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Wells County ND
Biographies


JAMES A. ATKINSON occupies a prominent place as a real estate dealer of Sykeston, Wells county. To his influence is due much of the present solid prosperity of Wells and Stutsman counties, wherein he has operated extensively. He is a man who commands respect wherever he is known and ably seconds all projects which tend to the protection and upbuilding of the business interests of his locality.
Our subject was born in Belmont county, Ohio, August 1, 1839, and was a son of Charles and Susan (Bowman) Atkinson, the former of English and the latter of Swiss descent. His father was a farmer by occupation and was born in America. Mr. Atkinson was raised on his father s farm in Ohio and attended the country schools and at the age of twenty years went to Davenport, Iowa, in company with his father and settled in the country and later started in the coffee and spice business in Davenport and was engaged in business and also in farming in Iowa for about twenty years. He went to Jamestown, North Dakota, in the spring of 1880 and began farming and dealing in real estate and was among the early business men of Jamestown and had a large farm south of there. He became interested in Wells county lands in 1882, since which time J.A. Atkinson & Son have aided as much perhaps as any other firm in the development of the possibilities of the agricultural and stock raising and dairying interests of North Dakota, and they now conduct an extensive real estate business in Sykeston, where the family located in 1895.
Our subject was married, at Davenport, Iowa, in 1867, to Miss Sophia Severn, who is of English descent, and a daughter of John Severn, of Toronto, Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson are the parents of five children, as follows: Laura A., Edith S., Charles S., Annie L. and Ralph J. The four older children were born in Iowa and the last named in North Dakota. Mr. Atkinson is a member of the Masonic fraternity and has passed the thirty-second degree of the order. Politically, he is a Republican and has taken an active part in affairs pertaining to local government.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]



GUSTAV A. BRAUER
, clerk of the district court of Wells county, is a young man of intelligence and ability, and is rapidly rising to prominence by dint of his own efforts, backed by the indomitable will and industrious spirit which came to him from thrifty and honest ancestors. Our subject was born on a farm in Fillmore county, Minnesota, October 16, 1875, and was a son of F. F. and Christine Brauer, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Norway. His father left his native country when fourteen years of age and went to Denmark, and then to Norway, and after attaining his majority came to America with his family and settled in Minnesota. Mr. Brauer was the fifth in a family of nine children, and was raised on the farm and assisted with the work, and at the age of fifteen years began his education at Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, where he attended school four years and received a good education. Ill health forced him to give up his studies and he returned to the farm. He taught several terms in both Norwegian and English schools in Minnesota and followed the work about two years. In 1897 he went to North Dakota and in the spring of that year located at Harvey, where he taught school and later commenced a real estate, loan and insurance business. He took government land in 1898, and still retains his farming interests, but makes his home in Fessenden. He is also interested in the First Bank of Harvey, of which institution R. W. Aiken is president. Mr. Brauer was elected to his present office as clerk of district court of Wells county, in 1898. He has resided in North Dakota comparatively few years, but he is widely known as a young man of sterling qualifications and has a host of friends, and is deservedly held in high esteem by them.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley]  


MARSHALL BRINTON
, county judge of Wells county, North Dakota, is a gentleman of exemplary character, and is widely and favorably known. He is the owner of one of the finest farms in the vicinity of Fessenden, and until recently resided thereon and engaged extensively in general farming and sheep culture. He is a man of intelligence and active public spirit, and has been a potent factor in promoting the political and social welfare of that region. A portrait of Judge Brinton is presented on another page.
Our subject was born on a farm near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1839, and represents the eighth generation descended from William Brinton, who went to Pennsylvania with William Penn in 1682. William Brinton participated in the battle of Brandywine. The father of our subject, Joseph E. Brinton, was a farmer by occupation, and the mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Mary Marshall, came from England in 1816, at the age of three years, and settled in Pennsylvania. The paternal grandmother of our subject was of Irish descent.
Marshall Brinton was the eldest in a family of seven children, and was raised on a farm and attended the common schools and the high schools and received al liberal education. After leaving home he first worked in the milling business, and manufactured flour for the city of Wilmington; then drifted westward and north and located in the copper mines of Michigan, and was connected with mining properties there several years. He taught school several terms in Michigan, and clerked in the office of the mining company, and then assumed charge of the surface work, and later furnished lumber, wood and fuel, under contract, for the mining company. He was in Michigan from 1872-83, except nine months in the Black Hills, in 1879, and spent two thousand dollars prospecting and made nothing. He was postmaster at Delaware Mine, Michigan, several years, and was elected township superintendent of schools, and later made a member of the board of county school superintendents, or school examiners, as they are known in that state. He settled in Wells county, North Dakota, in township 146, range 69, in 1884, and his farm was one and a half miles from Sykeston. He took a preemption in 1883 and built a claim shanty and began farming, and the following year located permanently on the place. His buildings were the best in the county at the time and were destroyed by fire in 1890, the fire starting by accident. He then removed to the homestead on section 32 in the same township and range, where he continued farming until 1896, and then removed to Fessenden. He was employed as clerk in the county offices there, and in May, 1897, was appointed county judge to fill a vacancy, and in 1898 he was elected to the same office, which he is now filling. He has three hundred and twenty acres of land in Wells county, on which he has arrangements for the operation of general farming, and his barn is a substantial, commodious structure, 64x92 feet, while the land is equal to any in the county.
Mr. Brinton was one of the organizers of Wells county, and was the first public officer in the county, being appointed county commissioner by Governor Ordway. He was the first acting county superintendent of schools, and organized the first seven schools of the county, and was elected a second time as superintendent. He is a member of the Congregational church, and is active in church work, and organized Sunday-schools in northern Michigan while a resident of that state. He is prominent in secret society circles, has held all the chairs in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a Master Mason, and a member of the Knights of the Maccabees, and is record-keeper for the local lodge of the last named order. In politics he is a Republican, and during the 1896 campaign and since, he has taken a leading and active part in the affairs and interests of the Republican party of Wells county.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]


GEORGE BRYNJULSON
, county sheriff of Wells county, residing in Fessenden, carries on an extensive farm near that city and is one of the wide-awake and well-to-do citizens of the county. He began for himself in North Dakota without means and has steadily risen by his own efforts and is now possessed of a comfortable competence and an enviable reputation. Our subject was born on a farm in Telemarken, Norway, in 1858. His father, Talaf Brynjulson, was a farmer and came to America in 1861 and settled in Wisconsin. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Aslang Jorgendatter. Seven children were born to this worthy couple, our subject being the second in order of birth. He was reared on a farm in Wisconsin until eight years of age and then removed to Lincoln county, South Dakota. The father took government land in 1868 and still resides thereon. Our subject remained on the farm in South Dakota and attended the country school. There were but few settlers in that locality during their early residence there and they lived under the protection of government Winchesters and experienced four Indian scares. Mr. Brynjulson left home at the age of seventeen years and drifted through the country in South Dakota, following the stone mason's trade from 1875-1894. In 1883 he went to Jamestown and spent three years in the vicinity of that city and Bismarck working at his trade. He settled on land in township 147, range 71, in Wells county, taking it under a "squatter's right," in 1883 and 1885 took up his residence thereon. He had a sod shanty, but no barn and farmed with oxen the first six years and from 1883-1887 lived alone and engaged in grain raising principally. He followed the stone mason's trade and farming and threshing in South Dakota from 1891 to the summer of 1893 and then returned to his North Dakota farm. August 19, 1896, fire destroyed his barn, a fine structure, and his son, John, who was in the burning building, lost his life. He has had varied experiences with prairie fires and severe storms and in 1886, while on his way to South Dakota via the stage, stopped to take dinner and started for Ellendale, when a storm broke and they lost their road. Mr. Brynjulson was the only one familiar with the prairie and he guided the party for some time, but they finally refused to follow him farther and he left them and walked to Ellendale and then sent a team to meet them. One of the occupants of the stage, a young lady, afterward died from the exposure. Our subject has added to his possessions and is now the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of land, on which he has erected a set of good buildings. His barn was blown to pieces during the summer of 1899 and he has since built a 40x64-foot structure with basement, and he also has a large granary and other farm buildings. A grove of trees is near the house and the entire farm presents a pleasing appearance. Our subject was married, in 1887, to Miss Hannah Dolan, a native of Norway. Mrs. Brynjulson was a daughter of Gerhart Dolan, who still resides in Norway. Mrs. Brynjulson died November 15, 1890, leaving two children, Tolaf and John, the latter now deceased. Mr. Brynjulson was married to Miss Ella Dolan, a native of Telemarken, Norway, in 1894. Mrs. Brynjulson came to America in 1892. Three children have been born to this union, as follows: Alma, Beatta and Olga. Mr. Brynjulson was elected sheriff' of Wells county in 1896, and his popularity is best evidenced by the fact that he was re-elected in 1898, and is now serving his second term. He also holds the office of postmaster at Bawdon, North Dakota, his appointment being made March 30, 1900. He has held numerous school offices and takes an active interest in affairs of a public nature. Politically, he is a Republican and an earnest worker for party principles.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley]

ALTON G. COVELL, one of the leading merchants of Sykeston, Wells county, is also interested largely in farming and stock raising near that city. He is a man of excellent education and has attained a prominent position as a worthy citizen and business man.
Our subject was born on a farm in Erie county, Pennsylvania, June 8, 1854. His father, W. W. Covell, was of English descent and was a farmer throughout his career. The great-grandfather of our subject, James Covell, served in the Revolutionary war. The mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Ellen E. Barber, was of English descent and her family settled in Rhode Island in colonial times.
Mr. Covell was the fourth in a family of seven children and attended the country schools and took an academic course and began reading law in 1877 and was admitted to the bar in 1880 in Pennsylvania. A partnership was then formed with his brother, C. L. Covell, and he remained with him two years and in 1883 came to North Dakota and located at Carrington and began the practice of his profession, in which he continued there three years. He located at Sykeston in 1886 and practiced law exclusively three years and during 1888-1889 was postmaster at Sykeston. He established a general store in 1890 and now conducts one of the most extensive business concerns of that city. He was elected state's attorney in 1888 and served one term. He purchased a farm of four hundred and eighty acres in 1891, on which he has a complete set of good farm buildings and engages principally in stock raising.
Our subject was married, in 1885, to Miss E. C. Butts. Mrs. Covell was born and raised in Minnesota and is of English-German descent, a daughter of D. J. Butts, who is engaged in farming in North Dakota, and was an early settler of that state, having settled there in 1881. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Covell, as follows: William M., born March 23, 1886; Ellen E., born March 8, 1888; Clarence L., born March 8, 1890, and Alice R., born June 14, 1895. Mr. Covell was appointed United States commissioner in 1898 by Judge Amidon, of Fargo, and now serves in that capacity. He is a member of the Congregational church and is a man of exemplary character and deservedly popular with the people. ["Compendium of History and Biography of ND", Transcribed by Christi Boyer]


JOHN M. COVELL
Among the foreign-born residents of Wells county, who are thoroughly identified with American progress, may be noted Mr. Covell.  He owns a farm in section 24 of township 147, range 70, where the usual improvements have been made and such arrangements consummated as make it a comfortable home.

 Our subject is a native of Wales and was born May 13, 1856.  His father Joseph Covell, was a farmer in Wales.  The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Margaret Evans.  Mr. Covell was the third in a family of six children and was raised on a farm and received a limited schooling.  His mother died when he was but ten years of age and he then left home and earned his own livelihood from that time, working at farm labor.  He went to Wisconsin in 1882 and spent two years in Winnebago county, working at farm labor, and in 1884 went to Wells county, North Dakota.  He entered claim to government land in township 147, range 70, and settled on section 26, and then worked for others the first year and in 1885 began farming his land.  He had one year s savings to make a start with and built a shanty 12x12 feet and bought three old horses and had a dugout for a barn.  His first crop yielded twenty-four and a half bushels per acre, and he had about twenty-five acres.  His residence, built in 1892, was destroyed by fire, caused by a defective flue, in 1895, and in 1887 fire destroyed his dugout barn and two horses.  He has had many exciting experiences with prairie fires.  He now has a farm of six hundred and forty acres, with about five hundred under cultivation, and has a fine grove started.  He has erected a complete set of good farm buildings and with the necessary machinery is fitted for general farming and his estate evidences good management.  He has twenty-three head of cattle and eleven horses and follows mixed farming.
Mr. Covell visited Wales in 1893 and upon his return was accompanied by Miss Deana Williams.  Miss Williams filed on land in North Dakota and presently became the wife of Mr. Covell.  Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Covell, as follows:  Jennie, Nellie and Emily.  Mr. Covell is a Republican in political faith and has attended several conventions as a delegate and is an earnest worker for party principles.
Source:  Compendium of History and Biography . Transcribed by Carol Eppright.


EDWIN DIMICK. Among the energetic and prosperous business men of Harvey, Wells county, who have acquired a sound financial standing and an enviable reputation as a citizen, may well be noted the name of Edwin Dimick. He is engaged in the meat business and is a man of good management and unbounded enterprise.

Our subject was born on a farm in Ohio, in 1853. His father, Royal Dimick, was a farmer throughout his life and was of English descent, but born in Connecticut. The mother was of English descent, but her parents were born in the state of New York.
Our subject was one of twins, the first born of the family, and was raised on the farm in Ohio. At the age of twelve years he began for himself and worked out at farm labor and received limited educational advantages, gaining his knowledge by his own efforts. He followed farming and various business enterprises before going to North Dakota in the spring of 1882 in company with his brothers, George and Addison Dimick. They settled in Eddy county after having spent one year near Grand Forms and engaged in stock raising. In 1891 they located a ranch twenty-two miles southeast of Harvey in McLain county, and conducted stock raising there until the spring of 1896, when they went to Harvey and established in the livery business. After two years they returned to the ranch and in the spring of 1899 started the meat market at Harvey which they still conduct. The business has proved successful and they enjoy a liberal trade. When they went to Wells county it was a waste prairie and Mr. Dimick and brothers have witnessed the growth and aided in the upbuilding of the town and country.
Our subject is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and in political faith is a Republican. He went to Dakota without means and snow one of the solid men of that locality.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

JAMES T. DODDS, principal of the Fessenden high school, has devoted the greater part of his career to educational work, and is an able instructor and popular with the people. He was born on a farm, in Ontario, Canada, in 1868. The father of our subject, Charles Dodds, was born near Rockburghshire, in southern Scotland, and came to America at the age of fifteen years, and was a farmer by occupation near Seaforth, Ontario. Our subject's mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Torrance, was born in the northern part of Ireland. Eleven children were born to this worthy couple, our subject being the second in order of birth. He was reared on his father's estate, and attended the country school until 1880, in which year he lost his right arm by accident. He attended the Seaforth Collegiate Institute at Seaforth, and graduated from that institution in 1888, and then attended Clinton Model School. He began his work as a teacher in 1889 and followed the same three years in the country schools, and then attended Ottawa Normal School, graduating in June, 1893, after which he taught the graded school, and in 1894 accepted the position of principal of No. 3, Gray School, near Brussels, Canada, where he continued four years. He went to Wells county, North Dakota, in 1897, and taught the Harvey School three months, and in the fall of 1898 accepted his present charge, as principal of the Fessenden High School. Mr. Dodds is a young man of excellent ability, and his time and attention are given wholly to his work, and he has gained a position commendable in every way as a teacher and citizen. His physical disability did not prevent him from attaining a high educational standard, and he is classed among the earnest teachers who are aiding in raising education to its proper position among the people of that state. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Canadian Order of Foresters. Politically Mr. Dodds is identified with Republicanism.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley]  


HERBERT J. FINCHER,
one of the pioneer settlers of Wells county, North Dakota, has been engaged in various enterprises in that locality, in all of which he has met with good success. He is a carpenter and mason by trade and follows the former in Manfred at present.
Our subject was born in Spencerport, Monroe county, New York, August 8, 1861. His father, Jesse E. Fincher, was a carpenter by trade, and the family came to America in early Colonial days. The grandmother of our subject, Betsy Colby, was the first white girl born in Monroe county, New York, the family coming from England to Vermont and later settling in New York state. The grandfather of our subject, David R. Hitchcock, served in the war of 1812.
Our subject was the second in order of birth and the only son in a family of three children, and at the age of four years went with his parents to Pennsylvania, and his father worked at carpentering at Corea. When he was five years of age the family settled in Washtenaw county, Michigan, where our subject was reared. He received a common-school education and later attended the Seminary, and he learned the carpenter s trade with his father. In 1886 he went to Wells county, North Dakota, and entered claim to government land. He had a span of mules and one horse, and he erected a claim shanty and a sod barn, and after the first year farmed with oxen five or six years. The Soo Railroad was built through that locality in 1893 and the town of Manfred was started, the town site being the homestead farm owned by his father, Jesse E. Fincher. Our subject s house was the first house in the town, with the exception of the railroad section house, and was a 22x21-foot building one story in height. Mr. Fincher carried mail under a government contract between Fessenden and Oberon for three years, since which time he has devoted his time to plying his trade, and is one of the skilled workmen of that town. During pioneer days for the first two or three years he derived a great share of his income from hauling buffalo bones to market, and his nearest railroad town was Sykeston, twenty-five miles distant.
Our subject was married, at the age of twenty-two years, to Miss Eliza Cone. Mrs. Fincher was born on a farm in Monroe county, Michigan, and was a daughter of Erastus S. Cone, a merchant and land owner. Her family are Americans for many generations back. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Fincher as follows: Jennie M., born November 192 1885; Jessie J., born February 24, 1888; Cora M., born November 18, 1889; Grace A., born August 9, 1895; and Nellie H., born August 17, 1897. The eldest was born in Michigan and the other children were born in Wells county, North Dakota. Mr. Fincher and wife are members of the Congregational church, and Mr. and Mrs. Fincher hold membership in the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. He is independent in political faith.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]


JOHN F. GOSS
, postmaster of Kiner, North Dakota, is one of the successful grain raisers of Wells county, and has a fine farm eight hundred acres in extent.  His home is in township 149, range 69, where he was one of the first settlers of Wells county, and has been identified with the advancement and development of the great agricultural interests of the locality.
Our subject was born in Grundy county, Illinois, April 9, 1863.  His father, Perry Goss, was born in Ohio, and was a farmer by occupation.  The great-great-grandfather of our subject was born in Boston Barracks, Massachusetts, prior to Revolutionary times.  The mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Mary F. Spillman, was born in Kentucky, and her people were of Scotch-Irish descent.  Her grandfather, William Spillman, was a farmer in Kentucky.
Mr. Goss was the sixth in a family of nine children, and was raised on the farm in Illinois, and attended school a short time at the Normal School in Morris, Illinois, and then attended one winter in the Business School at Oberlin, Ohio, spending his summers in the meantime at farm work.  At the age of twenty years he began teaching, and continued thus three winters, working on the farm summers and during this time made a trip to North Dakota and entered a tree claim and pre-emption in 1885.  He proved his pre-emption claim during the same year, and lived in a shanty, 7x9 feet, with a sod addition seven feet.  He filed on the tree claim in 1885, and this was the first claim filed in township 145, range 69.  He now has six hundred and seventy-five acres of his farm under plow and the balance of the eight hundred acres in in pasture.  He has a commodious and substantial residence, good barn, granary, machine shed, and all the necessary machinery for extensive farming, and his entire estae is well improved and conducted on a prosperous basis.
Our subject was married, in the spring of 1888, to Vina K. Kiner.  Mrs. Goss was born and raised in LaSalle county, Illinois, and was a daughter of Jacob P. Kiner, a farmer by occupation and a carpenter by trade.  Her parents were born in Pennsylvania and were of Dutch descent, and her grandfather was a preacher, and worked at the cooper s trade.  Three children, all of whom were born in North Dakota, have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Goss, as follows: Pearl I., born October 26, 1889; Loyle K., born May 29, 1891; and Perry J., born October 22, 1899.  The postoffice of Kiner was named in honor of Mrs. Goss, her maiden name being given to the office, and Mr. Goss was appointed postmaster in 1890, and has held the office since that date.  He was the first treasurer of his township, and has served as school treasurer six years and was again re-elected in 1900.  He takes an active part in public affairs of his township and county.  In politics he is a Republican.
Source:  Compendium of History and Biography . Transcribed by Carol Eppright.


OTTO H. GRAUPMANN
, one of the earliest settlers of Wells county, is proprietor of as fine a farm as can be found within the limits of the county and his home is in township 147, range 72. He conducts general farming extensively and in company with his father owns one thousand two hundred and eighty acres of land, of which he now has charge, his father having retired from active pursuits.
Our subject was born on a farm near Fond du Lac, in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, December 18, 1864. His father, Frederick Graupmann, was born in the southern part of Germany and came to America in 1854 and was married in this country. He was an early settler of Wisconsin, and also became in after years an early settler of North Dakota. He served one year in Company A, Forty-fifth Wisconsin, till the close of the war and followed farming in Wisconsin until taking up his residence in North Dakota. The mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Mary Storm, was born in Germany and came to America in 1856.
Mr. Graupmann was raised on the Wisconsin farm and attended school in a log cabin and received the greater part of his schooling there. He left home at the age of eighteen years and went to Wells county, North Dakota, in 1884, and worked at teaming and freighting from Sykeston to Pony Gulch for two years, and during the summer nights camped on the road and in winter lived in a tarpapered shanty at the head of the Jim river and hunted and trapped the wolf, fox, mink, antelope and deer. In 1886 he took government land in township 147, range 72, in section 24, and built a claim shanty, and he and his father who had previously gone to Wells county, started in partnership in farming. In 1885 he raised a crop on sod ground and the following season cropped his own land, but the crop was eaten by gophers. He hauled supplied from Carrington, thirty-five miles, or Jamestown, sixty miles, and experienced pioneer life during these trips. About half of their farm is under cultivation and one hundred and sixty acres is devoted to pasture. The house is commodious and substantial and the barn is one of the largest in the township. All other buildings on the farm are in proportion and the entire farm is well improved and carefully managed. The father retired from active labors in 1890, since which time our subject has had full control of the place and has made a success of his work.
Mr. Graupmann was assessor in 1891 and justice of the peace in 1889, and is actively interested in the welfare of his community. He is a Republican in political sentiment and an earnest worker for part principles, and has served as delegate to county and state conventions. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Knights of Pythias. He enjoys the distinction of being the first settler of township 147, range 72, and was among the earliest in the county. He traveled over the prairies from the Missouri river to the Red river in the early days, when settlers throughout that region were one hundred miles apart, and he has aided materially in the growth and advancement of wells county, North Dakota, and is deservedly held in high esteem by his fellowmen.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]

AMBROSE H. HARDY, of the firm Hardy Brothers, general merchants, of Cathay, is a man of good business qualifications, and enjoys prosperity.  He is the present efficient and popular postmaster of Cathay, and is well known as an early settler of Wells county, wherein he followed farming for many years on an extensive scale.
Our subject was born on a farm in Pike county, Illinois, in 1862.  His father, J. P. Hardy, was of American descent many generations back, and a farmer throughout his career.  He became an early settler of North Dakota, and followed farming there until 1891, when he, in company with Edward Spokesfield, was lost in a blizzard and perished in the storm.  The mother of our subject was of Holland descent, but the family have been in America several generations.  Four brothers of our subject served in the Civil war.
Mr. Hardy is the second in a family of seven children, and was raised on the farm and attended the country schools, and after attaining his majority he left home and began for himself.  His father went to North Dakota in 1882, and the family joined him there in 1884, and our subject and his father followed farming together for about two years.  Our subject continued on the farm after his father s death until 1898, and engaged principally in stock raising.  He established a general store in Cathay in 1898, in company with Thomas Burris, in the building which he had erected in 1894, and in January, 1900, he purchased his partner s interest, and the firm is now Hardy Brothers.  They handle a general line of merchandise, and are successful in their business.  Mr. Hardy was appointed postmaster of Cathay in 1897 by President McKinley.  He had about six hundred acres of his farm under construction at the time he left the place, and had erected a complete set of good farm buildings and made a success of agricultural pursuits.  At the time of his settlement in Wells county in 1883 his nearest neighbor was five miles distant, and Carrington was the nearest railroad station.
Mr. Hardy is a member of the Knights of the Maccabes, and in political sentiment is a Republican.  He is wide-awake and energetic, and his success and popularity are well merited.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]


JOHN G. JOHNS, M.D., one of the early settlers of Wells county, was successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits for many years and is well known throughout that locality.  He has built up an extensive practice in his profession and is one of the rising young physicians of the county.  He established his office in Cathay comparatively few years ago, but is recognized as a skillful practitioner and is remarkably successful.  A portrait of Dr. Johns appears on another page.
Our subject was born in La Fayette county, Wisconsin, October 10, 1865.  His father, James Johns, was born in England and came to America in 1860 and became a pioneer of Wisconsin and is now proprietor of a large farm in La Fayette county.  The mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Belinda Orchard, was born in England and her ancestors were in the wars between France and England and our subject has relics of those wars.
Dr. Johns is the fourth in the family of eight children and was raised on the farm.  He attended the country school and the State Normal at Platteville, Wisconsin, and in 1886 took a course in the Physicians & Surgeons School in Chicago and the following year went to South Dakota and settled at Ashton, Spink county, where he purchased grain for the D. R. Putnam Elevator Company two years and in 1888 went to Eureka and erected an elevator and bought grain two years.  He went to North Dakota in 1890 and became associated with the James Johns Elevator Company.  They owned a line of elevators on the Northern Pacific Railroad and the same year our subject went to Sykeston and operated the elevator there for the company.  He filed a claim to land near Fessenden in 1892 and also built an elevator in Fessenden and unloaded the first car load of lumber in the town.  He also built the first livery barn in Fessenden and in 1895 disposed of the barn and also his interest in the elevator and went to Nashville, Tennessee, where he attended the medical department of the University of Nashville, graduating with the highest honors in March, 1897, with the degree of M. D.  He located to Moline, Illinois, the same year and practiced his profession there one year and in 1898 located at Cathay, North Dakota, where he established his practice and also started a small drug store.
Our subject was married, June 28, 1892, to Miss Estella Karr.  Mrs. Johns was born and raised in Ripon, Wisconsin.  Her father, James Karr, is of Canadian-Irish descent and is a carriagemaker by trade and an inventor of distinction in the line of carriage manufacture.  Her mother, Elizabeth (Rowbotham) Karr, was of English descent.  Mrs. Johns grandfather, Rev. William Rowbotham, was born in England.  Has been a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church for more than a half-century and is now superannuated from the east Wisconsin conference.  One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Johns:  Llewellyn, who was born March 4, 1894.  Dr. Johns is actively interested in his community and is popular with the people wherever he resides.  He served as justice of the peace in Fessenden two years and has held other minor offices.  He reform principles in political views and is affiliated with the Knights of the Pythias and Ancient Order of United Workmen.  He was among the first business men of Wells county and is well known by his friends as Chief Justice Johns.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]



JOHN JORGENSON
, who, in partnership with J. Sorenson, conducts one of the leading places of business in Harvey, Wells county, is a man of sound financial standing and is possessed of excellent business ability. He has varied business interests in and near Harvey, and has become well known as one of the active men of his community.
Our subject was born in Vernon county, Wisconsin, on a farm, in 1865. His father, Andrew Jorgenson, was a native of Norway, and came to America in 1857 and settled in Wisconsin and followed farming throughout his career. The mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Oline Hovland, was born in Norway.
Mr. Jorgenson was the third in a family of eight children, and was reared on the Wisconsin farm and assisted with the work. He attended the country schools and three months in the grammar school, and, at the age of seventeen years, began for himself at farm work. He established in the creamery business when twenty-one years of age, but this did not prove successful after two years work, and in 1890 he went to Nelson county, North Dakota, and clerked in a hardware store at Lakota three months, when his employer sold the business, and he then began clerking for Kent & Brown, general merchants of Lakota. He remained with them three and a half years, during which time he purchased an interest in a general store at Mapes, Nelson county, consisting of a two-thousand-dollar stock, and in the spring of 1894 he moved the store to Harvey, North Dakota, and the business was conducted in company with O.L. Jensen, under the firm name of O.L. Jensen & Company until September 1, 1896, when the firm sold the business to Herr, Herr & Company, and Mr. Jensen embarked in the machine business. Our subject then formed a partnership with J. Sorenson, in general merchandising, the business having been established by Mr. Sorenson in 1893, and was the first store in Harvey, and is the leading store of the town at the present time. They have added to the building to meet the needs, and now occupy a main building 40x78 feet, and have three commodious warehouses, their business being located in a desirable business part. They carry a stock of seventeen to eighteen thousand dollars, and have met with unbounded success. The firm own and operate four hundred and eighty acres of choice land near the town, and two thousand dollars stock in the First Bank of Harvey, of which Mr. Sorenson is vice-president. Mr. Jorgenson has a comfortable and well-furnished residence, and enjoys prosperity and business success.
Our subject was married in the fall of 1894, to Miss Mary Johnson, a native of Coon Prairie, Wisconsin. Mrs. Jorgenson s parents were natives of Norway and Sweden, and emigrated to America from Norway, and her father, P.M. Johnson, is a farmer by occupation. Mr. Jorgenson was one of the pioneer business men of Harvey, and has witnessed the growth of that thriving town and aided in its upbuilding and advancement, and is favorably known as a business man and citizen. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and in political sentiment is a Republican.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler 


ADOLF R. JOSUND. 
As a representative citizen and a member of the farming community of township 148, range 68, in Wells county, the gentleman above named is entitled to a foremost place.  He has made a success of his vocation and has a well-improved farm and has gained his possessions by the exercise of honest industry and good judgment.  He went to Dakota as a pioneer without means, and has worked his way steadily to the front and is now surrounded by all that goes to make country life pleasant, and is highly esteemed in his community.

Our subject was born at Stavanger, Norway, December 20, 1863, and was a son of Rasmus Jaasund and Karen (Stokke) Josund, both of whom were natives of Norway.  The paternal grandfather, Asburnam Muglebust, was a farmer in Norway, as also the maternal grandfather, Tolaf Stokke.  Our subject s father is now a prosperous farmer of Wells county, where he located during pioneer days.
Mr. Josund was the second in a family of eleven children, and was raised on a farm in his native land.  He emigrated to America in 1882, landing at Boston, March 3, and the family at once went to Becker county, Minnesota, and settled on forty acres of school land.  The parents conducted the farm there until 1887, and our subject worked at farming and railroading and other work, and in the spring of 1886 went to Sykeston, North Dakota, and worked at farm labor during the summer and also filed a tree claim and pre-emption to land in Wells county, in township 148, range 68.  His father came and filed on a tree-claim and preemption at the same time.  The following spring the father removed to Becker county, where he worked a farm together with his father, mother and brother Rasmus for some three years.  They also had with them the young sister Clara.  The father had a shanty 10x10 feet, and our subject built an 8x8 foot shanty and they were later made into one house.  Later in the summer our subject built a shanty, half dugout, and lived therein several winters.  It was of sod and had but one small window and the roof had a few fence posts.  He had a team of oxen, three cows, some young stock, a wagon and a plow, and after paying his way to North Dakota had no money left, and purchased overall clothing with a sack of oats and the first night slept on hay in the shanty.  He and his father were caught away from home in one of the worst blizzards ever experienced in North Dakota, but escaped injury.
Mr. Josund began farming for himself in 1890 and he now has six hundred and forty acres of good land, while his father has three quarter-sections.  He has a complete set of good farm buildings, including a substantial house, barn, granary, machine shed, blacksmith shop, and other buildings, and has all machinery necessary for the economical conduct of the place.
Our subject was married, in 1888, to Miss Anna Jakobene Stokke, who was born and raised in the same place in Norway as our subject.  Her father died in Norway.  Her mother and Mrs. Gablel Gedrose came over from Norway to Cathay, North Dakota, in 1888 with her family and live close neighbors.  Mr. Gedrose has six hundred and forty acres of good land.  Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Josund, as follows:  Camilla, born July 23, 1890; Julius, born January 12, 1892, died May 18, 1898; Marshall, born June 18, 1895; Alfred, born May 31, 1897; and Alma, born October 12, 1899, all of whom were born in North Dakota.  Mr. Josund has held various school offices and is active in public affairs of local importance.  He is a Republican in political faith and a delegate to all county conventions for many years.  He and family are members of the Lutheran church, in which he is a leader, and is highly respected throughout the community in which he makes his home.
Source:  Compendium of History and Biography . Transcribed by Carol Eppright.


CHARLES L. KING
, president and general manager of the North Dakota Telephone Electrical Company, is a gentleman of good business qualifications and has become thoroughly identified with the advancement and progress of the Northwest.  He resides in Harvey, Wells county, and is well and favorably known throughout that region.
Our subject was born in Jackson, Michigan, April 27, 1862.  His father, James H. King, was born in the same place, his parents having settled in Michigan in an early day, removing there from New York.  They were of Dutch descent and the grandfather of our subject, Finner King, was a farmer and went to Michigan in 1836 and took government land on which the city of Jackson is not built.   On the maternal side, the grandfather, Anthony Burwell, was a farmer and raiser of fancy horses and the mother s family were from Vermont.
Our subject was the eldest in a family consisting of two sons and one daughter and was raised on a farm.  He also resided in Parma, Homer, Tecumseh and Jackson, as his father was engaged in the hotel business at different times.  Our subject attended the city schools and also the Adventist College at Battle Creek, Michigan, four years, and in 1882 went to South Dakota and located at Milbank, purchasing land there.  He also bought wheat at Milbank and in that vicinity three years for St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator company and also for himself, and in the spring of 1892 he sold his land, comprising three hundred and twenty acres, for twenty-five dollars per acre, and moved to Minneapolis, where he engaged in the commission business one year.  He went to North Dakota in the spring of 1893 and was employed during the summer as civil engineer on the Soo Line, then being built to Portal, North Dakota, after which he was employed at Harvey as clerk and cashier at the railroad station and in the summer of 1894 erected the hotel known as King s Place, and conducted the business until November, 1896, when he disposed of his interests, and in June, 1898, organized North Dakota Telephone Electrical Company, with the following officers:  Charles L. King, president and general manager; Otto Grethen, secretary, and Anton Erne, treasurer.  The company owns lines from Harvey to Fessenden, thence to New Rockford and Carrington and branches to Cathey and Sykeston and has local exchanges in Harvey, Fessenden and Carrington.
Mr. King was married, in the spring of 1892, to Miss Louisa Newhouse.  Mrs. King was born in Iowa and is of Scandinavian descent.  Her father, Ole Newhouse, is a farmer by occupation.  Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. King, as follows:  Florence, George and Fred.  The two younger children were born in Dakota.  Mr. King was elected county commissioner by the Republican party in 1897 and is now chairman of the board.  He has served as justice of the peace at Harvey for the past seven years and takes an active interest in public matters.  He has been a delegate to numerous county conventions and is identified with the Republican party.  He holds membership in the Woodmen of the World.
Source:  Compendium of History and Biography . Transcribed by Carol Eppright.


HENRY KLINDWORTH
, one of the prominent men of township 149, range 69, conducts an extensive farming and stock business and is one of the wide-awake and wealthy citizens of Wells county.  He started for himself with nothing except the tools which nature gave him and from his first employment at a small salary has steadily risen by his own efforts to a position of comfort and plenty.
Our subject was born in Hanover, Germany, October 11, 1844.  His father, Henry Klindworth, was an orphan boy and during his career was a farmer and wood dealer.  He served in the German army several years.  Our subject was reared on the farm in Germany and attended the country schools and at the age of fourteen years began working out in the city.  He entered the army at twenty years of age and served sixteen months and participated in one battle.  In 1867 he emigrated to America, landing at New York in February, and worked there in a hotel six months.  He then went to Pittsburg and worked on a farm and also in a hotel and then went to
Chicago, where he worked three years in the gardening business.  He was in southern Illinois at the time of the great Chicago fire, but returned soon afterward and worked at teaming or whatever he could find to do for about three years and then traveled in Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri and Illinois, spending his winters in the South and his summers in the North.  He finally settled near Red Wing, Minnesota, and established in the gardening business and remained in Minnesota until 1887, in the spring of that year going to North Dakota.  He entered a pre-emption tree clam in Wells county and built a shanty and barn and he had six horses, a wagon and a little machinery.  His first crop in North Dakota was off rented land near New Rockford and in 1888 he farmed his own land, but lost the crop by frost and in June, of the same year prairie fire destroyed his barn, horses, oats and harness, causing a loss of fifteen hundred dollars.  He had a struggle to get through the winter of 1888-1889 and in the following year he raised a good crop.  Fire again visited his farm in September, 1891, and burned his cattle barn, horse barn, one hundred tons of hay and some grain standing in the field, a total loss of two thousand dollars.  He now has a farm of four hundred and eighty acres, all of which is under cultivation, and on his place he has a complete set of substantial and commodious farm buildings and keeps twenty-one horses and about twenty-five head of cattle.  He has all machinery necessary for operating a good farm and has made a success of his vocation and has one of the best-equipped farms of the neighborhood.
Our subject was married, in Minnesota, April 22, 1877, to Mary Pepper.  Mrs. Klindworth is a native of Germany and came to America at the age of thirteen years.  Her father, George Pepper, died soon after coming to America.  The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Klindworth:  Katie, born April 13, 1879; John, born November 25, 1882; Henry, born August 4, 1884; Willie, born March 1, 1885; Charlie, born November 4, 1887; Annie, born September 16, 1888; Herman, born November 17, 1891; Mary, born July 2, 1893; Walter, born June 18, 1896, and Bertha, born in 1890 and died in 1895.  Mr. Klindworth and family are members of the German Lutheran church.  Mr. Klindworth is independent in politics.  He was among the earliest settlers of Hamberg township and aided in its upbringing.
Source:  Compendium of History and Biography . Transcribed by Carol Eppright

JAMES L. LEE, LL. D. The professions are well represented in Wells county, and a prominent place among this number is held by the gentleman above named. He is a practicing attorney of Fesenden, and has attained his high position as an attorney and citizen by faithful service and earnest study, and is a gentleman of excellent education and refinement.
Our subject was born in Toledo, Ohio, in August, 1856. His foster father, Hiram Lee, was a farmer by occupation in Ohio, and was a native of Pennsylvania, and died in Kansas in 1897. The great-grandfather of our subject was born in New England, and the mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Porter, was born in France and emigrated to America. Our subject was reared by foster parents, of the name of Lee, who were New York people. He was reared in Illinois on a farm and assisted with the work of the place and did not attend school regularly until nineteen years of age, when he attended the country school winters and later attended an academy. Between 1873-76 he attended the law school at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and graduated in 1887 with the degree of LL. D. He established himself in the practice of his profession in Clear Lake, Iowa, in the spring of 1878 and continued there twelve years, during which time he built up an extensive general practice, and in 1889 went to Topeka, Kansas, where he practice two years, and then spent some months traveling through the western states to the Pacific coast. He assumed charge of the collection department of the machine firm of D. M. Osborne & Company, of Chicago and was thus engaged five years. He located in Fessenden, North Dakota, August 15, 1896, where he established his office and has since followed his practice.
Our subject was married in Fessenden, North Dakota, March 21, 1897, to Miss Hattie Jones. Mrs. Lee was born in Vexio, Sweden, and came to America in 1886, at the age of fourteen years. Her father, who was of English descent, died when she was five years of age. Mr. Lee is the father of the following children by a former marriage: Fred L., owner and operator of a silver mine in Idaho, residing at Wallace; Stella; and James N., attending Central High School at Minneapolis. Mr. Lee is active in public affairs and is a Republican in Politics.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]



LOUIS A. LEU
, Fessenden, of the thirty-third legislative district, was born at Zaskerhuette, Germany, Mar. 25, 1868. and came to the United States August 22, 1883. His education includes a six year course in a classical college. He first settled in Iowa and in 1886 moved "to South Dakota and came to North Dakota in 1896, where he engaged in the business of pharmacist. He is married and has two children He was elected representative as a republican.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]


ROBERT LYALL
, residing on one of the well-improved tracts of township 150, range 72, in Wells county, has made a success of his calling, and is proprietor of one of the best farms of his locality. He is an early settler of North Dakota, and has witnessed its advancement and development and added materially in the same, and enjoys the esteem of his fellows.
Our subject was born on a farm in Scotland, in 1864, and was the second child and eldest son in a family of seven children. He began farm work at an early age and attended school during the winter months, and at the age of nineteen years emigrated to America, and at once went to North Dakota, locating in Cass county. He remained there at work on the Park farm during the summer of 1884, and in the fall of that year visited the exposition at New Orleans and then went to Liverpool, working his passage to save his money. He remained there seven months and in August, 1885, started from Scotland with a car load of sheep, which he took to Miles City, Montana, for the Montana Sheep & Cattle Company, for whom he worked nearly two years. He returned to Cass county in July, 1887, and the following spring rented land and began farming in Eddy county, and after two years there he went to Wells county, in 1889, and entered a tree claim and pre-emption in township 150, range 72. On his farm he built a 10x12-foot shanty and a sod barn and began his farming, but was in debt when he began. He now owns four hundred and eighty acres of good land, and he has placed the usual improvements on the place and provided a home of more than usual comforts. He follows mixed farming, but devotes more attention to grain raising, in which he has met with good success.
Our subject was married, in December, 1896, to Mrs. Nelson. Mrs. Lyall was born and raised in Denmark, and was a daughter of Jense Matson. She came to America in 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Lyall are the parents of two children, as follows: Mary and James. Mr. Lyall has always taken an active interest in local affairs of a public nature, and served as a member of the first school board of Wells township, and has also filled other township offices. He is independent in political faith. He holds membership in the Presbyterian church and the Modern Woodmen of America. Mrs. Lyall is a Royal Neighbor.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]


FRED H. MARTIN.
One of the well regulated farms of township 148, range 68, in Wells county, is owned and operated by the subject of this review. Mr. Martin is an early settler of that locality and has experienced pioneer life, and from his earnest work has accumulated a fine property and a comfortable home, while he enjoys an enviable reputation as a citizen.

Our subject was born in Ontario, Canada, October 3, 1864. His father, John Martin, was born in Canada and is a carpenter and also follows farming in North Dakota, holding ten adjoining quarter-sections of land in Wells county, and has been successful in agricultural pursuits. The grandfather of our subject, John Martin, was born in England and came to Canada when a young man. Our subject's mother bore the maiden name of Margaret Hume. She was born and raised in Canada and was of Scotch descent. Her father, William Hume, was born in Scotland and came to America when a child.
Mr. Martin was the fourth in a family of six children, and was raised in Eden Mills, Canada, and attended the village school. He left home at the age of fifteen years and went to work in a saw mill and from then earned his own livelihood. In the spring of 1882 he went to Grandin, Cass county, North Dakota, and worked for others until he attained his majority, and in 1885 went to Wells county and entered claim to land in township 148, range 68, upon which he erected a shanty and lived there alone the first four years. He farmed with oxen two years and then used oxen and horses and his first crop in 1886 consisted of fourteen acres of wheat, which mostly eaten by gophers. He lost his shanty and three hundred bushels of wheat in the stack in 1888 and in 1899 lost fully half of his crop by hail. His farm now covers five hundred acres, three hundred and seventy-five acres of which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. He has a fine house, barn, granary and other buildings, and a fine grove surrounds the home, and plenty of small fruits, including raspberries, currants, gooseberries, etc. Mr. Martin engages principally in wheat and flax raising, but keeps some stock, and now has eleven head of horses and some cattle.
Our subject was married, March 20, 1890, to Miss Maggie Workman. Mrs. Martin was born and raised in Canada and came to the United States at the age of ten years. Her father, James Workman, was a farmer in Traill county, North Dakota. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin, as follows: George, born June 10, 1891; Ruth, born May 16, 1893; Walter, born May 27, 1896; and Harold, born June 16, 1898. Mr. Martin has served as school clerk for the past six years and as constable four years and takes an active part in affairs of a public nature. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and Modern Woodmen of America, and in political sentiment is a Republican. Mr. Martin and his father and a younger brother, Charles Martin, began farming together and continued thus until 1891. Charles died January 16, 1898, and the father still resides in Wells county, and he and our subject have excellent farms and are well to do.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]


WILLIAM ROBERT McGLENN, president and manager of the Harvey Roller Mill Company, is a man of good judgment and executive ability and has prospered in the business in which he is engaged. He is well known throughout Wells county for his push and energy and his faithful efforts to advance the interests of his community, as well as his personal interests, have been rewarded by the acquisition of a good property and a high reputation.
Our subject was born on a farm in Michigan, June 23, 1860. His father, George W. McGlenn, was a ship joiner in his early life and later followed farming. He was a native of Otsego county, New York, and served in the Civil war in the Twenty-fourth Michigan. The family have served in all the wars of the United States and the paternal grandfather was a native of Scotland. The mother of our subject was of French descent, but her family have been in America many generations.
Mr. McGlenn was the oldest in a family of five children and was raised on a farm until he attained his majority and attended the country schools. He left home at the age of twenty-one years and engaged in the saw-mill business for himself and built a mill in Monroe county, Michigan, which he operated two years. He disposed of the property in 1884 and went to South Dakota and located near Bowdle on a farm. He hauled supplies from Ipswich, forty-five miles, and spent many nights under his wagon during these trips and experienced claim-shanty life. He followed farming until the fall of 1890, when he sold his farming interests and erected a flouring-mill at Bowdel, which was the first mill in the town. He began operating the same in the fall and October 27, 1897, the mill was burned, the loss amounting to thirteen thousand dollars. Mr. McGlenn began the construction of the Harvey Roller Mill at Harvey, Wells county, in April, 1898, and began running the same October 13, of the same year, and has continued operations night and day since. It is the only mill in Wells county and has a capacity of one hundred and twenty-five barrels per day. The boiler and engine room is 36x40 feet and is fitted with a Corliss engine of one hundred and twenty-five horse power. It is operated by an incorporated company with the following officers: William R. McGlenn, president and manager; E. J. McGlenn, vice-president.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]


JOHN MONTGOMERY.
As an all around prominent man of Harvey, Wells county, there is probably no one of its citizens who more justly deserves the title than Mr. Montgomery. He is one of the leading business men of the town and is well and favorably known for his active public spirit and good citizenship.
Our subject was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1863. His father, William Montgomery, came to America with his family in 1867 and settled on a farm in Ontario, Canada, and resided there seventeen years.
Our subject was the second in a family of seven children and was raised on the home farm in Canada and attended the common schools. He left home at the age of sixteen years and worked at farm labor and stock raising in Ontario and in 1885 went to Melville, North Dakota, and there worked a farm on shares. He and his brother, sister, and father went to Wells county in 1886 and entered claim to land three miles east of Harvey. Their nearest neighbor at the time and for one year thereafter was eleven miles away. They build a frame house and a sod barn and began farming and out subject continued on the farm until 1894 and met with good success. He established the first meat business in Harvey in 1894 and in 18989 sold his farm near the town, and now conducts the meat business exclusively. He started in a building 12x26 feet and had limited means, and now occupies a main building 34x32 feet, with sausage room and boiler room 16x24 feet, an ice house and smoke house, and enjoys a good business. He was one of the first settlers in the vicinity of Harvey and has shanty was the only one within eleven miles. He has watched the growth of the county and taken part in its development and advancement.
Our subject was married, in 1892, to Miss A. G. Mackie, a native of Canada, who was of Scotch descent. One child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery, named Lillah. Mr. Montgomery was elected county commissioner in 1894 and served one term and has been chairman of the township board one year. He holds membership in the Modern Woodmen of America and Knights of the Macabees. Politically he is a Republican.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]


JOSEPHYNE M. PAULSEN
. Among the prominent educational workers of the Northwest, the subject of this review is entitled to a foremost place. Miss Paulsen is identified with the schools of Wells county in the capacity of county superintendent and has accomplished much in that line and gained a high standing as an educator and promoter of the best methods of instruction. She is thorough, systematic and heartily interested in her work and is efficient and well educated and a lady of refinement and culture. Our subject was born in Brown county, Minnesota, on a farm and her father, Edwin Paulsen, was a native of Norway. He came to America when a boy of four years of age and was in his later years a public officer of Minnesota. Miss Paulsen was reared on a farm and attended the country schools for a while and then attended the graded schools and graduated from the Mankato Normal School in Alay, 1895. She at once began teaching in Minnesota, and in August, 1896, went to North Dakota, where she accepted a position as principal of the Harvey school. She spent one year in that position and then was principal of the Fessenden high school a year and a half. She was elected county superintendent of schools of Wells county in 1898 on the Republican ticket and is now serving in that capacity. Miss Paulsen is a leader in her profession and labors to raise the standard of educational excellence. She is popular with the people and her success as an instructor is well merited.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley] 


R.L. PRICE.
One of the best equipped newspaper plants of Wells county is that owned and operated by the gentleman above named, who is editor and proprietor of the Harvey Herald. He is well known in newspaper circles as a gentleman of ability and good education, and his paper enjoys a wide circulation, in fact is the most widely circulated strictly English newspaper of the county.
Mr. Price was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1872. His father, T.J. Price, was a newspaper man throughout his career, and the family are Americans for many generations, as is also the family on the mother s side.
Our subject was the second in a family of three children, and was raised in Chicago until about thirteen years of age when the family removed to Minnesota and our subject grew to manhood in that state. He began to learn the printer s trade when about fourteen years of age in St. Paul, and followed his trade there until 1895, when he went to Welcome, Minnesota, and established the Welcome Times. He conducted this sheet about ten months, and in the spring of 1896 went to Harvey, North Dakota, and established the Harvey Herald. The first issue of the paper was April 28, 1896, and in the fall of that year the entire plant was destroyed by fire and was a loss. He immediately rebuilt, and did not miss an issue of the paper, the sheet being printed in Fessenden for two weeks. The circulation of the paper has steadily increased, and prosperity has attended Mr. Price in his business. The plant is well fitted with presses and other equipment for job printing, and this work forms no small part of the work.
Our subject was married, in November, 1898, to Miss Mary Lucey. Mrs. Price was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and was reared in North Dakota. She is of Yankee descent. Mr. Price was among the early settlers of the town of Harvey, and has become identified with the financial and social growth of the town, and is one of the highly esteemed citizens of his community. In politics he is a Republican, and is strong in his convictions.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler



WILLIAM F. PRICE
. Among the prosperous and prominent young men of Fessenden and Wells county, may well be named this gentleman. He went to Dakota without means, but possessed of unbounded energy and enterprise and has arrived at his present high standing by the exercise of earnest industry and strict honesty. He is now proprietor of the most extensive livery barn and business in that thriving town, and for many years was a prosperous farmer of that vicinity.
Our subject was born in Winnebago, Wisconsin, August 28, 1867, and was the second in a family of eight children born to Daniel and Mary (Tones) Price. His father was a native of Wales and came to America in 1866 and settled in Wisconsin, following farming and still makes his home there.
Mr. Price was raised to farm work and received his education at the country schools in his native state and at the age of fourteen years left home and worked by the month and when sixteen years of age went to Randolph, Wisconsin, and followed farming work. He went to Wells county, North Dakota, in 1887 and took land as a tree claim and pre-emption in township 148, range 70, and built a shanty 8x14 feet, and the following year bought a team of horses and built a sod barn 24x40 feet. His first crop was fifteen acres of oats and the next season he broke sixty acres more of land. He followed grain and cattle raising and remained on the farm till 1897, when he removed to Fessenden and established a livery barn, the second livery business established in the town. He now has four large lots and a barn 30x80 feet, with a "lean-to" 28x80 feet, and an addition 30x50 feet. He keeps twenty-five head of livery horses and his stable is equipped with valuable harness, buggies and other rigs and he enjoys an ever-increasing patronage. He sold one quarter-section of his land in 1894 and another quarter-section in 1896, but took land as a homestead in 1897, which land he still holds. He borrowed money with which to get to Dakota and he is now among the substantial men of his community. He has expended various large sums in sinking a well, but has met with only partial success thus far.
Mr. Price is a member of the Knights of Pythias and Knights of the Maccabees. He has been called upon to serve his community in various local offices of trust and has served as school treasurer and school clerk and is favorably known throughout Wells county. In political sentiment he is a Republican and is firm for the principles of his party.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]


J. AUSTIN REGAN
, one of the pioneer businessmen of Fessenden, Wells county, is engaged in handling implements and machinery, and is widely known as a man of ability, and true citizenship. He is the present efficient postmaster of that town, and is also in the elevator business, in partnership with W. W. Lyness. He is a young man of good business capacity, and combines industry and integrity and is rapidly taking a prominent position among his fellowmen.
Our subject was born on a farm near London, Ontario, Canada, November 3, 1870. His father, Patrick Regan, was born in Canada, and was a farmer by occupation. He removed his family to Unionville, Missouri, in 1870, where he followed the mercantile business. The mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Mary Coughlin, was born and raised in Canada, and was of Irish descent.
Mr. Regan is the second in a family of nine children, and was raised in Unionville, Missouri, and after attaining his majority started for himself. He went to Carrington, North Dakota, in 1891, and was employed by Thomas Doughty in the machine business, and in June, 1893, he came to Fessenden and established the same business, in partnership with Mr. Doughty. They continued to conduct the business together till January 1, 1897, when Mr. Doughty sold his interests to our subject, who became sole proprietor, since which time he has conducted the same alone. This was the first machine firm in the town, and their building was the third or fourth erected in Fessenden. Mr. Regan lost his store buildings by fire, December 27, 1899. His store was24x100 feet, with an addition 24x60 feet, and was two stories high. Several other places of business were also burned, and the fire was the largest and most destructive of any that ever occurred in Fessenden. Mr. Regan and Mr. W. W. Lyness have been in partnership in the elevator business since 1897, and carry on an extensive business in that line.
Our subject was married January 19, 1899, to Miss Grace Christie, who was born and raised in Minnesota, and is a daughter of Captain A. E. Christie. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Regan, Arthur C.  Mr. Regan was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland, in November, 1893, and has held the office continuously the past seven years. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and Ancient Order of United Workmen. He was elected chairman of the Republican county central committee in Wells county, in 1898, and is an earnest worker for party principles.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Renae Capitanio]


TORSTEIN ROBLE
is one of the leading farmers of Wells county and is well known as an agriculturist who is doing a good business. His farm is well improved and furnishes a home of more than usual comforts, all of which he has accumulated by his own efforts. He resides on section nineteen in township 149, range 71, and follows grain raising with successful results. Our subject was born on a farm in Valders, Norway, October 2, 1859. His father, Ole Roble, was a farmer and also teacher for thirty-seven years, and passed his life in Norway, where the mother of our subject still lives. Mr. Roble was the second in a family of eight children, and was reared on the home farm and at the age of sixteen years entered the high school and later took a course in the seminary at Hamar, graduating with a first-grade certificate. At the age of twenty years he began teaching, which he continued five years. He emigrated to America in 1886, landed at New York, and at once went to Minnesota. He taught in a Norwegian parish school six years in Goodhue county and was under the noted minister. Rev. B. J. Muus. Our subject was also musical director for the church and a singing society there. He went to North Dakota in 1890 and took a pre-emption and tree claim, one in Foster county and one in Eddy county, and erected a claim shanty. He purchased horses with which to begin his farm work, and his nearest railroad station was Cooperstown and New Rockford, thirty miles distant. He remained there until 1893 and then removed to Wells county, hauling buildings, machinery and personal effects to his homestead on which he now resides. Grain has grown abundantly and is of good quality and success has attended him in his present location. He now owns three hundred and twenty acres of good land two hundred acres of which is under cultivation. His residence is a commodious and comfortable structure, and with good barns, granary and other outbuildings, furnishes a good home. Our subject was married, in 1884, to Miss G. Skogstad, who was born and raised in Norway, and was a daughter of Andrew Skogstad, a farmer and hotel-keeper. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Roble, but only five are alive now, as follows: Olaf, born November 17, 1886; Mary, born February 8, 1889; Gina, born September 24, 1892; Andrew, born June 30, 1897, and Alalvin, born May 30, 1899. Mr. Roble is a member of the United Lutheran church and takes an active part in church affairs.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley] 


THORSTEIN K. ROGNE
, the efficient and well known postmaster of Manfred, Wells county, was identified with the business interests of that thriving town from the early days of its existence. He is a man of good business qualifications, and has met with success in every enterprise in which he has embarked, and has built up an enviable reputation for integrity of character, and is highly esteemed as an exemplary citizen.
Our subject was born in Valders, Norway, in 1859. His father, Christ Rogne, was a native of Norway, and died in his native land. Our subject was the fourth in a family of six children, and was raised on a farm, and graduated from a military school in Christiania in 1880. He emigrated to America in 1881, and spent one year in Wisconsin at farm work, and then lived five years in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He worked on a Scandinavian newspaper during the winter months, and spent the summers with a surveying party. He visited his native land four months in 1888, and then went to North Dakota and took government land in Foster county, and farmed with oxen the first two years. He went to Wells county in 1892 and located near Manfred, where he has followed farming since. In company with Lewis Burkham he established the first general store in Manfred in 1894. He disposed of his interests in 1898 and established a furniture and hardware business and erected a building 52x52 feet, the largest in the town, and after conducting the business a year and a half sold the same to J.L. Berg. He has held the office of postmaster for five years, and was the first officer appointed at Manfred.
Our subject was married, in 1888, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Mary Forstraa, a native of Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Rogne are the parents of six children. Mr. Rogne takes an active part in local affairs, and has served as county surveyor four years and clerk of the school board for several years. He has watched the growth of the town, and has aided materially in its advancement. Politically, he is a Populist, and stands for reform principles under any name.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler 


HON. ALMON C. SANFORD.
The farming and stock dealing interests have a worthy representative in the person of Mr. Sanford, who has engaged extensively in this vocation since the early settlement of Wells county, and has one of the best estates in the county. His farm is in township 148, ranges 60 and 70, and is one of the pleasant homes of the locality. Mr. Sanford has a residence in Cathay where he resides during the winter months, but spends his summer seasons on the farm and personally superintends the operation of the same.
Our subject was born in Tecumseh, Michigan, in 1855. His father, William Sanford, was of American birth, and was a farmer by occupation, and his ancestors of the name of Chamberlain were in the early American wars, and Joe Chamberlain, of this family, killed a famous Indian chief. Two brothers of the family who came to America prior to Revolutionary times, stood for colonial government and one was opposed to this government. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Mary Parsons, and was born on a farm in Michigan and was of English-Irish parentage.
Mr. Sanford was the third in a family of eight children, and when four years of age moved with the family to a farm and was there reared. He attended the country schools, and the high school at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and at the age of eighteen years left home and went to St. Louis, where he engaged in clerking, and also farmed and traded in stock. He returned to Michigan later where he engaged in farming. He went to Wells county, North Dakota, in 1882, and settled on land and during 1882-83 farmed near Jamestown. He built a claim shanty on his farm in 1884 and a barn, and his parents went to Dakota in 1882 and resided with our subject, who had experienced bachelor life previous to that. He hauled all supplies from Jamestown and vicinity, and his first crop in Wells county was six hundred and twenty-eight bushels of wheat and four hundred bushels of oats. In the fall of 1994 he lost his granary and one thousand bushels of oats, and one thousand two hundred bushels of wheat, and five to six hundred bushels of wheat in shock, by fire, entailing a total loss of one thousand five hundred dollars. He began stock raising in 1884, and was the first to attempt this line in Wells county, and he has continued the same since with success. He raises Durham and Hereford cattle and Shropshire sheep, and has at present one hundred and forty-five head of the former and nine hundred sheep. He followed threshing from 1883-86, and in 1884, while taking his outfit from Jamestown the bridge gave way over the James river, with the engine and tank, and they went into the river with the engine steamed up. Ten days' time and six hundred dollars in money, and a large crew of men were required to get them out of the stream, but during the season he did an extensive business in threshing. He again began threshing in 1895, in partnership with William Snure, Richard Wikey and David Pros, and they have a steam rig of eighteen-horse power. Mr. Sanfords owns one thousand one hundred and twenty acres of land, with eight hundred acres under cultivation, and has a complete set of farm buildings, and all farm machinery for garnering and disposing of the crops. He has the best grove of forest trees in Wells county, and with four hundred and eighty acres of land owned by his father, has one of the largest estates in the county. The farm is named "Willowdale," and during the spring and summer is one of the most beautiful places in Wells county. He moved his family to Cathay in 1894, where he owns a lot and residence.
Our subject was married, in 1885, to Miss Hattie Teeple. Mrs. Sanford was born on a farm in Michigan, near Grand Rapids, and was a daughter of George Teeple, a farmer by occupation. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sanford, named Roy and Leland. Mr. Sanford was elected to the state legislature, in 1892, and served one term. He is actively interested in the general welfare of his community, and is a member of the Democratic party politically, and has served as chairman of the county central committee six years, and as a member of the state central committee a number of years, and has attended as a delegate numerous county and state conventions. He holds membership in the Ancient Order of United Workmen.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips]


JOSEPH SHEARD
, an ex-soldier and prominent early settler of Wells County, is now living in retirement on his fine estate in township 147, range 69. He successfully conducted farming in North Dakota for many years and has accumulated his possessions single-handed and now enjoys the result of a well-spent career.
Our subject was a son of Charles and Eliza (Thornton) Sheard. His father was born in England and came to America in 1825 or 1826 and was a farmer by occupation. He died in Illinois, where the family moved in 1849. The mother of our subject was born in England and came to America at the age of ten months.
Mr. Sheard was the second in a family of eight sons and was raised on the farm in Canada and Illinois and at the age of twenty-six years purchased a farm and conducted the same and also his father's place for some years. He enlisted in Company I, Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Infantry, in 1864, and was sent to join the Army of the Potomac and his first engagement was at Hatch Run. He was in the campaign around Petersburg and Richmond, and during five months was under fire almost constantly. He was discharged from the service in May, 1865, and was mustered out June 20, at Madison, Wisconsin. His brother was killed in action during the war. Mr. Sheard returned to the farm and continued there two years and in 1868 went to Missouri and engaged in farming in Lynn County, purchasing two hundred acres of land. He remained there fourteen years and engaged in stock raising and hogs and also grain. He had ten acres of timber and Yellow Creek ran through the farm. He went to Grand Forks, Dakota, in 1882, with a cart of mules and horses and sold them and traveled through the country during the summer, and in the spring of 1883 shipped his household goods, six mules, a cow and other personal effects to North Dakota and his family went to Jamestown, and our subject located in section 22, township 147, range 69, in Wells County. He built a claim shanty and a shed barn and lived in the shanty one summer and spent the winter of 1883-84 in Illinois, and in the spring enlarged the shanty and lived there another year. His first crop was in 1884 and was on forty acres. He now has a farm of four hundred and eighty acres, with four hundred acres under cultivation, and has good buildings and machinery and three good wells, and has met with remarkable success in his calling and is one of the substantial men of his community. The land was unsurveyed when he settled there and his nearest neighbor was six miles.
Our subject was married, in October, 1866, to Miss Harriet Wilson. Mrs. Sheard was born in Connecticut and was a daughter of S. W. Wilson, a farmer by occupation and a native of Connecticut. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sheard, as follows: Charlie W. and Mabel M., both of whom were born in Missouri. Mr. Sheard served as a delegate to the first two state conventions of North Dakota. He is a member of the G. A. R. Mrs. Sheard died in 1888 and Mr. Sheard has rented his farm and lives alone.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Laurel Durham]


PETER P. SWANSON.

The name of this gentleman will be readily recognized as that of one of the prominent business men of Harvey, Wells county. The firm of Jenson & Swanson, of which he is a member, is one of the oldest established houses of the town and conducts a prosperous agricultural implement business.

Mr. Swanson was born in Sweden on a farm in 1854, and was the son of Swan Paulson, a merchant miller of Sweden, who passed his life in his native land. The grandparents of our subject on the paternal and maternal sides lived to an advanced age.
Our subject was the sixth in a family of ten children and was raised on a farm and assisted with the work and attended the country schools. At the age of seventeen years he left home and followed the life of a sailor on a merchant vessel two years and during this time visited Norway, Denmark and England, and in 1873 landed at Baltimore, Maryland, and at once went to Illinois. He worked at farming two years and in 1876 went to work in the Marsh Harvester factory and was thus employed five years. He went to South Dakota in 1881 and settled in Bowdie and worked in that vicinity seven years. During 1894-95 he was engaged in traveling for the Acme Harvester Company in North and South Dakota, and in 1896 went to Harvey, North Dakota. He established the machine business at Harvey in partnership with O.L. Jenson, under the firm name of Jenson & Swanson in the fall of 1896 and this was the first establishment of the kind in the town. They have increased their stock and now occupy a main building 24x60 feet and have a machine shed of the same dimensions which is filled with machinery. They enjoy a liberal patronage and have built a successful business. Mr. Swanson has a fine farm of four hundred and forty acres on which he has a complete set of farm buildings, and he is also interested in the First Bank of Harvey.
Our subject was married, in 1896, to Miss Nelson. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Swanson, as follows: Arthur, Roy, Myrtle and Elmer. Mr. Swanson is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a gentleman of active public spirit and was instrumental in locating the Harvey Milling Company at Harvey.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler ]


RICHARD SYKES
, residing in Sykeston, Wells County, occupies a prominent position as a promoter of agricultural and town interests throughout several counties of North Dakota. He is a man of enterprising character; he has aided in developing many of the important enterprises of North Dakota and his active public spirit is recognized throughout the state. He was the founder of Sykeston, Wells County, and of Bowdon, in the same county, also of Edgeley, in La Moure County, and is largely interested in lands in and adjoining these thriving villages.
Mr. Sykes was born at Edgeley, in Cheshire, England, in 1839. His father, Richard Sykes, was a native of England, being a prominent citizen of that village. Mr. Sykes was educated at Rugby school and at the University of Heidelberg. After having been engaged in business in England he visited America in 1881 and the following year made land investments in Iowa and in Wells, Foster and La Moure counties in North Dakota. In 1883 he established the town of Sykeston, erecting a store building and large elevator, which still stands there.
Similarly in 1886 he established the town of Edgeley in La Moure County and in 1899 the town of Bowdon, where the 4th of July was celebrated when there were but two uncompleted buildings in the town. Mr. Sykes retains large land interests in Foster, Wells, Stutsman and La Moure counties, and has smaller holdings in Barnes and McLean counties. He has done much toward the settlement of these counties and has much land still to sell at three to ten dollars per acre. Mr. Sykes has made, at a cost of four thousand dollars, a beautiful lake within the town site of Sykeston, which is named Hiawatha Lake, and is eighteen feet deep in places and two miles long and about a fourth of a mile wide. The lake will be stocked with fish and boats will be supplied and the place becomes a summer resort. Mr. Sykes encourages sports of various kinds and is one of the leading golf players of North Dakota. In Edgeley is an artesian well, which supplies water for domestic use and fire protection and gas for illuminating purposes. This water has superior medicinal properties.
Mr. Sykes' first large purchase of land was made in 1880 and consisted of a tract of two thousand acres in Lyon County, Iowa, which he beautified by planting and maintaining at considerable cost groves of trees and willow hedges. Mr. Sykes still retains an interest in the village of Larchwood, which stands in the center of this lovely Lyon County tract. He has donated a park to the village, also sites for public schools, three churches, playground for the children and baseball ground. At Sykeston he has donated thirty acres for a park, which lies in the center of the village and is divided by Lake Hiawatha.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Laurel Durham  


MIKEL STOOS
.
This name is borne by a prominent agriculturist of township 149, range 72, in Wells county, whose life and labors in North Dakota date back from its early settlement. During this time he has aided materially in making it one of the thriving agricultural districts of the Northwest and is entitled to much credit for what he has accomplished, gaining for himself a good home and an enviable reputation.

Our subject was born on a farm near Rolling Stone, Winona county, Minnesota, in November, 1866. His father, Peter Stoos, settled in America in the early days and died in Minnesota in 1895. Our subject was reared on a farm and attended the German and English schools and at the age of seventeen years went to the Red River Valley. He worked on the Dalrymple farm one summer, and then worked in that vicinity two years, and in 1881 his father went to North Dakota, and our subject farmed with him four years. He then rented land and farmed in the Red river valley two years, and about 1887 went to Wells county, North Dakota, where he took government land in section 27, township 149, range 72, and erected a small house. He has followed wheat, flax, oats, cattle and sheep raising with success and now has three hundred and twenty acres, three hundred of which is under cultivation and twenty acres in meadow. He has a set of substantial farm buildings, including a comfortable house, good barns, granary and other buildings and all necessary machinery, wagons, etc., and twelve head of horses, fourteen head of cattle and some sheep and is in comfortable circumstances. He was among the first settlers in the northwestern part of the county and there were but few trails or roads when he located there and the nearest market was thirty miles distant.
Our subject, was married, in 1885, to Maggie Gludt, who was born and raised in Luxemburg, Germany, and came to America at the age of fourteen years with her father, Peter Gludt, who followed farming in Minnesota. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Stoos, as follows: Nick, Wady, Mikel, Lucy, John, Felix, Maggie and Arthur. Mr. Stoos has served as county assessor two years and held school offices many years and has served as road overseer and is actively interested in the welfare of his community. He is a member of the Catholic church and is highly respected and esteemed.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]


ROBERT TURNBULL
, one of the first settlers of township 149, range 69, Wells county, went to Dakota without means, and is now one of the substantial farmers of his township.  He has gained his possessions single handed, and is deserving of a foremost place among the capable and energetic farms and citizens of Wells county.
Our subject was born in Brant county, Ontario, Canada, in 1876, and was a son of William and Sarah Marie (Day) Turnbull.  His father was of Scotch descent, and was an early settler of North Dakota.  The paternal grandfather of our subject, Michael Turnbull, was born in Scotland and came to America in 1840.  The mother of our subject was born in England, and died when our subject was but two days old.
Mr. Turnbull was the youngest in a family of eight children, and was raised by his aunt, and at the age of twenty-one left home and went to Wells county, North Dakota, and entered claim to land in section 22 and section 27, where a shanty was erected, township 149, range 69.  He built a 14x16-foot shanty and lived therein five years in company with his two brothers, and the three farmed together.  They used oxen, and their nearest railroad station was New Rockford.  Their first crop was forty acres of wheat, and was a good yield.  Mr. Turnbull now has six hundred and forty acres, five hundred acres of which is under cultivation and the balance is in pasture and grass land.  He has a good residence, barn, granary and all buildings and machinery for the conduct of a model farm, and has followed grain raising exclusively and with success.  He lost twenty-five tons of hay and fifteen acres of oats and twelve acres of wheat by prairie fire, and has had many exciting experiences with fires in early days.  In 1896 Mrs. Turnbull was severely burned in trying to escape through a prairie fire, and in consequence was unable to be around her house for two months.
Our subject was married, in February, 1892, to Paulina Edinger, who was born in Germany and came to America with her parents.  Her father, Carl Edinger, is an old settler of Dakota.  Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Turnbull, as follows:  Flossy, born in 1893; Annie, born in 1896; Olive, born in 1897; and Lawrence, born in 1899.  Mr. Turnbull is actively interested in public affairs, and has served as school clerk for the past eleven years.  He is a Republican politically, and has attended as delegate numerous conventions.  He holds membership in the German Baptist church.  He and his brothers and one other party were the first settlers of township 149, range 69, and are well known throughout the locality in which they have made their homes.  During the winter of 1899, December 26, Mr. Turnbull took a trip back to the old Canadian home for the first time inside of thirteen years, and was indeed surprised to see the changes that had taken place.  His aunts he found still alive but failing very fast.  The oldest, Nancy Turnbull, was then eighty-one, and was indeed very feeble; and the other, Isabella, was in the seventieth year of her age.  They still held the old homestead, and had been farming the same.  It gave him great pleasure in meeting old schoolmates and companions during his visit, who were glad to see him.  He left Canada, March 6, 1900, for his Dakota home, and after a tiresome journey of four days and nights on the train arrived in Dakota to find his family all well and glad to see him home again.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Mary Saggio] 

HON. LUTHER L. WALTON
, who enjoys the distinction of being the first settler to break land in township 147, range 68, in Wells County, and was the second man to settle in the county, now has one of the finest farms to be found within its limits. Every appointment of his place evidences careful attention and good taste, and his home is one of comfort and even luxury, while he is held in the highest esteem by his many friends who have known him from the earliest days of the settlement of that locality.
Our subject was born in Farmington, Oakland County, Michigan, March 5, 1844. His father, Joseph Walton, was a native of Pennsylvania, and went to Michigan from New York state in 1836. He was of English descent. The mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Cynthia Lapham, was descended from the Puritans in Massachusetts and went to Michigan in 1827, her people being pioneer settlers of that state, and located near Detroit.
Mr. Walton was the eldest in a family of four children, three sons and one daughter, and was raised on the farm and attended the country schools and the high school at Ann Arbor. He enlisted in the First Engineers and Mechanics Corps in 1863, and was in the service two years and four months, and was with Sherman to the sea and participated in the grand review at Washington, after going through the Carolinas, and was then ordered to Nashville and mustered out of the service in October, 1865. He returned to the home farm in Michigan, and then began farming for himself soon afterward. He continued in Michigan until 1882, when he disposed of his interests there and went to North Dakota and settled in section 36, township 147, range 68. He erected a claim shanty and broke some land, and lived alone the first summer, and the lumber for his shanty he hauled from Jamestown, fifty miles distant. His family joined him in the new home in August, 1883, and he has resided there continuously since that date. He now has a finely cultivated tract of sixteen hundred acres, and has some pasture and hay land, and has met with success in general farming. His residence is a commodious structure, with cellar and cistern, and is heated by furnace, and the other buildings of the place are in proportion, and evidence thrift and good management. He has all machinery necessary for the conduct of the place, including an eighteen-horse-power threshing rig, and he has about twenty-two head of horses and cattle for use on the farm. He has three acres of forest and plenty of small fruits, and has one of the best equipped farms of the county.
Our subject was married, in 1868, to Miss Jane E. Norton, a native of Vermont. Mrs. Walton's father, Manson C. Norton, was of American descent, and her mother's people were in some of the early wars, and her great-great-grandfather McClellan was a minute man in Washington's time. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Walton, as follows: Guy, born in July, 1869, now engaged in farming in North Dakota; Hugh, born in August, 1871, now employed as a telegrapher; Elizabeth C., born September, 1872; and Jacob M., born in July, 1876. Mr. Walton served as school treasurer from 1886-89. He was elected a representative to the first state legislature in 1889, and re-elected in 1890. He was sergeant-at-arms in the state senate in 1894, and was elected railroad commissioner in 1896 and re-elected in 1898, and is still serving as a member of that board. He was county commissioner from 1892-95, and takes an active interest in local and state affairs. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and Knights of Pythias, and has been associated with the first named order since 1867, and is a member of the Scottish-rite Masons of Fargo, North Dakota.
History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Laurel Durham


ALOYS WARTNER
, (Harvey), of the thirty-third legislative district, was born December 29, 1870 at Lodi, Wis. Received his education in the public schools of Wisconsin, and graduated with the degree of L. L. B. from the law college of the University of Wisconsin, in 1895. Came to North Dakota, April 17, 1900. Held the position of city recorder at Graceville, Minn., for one term. Was mayor of the city of Harvey, one term, county Judge of Wells county, two terms, and was elected to his present position in 1912 as a republican. He is married and has one son. He is engaged in the practice of his profession, attorney at law, since 1895.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]


EDWARD A. WILLIAMS
, county treasurer of Wells county, is one of the early settlers of that region, and is proprietor of one of the fine farms of township 147, range 69. He has been identified with the interests of his township since its organization, and in all matters pertaining to the civil government, or in any way relating to the welfare of the township he has taken an active and leading part. He has gained many friends, and is held in high esteem, and enjoys the confidence of the people among whom he has chosen to reside. Our subject was born in Herkimer county, New York, November 30, 1851, on a farm, and was a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Evan) Williams, the former of English-Welch and the latter of Welch descent. His father was born in England, and came to America in April, 1851, and settled in New York state. Mr. Williams was the second child and eldest son in a family of five children, and was early put to farm work. He attended school in winter till eighteen years of age, and later attended Whitestone Seminary at Whitestone, New York, and after attaining his majority he traveled through Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois and Missouri, for four years, working at the carpenter's trade or any work which he could find. He then returned to New York, and remained two years and assisted on the farm, and April 6, 1882, arrived at Fargo, North Dakota, and April 20 went to Jamestown where he worked at his trade thirteen months and then took land in Wells county, in township 147, range 69, and built a sod shanty. He began farming in the spring of 1883, and bought oxen, a plow, wagon, walking plow and harrow, and had no barn till the fall of that year. He lived alone in Dakota the first nine years, and experienced pioneer life. The lumber in his shanty cost eighty-eight dollars per thousand, and he paid twenty dollars per ton for hay and hauled it twenty-two miles, and for the first two or three years he broke land for others. He engaged in wheat, flax and cattle raising, and at one time was largely interested in hog raising, and had over one hundred head, and sixty head of cattle. He now has a farm of one thousand one hundred and forty acres, about eight hundred acres of which is under cultivation, and on his home farm he has a complete set of good farm buildings, and all machinery necessary for the operation of a model farm. He has about two hundred acres of meadow land, and his farm is admirably adapted to general farming. Mr. Williams has a pleasant home with his sister as housekeeper, and their father resides with them on the farm. Our subject was elected county treasurer of Wells county in 1898, and is now ably discharging the duties of that office. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Politically he is identified with the Republican party and is an earnest worker for party principles.
[Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley]  


JOHN A. WILLIAMS. 
Among the prominent men now living in Fessenden, Wells county, who have won an honorable name as business men and citizens none is more deserving of special mention than Mr. Williams.  He has engaged successfully in various enterprises since taking up his residence in North Dakota, and is well known throughout that part of the state.  Our subject was born on a farm in Hillsdale county, Michigan, January 22, 1842.  His father, Henry S. Williams, was a native of Connecticut, and was a farmer during most of his career.  The mother of our subject, who bore te maiden name of Susan B. Harde, was a native of Vermont.
Mr. Williams was the third in a family of seven children, and was raised on the farm and attended the public schools of Michigan and also a seminary for boys at Rockford, Illinois, and received a liberal education.  He began for himself at the age of eighteen years, and learned the shoemaker s trade, and followed the same about two years, until 1862, in August of which year he enlisted in Company F, Fourth Michigan Cavalry.  He entered the service at Louisville, Kentucky, and joined the Army of the Cumberland after the battle of Perryville.  He participated in the battle of Crab Orchard, and then followed several skirmishes.  After arriving at Nashville, his regiment led the advance on Murfreesboro, and fired the first gun of that battle.  They also followed the army to Chattanooga, and were in the saddle almost constantly.  Our subject was in General Stanley s Cavalry Corps from Nashville to Chattanooga, and participated in the fight at the latter place.  After this engagement they joined Sherman s army, and were with him till after the fall of Atlanta, and after this campaign there were but seventy-five fighting men left in his regiment in line.  The regiment was reorganized and joined the army after the battle of Nashville, and from that time to the close of the war saw active service.  They were through Alabama, and assisted in the capture of Selma, Alabama, Columbus, Georgia, Montgomery, Alabama, and at the close of the war were at Macon, Georgia, and were there ordered back to Nashville.  Our subject was discharged at Edgefield, Tennessee, July 12, 1865, after three years of active and loyal service.
After the close of the war Mr. Williams returned to his home in Michigan, and followed his trade there a short time, and was then compelled to abandon it on account of failing eyesight.  He was then engaged in the patent right business, and later sold agricultural implements for several years, and then was engaged in railroading on the Illinois Central Railroad for several years, and in 1882 was in the government employ on levee work on the Mississippi river.  He went from Texas to North Dakota in the spring of 1883, and was employed on the Dalrymple farm in Cass county one season and then joined a coal exploring expedition to Winnipeg, Canada, and went as far west as the Rocky Mountains, finding large quantities of coal.  He went to Sykeston, Wells county, in the spring of 1884, and entered claim to government land near the town and for the next five years was employed on the Dalrymple farm as foreman in charge of the repair shops and elevators.  Since 1896 he has followed the real estate and loan business, and has also been engaged in farming to a limited extent.  He is employed by the Wells County State Bank as collector, and in each of the enterprises in which he has embarked he has been successful.  He established the Wells County News, in 1895, but owing to other business interests sold his plant.  In April, 1900, he established a newspaper business at Bowdon, North Dakota, The Bowdon Guardian.   His family went from Michigan to North Dakota in 1884.
Our subject was married, in the fall of 1865, to Miss Annis Bowen, of Addison, Michigan, who was of Dutch-Yankee descent, and is of American birth.  Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, as follows:  Cora, Percy, Susie, Dottie and Bruce.  Mr. Williams served as justice of the peace in early days, and later was appointed clerk of the district court of Wells county, and then elected to serve one term.  He was elected county auditor of Wells county, in 1890, and was re-elected twice, serving three terms, and was an efficient and popular officer.  He took an active part in the organization of the county, and through his influence Wells county secured a delegate to the constitutional convention when the state was organized.  He is a recognized man of public spirit, and well merits success.  He has been closely identified with the growth and development of the county since 1884, so much so as to have obtained the sobriquet of Father of Wells County.   The public buildings in Fessenden, a $20,000 brick court house and a $10,000 brick school house, are due more to his untiring efforts than to any other single individual in Fessenden or Wells county.
[History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Mary Saggio] 



JOHN E. WILLIAMS,
of the forty-sixth legislative district, was born at Oshkosh, Wis.. October 21, 1879, and came to North Dakota with his parents in 1884, locating on a farm in Wells county. He received his education in the common schools of the county and graduated in 1906 from the law department of the state university. He also attended the Red River Valley University at Wahpeton. On leaving the university he took up the practice of law at Turtle Lake, McLean county. He is married and has one son. He was elected to the senate in 1910 as a republican.
[Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.]


WALTER P. WYARD
, a general merchant of Cathey, North Dakota, was born in London, England, in 1863.  His father, JAMES Wyard, was also of English birth, and was a manufacturer of picture frames and ornamental moldings in the old country.  He emigrated to America in 1880 and settled in Philadelphia, where he continued in his trade.  His wife was an Aitchison, and was of English and Scottish decent.  Her father was a civil engineer in the government service in India.
W. P. Wyard is the third son in a family of seven children.  He was reared in London, and educated at a private academy.  He came to this country in 1881, and was first employed by Mitchell, Fletcher & Company, wholesale and retail grocers in Philadelphia.  He left that city in 1882 in company with his brother, J. G. Wyard, and went to Chicago.  There he found work for a short time, and then pushed on to the prairies of the West, and arrived in Fargo in May 1882.  In company with his brother J. G., he walked across the country to Jamestown, a distance of one hundred miles.  They were foot-sore and weary and stranded, but they had every confidence in the future of the great Northwest.  They found work and engaged in the services of a large English syndicate, which was opening up extensive farms in the northern country.  The firm was Sykes & Hughes, and the city of Sykestown commemorates the senior partner.  The boys drove oxen and broke the prairies for farming the coming year.  This was a novel experience for city lads.  Breaking the prairie was itself a hard and unusual labor, but the surroundings made it both novel and interesting.  They were sixty-miles away from the nearest railroad station and postoffice:  buffalo, antelope and other large game roamed the prairies.
They returned to the East for the winter, and were so well satisfied with the outlook that they brought their families back with them the coming spring, and coming to Carrington, filed on government land and commenced improvements.  He began farming with one yoke of oxen and lived in a shanty 8x14 feet.  They went through the hardships common in a new country.  The county developed as the tide of settlement rolled in.  New towns were built and the railroads came into the neighborhood.  They were once more in civilization.  My. Wyard proved up in 1890, and then engaged in the mercantile business at Carrington.  He was in partnership with G. L. Farnham, and in 1893 the firm moved to Cathay and opened a general store.  They were the pioneer merchants of the village and occupied the first building erected in it.  In 1895 Mr. Farnham withdrew from the firm, and our subject assumed the entire business.  He carries a stock of goods valued at about twelve thousand dollars.  He has been remarkably successful, and has outside his store extensive real estate holdings in North and South Dakota.  He was married, in 1887, to Miss Barbara Quarton.  She was born in Scotland and came to this country in 1885.  Her father John Quarton, was a grain merchant at Burnt Island, Scotland.  Mr. and Mrs. Wyard have two children living:  Barbara Anna, born April 23, 1892; Noel Osborne, born December 25, 1894.  Mr. Wyard s business establishment is on the corner of Third avenue and Second street, and his residence is on Second avenue.
Source:  Compendium of History and Biography . Transcribed by Carol Eppright.




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