North Carolina Genealogy Trails

North Carolina Genealogy Trails


Biographies
(Unknown Counties)

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    ALEXANDER, Evan
    Was born in North Carolina; graduated at Princeton College in 1787; was a member of the Legislature for two years; was a Representative in Congress from North Carolina from 1805 to 1809. Died October 28, 1809. (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

    ALLEN, William
    was born in North Carolina in 1806; received a good education; was connected by family ties with Allen G. Thurman; was an early emigrant to the State of Ohio; adopted the profession of the law; was a Representative in Congress from Ohio from 1833 to 1835, serving as a member of the Committee on Indian Affairs; was elected a Senator in Congress from 1837 to 1849, serving as a member of several important Committees. In 1874 became Governor of Ohio, serving as such until 1876. (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

    ASHE, John Baptiste
    was a Delegate to the Continental Congress in 1787 and 1788; was a Representative in Congress from North Carolina from 1790 to 1793; was one of those who voted for locating the Seat of Government on the Potomac; was elected Governor of the State of North Carolina in 1801. Died November 27, 1802 (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

    ARRINGTON, H. Archibald
    was born in North Carolina; represented that State in Congress from 1841 to 1845, after which he retired to private life; was a member of the Committee on Expenditures in the War Department. His son, Alfred W. Arrington attained distinction as a Methodist preacher, a lawyer, and judge, and a writer for the magazines under the assumed name of Charles Summerfield, residing in North Carolina, Arkansas, Indiana, Missouri and Illinois. (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

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    BLOODWORTH, Timothy
    Was born in North Carolina; was a Representative in Congress from North Carolina in 1790 and 1791; a Senator of the United States from 1795 to 1801;; was one of those who voted for locating the seat of Government on the Potomac. Died August 24, 1814. (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

    BLOUNT, William
    Was a Delegate to the Continental Congress in 1782, 1783, 1786 and 1787, from North Carolina; was Governor of the territory south of the Ohio, having been appointed to that office in 1790; in 1796 was chosen President of the Convention of Tennessee; was elected the same year, by that State toa seat in the United States Senate, but was expelled in 1797, for having, as it was alleged, instigated the Creek and cherokee Indians to assist the British in conquering the Spanish territories near the United States. While his impeachment trial was in progress in the United States Senate he was elected a member of the State Senate and made President thereof. Died at Knoxville, March 10, 1810, aged fifty-six years.  (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

    BLOUNT, Thomas
    Was born in North Carolina was a General of Militia; was a Representative from his native state in the Twelfth Congress. Died in Washington, February 9, 1812 (Source: Biography Annals of Citizens of the United States)

    BRAGG, John
    was born in North Carolina; was a Representative in Congress from Alabama from 1851 to 1853.  (Source: Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States, by Charles Lanman, 1887, pg 54)

     

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    CALKINS, Sidney Pratt
    Wholesale broker; born Oswego, Tioga Co., N.C., Jan. 14, 1852; Scotch descent; son of Sidney and Martha (Pratt) Calkins; father’s occupation timberman, owner of extensiv e saw mills and wholesale lumberman; paternal grandfather Judge Seth Calkins; maternal grandfather Abija Pratt; educated in public schools and Oswego (N.Y.) Academy; interested in wholesale grocery business for more than 25 years; married Henrietta Virginia Hilton Jan. 9, 1872; member of DeSoto Lodge No. 299 A.F. & A.M., Memphis Chapter No. 95 Memphis Com. No. 4 Knights Templar, U.C .T. and Business Men’s Club; Republican; member of Second Presbyterian ch urch, Memphis, Tenn. Source: Who’s Who in Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler

    CALLIS, John B.
    Was born in North Carolina, in 1828; emigrated to Tennessee in 1841; from that State went to Wisconsin; entered the volunteer forces during the Rebellion as a Lieutenant, and rose to the rank of Brigadier General; after the war, settled in Alabama; was commissioned a Colonel in the Regular Army; was elected a Representative from Alabama to the Fortieth Congress, serving on the Committee on Enrolled Bills. (Source: Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States, by Charles Lanman, 1887, pg 78)

    GEORGE W. CAMPBELL, 1807.
    Born in 1768, probably in North Carolina. Graduated at the College of New Jersey (Princeton), with fourth honors, 1794. A. M. Removed to Knoxville from North Carolina. Lawyer. Member of Congress, Hamilton District, 1803-1809. Appointed Charter Trustee of East Tennessee College, 1807. Judge of Supreme Court, 1809-1811. United States Senator from Tennessee, 1811-1814. Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, 1814. United States Senator from Tennessee, 1815-1818. United States Minister to Russia, 1818-1820. Commissioner on French Spoliation claims, 1831. Trustee of University of Nashville, 1830. Died at Nashville, February 17, 1848. (Goodspeed History. Caldwell-s Bench and Bar. Clayton's History of Davidson County.)
    [Explanatory Note. The date set opposite the name of each Trustee indicates the year of his first connection with the University as Trustee; either by election by the Board of Trustees pending confirmation by the Legislature, or by direct Legislative appointment without previous election by the Board. When the name of the State is not given the present State of Tennessee is to be understood. The terms Southwestern Territory or Territorial Government refer to the Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio.] [University of Tennessee record, Volume 1 By University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1898- Transcribed by AFOFG]

    LEMUEL Z CODOT
    Was born in Scioto county, Ohio, in 1838, and settled in this county in 1858. His parents are Lemuel and Catherine (Baccus) Codot; his father is deceased, and his mother resides in Scioto county, Ohio. Mr. Codot was married in Gallipolis, in 1863, to Josephine Carel, who was born in that city in 1839. She is a daughter of Franklin and Sallia (Whitney) Carel, residents of Gallipolis. Mr. Codot is clerk of the board of education and has been a member of the board since 1869. He is also deputy revenue collector for Gallia county. He was a soldier during the late war, a member of the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being captain of company A. After nine months' service as captain he was promoted to major, and he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, December 9, 1864. He served to the close of the war, through West and East Virginia, through the valley of the Shenandoah with Sheridan and Crook. He has two children: Charles C., born September 15, 1864, and Harry L., September 29, 1874. They both reside in Gallipolis. The business of Mr. Codot is a tobacco merchant. His postoffice address is Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]

    COLEMAN, Daniel
    was born in North Carolina in 1836 was appointed third Postmaster-General, holding the office until 1841. (Source: Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States, by Charles Lanman, 1887, pg 105)

     

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    DARGAN, Edward S.
    Was born in North Carolina; removed in early youth to Alabama, where he subsequently taught school and studied law; in 1844 was elected Mayor of Mobile; from 1845 to 1847 was a Representative in Congress from Alabama; during the latter year was elected a Judge of the Supreme Court of Alabama. (Source: Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States, by Charles Lanman, 1887, pg 126)

    DAVIE, William R
    Born in North Carolina in 1790, was appointed a Judge of the United States District Court for the District of North Carolina.  (Source: Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States, by Charles Lanman, 1887, pg 129)

    DEWEESE, John Thomas
    Representative from North Carolina; born in Van Buren, Crawford County, Ark., June 4, 1835; educated at home; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1856 and commenced practice in Henderson, Ky.; resident of Denver, Colo., for some years; moved to Pike County, Ind., in 1860; entered the Union Army July 6, 1861, as second lieutenant of Company E, Twenty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that command until February 15, 1862, when he resigned; mustered in as captain of Company F, Fourth Indiana Cavalry, August 8, 1862; successively promoted to rank of colonel; moved to North Carolina; upon the reorganization of the Army was appointed second lieutenant, Eighth United States Infantry, July 24, 1866; resigned August 14, 1867, having been elected to Congress; appointed register in bankruptcy for North Carolina in 1868; upon the readmission of North Carolina to representation was elected as a Republican to the Fortieth and Forty-first Congresses and served from July 6, 1868, to February 28, 1870, when he resigned, pending the investigation of certain appointments to the United States Military and Naval Academies; chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Forty-first Congress), Committee on Revolutionary Pensions (Forty-first Congress); censured by the House of Representatives on March 1, 1870, for selling an appointment to the Naval Academy; delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1876; resumed the practice of law; died in Washington, D.C., July 4, 1906; interment in Arlington National Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the United States 1774-present.)

     

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    ELLIOTT, JESSE  
    (Farmer) is a native of North Carolina, where he was born December 4, 1817. His parents—Jesse and R achel (Jordan) Elliott—of Scotch parentage, emigrated to Ohio about 1830, where they lived until the death of the father, when the mother went to live with her daughter in Iowa, remaining there until her death. Our subject was mostly reared in his native State, receiving a very limited education. In 1848 he emigrated to Grant County, living there until 1859, when he purchased and removed to the farm on which he now lives. August, 1844, he married Hannah B. Davis, by whom he is the father of these six living children: Henderson, who married Belle Bellew : Mary J., Sarah E., "Asbury, Charles M. and Julia A., the latter now Mrs. William Kile. Mr. Elliott has always followed agricultural pursuits, in which he has met with good success, owning a well improved farm of 103 acres. His son Asbury, who makes his home with his parents, is also the proprietor of 40 acres. The family are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. E. belongs to the Masonic fraternity. Politically, he is a Republican.  (History of Miami County, Indiana: From the earliest time to the present ... By Brant & Fuller, Chicago. Contributed by Barb Z.)

     

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    JONES, ALFRED I.  
    A native of North Carolina, born June 1, 1830. He is the eldest son of William M. and Elizabeth (Wood) Jones, natives of South Carolina. They left North Carolina in the early part of 1833 and located in Rush County, where they remained until 1852, and then came to Miami County. They now reside in Wabash County. The subject was reared on the farm, and secured a fair education. He is the owner of 113 acres of land. He was married in the spring of 1853 to Miss Mary Jameson, a native of Kentucky, whose father came to Miami County in an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are parents of seven children, five of whom are living. Their names are: Martha, William H., Frances, Emma and Mary, living, and Amanda and an infant, deceased.  (History of Miami County, Indiana: From the earliest time to the present ... By Brant & Fuller, Chicago. Contributed by Barb Z.)

     

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    LUDWELL, Philip
    Was the son of Thomas Ludwell, of Bruton, in Somersetshire, England, who was church warden of the parish in 1636, and steward of Sexey Hospital in Bruton. Thomas Ludwell died at Discoe, in the parish of Bruton, and was buried July 7, 1637. Philip Ludwell's mother was Jane Cottington, a relative of Sir William Berkeley, and only daughter of James Cottington, of Discoe, a brother of Philip, Lord Cottington. Philip Ludwell, who belonged to a royalist family, was born about 1638, and probably came to Virginia about 1660 to join his brother Thomas, who was then secretary of state. He was captain of the James City County militia in 1667, and on March 5, 1675, took the oath as a councillor of state. During the absence of his brother Thomas in London, at this time, he was acting secretary of state for two years (1675-1677). During Bacon's rebellion (1676) he was one of the most efficient supporters of Gov. Berkeley. He showed distinguished courage and discretion in capturing an expedition under Giles Bland sent to Northampton County to siege the governor. After Berkeley's death, in 1677, Ludwell married his widow and became the head of the "Green Spring Faction," as it was called, com prised of friends of the late governor. From being the supporters of government Ludwell and Beverley became the champions of the rights of the general assembly and the people. Gov. Jeffreys had Ludwell excluded from the council. Jeffreys died and Lord Thomas Culpeper came over to Virginia in 1681. He was a cousin of Ludwell's wife, Lady Berkeley, whose maiden name was Frances Culpeper, and at the request of the whole council he restored Ludwell to his seat in that body. When Lord Howard, of Effingham, came as governor to Virginia in 1686 he tried to increase the power of the executive and instituted a fee for the use of the state seal to land grants. He was opposed by Ludwell and the fee was ordered to be discontinued, but he again lost his place in council. The dismissal only served to increase Ludwell's popularity, and the assembly sent him to England as their agent to petition for relief. While he was in attendance at the privy council King William came to the throne and Ludwell was successful in obtaining a favorable decision on most of the questions involved. He was again restored to the council and on May 7, 1691, the house of burgesses voted him the public thanks and presented him with £250. Before this, on Dec. 5, 1689, the lords proprietors of Carolina appointed him governor of North Carolina, and in 1693 of both North and South Carolina. He held office till 1694, when, tired of the quarrels of that turbulent country, he resigned. He continued in the council in Virginia and in 1690-92 was agent for the Culpepers in the Northern Neck. In 1693 ne was one of the first board of visitors of William and Mary College. He heired from his brother Thomas, "Rich Neck," near Williams burg, but his chief residence was at "Green Spring," which he obtain ed by his marriage with Lady Berkeley. About 1700, leaving his estates in the hands of his son Philip, he went to England, where he was living as late as 1711. Col. Philip Ludwell married, in or before 1667 (first) Lucy, widow of Col. William Bernard, and before that of Maj. Lewis Burwell, and daughter of Capt. Robert Higginson; (second) Lady Frances (Culpeper) Berkeley. His son Philip (by his first marriage) and his grandson Philip were both members of the council. [Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Under the Editorial Supervision of Lyon Gardiner Tyler, 1915 – Transcribed by AFOGT]

     

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    McDOWELL, W. H.
    W. H. McDowell, OF NORTH CAROLINA; PRIVATE, CO. "B," CORPS OF CADETS.
    W. H. McDowell was born in December, 1845. In August, 1863, became a cadet at the Virginia Military Institute, and was killed in the charge of the corps of cadets at the battle of New Market, May 15, 1864. Only a few months at the Institute, Cadet McDowell had made a good standing, being twenty-fourth on general merit in a class numbering one hundred and eighty. As the corps charged through the fetal orchard, on Rude's Hill, he was shot dead, falling out of the line across a wounded comrade. A mere boy in age and in appearance, he offered up his life for his native land.  [Source: Biographical sketches of the Graduates and Eleves of the Virginia Military Institute who fell during the war between the States, by Chas. D. Walker. Published 1875. Transcribed by Linda Rodriguez]

    McMILLAN, Alexander
    A Representative from North Carolina; birth date unknown; member of the state senate, 1810-1812; elected as a Federalist to the Fifteenth Congress but died before the Congress assembled. (Source: Biographical Directory of the United States 1774-present.)

     

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    OWEN, Robert Alexander
    Minister of the gospel; born Franklin, N.C., Aug. 25, 1852; son of Thomas W. and Jane (Reid) Owen; father was farmer and trader and soldier in Confederate army; received his education in the common schools of North Carolina; was farmer and school teacher in early life; entered the ministry of the M.E. Church, South, in 1877 and served charges in North Carolina nine years, Princeton, W. Va. 1900-1904, three years in Wythe Co., Va., three years in Giles Co., Va., fifteen years in Tenn., member of Holston conference; married Lizzie J. Sherrill Nov. 17, 1881; member A.F. & A.M. and I.O.O.F.; Democrat. Source: Who’s Who in
    Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler

     

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    PRINCE, Thomas McCarroll
    Planter, was born in 1807, in North Carolina, and died October 16, 1871, in Choctaw County. He was graduated from the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, 1827; moved to Alabama; and resided for some time at Mobile, where he was a merchant in the commission house of Prince & Garrett. He was elected to the State egislat ure from Mobile County in 1840 and was again elected in 1845. Sometime later, he moved to a plantation in Choctaw County, and in 1855 was elected to the State senate from Sumter, Choctaw and Washington Counties, defeating Hon. William Woodward. At an early day he spent a year or two in Liverpool, England, as a member of a large commercial house there, for the transaction of American business, pursuant to the recommendations of a convention of Southern planters held in Macon, Ga., in 1839, so as to obtain advances on the cotton crop, through the agency of post notes, and to secure good prices for the cotton by holding the stock until it was demanded for immediate consumption by spinners. Among the agencies in Europe for the sale of American cotton, and for the carrying out of the plan agreed upon, was the house of Fontaine, Prince & Company. Mr. Prince was a Whig. Married: in Choctaw County, to Lucy Anthony Trotter. His son, Thomas McCarroll Prince, Jr., born July 28, 1842, was lieutenant colonel of the Twenty-second regiment, Alabama volunteer infantry, C. S. Army. After the War of Secession, he became a planter at Louisville, Ky.; married Gertrude Ingersoll, at Mobile, 1867; and died in 1869. Last residence: Choctaw County.  [History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Mrs. Marie (Bankhead) Owen, 1921 – Transcribed by AFOFG]

     

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    SIMPSON, Fabius Evans
    Tallest Light House Keeper
    He is Built Like a Carolina Pine – Picture Taken in sections.
    Like the towering pines that fringe the North Carolina coast, upon which he was born, in sight of dreaded Harteras, Fabius Evans Simpson, the assistant keeper of Lazzaretto lighthouse, at the entrance to Baltimore harbor can lay claim to be the tallest light house keeper in the fifth lighthouse district.  If not level with the tallest in the service from Maine to the Rio Grande says the Baltimore Sun. He is only 23 years old and is built on the concertina plan.  When he rises from a sitting posture one wonders how much more remains to be unfolded before he is straightened out.  He is 6 feet 6 inches in his stocking feet. His parents were reared alongside the sea and he comes of a family that has figured in the annals of the lighthouse service.  Alpheus W. Simpson, father of the young man was keeper on North River l ight station and his uncle, Fabius Evans Simpson, was in charge of the exhibit of the lighthouse board at the Jamestown exposition.  Another uncle, A . J. Simpson, is keeper of Southwest point light, all in North Carolina.  Young Simpson says he will stick to the business, believing he has inherited an ambition for the service in which his family has figured for many years.  He could not furnish a full-length picture of himself.  He said he tried to get a photographer in North Carolina to take all of him, but the artist said he could only do it in sections and then paste them together, which he thought would give an idea of his client’s towering figure.  To do so the photographer wanted to charge extra for the second section and the picture was not taken. (Source:Mountain Democrat, The (Placerville, California) January 25 1908 Submitted by Nancy Piper)

     

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    WILLIAMS, Robert
    (brother of John Williams, of Tennessee, and Lewis Williams and Marmaduke Williams), a Representative from North Carolina; possibly born in 1768 or 1773; two prominent men named Robert Williams from the same family are involved in politics at this time; elected as a Republican to the Fifth and to the two succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1797-March 3, 1803); died on either May 27, 1821 or January 25, 1836.(Source: Biographical Directory of the United States 1774-present.)

 

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