Louis, and it is largely due to its efforts, and the information on the subject given in a report made by it to the public, that the mud and dust of the macadam and the rotting wooden blocks of a former day have been replaced by the clean, firm and imperishable granite blocks with which the streets are now laid. The club's efforts in this behalf were followed by a vigorous action in favor of the general system of street sprinkling for the city, which has taken the place of the incomplete and unsatisfactory method by private subscription which formerly prevailed. At a later day the organization took a conspicuous and leading part in opposition to free silver coinage in the national controversy on that issue which preceded the presidential election of 1896. One of the duties which the club imposes upon itself, in the prosecution of its supreme purpose to "advance the commercial prosperity of the city of St. Louis," is that of interchanging courtesies with other cities, particularly Chicago, Cincinnati and Boston, in each of which a similar club exists, and between which and the Commercial Club of St. Louis cordial relations are maintained. The St. Louis Commercial Club has paid visits to each of these cities upon the invitation of their clubs, and has, in turn, entertained successively the Commercial Club of each.
Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

Cross Country Club.—This club was organized in 1895, in St. Louis, as the "Cross Country Cyclers," with twenty charter members and the following officers: Ralph Warner, president; William Louderman, vice president; Rufus Lackland Taylor, treasurer; Arthur Smucker, secretary. The membership of the club was limited to fifty, and was composed principally of wealthy young men, from old aristocratic families of St. Louis. Well equipped club quarters were opened at Spring Avenue, near Vandeventer Place, and the members went to work enthusiastically to make the organization the crack cycle club of the West. The membership rapidly rose to the limit, with from fifteen to thirty applications always on file to take any vacancy that might occur. Cycling tours through the State and to distant points in Illinois, as far as Chicago, were planned from time to time, and executed with a proficiency that attracted wide attention, and secured for the cyclists, wherever they appeared in their attractive uniforms of white sweaters, striped alternately with orange and black, marked recognition. In 1898 the club was reorganized with the following officers: Clarence White, president; William Louderman, vice president; Herbert Morris, secretary; Rufus L. Taylor, treasurer. It was also determined to enlarge the membership from fifty to three hundred, change the name to "Cross Country Club," and secure more commodious quarters. A large clubhouse was accordingly leased at Sarah Street and Suburban Tracks, and especially fitted up for the accommodation of the club. Here the club remained until February, 1899, when a charter was taken out, new officers elected, with Mr. Arthur Smucker as president; Clarence White, vice president; Clarence Brenizer, secretary; Rufus L. Taylor, treasurer.
Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

Columbian Knights.—A fraternal insurance order established in Chicago, and incorporated under the laws of Illinois August 14, 1895. Its total membership was about six thousand in 1898. St. Louis Lodge No. 55, having about ninety members, was the only lodge of this order in existence in St. Louis at the beginning of the year 1898. This lodge was organized in July, 1897, by George A. Lemming, who later removed from Chicago to St. Louis and became the president of the lodge, succeeding John B. Meyers. Other officers were N. W. Perkins, Jr., vice president; F. Ryan, secretary, and Hugh Koch, chaplain.
Source:  Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901;  Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

Children's Home Society of Missouri.—The mission of this worthy society is to rescue homeless, helpless and suffering children and place them in kind families for adoption and to continue to watch over them until they reach maturity. There is an understanding with the parents that they are not to know where the child is placed, except from the society, through which all necessary information must pass. The first society was organized in Chicago in 1883. In 1898 it was represented in twenty-two States, including among its directors names of the most noted personages. William McKinley, President of the United States, is president of the board of directors of the society in Ohio. Each State sends delegates in June to an annual convention held in Chicago, where the work of each State is reviewed, papers read and discussed, etc. The Children's Home Society of Missouri was organized in St. Louis in November, 1891, with Dr. John D. Vincil as president. The organization was effected by Rev. Charles F. Williams, of Iowa, who was elected by the national board State superintendent for the State of Missouri. Mr. Williams came at once to Missouri and encountered many difficulties, as St. Louis, then having sixty or more organized charities, felt that a new organization would be an additional burden. He nevertheless succeeded and secured a charter. Early in 1892 the Rev. Gilbert T. Holcomb was elected district superintendent and financial agent for the city of St. Louis. In 1894 the North Side Day Nursery gave up its charter and turned over its money and furniture to the Children's Home Society of Missouri. The St. Louis Auxiliary, consisting of ladies, was organized to take charge of the nursery of the society, at present—1898—located at 3516 Olive Street. Up to 1898, 868 children had been received into the society's guardianship. Out of that number a few had died, some had been returned to their legal guardians, and something over 700 had been placed in good family homes.
Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

Chosen Friends, Order of.—A mutual benefit and fraternal order, organized at Indianapolis, Indiana, May 28, 1879, by Rev. Dr. Thomas G. Beharell, Thomas B. Linn, and others. It admits to membership persons of both sexes between the ages of eighteen and fifty-six years, and makes provision for the payment of benefits in cases of total disability, at death, and when members shall have reached the age of seventy-five years. The first council of the order in Missouri was instituted at St. Louis March 5, 1881, by Freeman Wright, and was named St. Louis Council No. 2. Wright was made first chief councillor, and J. H. Williamson first secretary. In 1900 there were thirty-three councils in existence in the city, with a membership of 1,865. The total number of councils in the State of Missouri at the same time was forty-nine, and the total membership 2,500. There was one council in Kansas City with 68 members; and there were councils also in the following places in Missouri: Jefferson City, St. Joseph, De Soto, Bismarck, Springfield, Bowling Green, Moberly, Pacific, St. Charles, Catawissa, Sedalia, Macon City, Hannibal, Montgomery City and Villa Ridge. The order had in the United States a membership of 26,000, and had paid out in benefits $11,500,000.
Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

City Hospital Medical Society.—
An association of physicians who have served in the city hospital of St. Louis, which was founded in 1884 by Dr. Brandford Lewis and others. It is now known as the Medical Society of City Hospital Alumni. The objects of the society are the scientific investigation and discussion of medical and allied subjects and the bringing together of those who have been connected with the city hospital in social intercourse. To the efforts of this society has been due mainly the introduction into the public school system of medical inspection of pupils for the purpose of preventing the spread of disease and inaugurating health reforms. The society holds regular meetings twice a month, except during July and August of each year.
Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

Columbian Club.—Among the many pretty clubhouses of St. Louis the Columbian is one of the most imposing. Situated on Lindell Boulevard, at the northwest corner of Vandeventer Avenue, its location is admirable. It is a massive, square, yellow brick structure, with white stone trimmings, the front facade being a worthy tribute to the architect's art. In fact, the Columbian Club is the finest Jewish institution of its kind in the West. The internal appointments are rich in elegant simplicity, there being nothing lacking for the comfort and convenience of the members, and on evenings of entertainment the ball room is one of the sights of the city. The first meeting for the organization of the club was held May 15, 1892, there being present at this meeting Messrs. Marcus Bernheimer, Nicholas Scharff, J. D. Goldman, Jonathan Rice, Jacob Meyer, Elias Michael, Louis Glaser, Benjamin j. Strauss, Moses Fraley, Adolph Baer, Joel Swope and William Kohn. At this meeting it was decided that, besides the twelve gentlemen present, the following should be admitted as charter members of the club: Messrs. Isaac Schwab, William Stix, Ben Eiseman, David Eiseman, Isaac Meyer, Jacob Furth, Meyer Baumaii, Louis M. Hellman, A. S. Aloe, Gustav Roseberg, Simon Strauss, Morris Glaser, J. J. Wertheimer, Philip Constam, Meyer Swope, M. Schwab, Sam Schroeder, George W. Milius, Aclolph Scharff, Lazarus Scharff, Adolph Samish, Simon Seasongood, Joseph Wolfort, A. J. Weil and Charles Stix. The first officers were, Jacob Meyer, president; Jonathan Rice, first vice president; Gus Roseberg, second vice president; L. M. Hellman, treasurer, and Benjamin J. Strauss, secretary. The meetings before the formal opening of the clubhouse, in September of 1894, were held at the vestry rooms of Temple Israel.
Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

Civic Federation of St. Louis.—
Movements designed to remove or diminish the evils of municipal mismanagement have been repeatedly inaugurated in St. Louis. But until the formation of the Civic Federation
these movements were mostly spasmodic and lacked permanency. The Civic Federation was the outgrowth of a general conviction that, if anything was to be accomplished in the direction of civic reform, there must be organization, and organization of a permanent character.
In 1895 this feeling took shape. The Civic Federation of St. Louis was incorporated under a charter which declared its objects to be:
First—The formation of a non-political non-sectarian association embracing all the forces that are now laboring to advance the municipal, philanthropic, industrial and moral interests of St. Louis, and to use and aid such forces in promoting the honesty, efficiency and economy of its municipal government and the highest welfare of its citizens by educational methods addressed to the citizens of St. Louis without regard to race, creed or political affiliation.
Second—By the publication and circulation of the principles of social and economic science to establish a medium of acquaintance and sympathy between persons who reside in different parts of the city, who pursue different avocations, who are by birth of different nationalities, who profess different creeds, or no creed, who for any of these reasons are unknown to each other, but who, nevertheless, have similar interests in the wellbeing of St. Louis, and who agree in their desire to promote every kind of municipal welfare.
Third—By the promotion, extension and publication of the principles of the science of municipal government to increase the number and efficiency of agencies designed to discover and correct abuses in municipal affairs, and to increase the interest of the citizens in such affairs by securing the utmost practicable separation of municipal issues from State and national politics.
The means to be employed by the Federation were declared to be investigation, publication and organization, together with the exercise of every moral influence needed to carry its purpose into effect.
The incorporators were N. O. Nelson, Jas. L. Hopkins, Robert Rutledge, Alfred Matthews, J. W. Allen, Thos. McPheeters, Jonathan Rice, Rev. John Matthews, Benjamin Eiseman, Joseph Franklin, Dave Eiseman, J. T. Donovan, J. L. Boogher, W. A. Walker,
Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack 2011~

 



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