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Cass County, North Dakota Biographies

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THOMAS J. SAMPSON, proprietor of one of the finest farms of Cass county, is an early settler of Dows township, and is well and favorable known. He has made a success of his vocation and is well versed in the most approved methods of operating a farm, and the improvements on his estate bespeak thrift and painstaking care.
Our subject was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1859, and was a son of James and Harriet (Sullivan) Sampson, who ere natives respectively of England and New York. His father was a farmer by occupation and was born in 1818, and came to the United States when ten years of age and resided many years in Pennsylvania. He is now a resident of California. Mr. Sampson has one brother and two sisters, but is the only one of the family in North Dakota.
Our subject was reared in Pennsylvania and received his education there and began his business career on a farm. He went to North Dakota in 1882 and went direct to Erie, Cass county, and the same year entered claim to land in Dows township, where he has since resided. He has a farm of three quarter-sections and he has placed all under cultivation and his improvements are the best.
Our subject was married, in 1889, to Hattie Bostwick, a Native of Michigan. Mrs. Sampson's parents, John and Mary Bostwick, were natives of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Sampson are the parents of two children, named Robert H. and Florence M. Mr. Sampson assisted in the organization of Dows township and served as a member of the township board and is now chairman of the school board, and is also serving as assessor. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has gained many friends by his push and energy and enjoys well merited success.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]
GEORGE H. SANBORN.  This gentleman has for over a quarter of a century been engaged in farming in Barnes township, Cass county, and has gained an enviable reputation as a citizen and incidentally laid aside a competence to tide him through his declining years. He has an estate covering eighty acres of land and makes his home in section 24.
Our subject was born in Rochester, New York, September 18, 1831, and was the third in a family of ten children born to William and Permelia (Black) Sanborn, both of whom were natives of New York. When our subject was a child his parents removed to Erie, Pennsylvania, and settled on a farm, where he was reared to the age of seventeen years and then went with his father's family to Meadville, Pennsylvania, to which city they removed on account of the educational advantages. Our subject attended the Allegheny College in that city for two years, and then went to Erie, Pennsylvania, and was employed as clerk in a general merchandise establishment one year and later clerked in his father's store at Wattsburg two years and then went to what is now Winona, then Wabasha, and was engaged in the mercantile and real estate business.
He continued his residence there from the spring of 1853 to the fall of 18O0, when he removed to Texas, but after a few months removed to Ontario, Canada, and was engaged in the oil business about fifty miles from London. After two years he located in Chatham, Ontario, and engaged in the lumber business from the spring of 1863 to August 1871, when he located in Dakota, about twenty miles north of Fargo. The following June he settled on his present farm in section twenty-four, of Barnes township, Cass county, and has engaged in farming continuously since, and for two years also conducted a livery business in Fargo. He is now the owner of eighty acres of land, one mile from the city limits, and has added such improvements as are found on the model farm.
Our subject was married, in Chatham, Ontario, February 19, 1868, to Miss Sarah A. McKellar, who was born in Kent county, Ontario, March 13, 1845. Mrs. Sanborn was the fifth in a family of ten children born to Archibald and Lucy (McNabb) McKellar, both of whom were natives of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Sanborn are the parents of one daughter, named Permelia Anna, now Mrs. E. D. Naylor. The family are attendants of the First Presbyterian church of Fargo, of which denomination Mrs. Sanborn is an active member. Mr. Sanborn is a wide awake and well-to-do farmer and attends strictly to his work and is highly esteemed throughout his locality.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Renae Capitanio]

B. N. SANDBECK, Grandin, of the tenth legislative district was born at Hadeland, Norway, 1859, and came with his parents to Winneshiek county, Ia., at the age of two years. Received his education at Decorah, la., and Carleton college, Minn. Came to Cass county, North Dakota, in 1880. Taught public schools in and around Kindred for several years. He is now engaged in farming. He is married and has ten children. He was elected representative as a republican.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]

HON. ELBRIDGE C. SARGENT. The wealth of Cass county is formed in great part by the incomes from the well-developed farms of that locality. Among those who have brought many acres of raw land to a high state of cultivation and have prospered as a result, the gentleman whose name heads this review is entitled to special mention. He and his brother, Frank J. Sargent, are owners of extensive tracts in that region, and aside from grain raising are interested largely in cattle and horses. They make their home near Amenia, in Amenia township, and are highly respected for their business ability and good citizenship.
Elbridge C. Sargent was born in Merrimac county, New Hampshire, July 1, 1852, and was a son of George W. and Emily G. (Bunker) Sargent. His parents were natives of New Hampshire and his father was a farmer and passed his life in that state, where he died in 1897. The mother passed away in February of the same year. The grandfather of our subject, John Sargent, was also a native of New Hampshire, and spent his career there engaged in farming and died at the advanced age of ninety-three years. Three sons constituted the family of children of which our subject was a member, and all are now residents of North Dakota: Elbridge C., Frank E. and Willis J.
Our subject and brother, Frank E., were reared and educated in New Hampshire and followed farming and carpenter work. They went to Cass county, North Dakota, in March, 1879, and purchased the land in section 15 of Amenia township on which our subject now resides. They at once began the improvement of the place, and they now own and operate fourteen hundred and sixty acres of land, and raise an average of twenty thousand bushels of grain annually. They are also partners in the Owego Cattle Company's ranch, recently established in Ransom county. They purchased twenty-one hundred and sixty acres of land, and will handle the coming season six to seven hundred head of cattle. They have devoted their attention wholly to agricultural pursuits, and have secured their prosperity and success by good management and persistent efforts.
Elbridge C. Sargent was married, in 1880, to Addie F. Robbins, a native of New Hampshire. Mrs. Sargent died in 1896, leaving three daughters, as follows: Lura E., Alice B. and A. Mildred. Lura is attending school in the Fargo College; Alice is attending school in Massachusetts, and Mildred A. in New Hampshire.
Mr. Sargent assisted in the organization of his township and school district, and was among its first officers. He was elected to the legislature and served in 1895-97, and again in 1899, and is now representing his district. His services are efficient and toward the better interests of the community, and he is held in the highest esteem throughout that region. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in both local lodges. He has affiliated with the Republican party since attaining his majority, and is stanch in defense of party principles.
Frank E. Sargent was born in New Hampshire, July 15, 1855. He has been associated with his brother, Elbridge C., since taking up his residence in North Dakota, and is widely known as a man of ability. He has served nine years as a member of the township board, and in political sentiment is a Republican, and is the manager of the Owego Cattle Company's ranch in Ransom county.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

EDWARD SAUTEBIN. For over twenty years the farming interests of Cass county have been ably represented by Mr. Sautebin, who makes his home in Addison township, near Davenport. He has surrounded himself with all that goes to make country life pleasant and his estate is one of the finest in his locality, made so by his earnest efforts. He entered Dakota as a pioneer and he has since resided on the land he now owns and which he has developed into a highly cultivated tract.
Our subject was born near Berne, Switzerland, May 24, 1854, and was a son of Jacob F. and Julia (Gerod) Sautebin, both of whom were natives of Switzerland. The mother died when our subject was but three years of age and the father, who was a blacksmith by trade, emigrated with his family to America in 1865, landing November 2. They located in Wood county, Ohio, and from there went to Duluth and then to Ottertail county, Minnesota, where the father died in 1876.
Our subject came to America with his father and remained with him until 1871, when he went to Fargo and worked there and at Morehead two years and then remained in Minnesota until 1879, when he returned to Fargo. During 1871-1872 he freighted from Morehead to Bismarck for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, driving across the plains, taking twenty days for the round trip. He settled on the farm where he now lives in 1879 and from that stretch of wild land has acquired a comfortable competence and a fine farm. He began to improve the land at once and when he had his first house almost completed it was destroyed by a tornado. Mr. Brown was killed in the house and Mr. Sautebin was carried about forty rods in the building, but escaped injury. He now has five hundred and sixty acres of land, all of which is under the plow and equipped with good buildings and plenty of machinery and conveniences to facilitate the work of the place.
Our subject was married, in 1877, to Adella Blanchard, a native of Switzerland, who came to America with her parents in the '50s. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sautebin, named as follows: Mary, now Mrs. Zimmerman;. William, John, Walter, Alice, Ida and Luella. The family are members of the Evangelical Church and are held in the highest esteem throughout their community. Mr. Sautebin is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Brotherhood of American Yeomen. He is active in local affairs and is serving as a member of the school board. Politically, he is a Republican.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

JOSEPH SAYER. This gentleman enjoys the distinction of being one of the first settlers of Cass county and has witnessed the growth of the enterprises of that region step by step until he is one of the citizens of a great and well-developed section of the country. He has prospered in the pursuit of farming and is now passing his declining years amid comforts and pleasant surroundings and is one of the honored citizens of Hunter township.
Our subject was born in Norfolk, England, in September, 1826, and was a son of Robert and Sophia (Whiting) Sayer, who were natives of the same county and lived and died in England. His father was a cattle dealer. Our subject had four brothers and four sisters and he has three brothers now in the United States.
Mr. Sayer was reared and educated in England and assisted his father until 1848, when he emigrated to America and settled in Columbia county, Wisconsin, where he followed farming until 1879,  and then went to Cass county, North Dakota, and homesteaded the farm on which he now resides. He has one of the finest pieces of property in the county and he and his son together own a section and a quarter of land, all of which is well improved. Mr. Sayer is also a director of the Hunter State Bank and is well-to-do.
Our subject was married, in Wisconsin, to Nancy A. Streeter, a native of Pennsylvania. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sayer, as follows: Franck C., Robert A. and Sophia E. The daughter is now Mrs. M. V. Erb. Mr. Sayer has served as town assessor for some years and is popular with people among whom he resides. Politically, he is a Democrat.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

LOUIS SCHNEIDER, one of the pioneers of Addison township, Cass county, has successfully pursued agriculture in that locality and now owns and operates over eight hundred acres of choice land. He has built recently a fine house on his farm and has other improvements in keeping with the residence and every appointment of the place evidences thrift and good taste. Mr. Schneider is also interested in the hardware business in Davenport and is a man of good management and business ability and enjoys prosperity and the highest regard of his associates.
Our subject was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, December 6, 1847. His parents, Christ and Mary (Horn) Schneider, were natives of Germany and came to America about 1842 and settled in Dodge county and were among the first settlers of that county. The father engaged in farming and died in Wisconsin in 1864. The mother died when our subject was but two years of age. Our subject had one brother and one sister and the brother is now deceased.
Mr. Schneider was reared and educated in Wisconsin and followed farming and also conducted a store there until 1880, when he went to Cass county, North Dakota, and purchased a homestead, on which he now resides. He has improved the land and is now the owner of eight hundred and forty acres, and on his home farm has erected a set of fine farm buildings. He has been successful as a farmer and merchant and is among the well-to-do men of the state.
Our subject was married, in Wisconsin, in 1868, to Miss Joanna Wolf, a native of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider are the parents of eight children, as follows: William, Lizzie, Lillie, Ida, Benjamin, Arthur, Irvin and Claude. The family are members of the Evangelical Association and are highly respected in the community in which they make their home. Mr. Schneider holds membership in the Knights of Pythias and Brotherhood of American Yeomen. He has served in various local offices and takes an active interest in the affairs of his township and county. Politically, he is a Republican.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

MARTIN SCHOW. For thirty years this gentleman has followed farming in Noble township, Cass county, and has accumulated a fine estate and gained a host of friends, who hold him in the highest esteem. He makes his home on section 24, and is passing his declining years surrounded by the comforts of a happy country home.
Our subject was born in Norway, November 4, 1835, and was reared on a farm and also lived in Christiania, where he served in the army five years. He then engaged in the mercantile business near Christiania seven years and in May, 1866, embarked in a sailing vessel for America with his wife and three children. Fourteen weeks and three days were consumed before their arrival at Quebec, and immediately upon the arrival there they started for Minnesota, it being four weeks before they reached Winona, that state. Mr. Schow assisted in building a flour-mill and was thus engaged and also as a miller for four years. He then went to the Red river valley, moving with an ox team and settled where he lives at present and has held continuous residence since June, 1870. He has made good and valuable improvements and his farm ranks among the first of the locality. He owns about five hundred acres of land and has followed general farming with eminent success.
Our subject was married to Christiania, Norway, September 24, 1861, to Miss Dorthea Bjerke, who was born in Norway, September 17, 1839. Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schow, eight of whom are still living, and bear the following names: Clara C., now the wife of O.E. Flaten, of Moorhead, Minnesota; Alma, now Mrs. Even H. Holt, of Noble township, Cass county; Robert, a sketch of whose life appears elsewhere in this work; Lars, who has been constable of Noble township for seven years; Jennie; Carl; Othelia and Maria. One daughter, Amelia, died in Noble township, Cass county, at the age of fourteen years. Mr. Schow is a man of broad mind and is strong in his convictions. He takes an active part in important local affairs and has held all the higher offices in his township and has also taken an active interest in county affairs. Cass was formerly a part of Pembina county and prior to the division of the county Mr. Schow was chosen sheriff of Pembina county. He and his family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler   

ROBERT SCHOW. This gentleman is the proprietor of one of the finest farms of Noble township, and aside from the engaging in the pursuit of agriculture he follows blacksmithing and carriage-making, and has one of the best-appointed shops in that region. He is industrious and possessed of integrity and a capacity for well-directed labor and as a result of these characteristics is prosperous, and enjoys an enviable reputation. His home in section 26, Noble township, where he has resided since his boyhood days.
Our subject was born in Christiania, Norway, March 8, 1865, and was a son of Martin and Dorthea (Bjerke) Schow, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. His parents came to America when he was about a year and a half old and settled in Fillmore county, Minnesota, from whence they removed to the Red river valley and settled in what is now Noble township, Cass county, North Dakota.
Robert Schow assisted on his father’s farm and received a common-school education and grew to manhood in Noble township. He remained at home until 1889, when he began farming for himself and is now the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of choice land. He learned the blacksmith’s trade in Baker county, Minnesota, which he follows in addition to his farm work and also engages in carriage making and general blacksmith work. He has met with success, both in his farming and at his trade, and his farm is fully improved with excellent buildings and a completely equipped shop.
Our subject was married, November 4, 1889, to Miss Minnie Noben, a daughter of Ole and Christina Noben. Mrs. Schow’s parents came to America from Norway and lived in Dane county, Wisconsin, and afterward in Winneshiek county, Iowa, and later removed to Baker county, Minnesota, where the father died June 18, 1899. Ten children were born to this worthy couple, Mrs. Schow being the fourth in order of birth. She was born in Decorah, Iowa, April 10, 1866, where she spent the first twelve years of her life and then resided in Baker county, Minnesota, until her marriage to Mr. Schow. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schow, named as follows: Arnliot Leonard, Martin C.O., Lilly C.D. and Beatrice O. Mr. Schow and his wife are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church, and are held in high esteem by the people among whom they reside. Our subject is a man of active public spirit and has served as township assessor several years.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HENRY SCHROEDER, who enjoys the distinction of being the first settler of Erie township, Cass county, is of foreign birth and brought to this country the habits of thrift and economy characteristic of the children of the German fatherland. He has a fine farm and is among the prosperous men of his community, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a farmer and a citizen.
Our subject was born in Germany, April 24, 1852. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Plack) Schroeder, were natives of Germany, and the father was a farmer by occupation. The family emigrated to America in 1867, and located in Minnesota, and lived in Winona county many years. The father died there in 1873, and the mother in 1883. They were the parents of one son and two daughters, and the daughters are now residing in Winona county.
Our subject was reared and educated in his native land and came to America with his father and located with him in Minnesota, and followed farming there until 1880, when he went to Cass county, North Dakota, having taken a tree claim in Erie township the year previous. He moved his family to the new home in the spring of 1880, and has resided there since. He now owns a half-section of choice land and has placed good improvements thereon and completed arrangements for the best and most economical operation of the farm.
Our subject was married in Minnesota in 1875 to Miss Minnie Kruger, a native of Germany, who emigrated to the United States in 1872. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder, as follows: Annie, now Mrs. J. Beath; Emma, Hulda, Minnie, Henry, William, Clara and George. Mr. Schroeder is well versed in current events and is interested in the welfare of his township and county, but does not take an active part in local affairs and devotes his attention to the operation of his estate and enjoys well merited success.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

HORACE G. SCOTT, one of the leading attorneys of Casselton, is a member of the firm Pollack & Scott of that city, and enjoys an ever-increasing and lucrative practice.  He is a gentleman of intelligence and true worth, and his standing as a citizen is beyond question.
Our subject was born at Hudson, St. Croix county, Wisconsin, April 26, 1856, and was a son of William W. and Agnes (Cavin) Scott, natives respectively of Maine and Ireland.  His father was a lumberman, and moved to Wisconsin about 1853, where he still resides.
Horace G. Scott was reared and educated in Wisconsin in the public schools and Hinckley Military Academy, and later took a course in the State University.  He then began reading law at Hudson, and in 1882 went to Traill county, North Dakota, and entered a claim to land and in 1885 resumed the study of law with R. M. Pollock.  He was admitted to the bar in 1887 and later spent two years in California, and in 1890 formed a partnership with R. M. Pollock, under the firm name Pollock & Scott.  He has met with success in the practice of his profession, and enjoys a good practice.
Our subject was married, in 1894, to Miss Helen J. Shaw, a native of Michigan.  Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Scott, as follows:  Wallace W. and Agnes C.  Mr. Scott is a member of the Cass County Bar Association.  He has been the city attorney for Casselton for the past four years.  He is a Republican in political faith, but does not seek public office.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]

THEODORE SELL. Among the prosperous and intelligent farmers of Amenia township, Cass county, this gentleman is entitled to a foremost rank. He is a pioneer of that locality and has labored for its up building and has been a potent factor in producing the present solid prosperity enjoyed. His entire career has been marked with industry and integrity of word and deed and he is highly respected in the community in which he makes his home.
Our subject was born in Prussia, Germany, March 18, 1843, and was one of a family of six children, four sons and two daughters, born to Gottleib and Catherine Sell, both of whom were natives of Germany, and passed their lives there. His father was a cabinetmaker and joiner by trade. Our subject is the only member of the family who resides in America.
Theodore Sell was reared and educated in his native land and there learned the cabinetmaker and joiner's trade and followed the same in Germany until 1868, in which year he emigrated to America. He located in New York, but later removed to Hancock county, Illinois, where he spent four years and then removed to Pepin county, Wisconsin, where he followed farming for some time, then moved to Lake City, Minnesota, and there engaged in the cabinetmaker's trade four years. He went to North Dakota in 1878, and entered a tree claim to the southeast quarter of section 8, in Amenia township, Cass county, and pre-empted the southwest quarter. He erected a sod house and began the improvement of the place and has resided thereon continuously since. He has prospered as a farmer and has a choice property.
Our subject was married, in 1869, to Sarah Workin, a native of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Sell died in 1875, leaving two children, one son and one daughter; Fred G., who is a member of Company B, First North Dakota Volunteer Infantry. He served about eighteen months in the Philippines and was in all the engagements of his regiment and never lost an hour of service from sickness. The daughter, Annie, is now Mrs. Christ Schuer. Mr. Sell was married to Minnie Schuer, a native of Germany, in Minnesota, in 1878, and Mrs. Sell died in 1891, leaving two children, Max and Etta. Mr. Sell afterward married Bettie Hasse, a native of Germany. Three children have been born to this union, as follows: William, Emma and Martha. Our subject and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church and are highly esteemed throughout that community. Mr. Sell has served as a member of the school and town boards, school treasurer and justice of the peace. He assisted in the organization of the township in which he resides and takes an active interest in local affairs. Politically, he is a Republican and is firm in his convictions.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

HON. ELLING SEVERSON, one of the most prominent men of Norman township, Cass county, wherein he conducts an extensive estate, is a wide-awake and wealthy citizen and a pioneer settler of that county. He has gained his fortune by honest and earnest efforts, and from a limited start m North Dakota has accumulated a sound financial standing and gained an enviable reputation.
Our subject was born in Dane county, Wisconsin, October 29, 1853, and was a son of Andrew and Martha (Flatland) Severson, both of whom were natives of Norway. His father was a farmer by occupation and emigrated to America in 1847 and the mother in 1844. They were married in Dane county, Wisconsin, and lived there for many years, and then removed to Goodyear county, Minnesota, where the father died in 1895, and the mother still makes her home there. They were the parents of six sons and four daughters, of whom our subject and one brother reside in North Dakota.
Mr. Severson was reared and educated in Wisconsin and Minnesota and followed farming there until 1880, when he went to Cass county, North Dakota and purchased the farm on which he now resides. It was wild land at the time and he has brought it to a high state of cultivation and has one of the best improved farms of the county. His holdings amount to seven hundred and twenty acres and he has met with remarkable success in general farming and is surrounded by all the comforts of rural life.
Our subject was married in North Dakota in February, 1881, to Miss Jennie Lee, a native of Norway. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Severson, as follows: Emma, Nellie, Mortena, Cora, Martenus and Geneva, all of whom are living. Mr. Severson is well known as an old settler of Norman township and a public-spirited citizen, and he has served in local offices many years. He was elected to the lower house in 1893 and served one term and was an efficient and popular member of that body. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran Church and is held in high esteem by his associates. Politically he is a Republican and is strong in his convictions.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

MARTIN L. SHANKS, M.D. The medical profession is ably represented by Dr. Shanks, of Casselton, Cass county, North Dakota. He is one of the pioneer physicians and surgeons of North Dakota and his life and labors there have been crowned with success. He is known throughout the Northwest as a skilled practitioner and one who progresses as time moves all things forward and he enjoys an ever increasing patronage and the confidence of the people among whom he labors.
Our subject was born in Port Washington, Tuscarawas county, Ohio, November 1, 1848, and was a family of eleven children, five sons and six daughters, born to David and Catherine (Barrick) Shanks, natives, respectively, of Ohio and Pennsylvania. His father was a farmer by occupation and passed his career in Ohio, most of the time in Huron county. He died in 1885 and the mother in 1888. The grandfather of our subject, James Shanks, was a native of Scotland and came to the United States about 1792, and died in Ohio. He was a tanner by trade and conducted a tannery at Mansfield, Ohio.
Our subject was reared and educated in his native state, graduating from there in 1870. He enlisted, in July, 1863, in Company M, First Ohio Heavy Artillery, and served until August 3, 1865, and participated in the following engagements: Strawberry Plains, Tennessee; raid up the Tennessee river; London, Tennessee, with Hood; and following that with Morgan cavalry  near there; Salsbury, North Carolina; French Broad river, and finally at Nashville, where he was held as reserve. After his return from the war he completed his studies, and then, in 1870, began teaching school and also read medicine and clerked in a drug store at Clyde, Ohio. He attended lectures at Columbus, Ohio, Medical College, in 1875-1876 and graduated from that institution in 1882. He had practiced some since 1877 at New Castle, Pennsylvania, and in 1886 entered Rush Medical College and attended one course of lectures and in 1891 attended a course at the College of Physicians & Surgeons of New York. He made an extended tour through Europe in 1892, in the interests of his profession and visited the leading hospitals of England, Germany, France, Italy and Switzerland. He went to Yankton, North Dakota, in 1878, and after a short stay located at Casselton, in January, 1878, where he has since resided and has continued in the practice of medicine and surgery. When he located there he was the only physician between Fargo and Bismarck and he experienced many hardships during the early days of that region. He has followed the modern methods of his profession by attending lectures every two years in various parts of the country, is progressive in his work and conscientious as a practitioner. He is devoted entirely to his work and in 1899 established a hospital containing fourteen beds at Casselton. He is the owner of one of the finest business blocks in the city of Casselton and enjoys prosperity.
Our subject was married, in November, 1879, to Miss Laura A. Lean, a native of England. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Shanks, as follows: Markwell, Clytie and Vallow. Mr. Shanks is prominent in secret society circles and holds membership in the Masonic fraternity, Knights Templar and Mystic Shrine; Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Fraternal Union and Ancient Order of Foresters. He has been county physician for the past two years for the district in which he resides and is one of the best known men of the state. He is a member of the Cass County Medical Society and the State Medical Society. Politically, he is a Republican, but does not take an active part in political affairs.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]

GEORGE H. SHAVER, residing on section 17 of Mapleton township, in Cass county, is one of the early settlers of that vicinity, and has been identified with the agricultural interests of North Dakota many years.  His land during the early days bore no semblance to the highly-cultivated fields of the present day, and he is now the proprietor of as fine a farm as can be found in his township.  His buildings on his home farm include those which will add to the comfort and convenience of those carrying on the work, and he is well versed in the best and most approved methods of operating a farm.
Our subject was born in Matilda, Dundas county, Ontario, April 6, 1850, and was reared in that county till he was fifteen years of age, when he went to Rochester, New York, and remained one year, and then spent a few months in Detroit, Michigan, and in the spring of 1869 went to Duluth, Minnesota, where he followed railroading till 1878, in different capacities.  He assisted in grading the road between Duluth and Mandan, and in 1878 bought section 11, in Durbin township, Cass county, where he lived about three years, and then purchased sections 17 and 20, in Mapleton township in 1886.  He located thereon and has since resided in section 17.  He has followed farming since 1878 and is now the owner of one thousand six hundred acres of fine land in Mapleton township.  On his home farm he has built a complete set of buildings, and enjoys the comforts of rural life.
Mr. Shaver was married, in Brainard, Minnesota, September 6, 1878, to Miss Meriem D. Congdon, a native of Elmira, New York.  Mr. Shaver is a member of the Congregational church, and the Ancient Order of United workmen.  He has served as county commissioner one term, and is interested in the affairs of local importance, and is an earnest supporter of every enterprise looking to the good of his community.  He is energetic and wide-awake, and is deservedly held in high esteem and respect by his associates.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Maggie Saggio]

DR. WILLIAM C. SHURLOCK (deceased) was born in Enon Valley, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, on January 6, 1835.  Died at Fargo, North Dakota, January 17, 1892.  Attended Darlington Academy for a number of years, also Beaver Academy, Beaver county, Pennsylvania; taught school in Darlington township for a two or three years; studied medicine with Dr. W. S. Cochrane, of Darlington, Pennsylvania, and attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia; graduated from there in the year 1858.  The same year commenced the practice of medicine in Darlington, Pennsylvania; continued there for sixteen years.  Then moved to Beaver Falls, remained there for six years.  Came to Fargo, North Dakota, in October, 1880.
He was enrolled and mustered into the service of the United States army for three years during the war, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on the 31st day of August, 1861, as a captain of Company D, “Roundheads,” or One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Daniel Leasure.  On the 28th of December, 1863, he was commissioned surgeon with the rank of major of Pennsylvania Volunteers; served as surgeon of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers until the close of the war, was honorably discharged on the 6th day of June, 1865, at Alexandria, Virginia.  Was a member of the house of representatives of Pennsylvania in 1870, 1871, 1872 and 1873; was chief clerk of the house in 1874, 1877, 1878 and 1879.
He was a graduate of the class of 1858 of the Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia.  He then returned to Darlington, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, and entered upon the practice of his profession.  There he stayed until the echo of the first gun fired at Fort Sumter reverberated through Beaver county.  He then thought it his duty to offer his services to his country.  He raised a company of one hundred and ten men for the three-months service, but they were not accepted as the state’s quota was filled.  He kept his company together and when the time arrived he entered the service as captain of Company D, of the “Roundheads,” or the One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers.  He was in the taking of Port Royal and Beaufort, South Carolina, after which he was stricken down with disease with no prospect of recovering his health in that climate.  On the recommendations of the surgeons of his regiment he was induced to resign the 16th day of December, 1861.  He went home and the change restored him to health and he again entered the service as assistant surgeon in the One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers; his commission dated July 15, 1862.  He served with his regiment until December 28, 1863, when he was promoted to surgeon and ordered to report for duty to the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers on the 9th day of March, 1864, and remained on duty as surgeon at the division hospital in the field, where he remained on duty until April 24, 1865, when he returned to his regiment and remained with it till June 6, 1865, when he was mustered out of service under orders of the war department for the reduction of the army dated May 17, 1865.
Battles in which he participated were Port Royal, second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson, Blue Springs, Campbell’s Station, siege of Knoxville, Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, North Anna, front of Petersburg, June 17th and 18th, Burnside’s Mine, Weldin Railroad, Ream’s Station, Poplar Grove, Church, Hatchie’s Run, Fort Steadman, capture of Petersburg and fall of Richmond.
Brother Shurlock was a charter member of Fargo, now Auvergue, Commandery, and was a member thereof at the time of his death.  He was also a member of El Zagal Temple, A. A. O.  Brother Shurlock was a man large physically, embonpoint, and equally large mentally.  He possessed a wonder ful fund of war reminiscences which he related in such an inimitable manner that he at once interested the most indifferent. He thoroughly believed in the German proverb, "Leben und lassen." Of the good things of life he had a peculiar appreciation and exemplified the ulterior meaning of the Egyptian saying. "Eat, drink and be merry, for to-morrow we die." He possessed the faculty of drawing men to him and enkindling in their hearts friendships that endure a lifetime. He was eminently successful as a physician and his great skill in surgery was recognized and appreciated by his co-laborers in that professional field. At the time of his death he was president of the State Medical Association. His strong individuality, his genial qualities, his scholarly habits of thought impressed his associates and won their admiration and respect. He was a man amongst men, with faults and foibles that distinguished men from angels. These die with the body. Virtues, like the soul, live on, and by these we measure the man.' "Virtue alone outbuilds the Pyramids; Her monuments shall last when Egypt falls."- The niche which he occupied in life, there is no one to fill. Common men die and their places are filled as the water rushes in to replace the drop that is taken away. Not with those strong individualized souls, moulded either in clay, granite or that between; when death blasts them from earth the place they occupied still remains hollowed out in earth's life history. The soldier, the citizen, the physician has started on his pilgrimage with but the efforts of an earthly existence in his scrip to maintain him. Alay his good deeds follow him and all else be left behind.  
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]

FRED B. SIMMONS, manager and co-partner in the Amenia Mercantile Company, of Amenia, is one of the prominent business men of that thriving city and of Cass county. He is a man of ability and keen foresight and under his guidance the affairs of the firm have prospered and they now carry a complete line of general merchandise and conduct a business of forty thousand dollars per annum.
Our subject was born at Sacramento, California, February 14, 1858, and was a son of Nathan and Julia E. (Forster) Simmons, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of Massachusetts. His father was a whaler in the East and about 1853 removed to California and engaged in merchandising, remaining there until 1865, when the father died and the family returned to Vermont. The mother died in North Dakota. Three children were born to this worthy couple, two sons and one daughter, and all now reside in North Dakota.
Our subject was reared and educated in Vermont and remained in that state until 1882. when he went to North Dakota and located at Hunter and began work for Fuller & Johnson, in the machine business, and then spent one year with Walter A. Wood & Company. He then began clerking for Gale & Dufany at Hunter and remained with them until 1893. In that year the Amenia Mercantile Company was formed, J. H. Gay, Peter Dufany and our subject being the partners, and they purchased the mercantile business of the estate of E. W. Chafifey, of Amenia. They increased the stock and our subject and G. L. Dunning were given the management of the business. Mr. Dunning retired in 1897, since which time Mr. Simmons has been the manager of the firm. They have built up an extensive trade and are well-known merchants of that region.
Mr. Simmons was married, in 1894, to Miss Mary H. Hazen, a native of Vermont. Mr. and Mrs. Simmons are the parents of one daughter, upon whom they have bestowed the name of Isabel. Mr. Simmons is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically, he is a Republican and is stanch in his adherence to the principles of his party.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

EMERSON H. SMITH, one of Fargo’s most prominent and influential citizens, is now the junior member of the well-known law firm of Newton & Smith. Although he has but recently become a member of the bar, he has already won distinction in his chosen profession. Thoroughness characterizes all of his efforts, and he conducts all his business with a strict regard to a high standing of professional ethics.
Mr. Smith was born in Orange county, Vermont, April 8, 1854, and is a son of Richard and Frances (Hall) Smith, also natives of that state, where the father was successfully engaged in business as a stock raiser and tinsmith throughout life. He was a man of prominence in his community and was honored with a number of public positions, serving as a member of the lower house of the Vermont legislature for two terms, and as constable sixteen years. He is a man of excellent ability and a good capacity for well-directed labor, and has placed himself in a high station among his fellows. He was also Captain of Company E, Second Vermont Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war, and was in the service for two years and a half, participating with the Army of the Potomac in the battle of the Wilderness and in other important engagements. He died in Vermont in 1899, at the ripe old age of seventy-nine years, and his wife passed away in 1878. To them were born five children, four sons and one daughter, of whom two sons now reside in Fargo, North Dakota. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Ebenezer Smith, was also a native of Vermont and a son of Jonathan Smith, whose father, James Smith, was the founder of the family in the new world. He was born in England and on his emigration to this country settled in Middleboro, Massachusetts. He entered the Continental army during the Revolutionary war and died in the service, while his son Jonathan was a soldier in the war of 1812. Ebenezer Smith was an extensive farmer, owning one thousand acres of land, and for a quarter of a century he was selectman in his town. He had a family of thirteen children, eight sons and five daughters.
In the old Green Mountain state Emerson H. Smith grew to manhood and received excellent educational advantages, attending the St. Johnsbury Academy and the Randolph Normal School, both in Vermont, and the Meridian Academy of New Hampshire. He then entered Dartmouth College, from which he was graduated in 1882. He was made principal of the schools at Newmarket, New Hampshire, and served as such for two years, during which time he took up the study of law with Judge Mellows, of that place. As his health failed, he came west in 1884 to Fargo, and was superintendent of the city schools here for seven years, or until 1891. He then followed farming for one year and resumed the study of law with Seth Newman. He was elected mayor of Fargo in 1892, and during the two years he filled that office did much to assist the city after the great fire. He again took up the study of law and was admitted to the bar before the supreme court in 1896. He at once opened an office in Fargo and alone engaged in practice until forming his present partnership, in 1897. He is meeting with well-deserved success and occupies an enviable position among the representative legal practitioners of the city. As a Republican he takes quite an active and prominent part in political affairs, and in the interests of his party has made many speeches throughout the state. He still maintains an interest in educational affairs and for five years was one of the trustees of Fargo College.
On the 16th of August, 1882, Mr. Smith was united in marriage with Miss Ella Knight, who was born in Orleans county, Vermont, and they become the parents of two children, but only Helen E. is now living.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HON. GEORGE N. SMITH, one of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of Cass county, resides on section 17, in Rush River township, and in company with his brother, operates and extensive tract of land. He went to Dakota with limited means, and by dint of energy and perseverance, supplemented by the strictest integrity, he has accumulated a fortune and an enviable reputation. A portrait of Mr. Smith is shown on another page.
Our subject was born in Wyoming county, New York, April 1, 1849. When quite young he removed to Kalamazoo county, Michigan, with his parents, in 1854, and settled near Schoolcraft, Michigan, where he was reared to manhood. He was educated at the Kalamazoo Baptist College, later at Parson’s Business College in that city, and remained in Kalamazoo county till the spring of 1879, when he went to Dakota and located in Cass county, in what is now Rush River township, where he has since been a resident. He assisted in the organization of the township, and named it. He purchased, in company with his brother, Forrester H. Smith, one section of land, section 17, township 141, range 51. They have steadily increased their acreage, and are now the owners of five sections of land in Cass county, and our subject is also interested in a large tract of land in South Dakota. He and his brother have erected a set of fine farm buildings on the home farm in section 17, and enjoy all the comforts of rural life. In the spring of 1872 they shipped from Michigan twenty-two crs of stock emigrant movables, and at that time sixty-three men, women and children, went to settle in North Dakota with them. The first year our subject and brother with the aid of five men and fifteen head of horses and mules, seeded six hundred acres of wheat and oats, and broke six hundred and forth acers of land, put up seventy-five tons of hay, harvested twelve thousand three hundred bushels of wheat, and five thousand bushels of oats and back-set six hundred and forty acres of prairie. Only during harvest time were more men employed. They have been possessed of untiring energy and a capacity for well-directed labor, that has placed them at the front as agriculturists.
George N. Smith was elected to the legislature in the fall of 1890, and served one term, giving very efficient service for his community. He has held many of the township offices in Rush River township and is thoroughly identified with the upbuilding and general welfare of that locality. He is liberal and contributes to the various religious denominations, and no charitable cause worthy of support, or needy person, is refused aid when it is asked. He has gained his fortune steadily and well merits his success.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

HON. JAMES O. SMITH, a prosperous and intelligent member of the farming community of Cass county, has been associated with the financial and social growth of that district for many years and has gained a goodly fortune and an enviable reputation by his earnest efforts and strict integrity. His farm is nicely located in section 31, of Rush River township, and he has placed upon it such improvements as entitle it to rank among the finest pieces of property in that region.
Our subject was born in Boston, Massachusetts, January 14, 1854, and was a son of Larkin A. and Belinda (Potter) Smith, natives, respectively, of New Hampshire and Maine. His grandfather, James Smith, was a native of Massachusetts and died in New Hampshire. The family were farmers and the mother’s father was a native of Manchester, England.
James O. Smith was reared and educated in the public schools of Boston and in 1874 went to Denver, Colorado, where he remained one winter and then returned East and remained in New Hampshire and Massachusetts until 1877, when, in May of that year, he arrived at Fargo, North Dakota. He entered claim to government land in section 2 of Casselton township, and also entered claim to land as a tree claim and began at once the improvement of his farm breaking the land with the use of oxen. He is now the fortunate possessor of one section of the best land in Cass county and he has placed on his farm the finest buildings of that vicinity. His residence, erected in 1892, is a commodious and substantial structure and is equipped with all the modern conveniences and comforts, including hot water heat, and is a home of refinement and luxury and bespeaks the culture and tastes of its occupants. Mr. Smith removed to Steele county in 1886, for the purpose of personally operating a farm he owns there. He has made a success of farming and with limited means for a start has acquired a good income.
Our subject was married, in 1884, to Jennie Hildebrant, a native of Illinois. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as follows: Chauncey and Bernice. Mr. Smith is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was elected to the territorial legislature in 1888 and served during the last session of that body and in 1889 was elected to the state senate and served one term. He served as clerk of the senate in 1897-1898 and has taken an active part in public affairs since residing in North Dakota. Politically, he is a Republican and is a member of the district central committee.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]

WALTER W. SMITH, a representative business man and leading citizen of Fargo, is now connected with the North Dakota Harness Company, being senior member of the firm. He is energetic and enterprising, and his keen discrimination and sound judgment are shown in the capable management of what is one of the leading industrial concerns of the state. His portrait is shown in connection with this sketch. Mr. Smith was born in Knox county, Ohio, April 28, 1857, a son of Charles and Adeline (Bixby) Smith, also natives of that state. From Ohio they removed to Stephenson county, Illinois, and while residing there the father enlisted during the Civil war in the Twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was killed in the battle of Kingston, North Carolina. The mother is also deceased. Our subject was reared and educated in Illinois, attending the common schools, and later he spent some years in farming upon the home place. In March, 1878, he came to Fargo, North Dakota, and took up a claim, to the improvement and development of which he devoted his attention for a time He served as deputy clerk of Cass county under George I. Foster for two years, and then commenced the study of law in the office of Wilson & Ball. On his admission to the bar in 1884, he became a member of that firm, with which he was connected until 1892, when he sold his interest to Mr. Watson and spent one year in California. In 1892 he was elected clerk of tile district court, and most capably filled that office for four years. Since then he has given his attention to the harness trade—a business that was started in the state prison at Bismarck in 1892, but was transferred to Fargo in 1897. The company does a general manufacturing and jobbing business throughout the northwest, and is meeting with well-deserved success. In 1882 Mr. Smith was united in marriage with Miss Grace Gribble, a native of Michigan, and they have become the parents of two children: Pearl E. and Hazel Ione. In his political affiliations Mr. Smith has always been a Republican, and in his social relations is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent and Patriotic Order of Elks. In business and social circles he stands deservedly high in the esteem of his fellow citizens, and his circle of friends and acquaintances is extensive.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley]

PAUL SORKNESS, M.D., one of the ablest representatives of the medical profession in Fargo, North Dakota, was born in Dunn county, Wisconsin, October 17, 1867.  His parents, Ebert and Sarah (Quistad) Sorkness, are natives of Norway and on their emigration to America, in 1860, settled in Dunn county, Wisconsin, where they still continue to reside, the father being engaged in agricultural pursuits.  On the breaking out of the Civil war he enlisted in the Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and was in the service of his adopted country for about two years, taking part in many of the important battles, including that of Gettysburg.  He was also with Sherman on his celebrated march to the sea.
Dr. Sorkness is one of a family of four sons and the only one of the number residing in North Dakota.  In the county of his nativity he grew to manhood and was given good educational advantages.  He attended the high school of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and later the Galesville University, of Galesville, Wisconsin, from which he was graduated in 1887.  For five years he followed school teaching in Minnesota and then took up the study of medicine, entering the medical department of the University of Minnesota in 1892 and graduating from there in 1895.  Subsequently he took a hospital course at St. Barnabus Hospital, Minneapolis, where he spent one year.  In 1896 he opened an office at Moorhead, Minnesota, where he engaged in practice for one year and then came to Fargo, North Dakota.  Although comparatively a recent arrival his skill and ability in his chosen calling have already become widely recognized and he enjoys a large and constantly increasing practice.  He was assistant county physician for one year and is a member of the North Dakota Medical Society and the American Medical Association.
In 1897 Dr. Sorkness was united in marriage with Miss Josephine Berg, a native of Minnesota and they have one child, Sidney O.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]

B. F. SPAULDING, chief Justice, was born in Orleans county, Vermont, December 3, 1853. He was educated in the public schools and attended Lyndon Literary institute and Norwich University. He read law at Montpeller and was admitted to the bar in 1880. He came to North Dakota in that year and practiced law at Fargo. He is married and has five children. He has been superintendent of public instruction of the state, member of the territorial capitol commission, member of the constitutional convention, member of congress for two terms and chairman of the republican state committee. He was appointed Justice of the supreme court to succeed Edward Engerud, resigned, and was elected for the six-year term in 1908, becoming chief Justice on the retirement of Justice Morgan in 1911.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]

HON. BURLEIGH F. SPALDING
, member of Congress from North Dakota, has attained distinction as one of the ablest members of the Fargo bar.  In this profession probably more than in any other success depends upon individual merit, upon a thorough understanding of the principles of jurisprudence, a power of keen analysis, and the ability to present clearly, concisely and forcibly the strong points in his case.  Possessing these necessary qualifications, Mr. Spalding is accorded a foremost place in the ranks of the profession in this state, and stands today one of the most esteemed members of the Fargo bar.
He was born in Orleans county, Vermont, December 3, 1853, and is a son of Rev. Benjamin P. and Ann (Folsom) Spalding, also natives of the Green Mountain State.  As a Methodist Episcopal minister the father engaged in preaching in Vermont and New Hampshire for many years, but is now living retired with our subject, having come to North Dakota in 1882.  The paternal grandfather, Noah Spalding, was a school teacher of Vermont, and was a politician of some note, while the maternal grandfather, Rev. Moses Folsom, was a Free Baptist minister of New Hampshire and Vermont.  The Folsom family was founded in the United States in 1638, the Spalding in 1619.  Our subject has one brother and two sisters.  The brother is now living in Salt Lake City, Utah.  The elder sister lives in Traill county, and the younger is a professor in Pomona College, California.
In his native state, Burleigh F. Spalding was reared and educated until eleven years of age, when he left home, and for five years worked on farms in New Hampshire and Vermont for his board and clothes and the privileges of attending school.  At sixteen he engaged in clerking in a country store for forty-eight dollars per year, but later received seventy-two.  For some time he worked at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, and then attended the Lyndon Literary Institute, and later the Norwich University, from which he was graduated with a degree B. Ph., in 1877.  The following year he taught in an academy at Albany, Vermont, and next read law for two years with Gleason & Field at Montpelier.  He was admitted to the bar in Vermont, March 15, 1880.  He served as clerk of state legislature in 1878.
On the 31st of March, 1880, Mr. Spalding came to Fargo, North Dakota, and for one year was in partnership with S. G. Roberts in the practice of law.  Later he succeeded to the entire practice of the firm and admitted Charles F. Templeton to a partnership.  That connection continued for six and a half years, or until Mr. Templeton was appointed judge of the Grand Forks district.  In 1891 George H. Phelps became a member of the firm, and in June, 1893, Mr. Newman was also taken in but in 1897, Mr. Phelps retired, and business was then carried on under the name of Newman & Spalding until 1898, when Mr. W. S. Stambaugh was admitted to the firm, and the name was changed to Newman, Spalding & Stambaugh.  This is one of the strongest law firms in the state, and they enjoy a large and lucrative practice.
On the 25th of November, 1880, Mr. Spalding was united in marriage with Miss Alida Baker, of Vermont, a daughter of David and Emily (Cutler) Baker, and by this union five children have been born, namely:  Deane B., Frances F., Roscoe C., Burleigh M. and Carlton C.
Mr. Spalding organized the Merchants’ State Bank of Fargo, which was started as the Dakota Savings Bank, and re-organized in 1890.  He served as its first president, and is quite prominent in business as well as professional circles.  During his residence in this state he has taken a very important part in public affairs and is a recognized leader in political circles.  He served as superintendent of public instruction from 1882 to 1884, and in 1883 was elected a member of the board of commissioners to relocate the capital.  In 1889 he was elected to the constitutional convention, served on the judicial, school and public lands committees and was also a member of the joint committee to divide the archives and property of the states.  In 1898 he was nominated and elected a member of congress over the Fusion (Democratic, Populist and Silver Republican) candidate by a majority 9,932 votes, and is now most creditably and satisfactorily filling that position.  He has been a delegate to nearly all the state and territorial conventions of the Republican party during his residence here, and in 1896 was chairman of the committee on resolutions.  He was chairman of the Republican state central committee in 1892 and was a member of the same for three years.  In 1896 he was elected to the same position from Cass county, and has taken a prominent part in campaign work, being a strong and able debater and an orator of note.  He is a thirty-second-degree Mason, a Knight Templar and a member of the Sons of the American Revolution.  Socially he is deservedly popular, as he is affable and courteous in manner and possesses that essential qualification to success in public life, that of making friends readily and strengthening the ties of all friendships as time advances.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]

EDWARD E STAFFORD. A prominent position among farmers and early settlers of Cass county is accorded this gentleman. He resided in Ayr township many years but is now proprietor of a fine farm in Cornell township and is well and favorably known.
Our subject was born in Onondaga county, New York, October 28, 1850. His parents, Waldin M. and Laura E. (Smith) stafford, were natives of New York. His father was a cooper by trade and also operated a saw-mill and went to Wisconsin in 1855 where he followed farming until 1884 and then removed to North Dakota, and now resides in that state. He served in Company K, Forty-second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil war, and did guard duty in Illinois. Our subject has six brothers and one sister, and two of his brothers are now living Cass county, North Dakota.
Mr. Stafford was raised in Wisconsin and engaged in farming there until 1881, when he went to Cass county, North Dakota, and entered a homestead claim to land in section 7 of Ayr township, becoming one of the first settlers of that locality. He resided on a farm in Ayr township until 1897 and then removed to his present home in Cornell township, purchasing the south half of section 22. He has a pleasant and well improved farm and is one of the substantial men of his community.
Our subject was married, in 1879, to Malissa Hosford, who died in 1885, leaving one son, Seymour E. Mr. Stafford was married to Mary Preston, a native of Fox Lake, Wisconsin, in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford are the parents of three children, named as follows: Donnibel, Edward L. and Philip. Mr. Stafford served on the town board in Ayr township and for the past four years has been chairman of the board in Cornell township. He is a gentleman of energetic character and his public spirit has never been called in question. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and Ancient Order of United Workmen and Modern Woodmen of America. Politically he is affiliated with the Republican party.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

WILLIAM STAPLES, the popular postmaster and merchant of Absaraka, is one of the pioneer settlers of Cass county, and is widely known as an able business man and worthy citizen. Mr. Staples was born in Stroudsburgh, Monroe county, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1856, and was a son of Nelson and Sally A. (Albertson) Staples, both of whom were natives of Monroe county, Pennsylvania. His father was a lumberman and operated a saw-mill. He went to Jacksonville, Florida, in 1851, where he operated a saw-mill until 1861, and then returned to Pennsylvania, and the following year went to Wabasha county, Minnesota, and after the close of the war moved to Georgia and from thence to Alabama, where he followed lumbering until 1877, and then went to St. Paul, Minnesota, and in 1888 to Cass county, North Dakota. He located land in Buffalo township and opened a farm on railroad land which they had purchased some years before. He also became interested in merchandising in Absaraka, and continued farming in addition until his death in 1891. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was held in the highest esteem by his fellow men. The mother of our subject survives and makes her home in Buffalo township, Cass county. Two sons and six daughters were born to this worthy couple, and the daughters living are as follows: Mrs. E. J. Hodgson, St. Paul; Mrs. E. A. D. Reynolds, Chicago; Mrs. J. B. Mecham, Mrs. William Metzgar and Jennie. The last three named are residents of Cass county. Our subject was reared in Minnesota and educated at Hamline University of Red Wing, Minnesota. He then spent some years in the south with his father and then went with him to North Dakota and located land in Buffalo township, Cass county. They began merchandising in 1882 and erected the store in Absaraka, and our subject also operates about six sections of land, three and a half sections of which he owns. The average yield of grain is forty thousand bushels per annum. He is a successful business man and fanner, and enjoys a liberal patronage. Our subject was married, in 1888, to Miss Anna Dorsey, of Stillwater, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Staples have one daughter, Carrie M. Mr. Staples has been postmaster for many years, and has filled various public offices in his township. Politically he is a Democrat.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley] 

CHRISTEN STENERODDEN.  This gentleman is a representative citizen of Cass county, and has a pleasant home on section 25 of Pleasant township, where he located during pioneer days, and has been associated with the upbuilding of that region and is widely known as an old settler and energetic agriculturist.
Our subject was born in Houston county, Minnesota, September 29, 1859, and was a son of Ole C. and Berit (Ericksdatter) Stenerodden.  His parents were natives of Norway and emigrated to America in 1851 and settled in Houston county, Minnesota, the same year, and still reside there.  The father entered land in that county and was one of its pioneers.  Three sons and one daughter constituted the family of which our subject is a member, and all reside in North Dakota with the exception of one brother.
Mr. Stenerodden was reared and educated in Minnesota and in 1877 went to Cass county and purchased railroad land and in 1884 purchased the farm on which he now resides.  He is proprietor of an excellent estate and his real estate now consists of about three hundred acres, all of which has been brought to a high state of cultivation, and the buildings thereon are substantial and built with a view to comfort and convenience.  Mr. Stenerodden was engaged in general merchandising at Hickson about four years and was one of the well known merchants of that place and enjoyed good success in that line.
Our subject was married, in 1878, to Miss Caroline Vaaler, a native of Houston county, Minnesota.  Mr. and Mrs. Stenerodden are the parents of eight children, named as follows:  Carl O., Bergine A., Martha E., Annie G., Lena J., Ella M., Clara C. and Celia O., all of whom are living.  The family are members of the Synod Lutheran church.
Mr. Stenerodden has served as town clerk fourteen years, and in all matters of a public nature is always found standing for the right and promoting every enterprise for the public good.  He has a fine home all the comforts of life and has gained an assured financial position and the highest regard of his fellows.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Rhonda Hill 

J. O. STENSRUD, a prominent citizen of Cass county, and a pioneer of Pleasant township, is a native of Norway, where he was born September 18, 1841.  His parents were Ole and Marie (Julson) Stensrud, both natives of Norway.  They came to America in 1868, arriving in July of that year, and proceeded west to Houston county, Minnesota, and located at Spring Grove.  They afterward removed to Wisconsin, where they both died.  They had two sons and three daughters, the latter all dying in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in his native land, and came to the United States with his parents in 1868.  He resided for a time in Houston county, Minnesota, and then, in 1871, removed to Cass county, Dakota territory, and located on section 7, Pleasant township, where he still makes his home.  He secured land in its wild state, and began vigorously to bring it under subjection, and his success was remarkable.  He has his farm well improved, and under a high state of cultivation, and few farms of equal yielding capacity can be found in Cass county.
In 1869 Mr. Stensrud was married, to Miss Marie Johnson.  Mrs. Stensrud is also a native of Norway, and to them have been born the following children:  George E., John A., Minnie B. and Emma, all of whom are living, and form a pleasant family circle.  The parents and children are all members of the Lutheran Synod church.  Mr. Stensrud has always taken an intelligent interest in the affairs of good government and in educational matters.  He has served two years as a member of the township board, and as a member of the school board for many years.  He is an exemplary citizen and substantial property owner of the county.  He enjoys the friendship and esteem of a large circle of acquaintances, and has proved himself worthy of every trust that has been confided to him.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Mary Saggio] 

ALEXANDER STERN.  It is astonishing to witness the success of young men who have emigrated to America without capital and from a position of comparative obscurity have worked their way upward to a position of prominence.  The readiness with which they adapt themselves to circumstances and take advantage of the opportunities offered brings to them success and wins them a place among the leading men of the community in which they reside.  A worthy representative of this class is Mr. Stern, now president of the city council of Fargo, North Dakota, and one of the most prominent business men of the place.
He was born in Giessen, Germany, June 7, 1857, a son of Aaron and Emily (Meyer) Stern, who spent their entire lives in that country, where the father carried on operations as a farmer and stock raiser.  In their family were three sons and one daughter, of whom two are now residents of Fargo, and one son is deceased.  Our subject was reared and educated in his native land, and in 1871 came to America, landing in New York on the 17th of August.  He proceeded at once to Chicago, and from there went to Bloomington, Illinois., where he was employed as clerk for some time and in 1878 embarked in business on his own account, remaining in that city until 1882.
During that year Mr. Stern came to Fargo, North Dakota, and opened a clothing store on the corner of Broadway and Second avenue, where he continued in business until 1885, when he erected his present store building on Broadway.  In 1892 he built two other business blocks, which were destroyed in the fire of the following year, but with characteristic energy he at once rebuilt, commencing work upon the place two days after the fire.  He now has the best business blocks in the city and is erecting two others, which will be still finer.  He has become interested in a number of different enterprises and is now vice-president of the Fargo Packing Company, which he founded, is president of the Fargo Plumbing Company, and director of the Merchants’ State Bank.
On the 5th of July, 1885, Mr. Stern married Miss Bertha Kauffman, who was born in Arora mining camp in the mountains of Nevada, and they have become the parents of three sons, namely:  William M., Samuel S, and Edward A.  Fraternally Mr. Stern is a thirty-second-degree Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine, and also belongs to the Foresters.  Politically he is now a Republican, but formerly affiliated with the Democratic party until the campaign of 1896, when he withdrew from their ranks, not being a free silver advocate.  He has been a member of the board of directors of the Agricultural College for the past five years, being first appointed by Governor Allen and re-appointed by Governor Foucher.  He is also serving his second term in the city council and is now president of the same.  He is quite prominent both in political and business circles and the high position which he occupies is due entirely to his own well-directed efforts.  On landing in the United States, he had but seventeen dollars in gold, which he exchanged for twenty-two dollars in paper money, and with this capital he began life in the new world.  He has steadily prospered in his undertakings and is now one of the wealthiest men of Fargo.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Rhonda Hill 

WILLIAM STREHLOW. The business and social interests of Cass county have been carefully guarded and provided for by the gentleman whose name appears at the head of this article. He is one of the pioneers of that region, and since taking up his residence there he has labored with untiring perseverance for the upbuilding of the better interests of his community, and is held in a high position in the minds of his associates. He is engaged in the farming implement business in the city of Casselton, and has been identified with the various enterprises of that city, including the First National Bank, in which he was formerly a director, stockholder and vice-president.
Our subject is a native of Germany, and was born in the city of Berlin, April 30, 1844, and was a son of Frederick and Elizabeth (Menge) Strchlow, both of whom were natives of Germany. His father was a farmer by occupation and came to America in 1849, and settled at Watertown, Wisconsin, where he purchased land and resided until 1864, when he moved to Winona county, Minnesota, and later to DeForest, Wisconsin, and there made his home until his death in 1894. The mother of our subject died in 1892. They had four sons and three daughters: three sons and two daughters are now living, and our subject and one sister reside in North Dakota.
Mr. Strehlow was reared and educated in Wisconsin, and October 1, 1861, enlisted in Company K, Third Wisconsin Cavalry, and served until February 14, 1865. He was with the Third Army Corps most of the time under General Scofield, and was engaged at Cane Hill, Prairie Grove, Fort Smith, and Van Buren, and the raid in Texas, and was wounded twice during the service, once receiving a bayonet wound in his elbow and being once shot through the left leg, but he lost little time from active service and remained until the close of the war. After his discharge from the service he returned to Minnesota, and spent some years at farming and various business pursuits in Minnesota and Wisconsin until 1877. In that year he went to Cass county, North Dakota, and entered claim to land as a homestead and tree claim in Addison township, built the first shanty and was the first settler in that township, and was the founder of the large German settlement of that vicinity. He remained on his claim the first year alone and was then joined by his family. He removed to Casselton in the fall of 1879, where he has since resided, and is engaged in the handling of farm implements. He has met with eminent success in his business and is regarded as one of the solid men of Cass county.
The subject of this sketch was married in Wisconsin, in 1869, to Mary Buckholz, a native of Germany. Three sons and four daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Strehlow all of whom, with the exception of one daughter, reside in Casselton. Mr. Strehlow is actively interested in the government of his township and town and has served as mayor of Casselton, and twice as county commissioner of Cass county. He is a stanch advocate of the principles of the Democratic party, with which party he has affiliated throughout his career. His name is closely linked with the history of that region and much credit is due him for his energetic efforts in furthering its interests.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

F. S. TALCOTT, of the eleventh district, was born in New York City, July 12, 1863. He was educated in the schools of Buffalo and New York City and finished his education at Williams college. He came to North Dakota in 1878 and in 1881 located permanently in the state and established a large farm near Buffalo. He has served as chairman of the state and county central committees, and was elected to the state senate as a republican in 1900, in 1904, in 1908 and in 1912, but resigned after the legislative session of 1913 to accept the appointment of warden of the state penitentiary. He is married and has three children.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]

FRANK S. TALCOTT. One of the most extensive grain farms of Cass county is that operated by the gentleman whose name appears above. He is a pioneer settler of Tower township, and is entitled to a foremost rank among the prominent citizens of his locality.
Our subject was born in New York City, July 12, 1863, and was a son of Frank P. and Gertrude (Squier) Talcott, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts. His father was a dry-goods merchant and died in New York. Our subject was the only child and was reared in New York and educated in Buffalo and at Williams College, Massachusetts. He studied law for some time and in 1878 went to Cass county to look after the interests of his grandfather Squier, who was a heavy stockholder of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He opened up a farm in 1881, now known as the Talcott farm, and broke one half-section of land, and in company with his mother began operations thereon in 1882. They now own and have four sections under plow and one section in pasture and hay, and in addition farm one thousand acres rented land, the annual yield of the estate averaging forty to fifty thousand bushels. Mr. Talcott has met with unbounded success and is now well-to-do.
Our subject was married, in June, 1893, to Miss Agnes W. Thompson. Mrs. Talcott is a native of Buffalo, New York, and her parents are among the oldest families of New York. Three children have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Talcott, named as follows: Porter Thompson, Frank S., Jr., and Esther Bell. Mr. Talcott is an influential citizen, identified with the Republican party in political faith, and has always been an active and earnest worker for party principles.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

CHARLES M. TAYLOR, one of the well-to-do farmers of Cass county, was an early settler of Maple River township, and is widely known and highly esteemed for his energetic character and strict integrity of word and deed.
Our subject was born in Loudonville, Ohio, August 23, 1860, and is a son of Augustus A. and Priscilla P. (Wade) Taylor.  His parents were natives of Ohio, and the father was a miller by trade and owned several flour mills in Ohio, among them the old Manhattan Mills, of Toledo.  His death occurred in Casselton, North Dakota, in 1886, while he was visiting that city.  The mother survives and makes her home at Casselton.  The grandfather of our subject on the father’s side was a native of Texas.  Our subject has two brothers and five sisters, two of the sisters residing in North Dakota.
Mr. Taylor was reared in Ohio and attended the Denison University at Granville, and after completing his studies was given the management of the Mt. Vernon mill, owned by his father, in which work he continued three years.  He went to North Dakota in 1883 and purchased the farm where he now resides in Maple River township, since which time he has devoted his attention entirely to farming.  He is the owner of a half-section of the choice land, and has placed modern improvements on the same and enjoys a comfortable home.  He also has large financial interests in the old mills in Ohio, and is a man of ability and sound financial standing.
Mr. Taylor is devoted to his work, and his estate bespeaks good management and painstaking care in its operation.  He does not take an active part in public affairs and has never sought or filled public office, but lends his influence for the better interests of his community and is highly respected wherever he is known.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Maggie Saggio]

TONNES THAMS, M. D. Among those who devote their time and energies to the practice of medicine and have gained a leading place in the ranks of the profession is Dr. Thams, of Fargo, one of the best-known Norwegian physicians and surgeons of North Dakota.  He was born on the 5th day of May, 1848, in Norway, near the city of Tunsberg, one of the oldest cities of the country.  His parents, Johan and Fredericka (Taralsen) Thams, were also natives of Norway, but the family is of English origin and was founded in “the Land of the Midnight Sun” in 1688.  The father, who was a farmer and miller by occupation, died in Norway, in 1887, but the mother is still living and continues to make her home there.  To them were born three sons, of whom two are now residents of the United States.
Reared in his native land, Dr. Thams acquired a good practical education in the schools of the country, attending the high schools and the University of Norway, which he entered in 1866. The following year after graduating as master of Philosphym he commenced the study of medicine and was graduated from the medical department in 1873.  For eleven years he successfully followed his chosen profession in Norway, but in 1884 decided to try his fortune in the New World.  Crossing the Atlantic he first located in Minnesota, where he engaged in practice in Minneapolis until 1893 and during the following two years was a physician of Valley City, North Dakota.  In 1895 he came to Fargo and it was not long before he built up the large and lucrative practice which he to-day enjoys.  He is a general practitioner, but his specialty is surgery and he is considered one of the best representatives of this branch of the profession in the state.
In 1875 Dr. Thams led to the marriage altar Miss Augusta Just, also a native of Norway, who died in 1897, leaving four children namely: Fredericka, Ingeborg, Johan L. and S. Nicolai.  The Doctor is a prominent member of the North Dakota Medical Association, is a thirty-second-degree Mason and a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Yeomen.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

CHARLES B. THIMENS, the present well-known superintendent of the water works of Fargo and one of the old and popular steamboat captains on the rivers of the Northwest, was born in Montreal, Canada, March 27, 1831, and is a son of Noel and Marie (Gilban) Thimens, who spent their entire lives in that country, the father following the occupation of farming. In their family were three sons, but all are now deceased, with the exception of our subject. He was reared and educated in his native land and on starting out in life for himself engaged in farming and clerking there until twenty years of age.
In the fall of 1851 Mr. Thimens landed in St. Paul, Minnesota, and soon began lumbering on the Rum river. Later he turned his attention to steamboating on the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers and followed that pursuit for thirty years, becoming pilot and captain and also part owner of vessels for several years. For five year he was in the quartermaster’s department during the Civil war, carrying troops and supplies up and down the river. In 1874 he went to Moorhead, Minnesota, and took charge of a boat for the Red River Transportation Company, running between Moorhead and Winnipeg, Manitoba, for fourteen years. He was next connected with the Grandon line of boats, carrying grain to Fargo and Moorhead and remained with that company until 1893. In 1882 he took up his residence in Fargo, where he has since continued to make his home and is prominently identified with public affairs. He served as street commissioner two years, and has since had charge of the water works. He has proved a most competent man for the place, and his duties are discharged in a prompt and satisfactory manner.
In 1858, Mr. Thimens was united in marriage with Miss Sarah H. Grant, a native of Vermont, and to them were born two children, namely: Minnie, now Mrs. F. Painter, and Dora. Since the organization of the Republican party our subject has been one of its stanch supporters and he has ever taken an active and commendable interest in political affairs. He is a thirty-second-degree Mason, a member of the Scottish Rite and is a man highly respected and esteemed by all who know him. In his early steamboat career he endured all the hardships and privations incident to such a life, but, like most of his class, he is a jovial, genial gentleman, who makes hosts of friends wherever he goes.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

JAMES W. THOM, a retired merchant of Grandin, North Dakota, is well known throughout Cass county, where he has resided for nearly twenty years and is highly respected by his associates.
Our subject was born in Glasgow, Scotland, January 6, 1827, and resided there until 1842, when he emigrated to Canada and settled in the county of Lanark, and engaged in farming. He continued his residence there about twenty-seven years and then removed to Huron county, Ontario, where he lived about thirteen years and in March, 1881, removed to Grandin, North Dakota. He engaged in the mercantile business there until the spring of 1899, when he retired from business life. He owns a half-section of land in Cass county and has a comfortable competence.
Our subject was married in the county of Lanark, Ontario, to Jane McConnell, a native of that county. Ten children were born to this union, five of whom are living, and are named as follows: William, Agnes, Henry, Euphemie and John. The deceased children bore the following names: Jane, Jeanette, Bessie, James and Bessie. The daughter, Agnes, is married to David G. Geddes, a prosperous farmer of Kinyon township, a sketch of whose life appears elsewhere in this work.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

FRANK J. THOMPSON, a prominent attorney of Fargo, is a man of deep research and careful investigation, and his skill and ability have won him a large and paying practice. Prominence at the bar comes through merit alone, and the high position he has attained attests his superiority.
Mr. Thompson was born in Rockford, Illinois, August 23, 1854, and is a son of Jared C. and Sarah J. (Mason) Thompson, both natives of New York. During the ‘thirties they removed to Michigan, and for thirty years the father was employed as an engineer on the Michigan Central Railroad. In 1878 he came to Dakota, and after serving the Northern Pacific Railroad in that capacity for ten years, was transferred to the shops at Dickinson, where he now resides. He has two sons: Frank F., of this review; and Fred, also a resident of Dickinson. On both sides ancestors of our subject were soldiers of the Revolutionary war, and were among the minute men who participated in the battle of Lexington. His maternal ancestor was Hugh Mason, who settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1634. His paternal grandfather was John Thompson, who died in Fargo, North Dakota, in 1883.
The literary education of our subject was obtained in the schools of Marshall and Jackson, Michigan, and in the former city he learned the machinist’s trade, serving a five years’ apprenticeship, but he never followed the same. For two years he engaged in teaching music, and in 1876 began the study of law at Jackson, Michigan, with Higbee & Gibson, both well-known attorneys in that state. Soon after his admission to the bar in the spring of 1878 Mr. Thompson came to North Dakota, and located at Fargo, where he opened an office, and has since successfully engaged in practice f his chosen profession. In 1881 he formed a partnership with H. Krogh, but this connection was dissolved in 1892, and he has since been alone.
At Minneapolis, Minnesota, in November, 1882, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Thompson and Miss Elmadine Bissonette, a native of Montreal, Canada, and they now have two children: Jeredine and Jack Dacotah. In 1889 Mr. Thompson was elected to the state legislature and was chairman of the judiciary committee of the house. He was appointed assistant attorney-general under Hon. C. A. M. Spencer, and served in that capacity for some time. On attaining his majority he became identified with the Republican party, which he continued to support until 1895, when he became a Populist and is now chairman of the state central committee of that party. He is very prominent in Masonic circles and has taken every degree in the order. He is now secretary of all the state organizations in that fraternity; was potentate of the Shrine six years; is now recorder in the same, and also holds those offices in the Scottish Rite bodies. He also belongs to the Benevolent and Patriotic Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, and the United Commercial Travelers. He has always taken a most active and prominent part in public affairs; has stumped the state in the interest of his party at different times, and is the author of the resolution introduced into the first legislative assembly by which native-born children of North Dakota are known as “flickertails.” He stands high among his professional brethren, and is very popular with all classes of citizens.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

GORDON THOMPSON.  A high station as a citizen and prosperous farmer has been attained by this gentleman in Rich township, Cass county, where he was one of the first settlers.  He has pushed forward toward success and by honest industry has gained his purpose and is now he fortunate owner of fine farm of one-half section and is enjoying the result of a well-spent career.
Our subject was born in Gray county, Ontario, Canada, January 3, 1854.  His parents, Thomas and Jane (Houston) Thompson, were natives of Canada and his father was a farmer and passed his life there.  He died in 1896 and the mother of our subject survives and makes her home in Canada.  There were the parents of twelve children, six sons and six daughters, of whom two sons and three daughters now live in North Dakota.
Mr. Thompson was reared and educated in Canada and followed farming there until 1880, when he went to Cass county, North Dakota, and entered a homestead claim to the quarter-section in section 32, in Rich township, on which he still resides.  He was the second settler and passed through pioneer experiences.  He now owns and operates a half-section of choice land, all of which is improved.  He has met with success in his calling and is one of the substantial men of his community.
Our subject was married, in 1886, to Miss Jane P. Ferrier, a native of Bruce county, Ontario.  Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, named as follows:  Mary H., Thomas G., James A., Jane V., Florence A. and Harry A., all of whom are living.  Mr. Thompson is active in public affairs of local importance and has served five terms as supervisor and also felled other offices.  He is one of the best known and most highly esteemed men of his township.  Politically, he is independent.
Source:  COMPENDIUM OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. Transcribed by Carol Eppright.

JAMES THOMPSON occupies a prominent place as a well-to-do and progressive member of the farming community of Cass county, in Berlin township, of which he has been a resident for nearly a quarter of a century, and has become well known as an exemplary citizen. He makes his home on section 28, and enjoys the comforts of country life. His portrait appears in this work.
Our subject was born in Frontenac county, Ontario, February 9, 1849. He was reared in that county on a farm, and remained there till the fall of 1877, when he went to Dakota with his wife, and took one hundred and sixty acres of land as a homestead, and began farming on the place where he still resides. He has added to his possessions from time to time and is now the fortunate owner of nine hundred and sixty acres of land, on which he has placed such improvements as are found on a model farm. His buildings are commodious and substantial, and every method which lessens labor or adds to the comfort of the inhabitants of the place is provided. Mr. Thompson is well versed in his chosen calling, and enjoys success.
Our subject was married in Frontenac county, Ontario, April 18, 1870, to Miss Margaret Morrow, a native of that county. Mrs.. Thompson died in the same county, January 31, 1872, leaving one daughter, Ellen S., who became the wife of Miles E. Scott. He died in Berlin township, Cass county, North Dakota, February 14, 1899, leaving five children, as follows: Blanche AI., Edgar D., Ernest J., Sarah E. and Margaret M. Mr. Thompson was married to Miss Fedora M. Nelson, in Frontenac county, Ontario, October 4, 1876. Mrs. Thompson was born in that county, June 2, 1850. Six children have been born to this union, named as follows:  George R. was married, in Minnesota, to Annie Oseng, January 21, 1900; he is a farmer of Berlin township; Edward J., William E. G., John T., Adelaide M. and Andrew A. are the other children. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are members of the First Methodist church, and take an active part in church affairs. Air. Thompson has been school director for several years, township treasurer, and chairman of the board of supervisors, and is an earnest worker for the general welfare of his community, and is deservedly held in high esteem by his fellows.
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by B.Z.

JOHN M. THOMPSON. Persistent industry and strict attention to business have placed this gentleman among the substantial farmers of Cass county. He has a fine estate in Ayr township where he settled in pioneer days, and has made a success of general farming. A portrait of Mr. Thompson appears on another page.
Our subject was born in Norway, October 24, 1847, and was a son of Thomas and Sophia (Matheison) Thompson, both of whom were natives of Norway. His father is deceased, but the mother is still living.
Mr. Thompson was reared and educated in his native land and remained there until 1866, when he came to America and located in St. Croix county, Wisconsin. He remained there four years and then went to Duluth and Superior, Minnesota, where he spent four years, and in 1874 returned to Norway on a visit. He went to Cass county, North Dakota, in 1879, and located a homestead in section 26 of Ayr township, and was among the first settlers of the township. He began the improvement of the place the following year by breaking land, and has made his home there continuously since that time. He is now the owner of five hundred and sixty acres of land, all of which is improved, and devotes his entire time to the operation of his place, and is one of the well-known agriculturists of his township.
Our subject was married, in 1880, to Miss Jessie M. Moum, a native of Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are the parents of four children, named as follows: Stanley A., Matilda M., Jessie M. and Mary. Mr. Thompson assisted in the organization of Ayr township, and was a member of the first town board, and is the present treasurer. He is actively interested in the welfare of his community and has been useful in sustaining good government and furthering local enterprises. Politically he is a Republican and is strong in his convictions.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

WALKER D. THOMPSON. Among the well-regulated farms of Cass county, those in Erie township have contributed a large number, and the proprietor of one of these finely-cultivated tracts is the gentleman above named. He has been closely connected with the agricultural interests of that locality since the earliest days of its settlement, and now enjoys a comfortable and happy home, the result of a well-spent career.
Our subject was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1855, and was a son of Jesse and Sarah (Walker) Thompson, also natives of Pennsylvania. His father is a farmer, and still resides in that state. Three sons and five daughters composed the family of children of whom our subject was a member, and he now has one sister living in North Dakota.
Mr. Thomspon was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, and followed farming there until 1881, when he went to Cass county, and entered claim to land as a homestead in section 12, of Eries township, and has resided thereon since that date. He has prospered in his chosen calling, and is one of the substantial men of his locality.
Our subject was married in Pennsylvania, in 1881, to Miss Maggie Tudhop, a native of Pennsylvania. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, three of who are still living, as follows: Jessie, Home and Colby. One daughter, Maggie, is deceased. Mrs. Thompson died in 1891. Mr Thompson was married to Sarah Marsh, a native of Wisconsin, September 28, 1892. Two children have blessed this union, as follows: Fern E. and Delbert A. Mr. Thompson assisted in the organization of his township, and was assessor during the first ter of that office in the township, and has since filled various township offices on the board and also school offices. He is a Republican in political sentiment. He holds membership in the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Degree of Honor.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

JAMES D. TRAMMELL. one of the pioneer settlers of Cass county, is widely and favorably known, and has acquired an excellent property by good management and the exercise of sound judgment. He makes his home at Everest, and was engaged in farming many years in Everest township. On another page will be found a portrait of Mr. Trammell.
Our subject was born near Fairfax Court House, Fairfax county, Virginia, January 8, 1843, and was one of three sons born to Israel and Clarissa (Lanham) Trammell, natives , respectively of New York and Virginia. One of the sons is deceased, and one resides on the old homestead farm in Virginia. The father was a farmer and removed to Virginia with his parents. The grandfather of our subject, Jerat Trammell, was a native of Holland, and he and the father of our subject died in Virginia.
James D. Trammell was reared and educated in Virginia, and engaged in farming there until 1883, when he removed to Cass county. North Dakota, and purchased land in Maple township. He remained on the farm there many years and operated the same successfully.
Our subject was married, in 1864. to Isabella Wells, a native of Virginia. Mrs. Trammell died in 1886, leaving ten children. as follows: Edward. Etta. Asa. Albert. Amy. Nellie, May, Sidney, now in Company B, Fourth Cavalry, in Atlanta ; Hardie and Cleveland. Mr. Trammell was married, later, to Elizabeth McGregor, a native of Canada. Mr. Trammell is one of the best known men of his community, and has served his township in various offices, including chairman of the township board. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Masonic fraternity, and is a gentleman of excellent character, and merits his high position in the minds of his associates.
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Dena Whitesell

CHARLES TRITCHLER, one of the pioneers of Amenia township, Cass county, has been useful in sustaining and extending its agricultural interests and is a gentleman well-versed in the best and most approved methods of operating a farm. He has a well-improved tract of one half-section and makes his home in section 6, where he located in the early days of the settlement of that region.
Our subject was born in New Jersey, June 21, 1854, and was one of five sons, one of whom now resides in Fargo, North Dakota. His parents, Joseph and Wilhelmina (Rahrt) Tritchler, were natives of Germany, and the father was a mason, learning the trade in his native country. They emigrated to America in 1853 and settled in New Jersey, and from thence removed to Pepin county, Wisconsin, and from there to Wabasha county, Minnesota, where the father died in 1873. The mother survived him some years and died about 1887.
Our subject was reared and educated in Wisconsin and Minnesota and in the latter state learned the blacksmith's and painter's trades, which he followed in Minnesota until 1878. He then went to Cass county and entered claim to the southwest quarter of section 6, in Amenia township, as a homestead and at once began improvements on the place and the following year moved his family to the claim. He is now the owner of one half-section of well-improved land and also operates another quarter-section. He has prospered in the pursuit of farming and has gathered about him the comforts of a rural home.
Our subject was married in Minnesota, in 1875, to Miss Mary Gilbert, a native of Sweden. Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Tritchler, named as follows: Jessie J., William F., Mable L., Minnie E., Joseph R., Charles P., Teresa, Katie, Lulu, Myrtle, who died at the age of one year and two months, and John G. Mr. Tritchler assisted in the organization of Amenia township and has served in various local offices, including supervisor and some school offices. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Politically, he is a Democrat and is a man who keeps posted on current events. He went to Casselton, North Dakota, with limited means and has met with unbounded success and holds a high position among his fellow men.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

JAMES M. TUSTEN. In whatever vocation engaged the successful man is the persistent man. This gentleman has gained his possessions single-handed and is the owner of one of the fine farms of Gardner township, Cass county, and resides on section 25. He is highly respected for his industry, energy and integrity, and well merits his success as an agriculturist.
Our subject was born in Green Lake county, Wisconsin, September 14, 1852, and was raised on a farm and received a common-school education. He resided in his native state till the spring of 1885, when he went to North Dakota, having spent two years in Fond du Lac county, and two years in Waushara county, and two and a half years in Winnebago county, following farming in each location. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land when he settled in North Dakota, the tract being in section 25, in Gardner township, on which he has since resided. He has erected a complete set of substantial farm buildings and is now the owner of one and a half sections of well-improved land, on which he follows general farming.
Our subject was married in Waushara county, Wisconsin, to Miss Martha A. Spoor, a native of that county. Two children have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Tusten, upon whom they have bestowed the following names: Mabel E. and Edna M. Mr. Tusten is active in public affairs, and has served as assessor of Gardner township for the past three years. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Brotherhood of American Yeomen.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler  

L. L. TWICHELL, Fargo, of the ninth legislative district, was born at Hastings, Minn., September 13, 1872. Received his education in the Minneapolis high school, and is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Law .School, 1898. Came to North Dakota in 1882. Engaged in the practice of law since his graduation. Previous to that time was employed fifteen years on Twin City papers. He is unmarried. He was elected representative as a progressive republican.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]
HON. C. N. VALENTINE. Among the leading and influential citizens of Fargo, North Dakota, is this gentleman, who for fourteen years has been prominently identified with the interests of the state and is now serving as register of the United States land office. He was born in La Porte county, Indiana, May 14, 1850, and is a son of William and Samantha (Taylor) Valentine, both natives of New York, the former born in 1804, the latter in 1811. The paternal grandfather, Alexander Valentine, also a native of New York, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and later was a commissioned office in the state troops. In 1849 the parents of our subject removed from New York to Michigan, where the father followed farming until his death, which occurred in 1875. In his family were six sons, but our subject is the only one of the number living in Dakota.
On the home farm in Berrien county, Michigan, C. M. Valentine was reared to manhood, and in the public schools of his neighborhood he acquired a good practical education. For a time he was engaged in the drug trade in Three Oaks, that state, and from there removed to Benton Harbor, Michigan, where he had charge of a lumber pier and later engaged in boating, and was employed as bookkeeper for four years. In 1886 he came to La Moure, North Dakota, where he was successfully engaged in the drug business until February, 1897, when he was appointed to his present position, that of register of the land office at Fargo.
On the 27th of September, 1876, Mr. Valentine was united in marriage with Miss Lucy Wilcox, a native of Wisconsin, and to them have been born two children: Josephine and Maurice. Since attaining his majority Mr. Valentine has never wavered in his support of the Republican party and its principles, and being a man of recognized ability, progressive and public-spirited, he has been honored with some important official positions, having served as senator from the twenty-fourth senatorial district of North Dakota for four years, and county surveyor for the same length of time. Socially he is a member of the Masonic order and is a man of prominence in his community.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

MILO F. VAN DE BOGART, one of the first settlers of Cornell township, Cass county, is a man of mark in his community, and his standing as a good citizen is irreproachable. He is proprietor of a fine farm and resides in section 28, where he successfully conducts general farming.
Our subject is a native of Appleton, Wisconsin, and was born July 31, 1857. His parents, Henry and Emiline (Hubbard) Van De Bogart, were natives of Genesee county, New York, and his father was a farmer and went to Wisconsin about 1849. He enlisted in 1863 in Company D, Twenty-first Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served about one year, and died at Murfreesborough, Tennessee. The mother survives him and now resides in Minnesota. The paternal grandfather of our subject was a native of New York. Our subject was one of three children, two sons and one daughter, who grew to maturity, and the daughter and one son now residents of Minnesota.
Mr. Van De Bogart was reared and educated in Wisconsin and remained there until the fall of 1879, when he went to North Dakota and began farming on land which he entered as a homestead claim in section 20, of Cornell township, and was one of the first settlers there. He resided in that section five years and then moved to his present location in section 28, which he has fully improved and cultivates to the best advantage. He is the owner of one a half sections of good land and has acquired the property by his own labor.
Our subject was married, in 1886, to Mattie Hudson, a native of Wisconsin. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Van De Bogart, as follows: Guy H. and Paul M. Mr. Van De Bogart assisted in the organization of his township and takes an active interest in the general welfare of the same and was a member of the first township board and has since served as treasurer and school officer. He is a Republican and Prohibitionist and hold membership in the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He and family are members of the Baptist church at Tower City.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

JOHN W. VON NIEDA, a worthy representative of the moneyed interests of Fargo, North Dakota, is now president of the Red River Valley National Bank, one of the most solid financial institutions of the state. It was founded in 1881 with a capital stock of $100,000, and its first officers were L. S. Fallett, president; W. A. Kindred, vice-president and L. W. Fallett, cashier. When L. S. Fallett resigned the presidency in 1891 he was succeeded by J. W. Von Nieda, who had served as vice president for six months previous.  Stephen Gardner had succeeded Mr. Kindred as vice-president, and R. S. Lewis had succeeded L. W. Fallett as cashier, but is now serving as vice-president, while J. E. Hyde is the present cashier. The present board of directors consists of the following: W. B. Hancock, R. S. Lewis, James E. Hyde, E. A. Perry, J. E. Montgomery, F. A. Irish, J. H. Lewis and J. W. Von Nieda. They do a general banking business; have over seven hundred thousand dollars in deposits and a surplus of fifty thousand dollars, the largest in the state.
Mr. Von Nieda, of whom a portrait will be found in connection with this sketch, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 3, 1844, a son of George and Elizabeth C. (Carling) Von Nieda, also natives of Pennsylvania. He was reared in his native city and educated in its public schools. At the age of sixteen he commenced clerking in a wholesale store, and later learned the drug trade, which he followed for twenty-two years, twelve years in Pennsylvania and ten years in Fargo, North Dakota. In 1877 he removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and for five years represented the firm of Anthony Kelley & Company on the road, traveling all over North Dakota and northern Minnesota, and driving over much of the territory. Coming to Fargo in 1882, he opened a wholesale drug house, and for five years was associated in business with J. B. Raboteau. In 1892 he sold that business and has since given his entire time to his banking interests. He is a wide-awake, energetic business man of keen discrimination and sound judgment.
In Pennsylvania, Mr. Von Nieda was married in 1865, to Miss Florence Hughes, a native of that state, and to them have been born three children: Charles K., Maggie E., and George, now in Ann Arbor, Michigan. During the Civil war Mr. Von Nieda enlisted in Company K, First Philadelphia Gray Reserves, and was in active service about two months. In his political views he is a stanch Democrat, and has taken an active part in the campaigns of this state. Fraternally he is a member of the Mystic Shrine of the Masonic order and the United Commercial Travelers. He is now serving as treasurer of the Abricultural College. In business affairs he has prospered, and fortune has certainly dealt kindly with him. His life is a living illustration of what ability, energy and force of character can accomplish, and the city and state have been enriched by his example. It is to such men that the West owes its prosperity, its rapid progress and advancement.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

JOHN M. WAGAR, county commissioner for the fifth district of Cass county, is a resident of Tower City, and is well known as an early settler of that locality. He was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years in Hill township, and successfully conducted farming on the land which he purchased in the early day. He is a gentleman of ability and excellent characteristics, and is popular with the people among whom he makes his home.
Our subject was born near Cleveland, Ohio, August 1, 1849. His parents, Israel D. and Elizabeth (Pyle) Wagar, were natives of Ohio, and were farmers and followed that occupation for many years. His father is now living retired from active pursuits at the advanced age of eighty years. The grandparents of our subject, Mars and Keturah Wagar, went from Ontario county, New York, to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1818, and assisted in clearing the land on which the city of Cleveland now stands. Our subject has two brothers and five sisters.
Mr. Wagar was reared and educated in Cleveland, Ohio, and remained there till 1870, when he went to the southwestern part of Texas and served as deputy collector of internal revenue, and was stationed at Corpus Christi five years. He then returned to Cleveland and spent two years, and then passed some time in Kansas and Texas, and in the spring of 1880 went to North Dakota and purchased a tract of land in Hill township, Cass county. He resided on his farm until 1898, when he took up his residence in Tower City, where he has since made his home.
Our subject was married, in 1889, to Miss Harnett Hotchkiss, a native of Cleveland, Ohio. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wagar, as follows: George D., Isabelle E. and John B. Mr. Wagar was elected county commissioner in 1897, and is now serving as such. He is a Democrat in political faith, and is the only official in his party in the county offices, evidencing his popularity regardless of party affiliations. He has filled various local offices, and is actively interested in the general welfare of his community. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler 

JUDGE ALFRED WALLIN, now of Fargo, is a member of the supreme bench of North Dakota. In the last half-century, especially, it is seldom that one wins prominence in several lines. It is the tendency of the age to devote one's entire energies to a special line, continually working upward and concentrating his efforts toward accomplishing a desired end; yet in the case of Judge Wallin it is demonstrated that an exalted position may be reached in more than one line of action. He is an eminent jurist, an able lawyer and a leader in political circles.
The Judge was born in Otsego county, New York, February 12, 1836, a son of Charles C. and Dorothy (Strongitharm) Wallin, also natives of New York. The father was a successful physician and surgeon who graduated from the famous old medical school at Philadelphia, the Washington & Jefferson Medical College, and was engaged in the practice of his profession in his native state until 1836, when he removed to Michigan. For fifteen years he practiced in that state and then, in 1851, went to Chicago, where he made his home until called from this life, in 1898, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. The wife and mother died in Michigan in 1851. The paternal grandparents of our subject were born, reared and married in England.
Judge Wallin spent his boyhood in Michigan and attended the common schools of that state until fifteen years of age, when he was apprenticed to a tanner and currier. He soon mastered the trade and worked at the same until reaching his majority. Feeling the need of a better education he entered the academy at Elgin, Illinois, in 1858, and pursued his studies there for one year, during which time he began the study of law. Later he entered the law department of the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was admitted to practice in Allegan county, that state, in 1864, and subsequently by the supreme court of Illinois. He commenced the practice of his chosen profession at St. Peter, Minnesota, in October, 1865, and continued there and at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, until January, 1883, when he removed to Fargo, Dakota territory. He soon became a member of the law firm of Wilson & Ball, of that city, and later of the firm of Ball, Wallin & Smith, being associated with those gentlemen when the state was admitted to the Union in 1889. At the first election he was elected a member of the supreme bench and was re-elected in 1896, the duties of which position he is now most ably discharging. During his residence in Minnesota he was elected county attorney of Nicollet county and the same in Redwood county, and was also a candidate for district judge, but was defeat by Judge E. St. Julian Cox, of that state.
At Elgin, Illinois, Judge Wallin was married, in 1868, to Miss Ellen G. Keyes, also a native of New York, and a daughter of Eber and Juliette Gray Keyes, and by this union one daughter was born, Madeleine, now the wife of George C. Sikes, an editorial writer on the "Chicago Record." The Judge has always been a stanch supporter of the Republican party since its organization, and while in Minnesota stumped the state in support of its principles. He is an able jurist and is held in high esteem by the people of North Dakota.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

JAMES WALSH, Enderlin, of the fourteenth legislative district, was born at St. Augustine, Huron, Ont.. May 24, 1866. Was educated in the common schools of his native land. Came to the United States and to North Dakota, November, 1882, and he has engaged in the business of real estate and farming for the past twenty years. He is married and has six children. He was elected representative as a republican.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]

HARRY M. WASHBURN. one of the rising young men of Cass county, is engaged in the pursuit of agriculture in Rush River township, and has met with unbounded success in his calling. He enjoys a wide acquaintance who hold him in the highest esteem as a young man of ability, active public spirit and unfailing energy.
Our subject was born near Denver, Colorado, July 5, 1871, and was a son of Stellman B. and Enima A. (Morse) Washburn, natives of Maine. His father was a hardware merchant of Lake City, Minnesota, for many years, and later went to Arizona, where he engaged in prospecting for minerals and died there in 1873. The mother afterward married S. H. Knight, and she died in 1880.
After the death of his father our subject and the mother returned to Minnesota, and in 1879 went to Cass county, North Dakota, and our subject received his education in Minnesota and North Dakota. He took up his residence permanently in the latter state in 1882 and has followed farming in Cass county continuously since that date.
Our subject was married, in November, 1896, to Martha Grinke, a native of Germany, who came to America with her parents in 1886. Two children have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Washburn, upon whom they have bestowed the names of Mildred and Margaret. Mr. Washburn has filled the office of assessor and also road overseer, and has also served as a member of the school board. He holds membership in the Knights of Pythias and is popular with the people among whom he resides. He is yet in the prime of vigorous manhood and his labors for the advancement and development of his locality have placed him in an assured position as a citizen and farmer.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

JOHN S. WATSON, a leading and successful attorney of Fargo, North Dakota, and a member of the well-known firm of Ball, Watson & McClay, was born in Fountain county, Indiana, February 20, 1857. His parents, Samuel E. and Elizabeth M. (Brown) Watson, were natives of Kentucky and Virginia respectively, but for many years have been residents of Indiana. The father is a merchant.
Our subject was educated in Wabash College, from which he was graduated in 1878. Later, for two years, he was employed as a teacher in that institution and the following year was spent as a student in the law office of Hon. P. S. Kennedy, of Crawfordsville, Indiana. In May, 1881, he was admitted to the bar and the same month came to Jamestown, North Dakota, where he at once opened an office and engaged in practice until coming to Fargo, in 1892. With W. F. Ball he formed a partnership, which still exists, and they are now at the head of a large and lucrative practice. Mr. Watson was prosecuting attorney for Stutsman county, North Dakota, in 1883 and 1884, and in 1887 was made attorney for the Northern Pacific Railroad in the James river valley, in which position he continued until 1892. Since then he and Mr. Ball have controlled all the business of the company in North Dakota and western Minnesota and also that of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in this state. Mr. Watson is not only a good lawyer, but is a good business man as well, and has served as vice-president of the James River National Bank, of Jamestown, for some years. His powers as an advocate have been demonstrated by his success on many occasions, and he is an able lawyer of large and varied experience in all the courts. He has met with most excellent success during his professional career and stands high at the bar of his state. He takes no active part in political affairs, but is always willing to support any enterprise for the public good. Socially he is a Knight Templar Mason.
In 1884 Mr. Watson was united in marriage with Miss Lizzie E. Wells, a native of Wisconsin, and to them has been born one child, Constance.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

WM. WATT, Leonard, of the eleventh legislative district, was born at Stevenson, Ayrshire, Scotland, April 11, 1869. Received his education in the common schools of Scotland and Canada, and a two-year course at the University of North Dakota. Came to the United States in 1880 and to North Dakota in 1889 with his parents. Has engaged in. the business of farming since leaving school. Has held various township offices. He is married and has five children. He was elected representative as a republican.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]

EDWARD WEBER, who is well known throughout Cass county as a prosperous agriculturist, who is doing an extensive business in Everest township, is a man of ability. He makes his home in section 9, and has secured by industry and hard work the comforts of a happy country home.
Our subject was born near Landskron, Austria, September 28, 1849, and was a son of Bernhardt and Rosa (Wurst) Weber, both of whom were natives of the same province. His parents were farmers by occupation and came to America in 1868, locating in Steele county, Minnesota, with our subject, who had preceded them. The father later purchased and lived in Minnesota until 1879, when he removed to Cass county, North Dakota, and engaged in farming on land which had been purchased in 1877. He followed farming in Cass county many years and died in Casselton, in February, 1895, aged seventy-two years. The mother survives and is residing at Everett, Washington, where two sons live.
Our subject was reared in Germany till the age of seventeen years, and in 1867 came to America, landing at New York. He went at once to Minnesota, where he purchased land and followed farming until 1882. He visited Cass county, North Dakota, in 1877, in company with Frank and Joseph Langer, and purchased the section where he now resides, and also purchased a half section for his brother and father. He began the improvement of the land in 1880 and in 1883 removed his family there and has since followed farming on the land. He is now the owner of five sections, all of which is under cultivation, and during the season of 1899 raised twenty-six thousand bushels of wheat, one thousand four hundred bushels of flax and seven thousand bushels of oats. He also follows stock raising to some extent and devotes his entire attention to his agricultural pursuits.
Our subject was married in Steele county, in 1871, to Rosa Stangler, a native of Germany. Mrs. Weber’s parents came to America in 1864 and settled in Minnesota. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Weber, as follows: Julius E., Emil E., Edward L., Otto E., Gustus F., and Henrietta R., deceased. The family are members of the Catholic church and assisted in the erection of the present fine edifice of that denomination in Casselton. Mr. Weber has filled numerous township offices and has served as assessor for the past twelve years. Politically he is a Democrat and strong in his convictions.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

RALPH WEIR, a pioneer settler of Cass county, is one of the leading farmers of Dublin township, and has a fully improved farm in section 11. He has devoted his career to agricultural pursuits and is thorough, practical and industrious, and occupies a prominent position as a citizen of true worth.
Mr. Weir was born in County Grenville, Ontario, Canada, May 27, 1842, and was one of nine children, three sons and six daughters, born to George and Jane (Kennedy) Weir, both of whom were natives of Scotland. His parents emigrated to America in 1838 and passed their lives in Canada. His father was a railroad contractor and built some of the leading railroads of Canada.
Our subject was reared and educated in Canada and at Potsdam, New York, in the academy of that place, and in 1866 went to Northfield, Minnesota, but upon the death of his father, in the same year, he returned to Canada and followed farming there until 1877, when he went to Cass county, and purchased the land on which he now resides, paying $6 per acre for the land. He opened up the farm and was engaged in buying and shipping horses into North Dakota until 1886, when he removed the family to the new home and he has resided there continuously since. He now owns and operates one section of land, and has met with eminent success in his vocation.
Our subject was married in Canada, in 1866, to Harriet J. Shaver, a native of Canada and a sister of George H. Shaver, a pioneer settler of Cass county, North Dakota. Five children have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Weir, named as follows: Harry M., Jane A., now Mrs. Charles Gibson; Arthur H., Ralph K. and Maggie S. The family are members of the Presbyterian Church and are highly respected throughout that community. Mr. Weir is a man of intelligence and keeps pace with current events, and in political faith is independent. He has filled various township offices, including chairman of the board. He became a member of the Masonic fraternity while a resident of Canada, and is still associated with that order.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

HENRY WEST is one of the leading farmers of Cass county and is the owner of one section of choice land.  He was among the first settlers of Rich township and his farm, in section 30 is well improved in every particular and furnishes a comfortable home.
Our subject is a native of Lincolnshire, England, and was born on April 29 1854.  His parents Francis and Mariah (Stoddards) West, were natives of the same shire and passed their lives in England.  Our subject had three brothers and three sisters and he is the only one of the family in North Dakota. 
Mr. West was raised in England and remained there until 1872, when he emigrated to Canada and remained there eight years.  He went to Cass county, North Dakota, in 1880, and entered a homestead claim to land in section 30, in rich township, and was among the first to take up residence in that locality.  He has added to his possessions as circumstances would permit and is now the fortunate possessor of one section of land, on which he has placed the usual improvements and is regarded as one of the solid men of Rich township.
Our subject was married, in 1878, to Mary J. Newton, a native of Canada.  Mrs. West’s father, George Newton, was a native of England, and her mother was born in Canada.  Mr. and Mrs. West are the parents of five children, as follows:  William F., Albert, George H., Charles and James, all of whom are living.  Mr. West has actively participated in the affairs of his township and held various local offices and is an influential and enterprising citizen.  He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen.  Politically, he is a Republican and is firm in his convictions.
Source:  COMPENDIUM OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. Transcribed by Carol Eppright.

WILLIAM H. WHITE, the oldest continuous lumber merchant of North Dakota, is entitled to distinction as one of the most progressive and enterprising men of the state, and has for twenty-seven years been identified with the business interests of Fargo.  Upon the commercial activity of a community depends its prosperity and the men who are now recognized as leading citizens are those who are at the head of extensive business enterprises.  Mr. White is a man of broad capabilities who carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes.  On another page is presented a portrait of Mr. White.
He was born in Whiting, Addison county, Vermont, July 31, 1851, a son of Lyman P. and Phebe (Keeler) White, also natives of the Green Mountain state.  The paternal grandfather, Elijah White, was born in Massachusetts and served as a commissioned officer in the Revolutionary war, at the close of which conflict he removed to Vermont.  For some time the father of our subject was general superintendent of the Rutland & Burlington road, now the Vermont Central, and later was general fuel agent for the Northwestern Railroad Company, with office at Chicago, Illinois, for ten years.  In 1869 he removed to Minnesota, and is now living in Brainard, that state, at the ripe old age of eighty-nine years.  He had four sons, of whom three still survive.
The early like of William H. White was spent in Vermont and Wisconsin, and his education was completed at Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin.  At one time he was a resident of Chicago, where he was engaged in the lumber trade with his father, and in the fall of 1871 went to Brainard, Minnesota, but during the following spring removed to Moorehead, that state, where he was also engaged in the lumber business.  He sold the lumber which built the first bridge over which civilization entered North Dakota, it being the northern Pacific Railroad bridge across the Red river at Moorehead.  In the fall of 1873 he opened a yard at Bismarck, North Dakota, but after conducting it one year returned to Moorehead, Minnesota, and in 1874 run flatboats of lumber down the river, and it was in the fall of 1874 that Mr. White took up his residence in Fargo and has since given almost his entire time and attention to his extensive lumber trade, now owning and operating twenty-three lumber yards in the Red river valley.  He is the oldest lumberman in years of continuous business in North Dakota and has been remarkable successful, being a man of sound judgment, keen discrimination and good business ability, as well as energetic, progressive and enterprising.  For years he was a director of the First National Bank of Fargo.
In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 20, 1876, Mr. White married Miss Anna M. Williams, a native of that city.  There are consistent and faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal church and liberally support every enterprise for the public good.  Mr. White is the first member of that denomination in this state and built the first Methodist church in the state at Fargo in 1874.  He has also taken an active interest in educational work and was president of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal University at Wahpeton, North Dakota.  He is a thirty-second degree Mason and a  life-long Republican, but has never cared for the honors or emoluments of public office, though he is ever willing to aid movements calculated to advance the interests of his adopted city and state.
Source:  COMPENDIUM OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. Transcribed by Carol Eppright.

WALTER L. WILLIAMSON. He was one of the incorporators and acted as secretary of the normal school at Milnor, the first institution of its kind established within the present limits of the state of North Dakota. He is a popular member of the Masonic fraternity and is a member of all of the Masonic bodies; a Knight Commander of the Court of Honor of the Supreme Council Thirty-third S. J. U. S.; trustee of the Masonic Temple of Fargo and chairman of the committee of grievances and appeals of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota since 1893. He has been a member of the Grand Lodge since the organization of the same, and is also past master of Anchor Lodge, No. 25, of Milnor; and is deputy inspector general of North Dakota for the valley of Lisbon.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Laurel Durham

JAMES H. WILLS. Among the many prosperous farmers of Cass county, the gentleman above named, who owns a well improved estate in Wilburg township, is entitled to a foremost rank. He was one of the first settlers of that locality and has always taken an active part in matters pertaining to the up building and development of his community and is held in a high position by his associates.
Our subject was born in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, March 9, 1856, and was a son of Henry and Hannah (Tuffs) Wills. His parents came from Canada to Maine and the father was a farmer by occupation and became an early settler of Wisconsin, where they now reside. Our subject has two brothers and one sister.
Mr. Wills was reared and educated in Wisconsin and there learned the trade of wagon maker, which he followed until 1878 and then went to Cass county and entered a homestead claim and tree claim to land whereon he now resides in Walburg township. He has a full section of choice land, all of which has been brought to a high state of cultivation, and the improvements of the place make it a home of pleasant surroundings and the land furnishes a good income.
Our subject was married in Wisconsin, in 1877, to Miss Hannah Tuffs, a native of Wisconsin. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wills, as follows: Clarence V., Wilmot H., Hattie M., Myrtle V., Floy E., Hamilton W. Lila H. and Lloyd L., all of whom are living. Mr. Wills assisted in the organization of his township and is a man of recognized public spirit. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Knights of the Maccabees, and Mrs. Wills is a member of the Bee Hive of Chaftee.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

CHARLES E. WILSON, the present well-known and popular sheriff of Cass county, North Dakota, is a native of Connecticut, his birth occurring in Hartford, May 14, 1860. His parents were Roswell and Rebecca (Teaskey) Wilson, the former a native of Ireland, the latter of Connecticut. They spent the greater part of their lives in the Nutmeg state, but both died in Ontario, Canada. To them were born five children, three sons and two daughters, but our subject is the only one of the family living in North Dakota.
The early life of Charles E. Wilson was passed in Connecticut and Buffalo, New York, and at the age of thirteen years he became a resident of Chicago, Illinois, where he finished learning his trade, that of an upholsterer, which he followed there until coming to Fargo, North Dakota, in 1878. Here he was also interested in the furniture trade until 1887, when he became interested in a general business. He is a wide-awake, energetic business man and in his undertakings has met with well-deserved success.
In July, 1882, Mr. Wilson led to the marriage altar Miss Ida Seigne, who was born in Wisconsin, and they have become the parents of three daughters who are still living, namely: Addie M., Constance E. and Ellen M. Fraternally Mr. Wilson is identified with Masonic Order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Since casting his first vote he has affiliated with the Republican party, and has done all in his power to advance its interests and has served on the county central committee. He was a member of the board of county commissioners from the second district of Cass county for six years, and for the same number of years was a member of the city council of Fargo. In 1896 he was elected sheriff and so ably and acceptably did he fill the office that he was re-elected in 1898 by an increased majority. A trust reposed in him has never been misplaced and he has the entire confidence and respect of his fellow citizens.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]
LUTHER WYCKOFF. An honorable position among the farmers of Walburg township, Cass county, is willingly accorded to this gentleman by his associates. He is a pioneer settler of that region and occupies one of the well developed farms of the county, and has been a conspicuous figure in the development and extension of the great agricultural interests of that part of the county.
Our subject was born in Lansing, Tompkins county, New York, in 1821, and was a son of Joseph and Ella (Gibbs) Wyckoff. He was reared and educated in his native state and also New York. He moved to Minnesota in 1857 and followed general merchandising there and also lumbering to some extent. He resided in Minnesota until 1878, in which year he emigrated in a covered wagon to the Dakota territory and became a resident of Cass county, North Dakota, settling in Walburg township. He homesteaded the southwest quarter of section 4, and also entered a tree claim to the northeast quarter of section 8, and has resided in Walburg township since that date.
Our subject was married February 22, 1844, in Pennsylvania, to Mary Scott, a native of that state. Seven children, four of whom are living, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff, as follows: John; Anna, now Mrs. T.W. Page; Milton K.; and James H., all of whom reside in North Dakota, with the exception of one son. Mr. Wyckoff served as assessor of Cass county two terms and also as a member of the town board. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in political sentiment is a Republican. Mrs. Wyckoff died in North Dakota August 15, 1898. A portrait of Mr. Wyckoff appears on another page.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]

MILTON K. WYCKOFF was born in Pennsylvania December 22, 1854, and went west with his father and to Dakota with him. He settled on the southeast quarter of section 4 in Walburg township, Cass county, where he has since resided and is one of the prosperous farmers of his community. Mr. Wyckoff was married, in Minnesota, in 1880, to Miss Mary Combs, a native of Minnesota. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff, as follows: Mable M., Carrie E. and Walter W. Mr. Wyckoff is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Knights of the Maccabees. He is a Republican in political faith, but does not seek public preferment, and is highly esteemed.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]


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