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Kings County
New York
Genealogy and History



Brooklyn Navy Yard


Brooklyn Navy Yard
Brooklyn Navy Yard
c. 1904
Source: Library of Congress


The United States Navy Yard, New York, also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard and the New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), is a shipyard located in Brooklyn, New York, 1.7 miles northeast of the Battery on the East River in Wallabout Basin, a semicircular bend of the river across from Corlear's Hook in Manhattan. It was bounded by Navy Street, Flushing and Kent Avenues. It was built in 1801 and in use from 1806 to 1966. At the height of its production of warships for the United States Navy, it covered over 200 acres.
[source: wikipedia]

Brooklyn Navy Yard 2
Brooklyn Navy Yard - the Lawn and Offices
between 1890-1901
Source: Library of Congress


entrance 2 Brooklyn Navy Yard
Brooklyn Navy Yard - Sands Street Entrance
c. 1904
Source: Library of Congress


Navy Yard Docks and Work Shop
Navy Yard Docks and Work Shop
between 1890-1901
Source: Library of Congress

Brooklyn Navy Yard
Brooklyn Navy Yard
c. 1904
Source: Library of Congress


1849 Whig Party list of
important civilian positions in
Brooklyn Navy Yard with recommended replacements.


Transcribed by John Sharp

Introduction
This partial list of important civilian positions in Brooklyn Navy Yard was transcribed from a handwritten document found at National Archives and Records Administration, Washington DC, Record Group 45, section 70, Payrolls and Lists of Civilian Personnel at Navy Yards, New York Navy Yard. The list is not dated, signed nor is the author or authors specified but was almost certainly compiled shortly after the election of 1848 by a member of the victorious Whig Party. The document is dated by the NARA archival staff to the year 1849.

The document's author provided notations regarding BNY master workmen, their alleged affiliations with Democratic Congressman William Brown Maclay (1812 -1882) and assessments of their character. The author also wrote the names of potential Whig replacements.
Congressman Maclay came from a politically powerful family and was successfully elected to Congress to represent New York City three times during the 1840's.Maclay lived near the navy yard and took care to closely associate and find jobs (Maclay was a Baptist) for his districts Irish Catholic constituents. "When a person comes to me for employment I write a note suggesting his name to the master workmen..." Maclay later would recollect that he "very carefully selected some ten or twelve master s" that they remained in office during Democratic administrations and were subsequently removed when another party took office. Maclay was defeated by Whig Party candidate Walter Underhill in the election of 1848.
The 1848 U.S. presidential election was close and pitted Whig Party candidate General Zachary Taylor. Taylor a hero of the Mexican War ran against Democratic Party candidate Lewis Cass and Free Soil Party candidate and former President Marin Van Buren. The election of 1848 took place on: November 7, 1848. Taylor won the election over Cass, capturing 163 of the 290 electoral votes cast.
Political patronage or the "spoils system" a term which derives from New York Senator William L. Marcy's" to the victor belong the spoils" by the 1848 election was a fixture in the national political life particularly so at the naval shipyards. Political patronage usually involved appointing party backers to positions within government and prior to an election hiring large numbers of workers in the hope of winning their gratitude and votes.
Such political patronage began in earnest during the administration of Andrew Jackson (1829-1837) and continued until the passage of the 1883 Pendleton Act and the introduction of a merit system. The Whig Party victory of 1848 makes it highly probable that this list was compiled by an unnamed New York City Whig Party loyalist. Originally patronage was viewed as a positive method of filling positions appointed positions with loyal supporters, overtime however public opinion came to view patronage as a detriment to public service. Both the Democrats and the Whigs held the view that patronage was not only their right, but also the duty of winners in political contests. The comments alongside the names of Joseph Linmont and Samuel W. Sales "came in by proscription" reflect this view of the y practice of the elimination of political rivals. Patronage was theorized to be good because it would encourage political participation by the common man and because it would make a politician more accountable for poor government service by his appointees. Those who advocated patronage also held that long tenure in the civil service was corrupting, so civil servants should be rotated out of office at regular intervals.
In 1859 a Congressional investigation into patronage at Brooklyn naval shipyard highlighted the abuses there and at other naval shipyards. The same investigation concluded that all the political parties utilized patronage as their key to elected office
The list is handwritten into five columns specifying employee name, position, residence, comments as to political affiliation and character and a final column listing the names of possible Whig replacements.

Transcription
This transcription was made from a digital image made at the National Archives and Records Administration Record. In transcribing this document , I have striven to adhere as closely as possible to the original in spelling, capitalization, punctuation and abbreviation including the retention of dashes, ampersands and overstrikes.. Where I was unable to print a clear image or where it was not possible to determine what was written, I have so noted in brackets. Where possible, I have attempted to arrange the transcribed material in a similar manner to that found in the letters and enclosure.
Transcribed and Contributed to Genealogy Trails by John G. Sharp -- July 22, 2013

1849 Whig Party list of
important civilian positions in
Brooklyn Navy Yard with recommended replacements.

CIVIL DEPARTMENT

NAVY YARD

(New York)
Adam P. Pentz 1 Naval Store Keeper New York Maclay's Brother in Law 4 Aaron Storer
Josiah Palmer
Samuel Haritt Naval Constructor
Joseph Linmont Inspector of Timber Came in by proscription Maclay's Man Wm.W. Hallock
Isaac Rollins
George Homan, Williamsburg
Archibald Campbell
general commendation
Geo W. Lee Clerk of the Yard
John Milet Foremen New York Maclay's Man
Daniel Ladd Blacksmith Queen Lane Noisy
Samuel W. Sales Plumber 137 Hugh St. Came in by proscription
Theophilus Hardenbrook 5 Cooper 338 Sands St. Old Soldier
Francis Phillips Mast Maker New York Maclay's Man Titus E. Dodge Brooklyn
Daniel W. Boyle New York
Peter McManus Block Maker 179 Bridge Street Good
John Buckley Boat builder East Brooklyn
John Weeks Ship Carpenter New York
Peter Turner Gun Carriage Marshall near John Of the worst sort Fred. P. Wright
John Rodgers Joiner Totally unqualified master Wm. Cumberson
Wm. Webb Caulker 56 Carlton Ave
Douglas M. Collins Painter
True W. Robbins Mason Orderly and Regular
Jesse M. Folk 6 Overseer Laborers 156 Concord St Most unscrupulous of all
John Kerrigan Sawyer John Shanley - both
John Moore Supt. Yard Mills 244 Bridge Street
DRY DOCK
Wm. J. McAlpin 7 Chief Engineer Bancroft nominee Maclay's Man 8 Char. B. Stewart
J.W. Adams
Foreman
John H. Martin first [illegible]
John O Morse Assistant Engineer
Andrew Thompson Boss Labour Instruction of Election and the Ship's crew
George Smith Carpenter Abraham Cohen
William [illegible] Master Smith

1 Report of the Committees of the House of Representatives made during the second session of the thirty-fifth Congress 1858 -1859 James B. Steedman Printer: Washington D.C. 1859, pp. 5,, 314 and 315.

2 Sharp, John G., ''History of the Washington Navy Yard Civilian Employees 1799 -1962" Naval History and Heritage Command, p.98 http://www.history.navy.mil/books/sharp/WNY_History.pdf

3 Pentz, Adam P. Naval Storekeeper Pentz, Adam P. 1811 -March 1887 Naval Storekeeper Register of commissioned and warrant officers of the United States Navy United States Bureau of Naval Personnel, United States. Navy Dept. C. Alexander: Washington DC, 1847, p. 106 and 113. Pentz was a wealthy real-estate investor and active in the early NYC Volunteer Fire Department with Excelsior Fire Company Number 2. [New York Times, obituary March 3, 1887.]

4 Maclay, William Brown, a Representative from New York; born in New York City March 20, 1812; received private instruction; was graduated from the College of the City of New York in 1836; associate editor of the New York Quarterly Review in 1836; taught Latin; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1839 and commenced the practice of his profession in New York City; member of the State assembly 1840-1842; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth, and Thirtieth Congresses (March 4, 1843-March 3, 1849); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1848 to the Thirty-first Congress; elected to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1857-March 3, 1861); was not a candidate for reelection in 1860 to the Thirty-seventh Congress; died in New York City February 19, 1882; interment in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y. While in Congress Maclay was a member of the Naval Committee hence had considerable influence over appointments at naval shipyard. His sister Jane was married Adam P.Pentz.. [Source: Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress 1774 - Present http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=M000032]

5 Hardenbrook, Theophilus 1791 -September 29. 1860 HARDENBROOK. -- In Brooklyn, on Friday morning, Sept. 28, suddenly, of disease of the heart, Col. THEOPHILUS HARDENBROOK, aged 69 years, 11 months and 12 days. Col. H. was a native of the City of New-York, and for the last forty years, and up to time of his decease, held the position of Master Cooper of the Brooklyn Navy-yard, respected for his strict attention to duty and the faithful discharge of the trust confided to him. His friends and acquaintances, the members of the Veteran Corps of the War of 1812, and the Masonic fraternity, are respectfully invited to attend his funeral, from his late residence, No. 118 Sands-st., Brooklyn, at 2 o'clock, P.M., on Sunday, Sept. 30. His remains will be conveyed to Greenwood Cemetery for interment. [New York Times obituary., September 29, 1860.]

6 Folk, Jesse M. 1806 -December 17, 1891 New York Herald December 18, 1891 obituary also Smith's Brooklyn Directory 1856 enumerates Jesse M. Folk, Master Ship Joiner Brooklyn Navy yard residing at 156 Concord Street. Jesse Folk was a wealthy Builder and active in Democratic Party politics'

7 McAlpine, William Jarvis April 30, 1812 New York City - February 16, 189 New Brighton, Staten Island, Richmond County, New York) was an American civil engineer and politician from New York. He was Chief Engineer Brooklyn Navy Yard 1846 -1849 and New York State Engineer and Surveyor from 1852 to 1853.

8 Bancroft, George October 3, 1800 - January 17, 1891 Secretary of the Navy in the 1840's and noted American historian and statesman prominent in promoting secondary education both in his home state and at the national level. During his tenure as U.S. Secretary of the Navy, he established the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1845. Among his best-known writings is the magisterial series, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.


Commodore Isaac Chauncey, 24 February 1808 response to the Secretary of the Navy, re a petition of Brooklyn Navy Yard workers

Isaac Chauncey
Commodore Isaac Chauncey

Introduction: This letter dated 24 February 1808 from Commodore Isaac Chauncey, Commandant New York Navy Yard (Brooklyn Navy Yard) to the Acting Secretary of the Navy Charles W. Goldsborough. Isaac Chauncey was shipyard head from 1807 -1813 and again from 1824 - 1833. Chauncey was writing in response to a petition of shipyard workers requesting the removal of Christian Burgh, Master Shipwright and entrepreneur. In 1808 this new federal shipyard was not particularly active and was building mostly privateers but these jobs were relatively well paid and highly prized. Shipbuilding in New York City though was still in its infancy with about 117 shipwrights and caulkers in whole town. This transcription was made from National Archives and Records Administration Washington, D.C. from microfilm of records of the New York City Navy Yard, RG 45. In transcribing this letter and attached listing I have striven to adhere as closely as possible to the original in spelling, capitalization, punctuation and abbreviation including the retention of dashes, ampersands and overstrikes.
Transcribed by John Sharp

Navy Yard New York 24th February 1808
My Dear Sir,
I again thank you for your letter of the 4th inst., as it enables Merit to establish its innocence against the aspersions of foulmouthed calumny.
Mr. Christian Burgh (the subject of the Petition sent to the Honorable Secretary) was born in this state of course a Citizen. It is true that he went to Nova Scotia with his Father while a minor and of necessity obliged to follow the fortunes of his family but s oon after he became of age, he returned to his native state and resided in this city for the last 12 years two of which he has been personally known to me, he was Forman in the Navy Yard at the time the Frigate President was built and gave perfect satisfaction - For his talents and requisite merits as a mechanic, his integrity as a man there not his superior in the United States which I believe his merit will allow and for which I will pledge my reputation. I will appeal to the order of Dr. Mitchell to the truth of this statement. It is a fact that Mr. B. refused to take the oath of allegiance (as stated by Mr. Jacob Merrell. Note why he refused because he considered himself insulted for he went to the Poles as a native American citizen to note he was challenged by a person of opposite politicks this appeared so pointed that Mr. Burgh to take the oath not that he had any other objection merely not to gratify the challenge he however went to the to Ward to the Mayor of the City and took the oath of allegiance and abjuration.
Mr. Burgh was employed ( from my recommendation ) by Mr. Beakman in 1806 to build a few of G. Boats built at that time and I believe if you will refer to the estimates then sent forward you will note that he was the lowest, He also was one of the gentleman that Mr. Beakman purchased timber from in August for the building of G. Boats He has since been contracted with to build five Gun Boats of the twenty thee ordered to be built here when I received orders to repair the Constitution I employed Mr. Burgh in conjunction with Messieurs Eckford & Bebee (Republicans) to repair that ship it is my opinion the people best qualified for such a service It is true that I employed Mr. Burgh kno wing him to be a Federalist but I did not employ him for his politicks but for his intrinsic value as a workmen and as a man It may be necessary for me to state here which I do most solemnly upon the standards & honeur of a gentleman that I never since I have been in publick service employed a man for his political sentiments or have been in any way influenced by them I have always employed t hose people whom I thought would do the government the most Justice and do the work on the best terms always keeping in view economy and always have endeavored to impress upon the minds of all those whom I have had authority to employ the necessity of their doing the publick work on as good terms then they do for individuals for in one case there would be some risk in the other nine.
The whole of the persecution against Mr. Burgh has come from my reducing the Carpenters wages and time of some worthless fellows out of this Yard which they then conceived was owing to influence of Mr. Burgh which is not [illegible] is most scandalous The petitioners have asserted that they are all American citizens this is not the fact for some of them are not only British subjects born but not citizens by adoption - another strange position has been taken by the petitioners that by employing foreigners or enemies to the country to do the publick work (I presume Mr. Burgh) that it would be so executed as to make the ship not only useless but dangerous to the officers and[men] this is a strange & foolish doctrine unless they will consent became rascals themselves for the most of them petitioners in the carpenters petition ( that is worth employing ) are at this time and have from the commencement employed on the constitution. Therefore if the work is done badly it is their fault not Mr. Burgh's who merely [impertends ?] in conjunction with another Master Ship Builder (and a Republican) the fact is they are dissatisfied that their wages was reduced and have attacked Mr. Burgh deeming that would be of sufficient measure with a certain class for the purpose of making their attack on me with more success for they continue in [illegible] him their next object would be to me also - But I t rust that no government and particularly administration is entrusted as the present would not remand any of its servants for doing their duty -
I enclose a number of documents shewing that Mr. Burgh is a native born citizen of the U. States and a respected mechanic of this city I also enclose you a paper shewing the occupation and characters of most the signers of the petition's by which you may make a comparison between Mr. B - and his persecutors and draw your own conclusions - the City petition is headed with a few respectable names, but for what reason these gentlemen put their to that petition is I think very evident they would sign a counter one if they could gain a Vote by it
The petition itself was wrote by a man that makes a trade of criticism and would prostitute his pen in any cause that he could gain any thing by it he would write me a petition tomorrow on any subject for five dollars. The contractors for the building of the Gun Boats gave me in their estimates together of course there is no difference in them. The contractors I beelive are all republicans except Mr. Burgh - I however forward to you two original ship chandlers bill, you will be pleased to compare them - Mr. [illegible] who was employed before I came to the Yard wished to furnish the proposal from mere patriotism but Messrs. Lehermerhorns wanted a moderate profit on their goods _ I will prove whenever necessary by the Certificate and oath of most of the officers in the yard and Squadron that the [allegeable] and other articles furnished by Messrs. Lehermerhornsis at least 15% better than that received from Mr. Dickerson with all his patriotism and you will perceive by the bills considerably cheaper -
I regret that I could not forward these papers before but I was anx ious to obtain a correct statement of the facts relative to Mr. Burgh and also the Characters of his prosecutors I have taken much pains to obtain those and their characters those left blank I could not obtain to my satisfaction but the others you may rely upon the correctness of -
With great esteem and personal regard I am your friend
[Signed] Isaac Chauncey
[Addressed to :] Charles Goldsborough Esq Washington

Subscribers to the Citizens Petition
to the Honorable the Secretary of the Navy

Names

Occupation

Remarks

Dewitt Clinton Mayor
John L. Broome Merchant
Abr. Bloodford Asst. Alderman
George Mitchell Grocer & Grog Shop Keeper Brother to the Hon. Dr. Mitchell
Aspinwall Cornwallis Grocer & Grog Shop Keeper Brother in law to the Hon. Do.
Daniel Winship Butcher
Josiah Ferris
Leonard Seaman Auctioneer
John Broome Lt. Governor
John Pell Butcher
John A. Smith Clerk to Lumber Merchant
Matthew Bir Assist Alderman & cabinet maker
Stephen Ludlum Assist Alderman & cabinet maker
David Covert House Carpenter
R. Delaplaine Porter house keeper
David Hubbard Inspector of Beef & Pork
[illegible] Guest
Fisher Dunham
James Mitchell Grog shop Keeper Brother to the Hon Dr. Mitchell
Timothy Titus Boarding house keeper
John Polhanus Grocer
Joseph Titus House Carpenter
Bryan Titus
Alfred Titus School Teacher
Jonathan Titus Ferryman
Jrail Titus Grocer
Rufus Paggar House Carpenter
Cornelius Sebring
Rich Milivar
Micah Hawkins
Nath Smith
Phineas Lockwood Joiner A worthless Drunkard
Abraham Knopp House Carpenter
Phineas Hulese
P.J. Goodfellow
Thurston Wood Auctioneer
John Grey
Banney Radley
James Greaton Taylor
Phillip Jones Shoemaker
Reuben Brooks House Carpenter Discharged from the Service of the U.S. in consequence of his exorbitant charges -
Rodman Boone
Isaac Dereiner Cartman
Charles Dobbs Cartman
Adah Holmes Grocer
A. Welmore Grocer
David Reeve Grocer
[illegible] Newby Junior
John Smith
R.R. Owen
A list of Subscribers to the Carpenters Petition to the Honorable the Secretary of the Navy
Name Occupation Remarks
Jeremiah Dodge Junior Carver
Nathan Osborne Carpenter Good for Nothing
John Dodge do Good Workman
David Roberts do do
Homer Pease do Quit on account of wages
Jonas Baldwin do An Indifferent Workman
Edward Chamberlin do do
Nathan Known do A bad workman & bad character
John Sviffer do at present an oysterman
Dennis Munger Carpenter An indigent workman
[illegible] Snow Caulker A tolerable yard workman
Edward Middleton Carpenter ditto
Jacob Southward Caulker A good Workman but a worthless character
Hubard Reiner
Thomas Hall Oysterman A foreigner & worthless character
Nathan Gadney Carpenter Good - Quit on account of wages
Stephen Mott Caulker & Oakum Spinner But tolerable
Jacob Johnson
John Campbell
Andrew Parker
John Griffits A boy Carpenter Foreigner tolerable
James Weed Carpenter Good
James Seaman €œ A Poor Workman
James Evans
Edmund Conely Caulker A poor workman
John Owens Laborer A Foreigner
Paul Snow Caulker A good Workman
Richard Fernat Carpenter Good quit on account of wages
Henry Buck €œ Indifferent
Gilbert Hathaway €œ Good, Quit on account of wages
Ebenezer Clark €œ Indifferent
Robert Martin Caulker A foreigner & a poor character
Selleck Howe Carpenter Good
Henry How €œ €œ
Thomas Clark €œ €œ
Stephen Cavanah Caulker A foreigner & indifferent worker
Moses Fargo A Boy
Cornelius Johnson Oysterman A poor character
Jarvis King

Endnotes

[1]
Burrows, Edwin G. and Wallace , Mike Gotham A History of New York City to 1898 Oxford University Press: New York,1999, p.341 Also see John Stobo An Introduction to the Labor History of Navy Yards

[2] Christian Burgh/Bergh, born 30 April, 1763 and baptized 12 May 1763, Wettenburgh Church ,Rhinebeck, New York . Burgh may have worked as a shipwright apprentice in Canada for a brief period but later moved back to New York City and worked at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was appointed to superintend the construction of the Frigate President. During the War of 1812 accompanied Commodore Isaac Chauncey to the Great Lakes where with Henry Eckford he build ships for the U.S. Navy. After the war Christian Burgh established a prominent shipyard on Scamel Street became wealthy building packets for the Liverpool /London run.. Burgh;s son Henry Burgh was founder of the New York ASPCA Harpers Monthly Magazine June to November 1882 Volume LXV p 226 -228.

[3] Isaac Chauncey, born in Black Rock, Connecticut, 20 February 1779, he was from a well to do back ground. Chauncey was related to the 2nd President of Harvard University, and his family had connections to the shipping industry. The New York City ship-owners the Schimmerhorn's gave him his first command, the merchant vessel Jenny. He was appointed a Lieutenant in the Navy from 17 September 1798. He fought with gallantry in the West Indies during the Quasi-War with France; in the Mediterranean during the First Barbary War; and commanded John Adams (1804-5), Hornet (1805-6), Washington and the Mediterranean Squadron (1815-1820).Perhaps his most outstanding service was during the War of 1812 when he commanded the naval forces on Lake Ontario, conducting amphibious operations in cooperation with the Army, and containing the large British fleet under the command of Sir James Yeo stationed there.[1] He also served twice as commandant of the New York Naval Shipyard.1807 -1812 and again 1825 -1832. His last service was as member, President, of the Board of Navy Commissioners. Commodore Chauncey died in Washington 27 January 1840. He was buried at Congressional Cemetery, Washington DC Encyclopedia of the War of 1812 David Stephen Heilder and Jeanne T. Heilder, Naval Institute Press: Annapolis, 1997,p.90

[4] Charles Washington Goldsborough (1779 - 1843) Born in Maryland in 1793, Charles Goldsborough joined the Navy Department which was then located in Philadelphia and moved to the new capitol with the Department and became the Chief Clerk of the Navy where he served until his death in 1843. He is buried in Congressional Cemetery (R41/30). His residence was on G Street West. He has been described as the Samuel Pepys of our navy, for his organizational and logistical skills. Charles Goldsborough wrote one of the first histories of the U.S. Navy the United States Naval Chronicle in eight volumes published 1824. For much of his early tenure he was the only clerk in the Department (which grew very slowly, in 1812 the Department employed a total of 12 clerks); Goldsborough due to his long tenure and talent became extremely influential often assuming duties as acting Secretary of the Navy, see his letters to Commodore Thomas Tingey regarding workers' wages dated 14 March 1809. His son Lewis M. Goldsborough became a Rear Admiral and was later Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard 1870-1873.


PAYROLLS
Payroll of the Mechanics and Laborers Employed in New York [Brooklyn] Navy Yard 16 to 31 May 1848

No.

Name

Station

Days

Wages

Amount

1 John Weeks [i] Foreman Carpenter 14 3 42
2 James McGee [ii] Quarterman Carpenter 14 2.5 35
3 George Hall Quarterman Carpenter 14 2.5 35
4 Charles Wilson Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
5 John Verbjck Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
6 William Merllon Carpenter 13 2.25 29.25
7 Joseph Startt Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
8 Richard Bradley Carpenter 9 ¼ 2.25 20.81
9 Leonard Dunkley Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
10 Thomas L. Dry Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
11 William H. Dibble Carpenter 11 ½ 2.25 25.87
12 Richard Berry Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
13 Jonas Martin Carpenter 13 ½ 2.25 30.37
14 Theodore F. Barcells Carpenter 11 2.25 24.75
15 Jo. Gilbert Carpenter 12 ½ 2.25 28.12
16 Thomas Fossalle Carpenter 12 2.25 27
17 William Crowell Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
18 George Childs Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
19 Wandle Ham Carpenter 13 ½ 2.25 30.37
20 John Lozier Carpenter 13 ½ 2.25 30.37
21 Peter Dearborn Carpenter 13 ½ 2.25 30.37
22 Charles Lawrence Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
23 Joshua Corvin Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
24 George Lawrence Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
25 George James Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
26 Cornelius Perry Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
27 William Mc Gallager Carpenter 12 ½ 2.25 28.12
28 Avery Williams Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
29 Nathaniel Pettitt Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
30 Jeremiah Morris Carpenter 12 ½ 2.25 28.12
31 Daniel Herbert Carpenter 7 ½ 2.25 16.87
32 Charles Lynch Carpenter 11 ½ 2.25 25.87
33 Westley Hunt Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
34 Edward Hartt Carpenter 11 2.25 24.75
35 Seymour Murray Carpenter 12 2.25 27
36 Jno. Halsted Carpenter 14 2.25 31.5
37 Lawrence Powers Carpenter 14 2 28
38 Jno. Deacon Carpenter 14 1.75 24.5
39 Gustavious V. Birch Carpenter 13 ½ 1.75 23.62
40 Elam Gibb Carpenter 13 ¾ 1.75 24.06
41 Rich. Carpenter Carpenter 12 ½ 1.75 21.87
42 Garrett Cozine Carpenter 13 ¼ 1.5 19.87
43 Horatio Weed Carpenter 14 2 28
44 Peter Turner [iii] Gun Carriage Maker 8 2.5 20
45 William H. Tuner Gun Carriage Maker Quarterman 8 ½ 2.25 19.12
46 Aaron Storer [iv] Gun Carriage Maker Quarterman 13 ½ 2.25 30.37
47 Lewis F. Green Gun Carriage Maker Quarterman 6 ½ 2.25 14.62
48 Farrell Grogan Gun Carriage Maker 14 1.75 24.5
49 Francis G. Turner Gun Carriage Maker 13 1.35 16.25
50 Phillip Dougherty Apprentice 12 ½ 1 12.5
51 John Powers Apprentice 13 ½ 1.12 15.12
52 William Kerrigan Apprentice 14 1.12 15.62
53 James H. Weeks Boy 14 0.5 7
54 Jno. Moore [v] Superintendent 14 2.5 35
55 William Brown Carpenter 14 1.38 19.32
56 John Conger Laborer 14 1.12 15.68
57 Francis Hastings
58 George Patterson
59 Francis White Borer 14 2 28
60 Henry Taylor 14 1.75 24.5
61 Mcoy Brink 14 1.75 24.5
62 Nelson Baldwin 14 1.75 24.5
63 Levi Whitker 13 1.75 22.75
64 Jon Norman 14 1.75 24.75
65 Edwin N. Schoonmaker 14 1.5 21
66 Thomas J. Darling 12 ¾ 1.5 19.12
67 William Johnson Carpenters Laborer 13 ½ 1.12 15.12
68 Samuel White Carpenters Laborer 14 1.12 15.68
69 Benjamin Raynor Carpenters Laborer 14 1 14
70 Patrick Martin Carpenters Laborer 13 1 13
71 James Edins Carpenters Laborer 7 ½ 1 7.5
72 Barns H. Lyon Carpenters Laborer 13 1 13
73 Benjamin G. Dayton 12 ½ 1 12.5
74 Simon Copeman Dockbuilder 14 3 42
75 Elias Richard Carpenter 14 1.5 21
76 Peter R. Stevens 7 ¾ 1.5 11.62
77 Thomas Broad 12 ¼ 1.5 18.37
78 William Rutan Dockbuilders 14 1.35 17.5
79 Robert Collins 7 ¾ 1.5 11.62
80 Jn. Mulligan Do Laborers 12 ¼ 1.5 18.37
81 Hugh Murray 14 1.25 17.5
82 Patrick Murray 14 1.25 17.5
83 Thomas Brady 14 1 14
84 Pater Nealus 13 ¾ 1 13.75
85 Patrick McCormack 13 ½ 1 13.5
86 Daniel Ladd [vi] Blacksmith 14 3 42
87 Walter Merryfield 11 ¾ 2.25 26.44
88 Jno. Dickinson 12 2.25 27
89 Wm. Brundage 10 ¾ 2.12 22.79
90 Jacob Rniply 14 2.12 29.68
91 William Dolchird 11 ½ 2.12 24.38
92 Elijah Strickland Blacksmith 14 2 28
93 James Herbert 13 ¾ 1.88 24.91
94 Levi Dolly 14 1.88 26.32
95 Amos Dickerson 10 1.88 25.38
96 Jno. Brooks 8 1.88 15.04
97 Michael Riley 14 1.75 24.5
98 Joseph Wilsey 14 1.5 21
99 Benjamin Waldrow 14 1.5 21
100 Samuel Potter 14 1.5 21
101 Jno. Caviat 14 1.5 21
102 William Rae 14 1.5 21
103 Jno. Hartow 14 1.38 19.32
104 Lewis Buboise 14 1.38 19.32
105 Francis Arbona 14 1.38 19.32
106 Benjamin Bowen 14 1.38 19.32
107 Patrick Conlan 14 1.38 19.32
108 Patrick Moran 14 1.38 19.32
109 John Holbrook 14 1.25 15
110 William H. Stoothoff Apprentice 12 0.67 8.04
111 Richard Smith Machinist 14 2.5 35
112 William Foster Engineer Foremen 14 1.75 24.5
113 James Riggart Foreman 14 1.12 15.68
114 Harrison Miller Asst. Engineer 14 1.25 17.5
115 Jno. Mc Donald Asst. Engineer 14 ¾ 1.25 18.46
116 Gune Denike Sparmaker 14 3 42
117 Francis Phillips [vii] Sparmaker 14 2.25 31.5
118 Samuel Morell Sparmaker 14 2.25 31.5
119 George Thompson Apprentice 14 1.12 17.5
120 Francis Danike Apprentice 14 0.75 8.04
121 Richard Ridle Laborer 14 1 14
122 John Buckley [viii] Boat Builder 14 3 42
123 Alfred P. Clark Boat Builder 14 2 28
124 Lundy Ryer 10 ½ 2 21
125 Jacob Duryea 14 2 28
126 Thomas E. Brown Apprentice 14 1.12 18.62
127 Phillip Reilly 14 0.94 13.16
128 Jno. Smith Laborer 14 1 14
129 Jonathan Rodgers [ix] Joiner 14 3 42
130 Romeo Friganza [x] [Spar Maker] 14 2.25 31.5
131 Bethel Rodgers [Spar Maker] 14 2 28
132 Abraham Hass [Spar Maker] 14 2 28
133 George Mc Olwyn 14 2 28
134 Francis Quivedo 14 2 28
135 M. Mc Devitt 13 ½ 2 27
136 M.F. Kershaw 12 ½ 2 25
137 Nicholas Simons Joiner 13 2 26
138 Thomas Burns 12 2 26
139 Edward Cooper 13 2 26
140 George Acker 14 2 28
141 William Barrett 14 2 28
142 John M. Johnson 13 ¾ 2 27.5
143 James Price 7 2 14
144 William Bloodgood 6 ½ 2 13
145 Thomas Holmes 6 2 12
146 Thomas Furnold 6 2 12
147 William Willett 5 ½ 2 11
148 James Halsted 5 2 10
149 Farquhar McRae 12 ¼ 1.62 19.82
150 John Chauncey 11 1.62 17.82
151 Jeremiah Wells 11 1.62 17.82
152 Henry Oxwith 9 1.62 14.58
153 Richard Lawrence 8 1.62 12.96
154 John O'Connor [no wages or hours reported]
155 Hugh Marshall 6 ¾ 1.37 9.25
156 Michael Hurley Apprentice 13 1.17 15.21
157 David D. Rodgers 14 0.94 13.16
158 Samuel H. Moore Laborer 3 1.25 3.75
159 Laurence Jordan 14 1 14
160 Francis Hastings 4 1 4
161 Peter McManus [xi] Blockmaker 14 3 42
162 Laurence Green 13 1.88 24.44
163 Austin Fowler 13 1.75 22.75
164 William B. Smith 8 ¼ 1.75 14.44
165 Charles Brown 10 1.75 17.75
166 Charles B. Baldwin Apprentice 13 ½ 0.94 12.69
167 Samuel W. Sale [xii] Plumber 11 3 33
168 John Hunt 7 ½ 2 15
169 William McElroy 9 2 18
170 Robert Drake 1 ¾ 2 3.5
171 William A. Brownly 10 2 20
172 Isaac Mesirole 6 ¼ 2 12.5
173 Ebenezer Wood 3 1.75 5.25
174 Stephen Danagar 11 1.62 17.82
175 Jno. Richardson Laborer 6 1 6
176 Jno. W. Sale 7 ½ 1 7.5
177 Thomas Shanly 7 1 7
178 William Webb [xiii] Caulker 14 3 42
179 John Webb 10 ¾ 2.25 24.19
180 George Webb 9 2.25 20.25
181 John Hambler 8 ½ 2.25 19.12
182 William Ballantine Caulker Laborer 14 1 14
183 Eli Darling 14 1 14
184 Lewis Francis 14 1 14
185 William Cumberson 13 ½ 0.75 10.12
186 Michael Harison 11 0.5 5.5
187 Walter Spicer 14 0.5 7
188 John Oatman 13 ½ 0.5 6.75
189 Douglas M. Collins Painter 14 3 42
190 William Walters 14 2 28
191 James Powers 13 ¾ 1.62 22.27
192 William L. Reynolds 13 1.62 21.06
193 Artimus Jones 12 ½ 1.62 20.25
194 Patrick Farrall 14 1.62 22.68
195 Jn. White 14 1.62 22.68
196 Joseph Davis 14 1.62 22.68
197 Oliver Powell 14 1.62 22.68
198 Dennis Herren 5 1 9.86
3 1.12
199 Richard Cunningham Apprentice 14 1 14
200 Theophilus Hardenbrook[xiv] Cooper 14 3 42
201 Dennis Duffy 1.75 9 15.75
202 Jacob Vantassall 1.75 6 10.5
203 Hugh Spear 1.75 4 7
204 James Devoe 1.75 2 3.5
205 James Young 1.75 2 3.5
206 Jno. Bockhurst [no pay or hrs. reported]
207 Francis Clark Laborer [no pay or hrs. reported]
208 George Stailey Sailmaker 5 ½ 2.2 29
8 2.25
209 George Smith 5 ½ 2 11
210 James Ryan 9 ¼ 2 19.5
211 Rowlandson Smith 10 2 20
212 Charles Houglett 9 ¾ 2 19.5
213 Joseph Brown 9 2 18
214 William Brown 9 2 18
215 Samuel O'Brien 9 2 18
216 Samuel Adams 8 ½ 2 17
217 James Daily 8 2 17
218 James Hinton 8 2 16
219 Monroe F. Connors 14 2 28
220 Anthony Campbell 14 1.75 24.5
221 William Brayton [xv] [Master Sailmaker] 14 2 28
222 Daniel C. Brayton [xvi] [Sailmaker] 14 1.75 24.5
223 William S. L. Brayton [xvii] Laborer 14 1 14
224 Henry Stremell 12 ½ 0.75 9.37
225 Stephen Merritt Boy 14 0.5 7
226 Charles Harris Rigger 14 1.75 24.5
227 John Mavnook 13 ¼ 1.75 23.19
228 Nicholas Nicholson Rigger 14 1.25 17.5
229 Joseph Copping 14 1.12 15.68
230 Peter Stanwood 14 1.12 15.68
231 Abraham Caldwell Laborer 14 1.12 15.68
232 Jno. McDonald 14 1.12 15.68
233 Thomas King 14 1.12 15.68
234 Ebenezer Clark 14 1.12 15.68
235 [Ned] Myers 13 ½ 1 13.5
236 James Dinnin 9 ¾ 1 9.75
237 Jno. Dinnin Armorer 13 ¾ 1.88 25.88
238 Jno. Myers 13 1.88 24.44
239 Andrew Dinnin 11 ½ 1.88 21.62
240 Cain Dolan Hosemaker [xviii] 14 1.25 16.56
241 John Kerrigan [xix] Sawyer 14 2.5 35
242 Thomas Kerrigan 14 2 28
243 James Devlin 14 2 28
244 Jno. Farrell 14 2 28
245 Patrick Rugan 14 2 28
246 James King 12 ¾ 2 25.5
247 Francis Gallagher 12 ¾ 2 25.5
248 Hugh Nevens 14 2 28
249 Benjamin James 14 2 28
250 Henry Dunigan 13 ¼ 2 26.5
251 Michael Faverelle 12 ¼ 2 24.5

No.

Name

Station

Days

Wages

Amount

252 Jno. Wethers 11 ½ 2 23
253 Jeremiah Connelly 12 ½ 2 25
254 Ezekiel H. Davis Writer 5 1.62 8.1
255 James R. Zabriski 5 1.25 6.25
256 Isaac C. [Oplinz] 9 1.88 16.92
257 George L. Birch 14 1 14
258 Phillip Brady Musterers Laborer 16 1.12 17.92
259 Jacob Straub Teamster 14 1.38 19.32
260 James Willis 14 1.12 15.68
261 Jeremiah Box 14 1.12 15.68
262 William Walker 9 ½ 1.12 10.64
263 Thomas Lewis 4 ½ 1.12 4.48
264 Dominicus Vandiver 10 1.12 11.2
265 Morell Pettitt 14 1.12 15.68
266 Peter Yerks 13 ¾ 1.12 15.4
267 Corn. Vanderveet 12 1.12 13.44
268 William Willis 6 1.12 6.72
269 Samuel Sheppard 10 1.12 11.2
270 Thom Wood 2nd 4 1.12 4.48
271 Alpheus Lewis 4 1.12 4.48
272 Jno. A. Crum Storekeeper Labr. 6 1.75 10.5
273 John Stewart Storekeeper 4 1.25 5
274 Phillip Dougherty Laborer 6 1.12 6.72
275 Nath. L. Davis 6 1.12 6.72
276 Jno. Rodgers 6 1.12 6.72
277 Isaac N. Shoemaker 6 ¾ 1.12 7.56
278 Chas W. Pittman 4 1 4
279 James Flood 14 1.12 15.68
280 Robert N. Wood 14 1 14
281 Anthony Francis 7 1 7
282 Thos. McNamara 13 1 13
283 Barney Mc Pharlin 3 1 3
284 Jno. Riley 1st 3 1 3
285 Michael Carney 13 ½ 1 13.5
286 James Finn 3 1 3
287 Jno. Ford 2 1 2
288 Jno. [ Zevedo] 5 ½ 1 5
289 Thomas Cosgrove 14 1 14
290 Jesse M. Folk [xx] Laborer 14 2.5 35
291 Frederick Devoe Carpenter 14 1.32 19.32
292 Richard Barker 14 1.25 17.5
293 Patrick Hurley Laborer 14 1.12 15.68
294 Jno. Thomas 14 1.12 15.68
295 Jno. Conklin 14 1.12 15.68
296 Thomas Smith 14 1.12 15.68
297 Jno. Lewis 14 1.12 15.68
298 Jno. C. [Bassere] 14 1.12 15.68
299 Jno. Toman 14 1.12 15.68
300 Joseph Thompson 14 1.25 17.5
301 David Stewart 1st 14 1.25 17.5
302 Mich. Mc Donald 13 ¼ 1 13.25
303 Thomas Brian 13 ¼ 1 13.25
304 Richard Cochran 11 1 11
305 Joseph Brny 13 1 13
306 Cornelius Cozine 11 1 11
307 Cornelius Holmqyst 13 ½ 1 13.5
308 James Kenyon 13 ¼ 1 13.25
309 Henry F. Enslin 13 1 13
310 Jno.Conland 12 ¾ 1 12.75
311 Steven H. Nichols 9 ¾ 1 9.75
312 Michael Carr 13 ¼ 1 13.25
313 James Connelly 13 ¼ 1 13.25
314 Stephen French 10. ½ 1 10.5
315 Jn. Mulvahill 13 1 13
316 Robert McKnight 14 1 14
317 James Bragaw 14 1 14
318 Lawrence Curran Laborer 11 ½ 1 11.5
319 Thomas Bradley 13 ¼ 1 13.25
320 John O'Brian 13 ¼ 1 13.25
321 Samuel Baldwin 12 1 12
322 Patrick Delaney 13 ¼ 1 13.25
323 William Jameson 13 ¼ 1 13.25
324 John Mooney 12 ¾ 1 12.75
325 Peter Donnelly 11 ¾ 1 11.75
326 James Dennison 6 ½ 1 6.5
327 Jn. O’Grady 2nd 12 ¾ 1 12.75
328 James Nesbitt 13 1 13
329 Jno, Fervall 13 ¼ 1 13.25
330 David Reynolds 1
331 Michael Flood 13 1 13
332 David Stewart 2nd 11 1 11
333 William King 13 ¼ 1 13.25
334 Thomas H. McGee 3 ½ 1 3.5
335 Jno. G. Stewart 12 ¾ 1 12.75
336 Benjamin. Pearce 13 1 13
337 Patrick Martin 2nd 13 ¼ 1 13.25
338 Bartholomew O'Connor 13 ¼ 1 13.25
339 Isaac Schulyer 13 ¼ 1 13.25
340 Jno. Barry 13 ¼ 1 13.25
341 Bernard O'Neal 13 ¼ 1 13.25
342 John Dougherty 13 ¼ 1 13.25
343 Jno, Kenney 13 ¼ 1 13. 25
344 Benjamin Baldwin 14 1 14
345 Patrick McCann 13 ¼ 1 13.25
346 Thomas Green 9 ¼ 1 9.25
347 Thomas Cosgrove 13 ¼ 1 13.25
348 Jno. Cronan 13 1 13
349 Daniel Gallagher 11 ¾ 1 11.75
350 William Wendover 12 ¾ 1 12.75
351 Abraham Higbee 14 1 14
352 James Brady 6 ½ 1 6.5
353 Martin Higgins 6 ½ 1 6.5
354 Thomas Baldwin 13 ¾ 1 13.75
355 George Arnold 14 1 14
356 Lawrence McGovern 12 ½ 1 12.5
357 William Bennett 14 1 14
358 Michael Cogan 14 1 14
359 Seamus R. Johnson 14 1 14
360 Thomas Wood 14 1 14
361 Thos. Flanagan 13 ¾ 1 13.75
362 Thomas Stewart 14 1 14
363 Wm. Stoohoof 13 ½ 1 13.5
364 Phillip Duffy Laborer 11 1 11
365 Patrick Conlan 2nd 14 1 14
370 Michael Boylan 13 ¼ 1 13.25
371 Patrick Mulligan 13 ¾ 1 13.75
372 Michael Coffie 12 ¾ 1 12.75
373 Jno. Shrowsbridge 14 1 14
374 Michael O’Hara 13 ¾ 1 13.75
375 Michael Murray 13 ¼ 1 13.25
376 Jno. Riley 2nd 10 1 10
377 Michael Fitzpatrick 4 ¾ 1 4.75
378 Peter Stubbs 11 ½ 1 11.5
379 Oliver Valentine 12 ¾ 1 12.75
380 Daniel Lewis 14 1 14
381 Henry Miller 12 ½ 1 12.5
382 Daniel Lynch 12 1 12
383 Daniel McColigan 14 1 14
384 Jno. Larkin 14 1 14
385 Phillip Sweeny 13 ¾ 1 13.75
386 Patrick Egan 14 1 14
387 Thomas Ritchie 14 1 14
388 Michael Mc Enroe 4 1,00 4
389 Thomas Brady 4rd 5 1 5
390 Patrick Farrell 3rd 14 1 14
391 Jno. Kegan 12 ¾ 1 12.75
392 Matthew Dobson 12 ¾ 1 12.75
393 Samuel Lolliday 6 ½ 1 6.5
394 Barry Campbell 9 1 9
395 James Henry 5 1 5
396 James Dryer 7 1 7
397 Thomas Gerrihan 13 ¼ 1 13.25
398 Hiram Wegard 12 ¾ 1 12.75
399 Thos. Locusson 9 1 9
400 Michael Conlan 1st 14 1 14
401 Cormac Conlan 12 ¾ 1 12.75
402 Jno. McClure 14 1 14
403 Williams McLaughlin 5 1 5
404 James Brennen 4 1 4
405 Isaac Howell 14 1 14
406 Augustus Smith 13 1 13
407 Michael Rivlan 13 ¼ 1 13.25
408 Francis Howard 13 ½ 1 13.5
409 Owen Keean Laborer 14 1 14
410 James Welsh 7 1 7
411 Thomas Rhahill 8 ¼ 1 8.25
412 Thomas Dillon 11 ¾ 1 11.75
413 William Allen 12 1 12
414 Phillip Kaivanan 13 ½ 1 13.5
415 Patrick Quigley 14 1 14
416 Andrew Alivelle 9 1 9
417 Michael Kerrigan 6 1 6
418 William Mc Donald 5 1 5
419 William Purcell 9 ¾ 1 9.75
420 Terence Riley 14 1 14
421 Patrick McShane 13 ¾ 1 13.75
422 James Kerrigan 13 1 13
423 James White 9 1 9
424 Adam Parkhill 9 ¾ 1 9.75
425 Jno. Stewart 14 1 14
426 Jno. Meeney 14 1 14
427 Phillip Moore 13 ½ 1 13.5
428 Jno. Carroll Borer 2 1.75 3.5
429 Jno. Nattrass Plumber 2 1.75 3
430 George T. Beakey Painter 2 1.62 3.24
431 Stephen Works Watchman 14 1.25 17.5
432 George Sheffield Watchman 16 1.25 20
433 Brown Burlingame Watchman 16 1.25 20
434 Thomas Hope 2 1.25 16.5
14 1
435 Asa Varnum 16 1 16
436 Peter M. Beam 16 1 16
437 Char Rodger 16 1 16
438 Jno. Walker 2nd 16 1 16
439 Charles Bowers 16 1 16
440 Barzilla Russell 16 1 16
441 Jno. Wood 16 1 16
442 Johnson Brown 16 1 16
443 Jno. Smith 16 1 16
444 Benjamin Richardson 16 1 16
445 Jesse Oat 16 1 16
446 Jabez Goodwin 16 1 16
447 Patrick Burns 16 1 16
448 Thos. Murphy 16 1 16
449 Samuel Lolliday 2 1 2
450 Cor. Lafferty 16 1 16
451 Jno. Pride Laborer 14 1 14
Total 4, 178 ½

[1] The Payroll of Mechanics and Labourers Employed in the United States Navy Yard, New York from 1 to 15 October 1840 reflects a payroll of 780 employees. In 1840 the navy yard was especially busy with a new paddle boat steamer USS Missouri under construction. National Archives and Records Administration New York, Record Group45, 181.3.5 Records of the New York (Brooklyn) Navy Yard (New York, NY) payrolls1840

[2] George W. Lee began working at the BNY in the 1820’s and was Clerk of the Yard for over thirty – five years. Lee relinquished his position sometime in the early 1870’s but still kept and office on the navy yard where he was said to “engaged in writing a “History of the Brooklyn Navy Yard” for the government. Brooklyn Daily Eagle October 1, 1874, p.4

[3] Circular Navy Comm. – Office 31st Jan 1821
Sir
The Commissioners of the Navy have found it expedient to adopt the following additional regulations with regard to the Musters &c of the different Navy Yards –
1st – A Lieutenant, if there be one attached to the Yard, or if not, the Sailing Master, is to be present at all Musters of the Mechanics and Laborers, which Lieutenant or Master is keep a regular Book or Roll, in addition to that kept by the Clerk of the
Yard –
2nd To prevent Mistakes or fraud the Order of Muster must be as follows –
The rolls of the Lieutenants or Master, are to be made out in the same order as those of the clerk - The clerk is to call over the name of each Mechanic, Laborer, and other person employed by the day, in the order in which they stand on the rolls – and as they are so called, they are to pass in rotation in the presence of the said Lieutenant or Master, whose duty it will be to check any omissions or correct any mistakes, which may accidentally or otherwise be made by the Clerk
The roll being called [word crossed out illegible] The Lieutenant or Master is immediately afterwards to compare his Roll with that of the Clerk, in order to ascertain if they agree –
3.rd At the end of each week the Clerk is to deposit his Roll signed by himself in the hands of the purser and Lieutenant or Master is in the like manner, to deposit his in the hands of the Commandant of the Yard, who before signing the general Monthly pay Roll( by which alone the purser will be authorized to pay the mechanics laborers, and others belonging to the yard & paid by the day) is to compare the rolls so kept by the Lieutenant or Master, with the monthly Pay roll made out by the purser, in order to satisfy himself, that their respective Rolls agree, before he the Commandant puts his Signature to that, by which the purser pays the Men –
4th – The originals rolls kept by the Clerk, are on the settlement of the Pursers accounts with the 4th Auditor to be sent with such accounts as indispensable vouchers establishing the correctness of the Sums respectively paid to the mechanics, laborers and others employed by the day –
5th The Rolls kept by the Lieutenant or master, and deposited in the hands of the commandant of the yard, are those by which the Commandant is to make out the monthly rolls required to be sent to the Navy Commissioners Office, shewing the sums expended for labor on each and every object, whether for Navy Yards – repairs, Ordnance or gradual increase, or whatever object it may be; and in order to multiply the number of checks the commandant is to file and preserve all weekly rolls from which he makes out - the before mentioned monthly Rolls –
6th. – Some one day in every Week the Commandant will in person attend the Musters of the Yard and see that they are Conducted in manner herein prescribed –
Respectfully Jno Rodgers – Pres

To: Murray, Evans, Hull, Morris, Tingey, & Cassin.

[7] Writing in 1862 Admiral Hiram Paulding in response to rumors that “colored men” were being employed and taking the place of white mechanics and laborers stated “ A report having been published, to the effect that a number of men had been discharged from the Brooklyn Navy-yard, and their places supplied by colored men, (contrabands,) Commodore PAULDING transmits the following contradiction: "Men from almost every department of the yard were discharged on Saturday last to the aggregate number of two hundred and forty, for the reason that their services were not required, and a further discharge will probably soon be made for the same reason. As for the contrabands or colored men, there is not a word of truth in the statement. There is not a colored person employed in the Navy-yard, nor has there been since the day I assumed the command, or before that time as far as I know." New York Times 13 June 1862, p.2. Also see: Spann, Edward K. Gotham At War New York City 1860 -1865 Scholarly Resource Inc., Wilmington Delaware, 2002, p. 126. Spann has a thorough discussion of the race riots in 1863 and the economic background of which pitted Irish immigrants against African Americans in the labor market.

[8] In 1908 the Navy Yard employed about forty people making flags and pendants, the majority of whom were widows of servicemen killed in the Civil War or Spanish American War see Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn New York 30 January 1908, p.8.

[9] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 15 September 1942, p.10.

[10]Brooklyn Daily Eagle 27 October 1849, p.2 and New York Times 26 July 1855,p.3.

[11]Casey, Marion R. The Irish, The Encyclopedia of New York City Yale University Press: New York, 2009. http://www.virtualny.cuny.edu/EncyNYC/Irish.

[12] Foner, Eric Give Me Liberty! An American History Volume 1, WW Norton: New York, 2005, p.321. Brooklyn Daily Eagle September3, 1845, p. 2.

[13] In the 1830’s the New York City General Trades Union, led by the shipwrights, pushed for ten hour work days. Workers petitioned, marched with the result that by 1836 the “Mechanics Bell” was hung at the corner of Stanton and Goerck Streets. The bell signaled the ten work day for shipyard employees. See Burrows, Edwin G. and Wallace, Mike Gotham A History of New York City to 1898 Oxford University Press: New York,1999, p.604 On March 31, 1840 President Martin Van Buren, by Executive Order, formally changed work hours in federal naval ship yards from 12 to 10 per day for government employees doing manual labor. See Roediger, David R. & Foner, Phillip S. Our Time A History of American Labor and the Working Day New York, Greenwood Press, 1989, pp 40-42.

[14] Commodore Isaac Chauncey, Commandant BNY to the Acting Secretary of the Navy Charles W. Goldsborough 24 February 1808 . Chauncey was writing in response to a petition of shipyard workers requesting the removal of Christian Burgh, Master Shipwright. The carpenters alleged that Burgh was a foreign national and his selection based upon political favoritism. Chauncey claimed Burgh was a U.S. Citizen and the accusations a “foulmouthed calumny.”

[15] Report of the Committee of the House of Representatives, 2nd Session thirty –fifth Congress 1858 -1859, James B. Steedman Printers: Washington, pp 66-67.

[16] Graft and corruption in all the naval shipyards was a serious problem. In 1859 a series of scandals concerning the awarding of purchasing contracts at Brooklyn and the Philadelphia navy yards were the subject of Congressional inquiry. In testimony Anson Herrick BNY Storekeeper, answered the question “Has not the office been given for many years, under all administrations to the editors of papers or some political person” with candor “All offices that I know of are given to some political person; they are all politicians, either of one side or the other.” Herrick went on to acknowledge he appointed his son as first clerk justifying his selection thus “I do not spend but very little time in the navy yard, for this reason, these papers and documents are brought to me by my son whom I see every day, or by messenger… I appointed my son first clerk because I could have confidence in him.” Report of the Committee of the House of Representatives, 2nd Session thirty –fifth Congress 1858 -1859, James B. Steedman Printers: Washington, pp 76-77.

[17] Sharp, John G., ''History of the Washington Navy Yard Civilian Employees 1799 -1962" Naval History and Heritage Command, p.57 http://www.history.navy.mil/books/sharp/WNY_History.pdf

[18] Albion, Robert G. A Brief History of Civilian Personnel in the U.S. Navy Department, 1943, p.27 online http://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/b/brief-history-civilian-personnel-us-navy-department.html

[19] Isaac Chauncey to Robert Smith 10 August 1807.

[20] John Weeks, Ship Carpenter Forman is enumerated on in the circa 1849 Whig Party list of possible replacements at the BNY

[21] James R. McGee June 15, 1810 – February 15, 1894, Obituary, Death of an Old Government Employee
Sixty-three Years in the Navy Yards as a Shipwright. James R. McGee, one of the oldest citizens of Brooklyn, died at the residence of his son-in-law, Daniel B. Phillips, 283 Adelphi Street, on Thursday February 15, of pneumonia, in the 84th year of his age. Mr. McGee was born in the Fifth ward of Brooklyn on June 15, 1810. He received a common school education until his 15th year when he was apprenticed in the Brooklyn Navy Yard to learn the trade of a shipwright. Ever since his entrance into the navy yard and up to February 4, 1894, Mr. McGee was actively in the employ of the United States government. All his life he was an ardent Democrat and took a vigorous interest in national and local politics. During the administration of President Buchanan Mr. McGee held the position of master of construction in the ship wright's department of the navy yard, but was removed upon the advent of the Republican party under Lincoln. Mr. McGee had not left his position when active hostilities commenced. He was instructed by Secretary of Navy Wells to report immediately in St. Louis, where a yard had been opened for the construction of river gunboats. During the entire war Mr. McGee remained there and at Cairo, where similar work was undertaken, and upon the cessation of hostilities returned to the Brooklyn navy yard. Since his wife's death, then years ago, Mr. McGee had made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Phillips, where his death took place. He was a member of Nassau lodge No30, I.O.O.F., and is said to have been the oldest odd fellow in the city. Mr. McGee was also a member of the Society of Old Brooklynites and of the Veteran and Volunteer Firemen's associations, all of which bodies attended his funeral at 1:30 o'clock to-day at the residence of Mr. Philips. Dr. Van Alstyne, pastor of the Sands street Memorial church, conducted the services. The interment was at Cypress Hills cemetery. Mr. McGee leaves three daughters and one son, all of whom live in Brooklyn. Source: Brooklyn Eagle, 17 Feb 1894, p.5.

[22] Peter Turner Gun Carriage Maker born 1787 in Ireland died in Brooklyn New York Dec 31, 1863. Peter Turner was for many years BNY Carpenter Foreman. He was known for his devotion to the Catholic Church, and his work to help Irish immigrants and improve the lot of working people. His obituary states he was helpful in finding employment for those recently arrived from Ireland. He led the Irish fraternal society "The Erin Fraternal Association' and Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum. His wages as Foreman in May 1848 for 14 day period @3.00 per day week $ 42.00. His son John M. Turner, became a priest and was Vicar General of the New York Diocese Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle Dec 23 1894 p. 8 Turner is enumerated in the circa 1849 Whig Party list of possible replacements at BNY “of the worst sort “likely a reference to Turner’s Irish heritage and championing of Roman Catholic causes.

[23] Aaron Storer was discharged from the navy yard for an alleged fraudulent transaction as timber inspector. As the supervisor of the Timber Inspectors Department, Storer, led two quartermen and 48 employees. see Brooklyn Daily Eagle May 4, 1876, p.4 Storer’s son Aaron Augustus Storer Jr. in his 1876 testimony to the Congress testified his father was removed for political reasons

[24] John Moore was superintendent of the navy yard coffee mill see Brooklyn Daily Eagle July 1. 1853 p.3

[25] “Daniel Ladd (son of Joseph Ladd) was born in Mount Vernon Me., August 27, 1793; he married Rachel Richard January 22, 1817. He left home before the war of 1812, was a sailor, after the war began he was taken prisoner and confined in Darmoor Prison in England a long time. After his release he came home and as a slight reward for his sufferings while in prison, was employed in the navy yard Brooklyn N. Y. as a Superintendent of one of the blacksmith shops, he having learned the trade as a young man and continued until his death.” Ladd, Warren The Ladd Family A Genealogical and Biographical Memoir of the Descendants of Nathaniel Ladd. Edmund Anthony and Sons New Bedford Mass. 1890 p.77

[26] Francis Phillips Mast Maker /Spar Maker Foreman is enumerated on in the circa 1849 Whig Party list of possible replacements at BNY

[27] James Buckley Master boatbuilder

[28] Jonathan Rodgers BNY Master Joiner is enumerated on in the circa 1849 Whig Party list of possible replacements. as “a totally unqualified master.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle of August 2, 1849, p.2., under the heading “NAVY YARD REMOVALS”, proclaimed Jonathan Rodgers “the most efficient and popular Master joiner ever employed by the government, removed because he voted for Gen. Cass.”

[29] AN OLD RESIDENT GONE. Death Claims Romeo Friganza, of Mound City.
The History of His Life an Interesting One.—After Forty-Six Years in the U.S. Naval Service, He Serves the Public as Mayor, Postmaster and County Commissioner. Romeo Friganza was born October 17, 1815, on Minorca Island, one of the Balearic group, in the Mediterranean Sea, subject of Spain. His father, Salvador Friganza, was a native of Malta, in the Mediterranean. He died in Minorca, where he had been married to Juana Pons, a descendant of one of the oldest and most renowned families on the island. She died on the island after giving birth to thirteen children. Romeo was partly educated on his native island, but received most of his education on board the United States man-of-war, Constitution, the commodore ship of the Mediterranean squadron, on which he had embarked without the knowledge of his parents, and on which he stayed two years, when he was transferred to the North Carolinian, who relieved the old Constitution. He stayed on her till 1827, when he was transferred with the paymaster, N. H. Perry, to the United States sloop-of-war, Lexington, on which he remained till his arrival in New York in 1830. He was the transferred by Commodore Isaac Chauncey to the New York navy yard, for the purpose of learning the trade of ship joiner, there to remain till the aged of twenty-one. Through his industry and efficiency he was, at the breaking out of the Mexican War, made foreman of the joiners in the navy yard, continuing as such till 1856, when he was promoted to master joiner, a position of high trust which he held till the breaking out of the Civil War, when he was ordered to St. Louis, there to aid Admiral Foote in building and equipping gun boats for the Mississippi squadron. He remained in the service till July 1, 1874, which was after theabandonment of the naval service at Mound City. After a continual service of forty-six years, he retired from the public service. His record in the navy was one of the very best. During the years from 1861 to 1865, while acting as naval constructor, $3,000,000 passed through his hands, yet no questions were asked at Washington. His was the only office of that kind that was not investigated after war. Admiral Porter in a letter says: “You ought to feel highly honored, as yours in the only office that does not need investigation.” He was also honorably mentioned in naval histories.When he left the naval service, Mr. Furigana was elected mayor of Mound City, serving twelve years. He had also served as county commissioner and school trustee, and during Cleveland’s first administration was postmaster. He had been a member of the Congregational church for seven years prior to his death. Mr. Furigana was married twice. By his first wife, Delilah Boardman, he had eight children, four of whom now survive, Joseph, a resident of Brooklyn; John, now living in Mississippi; Mrs. Maggie O’Callahan, of Cincinnati; and William, of Priscott, Ark. His first wife died in 1856 and he was married again to Mrs. Anna Huckleberry, who now survives him with one child, Willis Friganza, aged 14. He was a great grandfather at his death, his eldest son being a grandfather. Source: Obituary The Cairo Citizen, Mount City Illinois 18 July 1895.

[30] Peter McManus Master Blockmaker circa 1807 – June 27, 1862

[31] Samuel W. Sale Master Plumber is enumerated on the 1849 Whig Party list of possible BNY replacements .Brooklyn Daily Eagle August 6, 1849,p.2 reports that Master Plumber, Samuel W. Sale, ‘who had been guilty of the crime of supporting General Taylors opponent” was replaced by an appointee of the new administration

[32] William Webb Master Caulker, appears on a 1849 list of BNY replacements proposed by the Whig party The Brooklyn Daily Eagle 8 August 1849 p. 2, confirms William Webb’s removal from his position as Master Caulker and notes a delegation of ship caulkers met to show their support and present a memorial to his years of service. They then proceeded to state they believed Webb’s removal was “prescriptive in nature” and based solely on “the mandate of party spirit.”

[33] Theophilus Hardenbrook Master Cooper for over forty years was born New York City, in September 1791. During the War of 1812, Hardenbrook served as a seaman on the privateer Zebra. On 20 April 1813 red in the Bay of Biscay, his ship was attacked and captured by the HMS Pyramus and Belle Poule. As a prisoner of war he was transferred to England where he was first taken to HM Stapleton Prison and later to HM Darmoor Prison on 23 June 1814. In HM Darmoor Prison, he survived the brutal conditions where over 200 Americans died of diseases such as smallpox, dysentery and on 6 April 1815, the notorious "Darmoor Massacre" which wounded 60 American POW’s and killed 7. Darmoor records describe Hardenbrook as 23 years of age, 5 ft. 6 ½ inches tall, blue eyes with dark brown hair and a scar on his left hand. He was released in May 1815, following ratification of Treaty of Ghent. The actual date of his repatriation to the USA is unknown, though most likely late June 1815. Based on his war service Hardenbrook found employment BNY. Hardenrbook was an active member of the Proprietors of Greenwood Cemetery and the Veterans of the War of 1812. He died of heart disease in Brooklyn New York September 29 1860

[34] William H. Brayton, BNY Master Sailmaker was born Nantucket Massachusetts July 8, 1799 and died 20 October 1850. William Brayton worked for a number of years on whaling vessels and on 21 September 1837 joined the U.S. Navy as a sailmaker. Brayton was dismissed from the navy 6 November 1847 and took a civilian position as Master Sailmaker at BNY. Brayton left the navy yard in 1849 to journey to the California gold fields. Obituary “Murdered in California -Captain William H. Brayton, of this city, was recently murdered in Laird’s Pass, California. The particulars as communicated to us, are as follows: Captain B and his partner had commenced a ranch at the point named, stocked it and were progressing with improvements. The latter started out on some errand and passing four Mexicans riding along the road in direction of the ranch. On his return an hour after he found his partner, Capt. B shot dead – The murdered man on receiving the fatal wound, fell forward upon his hands and knees and was found in that position. The unfortunate gentleman was widely known and much beloved, and his death will be most deeply lamented.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle December 11, 1850, . “Capt. Brayton was murdered on the 20th inst.,[20 October 1850] at his residence, in Correll Hollow, near Pacheco's pass, and robbed of $700.” Daily Alta California, 8 October 1850, p.2. See also Biographical Sketches of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston: Grace and Steinbarger, 1901, pp. 778-779 for biography of Brayton and his son’s Daniel Coffin Brayton and William S.L. Brayton. Both boys served as William H. Brayton’s apprentices at the navy yard and later became Sailmakers USN.

[35] Daniel Coffin Brayton Sailmaker born February 17, 1829 died 21 November 1904. He first went to work at BNY in 1844 as a sailmaker apprentice to his father. Brayton worked at the navy yard until 1851 when he received a Warrant officer (Sailmaker) USN. He was wounded in action while serving aboard the USS Brooklyn during the Battle of Mobile Bay August 1864. During this battle that lasted a bit more than three hours, Brooklyn suffered 54 men killed and 43 wounded while firing 183 projectiles. Daniel Brayton remained on active duty until 1890; he died November 2, 1904.

[36]William S.L. Brayton, born Nantucket Massachusetts 12 November 1831. Brayton served a sailmaker apprenticeship with his father William H. Brayton at the navy yard. He later joined the U.S. Navy on 4 September 1852 as a warrant officer Sailmaker. In September 1863 while serving as Sailmaker on the USS Powhatten Brayton was captured during the assault on Fort Sumter in Charlestown South Carolina. He was taken prisoner and died at Charleston, South Carolina, 22 April, 1864

[37]Cain Dolan’s occupation hose maker is normally associated with the making of socks and leggings. Although uncertain his title is likely a reference to hoses for the shipyard, as the navy yard required numerous hoses to move or pump water into or from containers and vessels.

[38]John Kerrigan is on the 1849 list of BNY replacements proposed by the Whig party

[39] Jesse Morell Folk September 22. 1804 – December 16, 1891 was a leader in Democratic Party politics and a prominent figure in BNY. Starting as laborer, Folk quickly became Overseer of the Navy Yard Laborers and later Master Ship Joiner. In the often acrimonious world of nineteenth century politics Folk was the subject of much speculation. In April 1842 he was charged with assault and battery against fellow Democrat Francis C. Treadwell. Treadwell charged Folk with pushing him off the stage when he was trying to speak. At trial witness testimony was nearly evenly split. The jury ruled for the plaintiff but many were in doubt for Treadwell was awarded just six cents in damages see Brooklyn Daily Eagle April 29, 1842, p. 2. Folk organized 55 of the navy yard working men into a militia “the Jesse M. Folk Guard” which met for drill and target practice see Brooklyn Daily Eagle 28 November1854, p.3 For the Whig Party assessment of Jesse M. Folk


About the Payroll Records
For over 150 years the New York (Brooklyn) Navy Yard known to many as the "Brooklyn Navy Yard" (BNY), was one of the largest employers in New York City. Civilian payroll records are an important source of information regarding the many thousands of employees who worked at this historic shipyard. These 1848 records are housed at the National Archives and Records Administration New York City, New York. The earliest surviving BNY payrolls are from 1840. All early navy payrolls were handwritten in large ledger volumes arranged by year. For historians and genealogist these records offer researchers important and fascinating glimpses into the economic and occupational status of the first mechanics and laborers.

New York (Brooklyn) Navy Yard Station Logs
1839 - 1863

STATION LOGS - 1839 - 1863



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