Stutsman County, North Dakota
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HISTORY OF KENSAL
WITH
KENSAL DIRECTORY

1910

by WILLIAM SNAPE
Price 25 Cents.
PRESS OF THE CARRINGTON RECORD, 1910
CARRINGTON, N. D.

PREFACE
The gathering of material for this brief history has been a laborious, yet withal a pleasant task. The author was not favored with the "assistance of any previous work of the kind, but has secured his material from people now living in this vicinity, who though thoroughly conversant with the essential facts, were found not DO have taxed their memory with the details. Painstaking corroboration has been resorted to in almost every instance To each and every one who has given assistance in the preparation of this work grateful acknowledgement is here recorded.
The directory is meant to include the name of every single individual within the corporate limits of the village, from the snowy headed grandfather to the latest arrival from the land of motherhood.
In genealogical work the author has examined a great many street directories, but has yet to discover that he is not the first in a work of this character. In most directories the heads of families are alone given, seldom any of the minor children.
We trust that the work may be appreciated by the living and found to be sufficiently worthy for future preservation.
No skeleton has been paraded. A wealth of detail, too onerous for such a work as the present, is required to do justice to such a case, and when all is said and done no constructive results are apparent.
That unappropriated or unknown material remains in the soil of historical Kensal the author doubts not. He has presented the Kensal which he has taken to his own heart, and as such introduces her as his own friend.
WILLIAM SNAPE.
Kensal, North Dakota, April, 1910.

History of Kensal

KENSAL, NORTH DAKOTA, is situated in the northeastern part of Stutsman county on the main line of the Soo railway, 340 miles northwest of St. Paul. When in the fall of 1892 the railroad builders reached what is now the town of Kensal, its situation in the midst of an unsurpassed farming country determined the location of a station at this point.
At that time there were but two frame buildings included within the corporate limits of Kensal. One of these was a small unplastered shack, 12x16 feet, built in 1887, by Anton Frederickson on his claim at a point immediately north of the present Commercial hotel, of lumber which he had brought with him from Maple Valley, Oconto county, Wisconsin, where he formerly lived, and which he hauled overland from Pingree, North Dakota. This shack is not without honor of its own, for, after having served the purpose of assisting the original owner in proving up on his claim, which he did in 1890, it was bought by F. W. Bartz the following year and by him moved to his homestead five miles north of town (NE¼, Sec. 20-145-63). It is now incorporated in the Charles Pierce farm house, Mr Pierce having succeeded by purchase to the ownership of the Bartz homestead. The other building was a counterpart of the first, and was erected in 1888 by Julius Frederickson on his claim adjoining that of his brother, Anton, and was substituted for the small sod house made in June of 1886, located near what is now known as the Sletten property and which up to this time had served to satisfy certain demands of the homestead laws. This shack, still used as a granary by the original owner, was succeeded by a frame building, 14x18 feet, which not only for the sake of its utility, but because of its associations, was included in the archi-tectural plans for the splendid home which he completed last year. This early humble home has the honor of receiving the first bride brought to Kensal. To its shelter Julius Frederickson brought his bride, who was Miss Emma Johnson, and to whom he was joined in wedlock Nov. 1, 1893, in the Kirkwood hotel at Carrington, North Dakota, by the Rev. William H. Gimblett, pastor of the Congregational church of that place. Here, too, Ralph their eldest son, announced himself as Kensal's firstborn. Mrs. Julius Frederickson however, was not the first woman to live in the town. That honor falls to Miss Lizzie Schuler, C. W. Pottgeiser's aunt, who presided over his home at the depot. A sod barn, the type of building familiar to the Dakota pioneer, antedating in time of construction the above named building was located near by and furnished shelter to the Frederickson oxen.
The original townsite was laid out by the Minnesota Loan and Trust Co. and included exactly one quarter section of land. The northwest forty was purchased of Anton Frederickson and the northeast forty of his brother, Julius. The south half was secured

from the Metcalf Land Co., which had succeeded to the ownership of the same from the Northern Pacific railway as part of their land grant from the government. Legally speaking this included the southeast quarter (SE¼) of the southwest quarter (SW¼) and the southwest quarter (SW¼) of the southeast quarter (SE¼) of section twelve (12) in township one hundred and forty-four (144) range sixty-four (64). Also the northeast quarter (NE¼) of the northwest quarter (NW¼) and the northwest quarter (NW¼) of the northeast quarter (NE¼) of section thirteen (13) township one hun-dred and forty-four (144) range sixty-four (64). In general terms the original townsite extended from a point just west of E. W. Stroh's dwelling to the row of willows east of C. J. Croonquist's home, and from a point just north of Albert Hanson's residence to a line of which the north side of the lot on which Anton Feckler's dwelling is located is a part.
Since then numerous additions have been made, until all the dwelling houses near town are now included in its corporate boundaries. The depot, coal sheds, section house and the Osborne-McMillan elevator, of which Ellis Tyler was first manager, were erected simultaneously, but completed in the order named in the latter part of 1892 and the early part of 1893. The building used as the first Soo station and in which the first telegraph instruments were placed, was a small 10x12 shack now utilized as a hand car shed.
G.W. Hawes was the first telegraph operator and was succeeded by C. W. Pottgeiser who was the first station agent. He also represented the Rogers Lumber Co, as their first manager at Kensal. His accomodating disposition is not forgotten by the pioneers.
C. W. McDonnell became the second Soo agent, succeeding to that position in March 1893 and continued to serve the railroad and the public until February, 1905, a period of twelve years, when he established a dray line.
To John Putnam must be given the credit of being Kensal's pioneer merchant. In the fall or winter of 1892 he received a car load of lumber from Minneapolis with which he erected a building on the corner where now stands the Kensal Implement company store in which he placed a few groceries and a limited quantity of dry goods that he had secured at Carrington. His want of success compelled the closing of his store and his own removal to Minneapolis the following spring
In the fall of 1893 C. J. Croonquistopened with, a line of general merchandise in the Putnam building since which time he has done an increasing business both here and in the building which he now occupies, to which he moved in the fall of 1894.
J. S. Tufford having bought the lots on which the Putnam building stood, and desiring to erect a larger building, sold the first store building to F. W. Bartz who removed the same to his property in the eastern part of town where it has since been used as a granary.
The first hardware store was established in 1901 by C. J. Croonquist, and was located immediately in the rear of his present store building. In 1904 the Jacob Peterson Co. bought the stock and building and moved the same to the location which they now occupy. This building was consumed in the fire of 1908. The debris of the fire was soon cleared away, and an up to date building erected in its place, where this thriving concern continues to supply the needs of its increasing customers.
In 1902 H. M. Tucker & Co. opened a second hardware store, as a branch of their Courtenay business, which a few years later they sold to the Kensal Implement Co. The latter company continued the business at the original site. Their business has been greatly extended and continues to exhibit a vigorous growth.
In the winter of 1892 Dan C. Clancy erected a small building where the Croonquist store now stands in which he opened the first restaurant and where he ministered to the gastronomic needs of the bachelors of those early days. Here he also furnished lodging to a limited number of transients. This building he continued to occupy until the fall of 1893 when he sold it to Thomas Nihill, who moved it to his claim where it is still doing service.
The Soo Restaurant,of which T. M. Hjorth is proprietor, though not situated on the identical spot of the Clancy restaurant, is in the same locality, and its increasing patronage certifies to the high esteem in which Mrs. Hjorth's culinary ability is held. It is never closed.
The first blacksmith shop was built by the first blacksmith, F. W.Bartz,on the present site of the Guenther butcher shop. This lot was the first lot sold by the townsite company, and its price at that time was $35.00.
When in 1901 Gustave Guenther succeeded to the ownership of this building and became Kensal's first butcher, he removed it to make room for his present up-to-date butcher shop.
John W. Wilson, who had been the Bordulac blacksmith, now opened the shop which he later sold to N. M. Boe whose increasing business testifies to the character of his work.
The early Kensalites were not the proverbial bewhiskered westerners, for as early as 1894-5 Frank Smith, who lived on his claim west of the "Jim" river came to town on Wednesdays and Saturdays of each week and in Hugh Smith's livery barn cared for the tonsorial needs of the bachelors of those days, being the first to handle the razor in that capacity in the town. Of course he had no such pretentious establishment as our genial townsman T. R. Clemo, who about five years ago shook the Courtenay dust from his shoes that he might get some of the golden coin that the east is glad to pour into Kensal's lap for the golden grain which her rich farm lands produce.

Wheat indeed, is "golden." The production of gold in the United States in 1909, according to the preliminary report of the Geological Survey amounted to $99,232,200, which exceeds all records for the yellow metal. The grain produced in that time totaled the phenominal yield of 770,000,000 bushels, valued at almost as many dollars. More, the farmer produces $8,000,000,000 of wealth annually. Every dollar extracted from the earth in yellow metal impoverishes that locality for the same amount. Not so the agricultural community. The land if properly cared for will continue to give birth to increased wealth annually. This is evidenced by the fact that in contiguous towns where conditions are similar, if not identical, the farm yield is greater in one than the other. The better farm comforts, the increased bank account and the thrifty appearance of the village, all other things being equal, spell better farmers.
Kensal's increasing wealth is chronicled by the successive erection of her seven (7) elevators. The Osborne-McMillan led the procession in 1892, the year the railroad reached town. O J. Christiansen is the present manager. The following year the Royal, of which D. C. Dye is the manager, was erected. In 1898 the Atlantic followed and continues doing business with F. T. Kuhry in the office. Four years later (1902) the Lahart succeeded which in 1905 was sold to the Farmers Elevator Co. whose manager is J. C. Ashley. The Wood worth was built in 1907 and is now managed by J. D. Schlecht. The Independent, Hans Horgan manager, and the Minnekota, Swan Nelson manager, followed in 1907.
The Rogers Lumber Co. came as indicated above and aside from lumber sold to farmers outside of town, furnished as their first large (?) orders the lumber needed by Messrs. Clancy and Bartz for their buildings. J. S. Tufford succeeded the Soo agent, C. W. Pottgeiser, as manager of the Rogers Lumber company's Kensal interests. O. M. Wilkinson is the present manager of this thriving concern.
In 1901 Fred A. Bartlett established the Bartlett Lumber Co, where the Langworthy Lumber Co. is now doing business, to whom he sold his interests. Edward Smith was their first agent. The Langworthy yard is well represented by Guy Noel of Kirkville, Iowa, who took charge of the plant January 1st of the present year.
The first hotel, erected in 1893, called the Kensal House, and which forms part of the present Commercial hotel, was built by Anton Frederickson and leased to B. A. Thorsgard who continued as landlord for about a year when the owner assumed the role of proprietor and directed its affairs for about a year himself and until he sold it to J. Moody Watson, who was succeeded in turn by John Robert Smith, Warner and Shafer and Dan C. Clancy, the present proprietor.
The first dwelling of any importance erected within the present corporate limits was the J. S. Tufford home, which arose simultaneously with the hotel.
R. W. Miller, W. G. Tubbs and Allen G. Randall came in 1902, and having bought from the Minnesota Loan and Trust Co. the undisposed portion of the townsite, began to boost the town.
They established the first bank January 16, 1903, which was known as the First State bank of Kensal and of which A G Randall was the first cashier. Later the corporate name of this bank was changed to read the Kensal State bank when H. R. Melrose became cashier. The charter of the present First National bank, which was the successor of the Kensal State bank, bears date of October 9, 1905, and was opened for business November 21 following. George C. Jewett succeeded to the position of cashier, becoming the first cashier of the new organization. Though this bank has passed from the control of its original owners its success has remained undiminished. Glenn Farrar is the present efficient cashier, George A. Kern is assistant cashier and Charles D. Funk, bookkeeper. On his retirement from the service of the Kensal State bank H. R. Melrose became the first cashier of the Farmers and Merchants bank, which was incorporated August 29, 1904, and of which Frank A. Lenz was the first president and C. A. Klaus the first vice-president. The other presidents in the order of their election are Knud Christensen, W. G. Tubbs, F. M. Bailey and the present incumbent, Loren Nichols. This bank has had a steadily increasing patronage since its incorporation and was never in better condition than now as its recently published statement will indicate. F. L. Nichols is cashier and A. L. Casey, assistant cashier.
The first paper published in Kensal was the North Dakota State Journal, and William H. Dudley was the first editor and publisher. The office was opened in the building where now C. A. D. Kolb furnishes the most exacting with all they need in equine apparel. This was in the spring of 1902, and was brought about largely through the efforts of Messrs. Randall, Tubbs and Miller. The plant has passed through many hands. J. S. Tufford, who changed its name to that of the Kensal Journal, is the present editor and proprietor. In 1904 while E. L. Allen, as the third incumbent of the editorial chair of the North Dakota State Journal,a difficulty arose which precipitated the establishment of a new paper, the Kensal News. W. G. Tubbs, who launched this paper secured as editor, William H. Dudley, the Journal's first editor, who after the Kensal News had run a course of about six months, induced George T. Richmond to buy Allen's outfit when the publication of the new paper was discontinued and the type and machinery of the two offices merged into one and William H. Dudley resumed the editorship of the Journal.
The Messenger was established October 23, 1909, by the Rev. William Snape, pastor of the Kensal Congregational church, who was its first and is now its present editor and publisher. It is published weekly in the interests of the religious communion which he represents and for the moral and spiritual uplift of the community.
There was a weekly Kensal paper (not printed) that antedated all of these, known as the Kensal Kicker, which had the unique honor of a different editor for each week. It was read in the Fri day evening meetings of the Lyceum which met in the Soo waiting room and was attended by the settlers from "miles around," in a sense, though it could not be called a beneficial society, the Lyceum may be listed as Kensal's first lodge. And what good times were had! If the old Soo waiting room could speak it would tell of the happy faces and glad greetings of those who had looked forward all week for Lyceum night to roll around. Those were the happy days when the fewness of the people, their extreme isolation and a lean bank account precluded disintegration because of views social, political or theological. Happy days! "How sweet their memory still."
The first regular lodge to be organized in Kensal was the Modern Woodmen of America, on March 3, 1896, which now has forty-four members.
The Independent Order of Odd Fellows followed on March 21, 1900, and has attained a membership of ninety. The Knights of the Maccabees of the World was organized in September, 1902, but has at the present time only five members living in town. An unfortunate circumstance occurred at the time of organization, in the perfidy of the organizer, which lost for the Maccabees the confidence of prospective members. Only those who were previously connected with the order remained.
September 20,1905, a lodge of the Royal Neighbors of the World was instituted at Kensal, which has at the present time sixty members.
The Brotherhood of American Yeomen, organized September 30, 1907, has attained a membership of fifty-seven.
Of the sixty or more in this community who are eligble, twenty-six have associated themselves in a lodge of the Danish Brotherhood of America. The lodge was organized April 23, 1909.
The first public school was organized in a part of the J. S. Tufford dwelling and was taught by Miss Queen Gott, who was succeeded the following year by Miss Nelia Burdick. The first school house was built in 1894 on the present site of the Roman Catholic church, and in which Miss Mintie Smith was the first teacher. The growing needs of the community necessitating a larger building, the original school house was moved about 31/2 miles southeast of town where for several years it continued its beneficent work in Negosek township, when it was sold to Adolph Semke who moved it to his farm 31/2 miles southwest of the Negosek school site, where for the last six or seven years it has formed part of his dwelling house. On the site which it occupied in Kensal the second school building, much larger than the first, was erected in the year 1896. At first the interior was in one large room. Early needs however, required its division into two rooms. In 1903 the present commodious school building, consisting of five large rooms, appropriately situated in a three quarter block and conveniently located on the north side of town, was erected. The present corps of teachers includes Professor Sven Hansen, Miss Josephine Erlandson, Miss Cecelia Whelan, Miss Blanche Richart and Miss Hilda Anderson.

Kensal has not been lacking in religious opportunities. The smoke from the first locomotive had scarcely cleared away when a Congregational minister appeared on the scene and conducted a service. This was on the 3rd day of December. 1893. That first minister was the Rev. E. H. Stickney, superintendent of the Congregational Sunday School and Publishing Society for North Dakota through whose efforts, primarily, Kensal's first band of Christians found themselves in a church edifice of their own November 12, 1899, when the Kensal Congregational church building was dedicated. The Congregational church organization was effected July 13, 1894.
In the spring of 1900 the Methodist Episcopal church was dedicated and the Roman Catholics secured a place of worship when, in 1903, the present large school house to which we refer later, was completed by purchasing the building which had grown too small for the needs of the public school. This they modelled into a most delightful house of worship. With the tide of immigration a large number of that faith have settled in the vicinity of Kensal, and as a result the erection of a new $10,000 edifice is contemplated for the near future.
Rev. William Snape is the present congregational minister, Rev. H. W. Hynes is the pastor of the Methodist church and Rev. G. Bierens is the present Roman Catholic priest. Besides these the Lutherans are represented by Rev. S. K. Tollehauge, a minister of the Norwegian Evangelical Synod, who conducts services in both Norwegian and English once in three Sundays in the Congregational church.
At first only one street, Third avenue, was "cut through," and that but one block in length. With the booming of the town in 1902 this street was extended one block and widened from 70 feet to 100 feet. This second block was named Main street. This necessitated the widening of the first block to correspond with that of the second, which when completed will greatly enhance the beauty of the town, besides amply provide additional room for the increasing trade.

Two big fires entailing much loss will live in the memory of the Kensal people. The first fire occurred about 11:45 p. m., Friday, September 13, 1907. It started in the Farmers Mercantile company's store, a two story double building, and being driven by a strong northwest wind, rapidly devoured the following buildings: J. Peterson Co.'s hardware; O. E.Holmes' drug store and ice house; the Central hotel; T. R. Clemo's barber shop; Anton Neva's harness shop and H. A. Stinson & Co.'s general merchandise store. The greater portion of the goods from all the stores, save the one in which the fire originally started, were saved. The opportune arrival of the Courtenay fire department alone saved the entire block from the ravages of the flames. The Kensal Implement company's store was the only building left standing in the block when the fire had spent its force. The other fire is of recent date. Just about supper time of November 9, 1909, an overturned lantern in Frank Neva's livery barn caused the fire which, before it could be gotten under control, consumed his large barn together with sixteen head of horses and two cows, hay, harness, etc, entailing a loss of over $5,000. 'Twas in this latter fire that the fire department, organized in September, 1908, rendered such excellent service. To their efficient labors, particularly in saving the small barn in the rear of the Rollef Berg furniture store is due, in a large measure, the fact that another business block was not reaped by the fire fiend. Beside the Neva barn fire the department has been called out on three other occasions since its organization as noted above-that of the Harris barn, the slight blaze at the J. J. Clancy home and the explosion in the Soo pump house.

The first and present officers follow:
First Officers

Chief - C. A. D. Kolb; Present Officer: E. W. Stroh
Asst. Chief - E. W. Stroh Present Officer: O. M. Wilkinson
Capt. Hose Co. - James McRae; Present Officer: Ben J Jones
" Engine Co .- J. C. Ashley; Present Officer: J. J. Brom
" Hook & Ladder Co.- G. Partlow; Present Officer: Glenn Farrar
Secretary - O. M. Wilkinson; Present Officer: L. C. Lane
Treasurer - Glenn Farrar; Present Officer: Glenn Farrar

At the instance of Anton Feckler, E. D. Lum, then editor of the Kensal Journal, and other business men, a public meeting was held February 16, 1907, in the office of the Kensal Implement Company, when the Kensal Commercial club was organized. Anton Feckler was elected president and James Darcy secretary pro tem, and these gentlemen were appointed a committee to draft articles of incorporation and by-laws. At a subsequent meeting held March 12, 1907, articles of incorporation were adopted and the following board of directors elected: Anton Feckler, S. C. Shockley, H. A. Stinson, O. E. Holmes, P. O. Sletten, Anton Pederson and F. A. Russell, who in turn elected Anton Feckler, president: S. O. Shockley, vice-president; James S. Darcy, secretary. The efforts of the club were first directed toward incorporating the town of Kensal as a village and in this respect gave valuable assistance, supporting the proposition in a body and defraying a part of the expense. They were, however, reimbursed for their outlay in this respect by the village when the first year's taxes had been collected.
The club had advocated the broadening of Third avenue to 100 feet so as to correspond with Main street, and recommended the same to the first board of trustees. This became in part realized during 1909.
To their credit may also be mentioned the filling in of the team track in the railroad yards and the building by the Soo of a walk from the station to the street cross walk. During the past two winters social smokers have been held at which matters of interest to the merchants and the farmers have been discussed, all of which have been well attended and greatly appreciated. These have helped to bring about a closer relationship between the two, and this is as it should be-the interests of the two are communal, not separate.
The Commercial club is now endeavoring to obtain better passenger accommodations, and has also taken up with our representatives at Washington the matter of securing better pay for the rural mail carriers. The present officers are: Directors-O. E. Holmes, Anton Feckler, Glenn Farrar, Thomas Nihill, F. L. Nichols, Jacob Peterson and Albert Hanson; President-F. L. Nichols; Secretary and Treaurer-L. C. Lane. Kensal's latest organization was born February 8, 1910, when in response to invitations extended by L. C. Lane, ten ladies met in the town hall and formed the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Kensal Commercial club. Its object and aim is said to be the beautifying of the village; its streets, alleys and lawns; the establishment and maintenance of a public library and reading room; the maintenance of a literary and art club and the aiding of the Kensal Commercial club generally. The following officers were duly elected:
President - L. C. Lane; Vice-President - Mrs. Sam Ferguson; Secretary and Treasurer - Mrs. C. A. D. Kolb; Chairman Improvement League - Mrs. Sam Ferguson; Chairman Library Association - Mrs. C. J. Croonquist; Chariman Literary and Art Club - Miss Gladys Thompson.

Kensal was incorporated as a village in the spring of 1908 at which time the boundaries of the three wards were determined, Third avenue, Main street, the railroad and the limits of the town determining their boundaries. The First ward being that part of the town east of Third avenue, Main street and north of the railroad. Second ward includes that part of the village east of Third avenue, Main street and north of the railroad, while the Third ward includes that part of the town south of the railroad. The election to determine whether the town should incorporated as a village was held April 25, 1908, when Albert Hanson, S. C. Shockley and L. C. Lane were the inspectors of election. The vote stood 67 for and only 1 against incorporation.
First election of officers was held May 5, 1908, and the third Tuesday in March was determined upon as the date for subsequent annual elections. The first and present officers follow:
First Officers
Trustees -
1st Ward, Jacob Peterson ; Present Officers: Dan C. Clancy
2nd Ward. Anton Feckler ; Present Officers: O. E. Holmes
3rd Ward, Albert Hanson; Present Officers: J. S. Tufford

Clerk -
O. M. Wilkinson; Present Officers: George A. Kern
Treasurer-Glenn Farrar; Present Officers: Gustav Guenther
Assessor-Ben J. Jones; Present Officers: Charles McKinnon
Justice of the Peace- L.C. Lane; Present Officers: J. S. Tufford
Marshall- T. J. Walsh; Present Officers: Matt Bowers

The early residents of Kensal did not have the Soo to bring their mail daily almost to their door. Instead they were required to go to what was known as the Arrowood post office located on the George F. Armstrong place, at which time Mr. Armstrong was postmaster. Later when Henry Tufford, the father of J. S. Tufford, became postmaster, the post office was transferred to his farm, now the Drew farm. A. C. Gonant carried the mail from Fingree to Esler and also to Arrowood, making the trip on Tuesdays and Saturdays of each week until 1893 when a post office was established at Kensal and G. F. Armstrong became the first postmaster. The first post office building was a small shack brought in from his claim by G. F. Armstrong and located on the lot on which now stands Bredahl & Radke's pool room. After serving Uncle Sam faithfully it was moved by Bert George to his claim where it again figured in dealings with the government and is still doing faithful service for Joseph Pitia. On the retirement of the first postmaster, C. W. McDonnell succeeded to that position in connection with his duties as agent for the Soo. The other post-masters in the order of their service were: J. M. Watson, H. A. Stinson., H. L. Hoover, O. E. Holmes and A. J. Thompson, the present incumbent. In the summer of 1909 two rural routes were created. Martin Larson through heat and cold delivers, daily, the letters from afar to the farmers along the north route Rural Delivery No. 1, and Henry Christiansen, who served the government as a soldier for 25 or 30 years, developed such bravery that he smiles at a North Dakota blizzard as he connects the tillers of the soil along Rural Delivery No. 2, south of town, with the rest of the world.
There is perhaps no better indicator of the growth of a town than a comparison of the post office receipts for a decade. We are indebted to Miss Gladys Thompson for the following statement showing the increase in business at the Kensal post office for the period named:
Receipts from money orders issued during the year 1900, the late James Moody Watson postmaster during that period...........................................$ 968. 28
Postal receipts for the year 1900....................... 526. 00
Total............................................$ 1,494. 28
Receipts from money orders issued during the year 1909,
Andrew Thompson postmaster....................$ 23,147. 05
Postal receipts for the year 1909....................... 2,514. 07
Total............................................$ 25,661. 12
Increase in gross receipts of office during the 9 years. . . .$ 24,166. 84

The "City of the Dead" is a three acre tract in the southwestern part of town, a site donated to the township by Andrew Holm. Rev. J. Lincoln Jones, a former minister of the Congregational church at Carrington, surveyed and prepared the cemetery plan. It is controlled by an organization formed for the purpose, known as the Kensal Cemetery association, whose board of trustees is elected annually by the residents of the township. The present trustees are J. S. Tufford, Albert J. Thompson and Edward McKinnon.
Tom Dooly who died as a result of being run over by his drag on what is known as the Greenen farm, was the first one to be buried there. Mrs. Tom North who died March 25, 1899, was the first person to depart this life within the village of Kensal. The cemetery was enclosed with a suitable fence the latter part of 1909.

Before any physician had settled in Kensal Dr. A.W.McDonald of Courtenay and Dr. W. W. Wanner of Wimbledon responded to calls for their services. To Dr. F. L. Kitchen is credited the honor of being the first resident physician of the town. He opened an office and drug store in what is now the town hall, but which was then located on the site of the present up-to-date drug store presided over by O. E. Holmes, assisted by the genial Clarence Isaacson. In the spring of 1902 Dr. E. M. West became Kensal's physician and was followed in about a week by Dr. E. E. Martin. Dr. West retired in the fall and Dr. Martin remained a short while longer, leaving however soon after the coming of Dr. W. E. Longstreth who, with Dr. A. R. Curtis, the latter coming in August, 1906, assure the people of Kensal efficient professional skill second to none in the state.

Whatever the reason for violating the sentiment so long a precious heritage of the bride, that of being wooed, won and wed within the sacred precincts of her own home, whether it be the facility of securing the marriage license or the avoidance of the usual pranks played upon Cupid's captives by their friends, the compensating results are scarcely adequate. The securing of a license so as to be married in the home town is not an onerous burden. Fred Paulson who was promptly arrested and jailed as a suspicious character when he returned with his bride, though the "authorities," appraised by a wire from Valley City, were required to apprehend him as he stealthily tried to effect his escape from the south side of the train, and George C. Jewett who gave reluctant exhibition of bare back riding on a donkey through the principal parts of town, and R. W. Miller who half concluded the blanket was made of rubber, while he presented satisfactory evidence to his friends that he was capable of a high jump, a broad jump and a jump at their pleasure, will testify that they do not thus escape the interest of their friends in their new venture. The weddings which have actually taken place within the corporate limits of the village scarcely average one in two years. The unique honor of being the first bride to be married in Kensal falls to Miss Gertrude Benson whose marriage to Hans Stinson occurred December 2, 1897, by the Rev. Charles E. White in the C. J. Croonquist home when Mr. Croonquist lived in rooms over his present store building.
Kensal's first introduction to a telephone was that of a private line connecting the First National bank. Allen G. Randall's house, now the Glassner home, L. D. Thayer's home, where Anton Frederickson NOW lives, and W. G. Tubbs' rooms, over what is now Rollef Berg's furniture store. Later the Citizens Lumber Co. and Anderson's harness shop were added. At a later date C. W. McDonnell built a line from the Soo station to his claim two miles from town, connecting also with the restaurant which was in the building that afterwards became the Central hotel, and Hugh Smitn's livery barn. Another private line was that which connected the Osborne-McMillan elevator of which J. O. Johnson was manager, with his home, now the Chase residence. A fourth private line connected H. A. Stinson & Company's store with the J. M. Watson home, now the Greenen place. In 1903 J. O. Johnson and H. A. Stinson formed a co-partnership under the name of the Kensal Telephone Company and established the Kensal exchange the same year. The next year the lines were extended to McHenry and the McHenry exchange established. L. C. Lane purchased the entire outfit from the above parties, taking possession March 1, 1906. In the spring of 1907 the McHenry exchange and rural lines tributary, and one-half of the toll line were sold to a company formed at McHenry and a new 200 line capacity Kellogg switchboard was in-stalled at Kensal. The fire in the fall of 1907 proved a serious handicap, and while not apparent, the loss was in excess of $2,000. In 1908 a long stride toward was made by the construction of two rural lines aggregating 40 miles of poles and line, and the installation of the famous lockout phones which gives its patrons central energy, private line service, a service not surpassed by any exchange whether large or small. The service has been extended to 110 phones and 65 miles of poles, and it is a notable fact that it is the smallest exchange in the state giving all day and night service.
Beside the tow mill, which was erected by Postmaster Thompson in 1895, and which has an annual capacity of 500 tons, the town boasts of 2 banks, 7 elevators, 1 feed mill, 2 lumber yards, 3 general stores, 2 hardware stores, 1 hotel, 1 restaurant, 1 drug store, 1 jeweler, 1 blacksmith shop, 1 butcher shop, 1 harness establishment, 1 furniture store, 2 weekly papers, 1 telephone system. 3 livery barns, 2 draying outfits, 1 pool room, beside 1 lawyer, 2 doctors and 2 resident ministers.
The prospects for the future of Kensal were never brighter. Like all western towns it has had its problems and still has them. Some are solved, others are being solved. Questions moral, political, commercial remain. Those who know say a more laudable civic consciousness has not prevailed since the townsite was laid out. This carries with it, and rightly so, antagonism to evil of whatsoever character. We who have just come on the scene have great reason to rejoice in the fruits of the labors of our predecessors. Agriculturally the possibilities of this section are simply marvelous. The soil is a rich, dark loam, comparatively free from stones and is very productive of wheat, barley, oats, durhum wheat and flax. These grains, as to quantity, are produced in the order named. The yield some years is larger than in other years. In 1905 there was shipped from Kensal 750,000 bushels of grain and in 1902, with only about one-half the land that is now broken and planted, 190,000 bushels of flax, which averaged $1.35 per bushel, was shipped, beside other gram. It is estimated by competent authority that, notwithstanding the fact that the Great Northern cut off which will parallel the Soo fifteen miles north of Kensal will detract some grain to its line that would otherwise reach Kensal, nevertheless the shipment of grain from this place should not be under 700,000 bushels annually. This is urged because of the increased acreage of broken land and the scientific character of farming which more and more prevails on old land. It is not surprising that old land thus farmed, alter producing wheat fifteen or twenty years, has yielded thirty-three, thirty-eight and even forty-two bushels of wheat per acre, when in Great Britian. on lands that have been farmed for more than a thousand years, the yields of wheat now exceed thirty-two bushels of wheat per acre, in the Netherlands the average yields are still higher. There the soil at one time was poor because of its light character. There is no better land in the world for growing wheat than is to found around Kensal. The future in this respect is full of nrcmise. The Kensal soil is not only suited to growing wheat but will produce vegetables of all kinds, particularly roots. No better peas can be found in the country for canning than are grown here. What a splendid opportunity for a cannery!
Dairying will more and more engage the attention of the farmer, a creamery being a not very remote certainty. When the large farms are cut up into smaller tracts and each quarter section is supporting a family, then land which can be had for thirty-five and forty dollars per acre now will be considered cheap at double that price.
The character of the water at Kensal insures the stopping of all passenger trains, guaranteeing excellent passenger and mail service.
Lodges are numerous and well patronized. Religious opportunities were never better, school facilities never so commensurate and commercial openings never so attractive.
With the breaking up of winter and the resumption of immigration westward, Kensal will no doubt welcome her share of the cream of prospective settlers.



1910 Directory

Family Surname

First Name

Alex

Anton

 

Mrs. (Nettie)

 

Myrtle

 

Leonora

 

Harry

 

Baby

Allbaugh

Elijah

 

Mrs (Rowena)

 

Velva

 

Evelyn

 

Leonard

Allbaugh

Floyd

 

Mrs. (Ella)

 

Arthur

 

Blanche

 

Edith

 

Dewey

Anderson

Frances

 

Jennie

Anderson

Hilda C.

Ashley

J. C.

 

Mrs. (Elizabeth)

 

Sheldon

 

Glenn

 

Lona

Austed

O. C.

 

Mrs. (Josephine Peterson)

 

Peter

 

Olga

 

Evelyn

 

Baby

Bartz

F. W.

 

Mrs. (Louise)

 

Vella

Berg

George

 

Rollef

Boe

N. M.

 

Mrs. (Emma)

 

Norman

Bowers

Matthew

 

Mrs. (Emily)

Bredahl

Christian

 

Mrs. (Anna D.)

 

Edward

 

Albert

Brewer

J. H.

 

Mrs. (Delia)

Brom

John J.

 

Mrs. (Carrie)

 

William

 

Benjamin

 

Henry

Brown

H. C.

 

Mrs. (Margaret)

 

Oscar

 

Margaret

Burt

William

 

Mrs. (Emma)

 

Baby

Butz

Henry

 

Mrs. (Mary Jane)

Carr

J. S.

Casey

A. L.

Caven

John

 

Mrs. (Jane)

 

Walter L.

 

William

 

Arthur

Chapelle

Nina

Chase

R. F.

 

Mrs. (De Nee)

 

Mabel

 

John

 

Elizabeth

 

Baby

Christensen

Christian

Christensen

Henry

 

Mrs. (Emma)

Christensen

Knud

 

Mrs. (Christiana)

 

Christine

 

Maria

 

Christian

 

Holger

 

Astrid

 

George

 

Leta

 

Louise

Christopherson

O. B.

 

Mrs. (Lyda)

Clarice

 

Christy

Ira M.

 

Mrs. (Emma)

 

Laura

Jennie

 

 

Rush

 

Ruth

Claflin

Mrs. Ellen

Clancy

D. C.

 

Mrs. (Sarah)

 

Daniel

 

Grace

 

James

 

Thomas

 

John

 

Cecelia

 

Francis

Clancy

Mrs. John J. (Johanna)

 

Irene

 

Lyda

 

Ethel

 

John

 

Maragret

 

Helen

Clark

Bert

 

Mrs. (May)

 

George

 

Nellie

 

Cora

Clemo

T. R.

 

Mrs. (Ruby)

Croonquist

C. J.

 

Mrs. (Emma)

 

Herbert

 

Anna

 

Ernest

 

Raymond

Curtis

Dr. A. R.

 

Mrs. (Margaret)

Davey

Michael T.

 

Mrs. (Ella)

 

Maria

 

Henry

 

Gabriel

 

Rosella

 

Vera

 

John Cecil

Drycourt

Joe

DuBois

G. W.

 

Mrs. (Rose)

Garfield

G.

 

Viola L.

 

Pearletta R.

Eaton

Charles (West)

Edgworth

Fred

 

Mrs. (Effie)

 

Myrtle

Ekron

Olaf

 

Inner

Emery

A. D.

 

Mrs. (Needa)

 

Grace

Erlandson

Josephine

Fahnrech

Ludwig

 

Mrs. (Paulina)

Farrar

Glenn

 

Mrs. (Amelia)

 

Ruth

Feckler

Anton

 

Georgiana

 

Max

 

Richard

 

Wilfrid

Ferguson

Sam L.

 

Mrs. (Frances)

 

Laura

Frederickson

Anton

 

Mrs. (Betsy)

 

Henry

 

Edna

 

Delia

Frederickson

Julius

 

Mrs. (Emma)

 

Ralph

 

Vilia

 

Florence

 

Bert

 

Waldo

 

Garfield

 

Beulah

 

Ruby

Frederickson

Sophie

Frederickson

Sophus

 

Mrs. (Christine)

 

Clifford

 

Lilly

 

Jennie

 

Clarence

 

Otto

 

Baby

Funk

Chas. D.

Glassner

Frank

 

Mrs. (Helen)

 

Ralph

Gossel

John

 

Mrs. (Elizabeth)

 

Myrtle

 

Datrice

 

Sadie

 

Violet

 

Leone

Guenther

Gustav

 

Mrs. (Mary)

 

Arnold

 

Amy

 

Frank

 

Bertha

 

Gustav

 

Emma

 

Winnie

Guslander

William

 

Mrs. (Elizabeth)

 

Charles

 

Louise

 

Elvira

 

Adama

 

Stella

 

Martha

 

Vesta

 

Violet

 

Wilbert

Hansen

Albert

 

Mrs. (Christena)

Hansen

Prof. Sven

Hjorth

T. M

 

Mrs. (Anna)

 

Louise

 

Hans

 

Theodore

Holmes

O. E.

 

Mrs. (Hannah)

 

Julia

 

Olga

 

Florence

Hagan

Elvin

Horgan

Hans

 

Mrs. (Selma)

Harold

Orville

Hunter

Mrs. Lizzie

Hynes

Rev. H. W.

 

Mrs. (Agnes)

 

Joyce

Isaacson

Clarence

Janke

Martha

Jensen

Peter

Johnson

Anton

Johnson

Emma

Johnston

Orson

Jones

Ben J.

 

Mrs. (Ella)

 

Robert

Joos

Elizabeth

Jorgenson

Sophia

Kern

George A.

 

Mrs. (Nora)

 

James

Kleflar

Henry

 

Mrs. (Henrietta)

 

Clara

 

George

 

Edna

 

Margaret

 

Freda

 

Ruth

 

Mabel

Kline

John

Kolb

C. A. D.

 

Mrs. (Hilma)

 

Helen

Kuhry

Fred T.

 

Mrs. (Winnie)

Leet

George

 

Mrs. (Nora)

Lindholm

Ellen

Litke

William

Lloyd

Lewis

 

Mrs. (Fanny)

 

Esther

 

Harold

 

Eva

Lane

L. C.

 

Mrs. (Louise)

 

William

Longstreth

Dr. W. E.

 

Mrs. (June)

 

George

Maizel

Hilma

Malm

Harrold

McKinnon

Edward

 

Mrs. (Christine)

McKinnon

C. Ed.

 

Mrs. (Orpah)

 

Merritt

 

Erwin

 

Flora

McGuire

Thomas

 

Mrs. (Rose)

 

Mary

 

Thomas

 

Joseph

Mickelson

Lewis

Moss

Frank

 

Mrs. Louise

 

Vernon

Nelson

George E.

 

Mrs. (Permelia)

Nelson

Julius

Nelson

Lars

 

Mrs. (Christena)

 

Anna

Nelson

Swan

 

Mrs. (Augusta)

 

May

 

Hazel

Neva

Frank

 

Mrs (Rose)

 

Frank

 

Anna

 

Mary

 

Rose

Nichols

F. L.

 

Mrs. (Gene)

 

Francis

 

Henry

 

Elizabeth

 

William

 

Mable

Nihill

Thomas

 

Mrs. (Ruth)

 

Lizzie

 

John

 

Madge

 

Mary

North

Ida

O'Donnell

Patrick

Parks

E. O.

Partlow

Fred

 

Mrs. (Anna)

 

Lester

 

Ruby

 

Ella

 

Elsie

Partlow

Grant

 

Mrs. (Gertrude)

 

Ellen

 

Foda

 

Urban

 

Dewey

 

Gertrude

 

Lloyd

Perry

Otis

 

Mrs. (Minnie)

 

Lottie

 

Vincent

 

Eva

 

Ora

 

Jessie

 

Vera

 

Olive

Peterson

Frank O

 

Mrs. (Anna)

 

Vernon

 

Merton

 

Fern

 

Irene

Peterson

Jacob

 

Mrs. (Johanne)

 

Mamie

 

Hennie

 

James

Petrek

Mike

Pierson

Aurora

Radke

Fred

 

Mrs. (Bertha)

Richart

John E.

 

Blanche

Roach

John

 

Mrs. (Sarah)

 

Wililam (sic)

 

Hazel

Rounce

A. A.

Savage

Thomas

 

Mrs. (Mary)

 

Doris

 

Patricka

Schlecht

J. D.

Smith

Blanche

 

Cecil

Smith

J. R.

 

Mrs. (Alice)

 

Mary

 

James

 

Henry

Snape

Rev. William

Solberg

John

Sonnestahl

Gustar

 

Mrs. (Laurina)

 

Frederick

Spermarsky

Mary

Spitzer

John

Stroh

E. W.

 

Mrs. (Nettie)

 

Corinne

 

James

 

Hugh

 

Charlotte

Stromsted

A. W.

Schultz

Pearl

Thomas

Mrs. Loa

Thompson

Andrew

 

Mrs. (Sarah)

 

Andrew J.

 

Gladys

 

Bird

Thompson

Gertrude

Thayer

C. E.

 

Mrs. (Esther)

 

Lyle

 

Lester

 

Leone

Tufford

J. S.

 

Mrs. (Mary)

 

Arthur

 

Lydia

 

Ruth

Vernon

Warren

Walters

William

 

Mrs. (Lizzie)

 

John

 

Simeon

 

Minty

Wench

Polly

Wells

Edward

Whelan

Cecelia

Wilkinson

O. M.

 

Mrs. (Edna)

 

Roy

Williams

Judd E.

 

Mrs. Dorothy

 

Maud

Wiseman

Herman

Wright

Joseph J.

 

Mrs. (Julia E.)

 

Oscar

 

Lucy

 

William

 

Frank

 

Oma

 

Alta

Young

Otis

 

Mrs. (Bertha)

 

Helen

Zuelke

Martha

Recent Departures
Some are on their farms for summer:

Christianson

O. J.

Collison

Guy

Cransey

Joe

Croonquist

Ocsar (sic)

Gossel

Lydia

Hansen

Christian

Horgan

Clara

 

Gena

House

Mrs. (Cordelia)

 

Mrs. (Katherine M.)

 

Arthur Harry

Hogarth

John

Kramer

Joe

Laqua

Joseph A.

Leet

Fred

Matthews

Bob

McDonnell

C. W.

 

Mrs. (Emily)

 

Wesley

Mickling

Fred

Miner

C. K.

Noel

Guy U.

 

Mrs. (Melitta)

 

Corinne

Netzinger

P. J.

 

Mrs. (Emma)

 

Vivian

 

James

 

Fern

Publinski

Stella

Radke

Arnold

Richardson

Mrs. (Hilda)

 

Hazel

Sorenson

Nels B.

 

Axel

Swanson

Arthur

Tufford

Chester

Zuelke

Ella




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