Finding Ancestors wherever their trails led

Lewis County
New York
Genealogy and History


Biographies


ADAMS, WILLIAMWilliam
            Adams

WILLIAM ADAMS, son of William and Hannah (Gates) Adams, was born August 23, 1824, and is of English ancestry.

His father died when he was a little less than one year old, and, by necessity, he supported himself by hard labor after the age of fifteen years; and also gained an academic education. Soon after he attained his majority he was a surveyor on the Pierrepont estate in Lewis and Oswego counties, in the employ of the late Hon. Diodate Pease, ten years, except in winter, when he taught a common school. From 1854 to 1867 he was a farmer, lumberman and merchant. From Jan. 1, 1867, to Jan. 1, 1873, he held the office of school commissioner. His second nomination for the above office was a compliment of appreciation given by unanimous acclamation. At the close of this term, he became the principal of Martin Institute at Martinsburgh, which he conducted a year; resigned and was principal of Constableville graded school the ensuing year. Since 1881 Mr. Adams has been engaged in writing county histories in Vermont, New Hampshire, Western New York, and is the publisher of this work. In his early manhood he assisted Col. Henry Miner in organizing a company of Uniformed Militia and was its captain three years and resigned his commission. Before Mr. Adams absented himself from his county he was generally one of the delegates to the Republican county conventions, and was a delegate to the Senatorial convention held In Carthage in 1867. May 1852 he united in marriage with Miss Ann Louisa Bingham, daughter of Oliver Bingham of Martinsburgh, who was born Oct. 24, 1824, and died May 19, 1865. Three children were born to them, viz: Isaac B., born March 16, 1854, married Minnie L,, daughter of Rev. Sanger Dewey, and is a merchant in Rome, N Y.; Mary L., born April 18, 1858. (Mrs. E. E. Alger), whose husband is a clerk of the U. S. Pension Department, now on detached duty as special pension examiner, located at Augusta, Maine, and William D., born April 14, 1865, who became a prominent citizen, and business man of Rome, N. Y., died Nov. 27, 1894. His widow, Susie B. (Beal), survives him. Feb. 20, 1867, Mr. Adams married Miss Mary E. Johnson of West Turin, who died Sept. 25, 1876. Their son, Charles F., born Feb. 24, 1868, is a physician and surgeon, practicing his profession in Carthage, N. Y., who married, Sept. 4, 1895, Miss Edith O. Farrar of Carthage. Oct. 3, 1886, Mr. Adams married Miss Marie Ida Dugas of Montreal, his present wife.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


ADAMS, WILLIAM

WILLIAM ROOT ADAMS was born in the town of Lowville Oct. 25, 1823. His father. Dr. Ira Adams, came from Cavendish, Windsor county, Vermont, to this state, when William Root Adamsabout twenty-two years of age. After graduating from the medical school in Albany, he enlisted in the army, and during the War of 1812 served as military surgeon at Port Erie.

William R. passed his boyhood days on his father's farm, attending the district school, until 1841, when he entered Lowville Academy as a student, where he attended the fall and winter terms, until 1845-46, when he taught his first district school, in the town of Martinsburgh. In September, 1846, Mr. Adams was admitted to the Junior class in Union College, Schenectady, and after remaining in college one year, he taught three terms in a boarding school In the town of Nassau, Rensselaer county. Returning to college, he graduated with the class of 1851 with high honors. After teaching two terms as assistant principal in Rome Academy, he was engaged as assistant at Lowville Academy. In June, 1852, Prof. David P. Mayhew, principal of the Academy, resigned, and Mr. Adams was called by the trustees to fill the vacancy. On the 17th of August, 1852, he was married to Melissa Mills, daughter of Timothy Mills of Lowville. He held the position as principal of Lowville Academy until 1860, when failing health compelled him to resign. In 1861 he again assumed charge, and retained the position until 1866, when he resigned and engaged in mercantile pursuits. In 1874, he was for the third time elected principal of the Academy, which charge he held until 1890, when he again and finally resigned. He is now secretary of the Board of Trustees of the Academy, with which institution he has been connected the last fifty-four years as student, principal, or trustee.

Mr. Adams, in his long connection with the Academy, has shown himself to be a man of great perseverance, high intellectual powers, and a spotless character, and has won the esteem and respect of all his numerous acquaintances.

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)



WILLIAM ROOT ADAMS, A. M.
William Root Adams was born in the town of Lowville October 25, 1823. His father. Dr. Ira Adams, was the son of Timothy Adams, of Cavendish, Windsor county, Vermont. Doctor Adams came from Cavendish to this State when about twenty–two years of age. After graduating at the medical school in Albany, N. Y., he enlisted in the army, and was stationed during the War of 1812 as military surgeon at Port Erie. After his discharge from the army. Dr. Adams began the practice of medicine in the town of Denmark, and in 1821 married Arzelin A. Root, of the same town. A short time after his marriage he took up his residence at Stow's Square, in the town of Lowville, where he continued the practice of medicine until the time of his death in 1857.

William Root Adams, the subject of this sketch, passed his boyhood upon his father's farm, attending the district schools during the winter, and working on the farm during the summer, until the autumn of 1841, when he entered the Lowville Academy as a student. He attended the Academy during the fall and winter terms, spending the summer upon the farm, until the winter of 1845-'46, when he taught his first district school in the town of Harrisburgh.

During the two succeeding winters he taught district schools in Lowville.

In September, 1848, Mr. Adams entered the Junior class in Union College, at Schenectady, and after remaining in college one year he taught three terms in a boarding school in the town of Nassau, Rensselaer county, in this State. Returning to college, he graduated with the class of 1851, ranking in scholarship among the first of his class. After teaching two terms as assistant principal in Rome Academy, he returned to Lowville and engaged as assistant in the Lowville Academy. In June, 1852, Prof. David P. Mayhew, who had held the position of principal of Lowville Academy for thirteen years, resigned his position, and Mr. Adams was called by the trustees to take his place, and entered upon his duties during the summer term of 1852.

On the 17th of August, 1852, he was married to Melissa Mills, daughter of Timothy Mills, of Lowville. Mr. Adams held his position as principal of the academy until November, i860, when failing health compelled him to resign.

During the winters of 1860 and 1861, he attended a course of medical lectures in the city of New York. His health being restored, in December, 1861, he again assumed charge of the academy as principal, and retained his position until the close of the academic year, in 1866, when he resigned for the purpose of engaging in mercantile pursuits.

He engaged in the book and stationery trade, in which he continued until the beginning of the academic year in September, 1874, when he was for the third time elected principal of the academy. He conducted the school in connection with his trade until May, 1878, when he disposed of his store and subsequently gave his entire attention to his duties at the academy.

Mr. Adams still remains in charge of the institution with which he has been connected during nearly the whole of the last forty-one years, as student, principal, or trustee. In March, 1866, he was elected one of the trustees of the academy, and continues to hold that position. At a subsequent meeting of the Board, held on the i8th of the same month, he was elected secretary of the Board of Trustees of the academy, which office he still retains. In December, 1861, Mr. and Mrs. Adams lost their second son, Edward, when in his fifth year. Their third son, Everett, died in February, 1865, in his second year. In November, 1871, their oldest and only remaining son, George Tyler Adams, died when nearly nineteen years of age. This son, by his noble qualities of heart and mind, had endeared himself to a very large circle of friends. Possessing superior mental abilities, and exhibiting an unusual aptitude for business, his parents were fondly hoping for him a successful and honorable future. His death came upon them with sudden and crushing force.

Two daughters still survive of their family of five children. The pride of Professor Adams' fife has been the success and prosperity of Lowville Academy. During the entire time that the school has been under his charge, he has taken the responsibility of employing his assistant teachers, and paying the current expenses of the school from year to year. The academy has been successful financially, and, when considered from a literary standpoint, it ranks among the first institutions of the State. The attendance during the last few years has been larger than ever before since its organization in 1808, and it bids fair to continue for years in its career of usefulness.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


AGER, JOEL

JOEL WHEELER AGER.
Joel W. Ager, was born in Warner, New Hampshire, August 20, 1820. His father, Eliphaz Ager, was of Scottish descent, and was a native of Arlington, Vermont, born March 7, 1800. The family is descended from two brothers who came to America at an early date, and who originally spelled the name Eager.

Eliphaz Ager married Esther Wheeler, of English origin, who was born in Dunbarton, New Hampshire, August 15, 1800, and died August 28, 1821. He died in Lyonsdale, Lewis County, November 19, 1870.

Joel W. Ager resided in Warner until about ten years of age, when his parents removed to Franklin Falls, N. H., where the elder Ager engaged in the trade of paper manufacturing, in the firm of Peabody, Daniels & Co. With this firm Joel learned the art of paper making, receiving the education of the common schools and the academy at Franklin, and remaining with his parents until he had attained his majority. At the age of twenty-one he went to Springfield, Mass., where he had for one year the charge of the paper manufactory known as the Springfield Paper Manufacturing Company. From there he went to Fitchburgh, Mass., where he engaged in setting up paper machinery and in starting new mills for Rice, Goddard & Co., of Worcester. Here he remained some three years, and then went to Louisville, Kentucky, where he built a paper mill for Kellogg, Weisenger & Co., remaining in their employ and in charge of the mill two years. In 1848, in company with a gentleman from Louisville, Ky., David Lane, he took an extensive journey through the Western States prospecting for a site for paper manufacturing. Mr. Lane, who had in boyhood lived in Lewis County, and had remembered its streams and excellent water privileges, suggested a visit to this locality. Their visit resulted in the purchase of thirty acres of land with its water privileges, of A. G. Dayan, which comprised a portion of the Lyon estate.

He could not have chosen a better location for his enterprise, or one possessing more of the beautiful in nature. Utility and picturesqueness are here combined. The stream which never fails in its volume, flows through the valley between hills crowned with evergreens, expands itself in the broad ponds above the mills, and rushes with a roar, and whitened, as in anger, through the narrow gorge and over the falls to the quieter level below, and in its course is caught by the hand of man, and compelled to do duty for the benefit of the world. Here in a region which was then in its primitive state of wildness, Mr. Ager determined to locate and build for himself a business and a home. His friends endeavored to dissuade him from settling in a region so uninviting and inaccessible, and prophesied that his stay would be brief. But he had inherited too much of the vigor of the New Hampshire hills to fear the labor that laid before him, and was possessed of that indomitable perseverance which enters into the characters of all successful men. He began soon to cut roads and clear the land preparatory to building his mill. Remote from neighbors and villages, cut off as it were from the outside world, he felt oftentimes lonesome, but never discouraged. He knew that in that rushing stream, whose waters were never still, was a power that would turn the wheel of his fortune if he but remained and trained its forces to his use. Time has shown the wisdom of his determination. The old adage, "They laugh best who laugh last," is pertinently applicable in his case, for those who would have deterred him from his enterprise have seen him make a success where they supposed failure was certain. His success was merely another instance of the triumph of pluck and perseverance. He converted that region of wild country into a region of usefulness, and founded a business and a home in one of the most picturesque localities in the county. Even now it retains some of the wildness of its primitive days. The approach to it is over roads which wind through woods and boulders, and past fields of blackened stumps, where the hand of man has robbed nature of some of her beauty to enrich himself. As one passes over these roads where the stillness is almost as unbroken as in early days, it would require no great stretch of imagination to believe that behind those stumps and boulders, and in the tangled underbrush, lurk some of the dusky aborigines who once peopled this section. But the hum of the busy wheels on the river remind us that they have gone, and that a race more useful to mankind has taken their place. Villages have sprung up where once stood their wigwams, and the railroad has taken the place of their trails and the draft roads of their successors, the early pioneers. Foreseeing these possibilities of inhabitation and railroad facilities, Mr. Ager in that year, 1848, built his present paper-mill, which was the first machine mill of the kind in the county of Lewis. Mr. Lane engaged with him as partner, and was with him in the business eleven years. In those days there were no railroads, and their paper was carted from forty to eighty miles to market. The first paper of their manufacture was sold to Cyrus W. Field & Co., of New York. From small beginnings the manufacture of paper was increased to a steady and uniform business, and his purchase of land was extended to seven hundred acres. About 1871, he engaged in lumbering, and built in that year the present saw-mill with a capacity of 6,000 feet per day. Mr. Ager set up the first Fourdrinier paper machine west of the Alleghany mountains. For twenty-one years he has filled the office of postmaster of Lyonsdale, which position he now occupies. Religiously, he is a Unitarian of comprehensive and liberal views, and socially is esteemed for his honest and genial nature. In December, 1845, he married at Fitchburgh, Mass., Celia A. Johnson, of Bellows Falls, Vt. One child was born to this marriage in Louisville, Ky., October 31, 1846, and died in infancy. On the 25th of October, 1864, he married for his second wife, Julia F. Williams, of Martinsburgh, who was born in Ogdensburgh, N.Y., August 22, 1839. Their children are: Josephine E. W., born May 27, 1866; C. Leonard J., born August 29, 1869; A. Florence, born July 28, 1871; F. Pet, born July 16, 1874.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


ALLEN, CHARLES & HENRY

CHARLES M. AND CAPT. HENRY WILLARD ALLEN.
Willard Allen, grandfather to Charles M. and Henry W. Allen, was one of those enterprising young men who first commenced a settlement in Lewis county. He came to West Turin in 1797 and selected a spot in the wilderness, which he converted into a fertile farm, on which he lived more than half a century. His father was Ebenezer Allen, a resident of Connecticut. He added to his farm labors the occupation of surveyor, which he followed many years. His life was characterized in an unusual degree by integrity, honesty and uprightness. He died September 18, 1850, aged 77 years. The grandfather of the subjects of this sketch, on the mother's side, was Rev. James Miller, a Methodist minister, who was born in Worcester Mass., and who came to this part of the country about 1800. The mother of Charles M., and Henry W., was the second oldest child in his family. He died March 31, 1843, aged 67 years.

Zenas Allen, son to Willard, was born in West Turin, March 9, 1804. He was a farmer and surveyor, and was at one time Judge of Sessions, and creditably held numerous town offices. He married Betsey Miller, daughter of Rev. James Miller, January 26, 1831, and died November 25, 1869. The children of this marriage were as follows: —

Henry Willard; James, born March 14, 1837; Mary E., born September 29, 1839; Susan E., born November 25, 1841; Charles M.

Charles M. Allen was born in West Turin, July 24, 1845, in which town his early life was passed. He received his education at Whitestown and at Lowville Academy, and in March, 1863, at the age of eighteen, entered as clerk in the store of S. Miller & Son, in which capacity he served four years. He then began business in Constableville, with Stephen T. Miller, under the firm name of Stephen Miller & Company. Under this name the firm transacted business three years, when it was changed to Miller & Allen, and in August, 1881, Mr. Allen became sole proprietor. He has evinced marked ability as a merchant, and through his honesty and genial nature, has won the confidence and esteem of the citizens of his town. In 1881, Mr. Allen was elected Supervisor, and held that office two terms, being chairman of that body in 1882. He married, September 30, 1867, Miss N. M. Pease, daughter of A. B. Pease, of Lowville. The children of this marriage are: — Flora, born in November, 1868, died in infancy; and Alice A., born August 31, 1870.

Henry Willard Allen was born November 3, 1834. At the early age of seventeen, he began teaching school in his native town, an occupation for which he possessed pronounced abilities. At the age of twenty-one he went to Cook county, Ill., where he engaged in teaching. He afterwards went to Springfield, in that State, where he entered mercantile business and was there at the breaking out of the Rebellion. He was one of the first to answer to the call to arms.

Entering the service as a private, he was promptly elected Orderly Sergeant of Co. G, 7th Illinois Infantry, the duties of which office he faithfully discharged until the expiration of his term of enlistment. Believing that his services were needed by his country, he re-enlisted and was appointed to the Captaincy of the same company to which he originally belonged. As a soldier, he nobly fulfilled his mission, being actuated by a pure and lofty patriotism. He participated in the engagements at Fort Donelson and Pittsburgh Landing, and in the latter was severely wounded in the shoulder. Of the principles underlying that eventful struggle, he had a remarkably clear insight and sound judgment. His letters written during that period evince a descriptive talent of a high order, and in some he expressed views which time has demonstrated to have been just and correct. In one of them he said: —

"We are fighting for a principle on which has been reared the whole fabric of our government, and all the institutions which have been fostered and matured by it. That principle is popular sovereignty. The will of the people is the Supreme law — not of the whole people, but of a majority properly and constitutionally expressed. No factious minority have a right to interfere with that decision. If so, farewell to the theory of self-government. Sacrifice every other interest to the permanent establishment of this principle. * * *
* * * Forgetful of private interest or party prejudices, I claim that every man is called upon to peril all, if need be, in perpetuating the institutions under which we have so long and prosperously lived. I shall support the proclamation."

The last sentence bears the true ring, and portrays the kind of a nature of which heroes are made. This faithful soldier and brave and honored officer was doomed to a sad death. Under his command, at Corinth, Miss., one of the soldiers of his regiment had been confined in the guard-house for striking and severely injuring a negro belonging to the camp. There was a feeling among some of the men against punishing a soldier for abusing a negro, and one of the malcontents, named John Meyers, encouraged this feeling, and talked of attempting to rescue the man from the guard-house. Captain Allen promptly opposed such a breach of discipline, and Meyers, under the influence of passion and liquor, deliberately shot him with his musket. He died Decembers, 1862, and added another name to the long list of our country's preservers who demand our remembrance and our praise.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


ALLEN, EMORY

EMORY ALLEN.
Samuel Allen, from Braintree, Essex county, England, came to this country and settled first at Cambridge, Mass., removed thence to Windsor, Conn., about 1635, where he died April, 1648, leaving his wife Ann, and six children. She removed to Northampton, and married again. Their children were: (1) Samuel, who married Hannah Woodford, in 1659; (2) Nehemiah, married Sarah Woodford; (3) John, married Mary Hannum; (4) Abigail; (5) Obadiah; (6) name not found.

(5) Obadiah Allen, son of Samuel, of Windsor, married October 28, 1669, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Sandford, of Milford. He settled in Middletown, and became deacon of the church. He died April 7, 1712. Their children were: (7) Obadiah, born September 27, 1670; (8) Thomas, born September 20, 1672; (9) Thomas, born September 27, 1673; (10) Mary, born September 15, 1675; (11) Anna, born September 12, 1677; (12) Thankful, born September 8, 1679; (13) Samuel, born March 15, 1685; (14) John, born September 27, 1786.

(7) Obadiah Allen, son of Deacon Obadiah Allen, married November 23, 1699, Dorcas, daughter of James Wright. Their children were: — (15) Obadiah, and (16) Dorcas.

(15) Obadiah Allen, son of (7) Obadiah married June 1, 1727, Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Lydia Cotton. He lived in Middletown. Children: — (17) Obadiah; (18) Ebenezer, born April I, 1730; (19) Daniel, born August 28, 1732; (20) Ebenezer, born February 5, 1738; (21) Lydia, born August 26, 1742.

(19) Daniel Allen, son of (15) Obadiah came to Southington Conn., when a young man, and married March 31, 1765, Huldah Clark, daughter of David and Hannah Woodruff. He was a merchant, and also kept a hotel. He died February 15, 1793. Children:— (22) Joel, born September 21, 1755; (23) Elizabeth, born December 18, 1757; (24) Philothea, born July 5, 1761; (25) Philothea, born March 5, 1764; (26) Huldah, born October 30, 1766; (27) Sabrina, born July 29, 1769; (28) Phebe, born April 16, 1773; (29) Nancy, born April 12, 1776; (30) Daniel born April 12, 1776; (31) Lydia, died when an infant; (32) Lydia, born May 9, 1779.

(20) Ebenezer Allen, son of (15) Obadiah, married Elizabeth Powsley, in 1766. Children: — (33) Ebenezer, born February 15, 1769; (34) Elizabeth, born July 8, 1770; (35) Willard, born May 10, 1773; (36) Samuel, born January 24, 1775; (37) Lydia, born November 24, 1777; (38) Sarah, born January 29, 1780; (39) Jonathan, born January 10, 1782; (40) Ichabod, born August 1, 1783.

(34) Elizabeth Allen, married Caleb Merriman, June 1, 1801. She died January 1, 1814, aged 44 years, and her sister (38) Sarah Allen, married Caleb Merriman, October 10, 18 14. She died April 10, 1849.

(22) Joel Allen, son of (19) Daniel born September 21, 1755, married Lucy Newell, who died May 2, 1783. He then married Diadamia Newell. Children: —50) Octavia, born October 31, 1779; (51) James, born August 4, 1781; (52) Augustus, born October 14, 1787; (53) Joel, born January 15, 1795; (54) Lucy, born August 4, 1799.

(51) James Allen, son of (22) Joel married Lucena Bradley, daughter of Hemingway Bradley. He was a merchant in Southington, Conn., and died September 15, 1825. Children: — (55) Adeliza, born in 1809, died May 18, 1826; (56) Harriet, born in 1811, died February 23, 1812; (57) Amon, born in 1813, died October 5, 1827.

Emory Allen was born February 2, 1810, in the town of West Turin. He is the sixth in descent from Samuel Allen, the English immigrant from Braintree, Essex county, England. His father, Ebenezer, born February 15, 1769, in Middletown, Conn., removed from there, with one ox team and cart in company with James Miller, to West Turin, in the spring of 1796. General Ethan Allen, of Ticonderoga fame, was a branch of this original stock.

Emory Allen married Sally, the third daughter of James Miller, above mentioned. His early life was passed in the town of his birth, where he received the education of the common schools of that day. He afterward adopted the occupation of farmer, which he has followed with success, and his genial nature and kindness have won for him numerous friends.

His children are: Richard, Kate S., Nancy G., and James M.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


ALLEN, SAMUEL

Dr. Allen was a native of Massachusetts, studied with Drs. Guiteau of Trenton and Willoughby of Newport, settled in practice at Lowville in 1808, and in April, 1809, became a partner with Dr. Perry. He removed to Copenhagen in 1811, engaged in trade with David Canfield, and through the war was concernedin heavy contracts with the navy. The peace which followed brought ruin to this firm, although they kept on doing some business from about 1820 to 1828. They succeeded in recovering from government, a portion of the claims which the suspension of contracts occasioned, and while on this business at Washington, Dr. Allen formed acquaintance of many prominent public men. He became the agent of Varick, in the rope manufactory at Copenhagen, and afterwards engaged in farming a little S. E. from the village, and adjacent to the High Falls. He died, June 12, 1849, aged 66 years. Dr. Allen was ardently attached to the Whig party and once nominated by them to assembly, but not elected. With literary tastes, polished manners, and uncommon conversational powers, he was eminently fitted to please and instruct, while his prompt reply and keen wit, made him the life of the social gathering.

(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson)


ARTHUR, BRADFORD

BRADFORD ARTHUR.
Of the earlier ancestry of this family nothing definite is known, save that they were residents of England. The name was originally known as McArthur, which would indicate that the family was of Irish origin.

The prefix was dropped from the name at some remote period in the history of the family. Bartholomew McArthur, the grandfather, came to this country from England, but at what date and at what place he settled are both unknown. Richard Arthur, his son, and the father of Bradford, was at one time a resident of Groton, Rhode Island, from which place he removed to Westfield, Mass., at about the beginning of the Revolutionary war.

He married Hannah Bradford, a great-granddaughter of Governor Bradford, who came over in the Mayflower. He was by occupation a ship carpenter, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and at one time a prisoner in that eventful struggle.

He died in Westfield, Mass., in 1790, aged forty years. Hannah Bradford Arthur, his wife, died December 13, 1831, aged eighty-four years. They had eleven children, six sons and five daughters.

The sons were Bradford, Levi, Richard, Russell, Joseph, and Elisha. Four of the daughters married early settlers here, and the entire family came from Westfield, Mass., in 1802 and 1803, and took up large farms on the State road north of Martinsburgh village, the most of which are still owned by their descendants.

Bradford, the eldest of these children, and the subject of the portrait connected with this sketch, was born in Groton, Rhode Island, in 1773. Some portion of his early life was passed in Rhode Island, when he removed with his parents to Westfield, Mass., where he was educated. He was a farmer, and served as a lieutenant in the American forces during the War of 1812.

On the 26th day of April, 1798, he married Rheumah Ely, of Springfield, Mass. In 1803, he came to Lewis county and took up a farm. He was for a number of terms supervisor of his town, and held also the office of coroner.

He died September 9, 1855, aged eighty-two. Rheumah Ely, his wife, died April 15, 1850, aged seventy-three.  Their children were: — Lovisa, born March 7, 1799, married Murlin Finch, of Lowville, died August 6, 1882 ; Warren, born December 20, 1800, married first, Maria Harger, of Martinsburgh, and second, Almira Hough, died June 19, 1876; Rheumah, born August 6, 1803, married Egbert Ragan, of Turin, died May 24, 1828; Almira and Alvina, (twins) born June 8, 1805, the former married Roswell Miller, of Leyden, and died February 21, 1838, and the latter, now the widow of Willis Rudd; Louisa, born February 18, 1808, widow of Thomas J. Adams, of Martinsburgh; Julia Ann, born April 1, 1810; DeWitt Clinton, born July 15, 1812, died September 27, 1815; Mary Ann, born November 27, 1815, widow of Chauncey Roberts, of Leyden ; Emily, born March 31, 1818, married Duane Moore, of Martinsburgh ; Harriet, born August 20, 1821, married Sherman Phillips, of Lowville.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


ARTHUR, ORLANDO

ORLANDO ARTHUR.
The father of the subject of this sketch was Levi Arthur, who was born in Westfield, Mass., March 20, 1780, and who came to Lewis county about the year 1802.

He married Sally Hovey, who was born in Bennington, Vermont, April 20, 1785, and who, in 1803, came from that State to this county with her brother, Samuel Hovey, for whom she kept house for some years.

Levi Arthur died November 28, 1852. His wife died in Martinsburgh, October 19, 1861. Their children were Jane Ann, born February 16, 1807; Orlando; Caroline, born January 10, 1812, died November 14, 1846; Mellissa, born June 11, 1814, died September 7, 1815; Alfred, born August 16, 1818; Pamelia, born August 20, 1820; Levi, Jr., born March 1, 1823, died December 10, 1877.

Orlando Arthur was born in Martinsburgh, June 4, 1809, in which place he has always lived. He received the education of the common schools, and entered upon the occupation of farming, which he has followed through life with some success. Born at a time when the town and county was in a state of rugged wilderness, he passed his earlier years in the trials and deprivations of pioneer life, and has lived to see the county rescued from its primitive condition; to see the forests fall beneath the settler's axe, and cultivated farms spring from the wilderness; the cramped cabin give place to the comfortable dwelling, and all the modern improvements supersede the crudeness of those pioneer days. On the 29th of January, 1834, he married Eliza Ann Mastan, by whom he had eleven children, as follows: —

Elijah, born November 12, 1834, died February 2, 1835; James E., born April 22, 1836, died September 12, 1839; Orlando, Jr., born August 6, 1838; Charles D., born May 12, 1840; Lewis, born July 22, 1841; Martha A., born January 23, 1843, married Amos Peebles; Frances H., born January 10, 1845, married Henry Coats; Caroline, born December 3, 1847, married James Kelly; Almedia, born November 19, 1849, married John McCue; Eliza Ann, born July 22, 1851, married John McCue, and died August 2, 1872; Nancy A., born September 9, 1853, married Samuel Roberts.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


BAILEY, FLORENCE

Bailey, Mrs. Florence Merriam, litterateur, author, was born Aug. 8, 1863, in Locust Grove, N.Y. She is the wife of Vernon Bailey of Washington, D.C. She is the author of "Birds Through an Opera Glass"; "Birds of Village and Field; My Summer in a Mormon village"; and "Handbook of Birds of Western United States".

(Source: "Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States", by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar
)

BANCROFT, EDWARD

Edward Bancroft removed from Westfield in 1816, engaged as a merchant, built a grist mill and distillery, was concerned in the manufacture of potash on a somewhat extensive scale, and held the offices of County Clerk and First Judge. Having proved unsuccessful in business, he removed in 1832 to Detroit, and after another crisis in his affairs, removed to Newport, St. Clair county, Mich., where he died April 15, 1842, aged 58 years.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

BLODGET, JESSE

Mr. Blodget died January 9, 1848, nearly 84 years of age. His wife, the first woman who came into town, died August 5, 1844, aged 70 years. The first male child born in town was Harrison Blodget, their son, in 1801. Mr. Blodget erected the large stone hotel in Denmark village in 1824. Harrison Blodget was a member of assembly in 1831.
(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson)

BOSHARD, CHARLESCharles Boshard

CHARLES D. BOSHARD, the tenth child of Garret and Dolly (Goutermout) Boshart, was born in Lowville on the Boshart Homestead, Nov. 2, 1829. His father was born in .Johnstown, Fulton county, July 15, 1771, and died May 26, 1846. He came to Lowville, Lewis county, 1798-99, when but three houses stood where at present is the village of Lowville. His mother was born in Ephratah, Fulton county, .Jan. 4, 1788, and died June 11, 1875. He received his education at the common schools and Lowville Academy. On the 11th of February, 1858, he was married to Margaret Quackenbush, daughter of James and Margaret Queckenbush of Fonda, Montgomery county, N. Y. He has been a life-long farmer. About 1863, he began the culture of hops and for more than thirty years has been the largest hop grower in Lewis county. He now resides in the village, and gives his attention to the supervision of his 3,000 acre a of fine farming lands. He is one of the representative men of Lewis county, and has served as supervisor of his town nineteen years. He is a man of honor and strict integrity, whose word is his bond.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)



CHARLES D. BOSHART.
The father of the subject of this sketch was Garret Boshart, who was born in Johnstown, Fulton county, July 15, 1771, and died May 26, 1845. He came to Lewis county in 1798, or '99, when but three houses stood where at present is the village of Lowville. His wife was Dolly Goutermout, who was born in Ephratah, Fulton county, January 4, 1788, and died June 11, 1875. They had ten children as follows :—

Garret, died April 7, 1872; Catherine, married Rev. Phihp Weiting, pastor of the Lutheran church at New Rhinebeck, Schoharie county, November 23, 1828, died March 14, 1876; Nancy M., Dolly A., Nicholas, William; Eliza, married K. Collins Kellogg, of Lowville; John died May 4, 1843.

Charles D., the tenth child, was born in Lowville, on the farm where he now lives, November 2, 1829. In this place his early life was passed. He received his education at the Lowville Academy, an institution which has graduated many persons of stability and prominence, and engaged in the occupation of farming in which he has been eminently successful. About 1863, he began the culture of hops, and during these twenty years has been one of the largest hop growers of Lewis county.

To the men of quiet, persistent, yet unobtrusive mould is due the material prosperity of every town and county. They cultivate their farms and produce prolific crops.

Of this steadily persistent cast is Mr. Boshart. A keenly observant, well informed man, who rarely leaves the work he has marked out until his purpose is accomplished; of honor in the fulfillment of his spoken promise as well as of his written word; and of strict integrity in the transaction of his private and public business, he may be numbered among the representative men who have graced the annals of Lewis county and aided in the advancement of its prosperity.  Though not a politician in the lower sense of that term, he has taken some interest in the affairs of local government, and has for eleven years served the town acceptably as Supervisor — to which office he was elected in 1872.

On the 11th of February, 1858, Mr. Boshart was married to Margaret Quackenbush, daughter of James and Margaret Quackenbush, of Fonda, Montgomery county. New York. The children of this marriage were:—

Julia, born February 22, 1859, died in infancy; Charles Frederick; Nellie M. E.; Edward James; and Grace E.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
BOTCHFORD, HENRY

HENRY J. BOTCHFORD.
The subject of this memoir was born in the town of Hunter, Greene county, N. Y., June 11, 1839. When in his ninth year, his father moved to Woodland, Ulster county, N. Y., and engaged in the business of tanning, He attended the district schools of the neighborhood until his seventeenth year, when he entered the Ashland Collegiate Institute, where he remained three years, graduating therefrom in 1859. He soon after entered the law office of King & Mattoon, of Catskill, Greene county, N. Y., but after a year's study there, his health failed him, and he was obliged to give up the legal profession.

In 1861, he enlisted in the 44th New York State Volunteers, and served three years in the Army of the Potomac, engaging in all the principal battles of that branch of the service. Here his bravery entitled him to recognition, and from the ranks of a private, he was successively promoted to sergeant, second and first lieutenant and captain, and during the major part of his last year's service, was acting-adjutant of the regiment.

After the regiment was mustered out of service, he returned to his home, and soon after engaged in the business of leather tanning with General Sampson, of Ulster county, N. Y., where he remained until the fall of 1866, when he married Clementina G. Woodworth, daughter of David Woodworth, of Woodland, Ulster county, and soon after, in connection with his brother, G. M. Botchford, came to Lewis county, and built the Otter Lake tannery, where he remained until 1870. In that year he became connected with the Moose River tannery, having in the same year purchased a residence in Port Leyden, where he lived up to the time of his death. In 1879, he built a second tannery at Moose River, and in December, 1880, purchased in connection with his father, the Oswegatchie tannery, at Harrisville, N. Y. In these various and extensive enterprises, he displayed unusual business capacity, being quick in perceptions, and of sound judgment in all affairs of business.

Of this trade he was master, and he had a happy faculty of elucidating any proposition in which he was interested, so that he was equally capable, both as to the theory and the practice of leather making. In the conventions of the National Tanner's Exchange, held in Philadelphia, in 1876, and in New York, in 1877, he was prominent among the debaters on the art of leather tanning.

Politically, Mr. Botchford was a Republican, and for a time was as active as he was influential. In the fall of 1875, he was nominated for member of Assembly from Lewis county, but was defeated by twelve votes.

In 1877, when Lewis and Jefferson counties were in the same senatorial district, he carried his county for State Senator, but was disqualified on account of being postmaster at Moose River.

Mr. Botchford was a prominent and devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Port Leyden, and in all his various walks of business, church or politics, succeeded in making friends of all with whom he came in contact.

At the time of his death, he was a partner with his brother, G. M. Botchford, as H. J. & G. M. Botchford, at Otter Lake, and as H. J. Botchford & Co., at Moose River; also with his father, D. Botchford, of Botchford & Co., at Harrisville.

He died February 22, 1882, aged 42.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

BOWEN, LEVI & FARNAM

LEVI AND FARNAM J. BOWEN.
Levi Bowen was born in Lanesboro, Mass., May 6, 1799. At an early age he was "bound out" until the age of twenty-one to Truman Terrill, a farmer, and in that occupation faithfully served until he attained his majority.

In this family, who were people of the honorable, straightforward pattern, he acquired the habits of honesty, perseverance and frugality which characterized his life.

His education was of the limited kind of the bound boy of those days — a month or two in the district schools during the earlier winters of his stay with the Terrill family. The education obtained was supplemented by a sturdy common sense which enabled him to succeed in life where others failed.

In the fall of 1822, in his twenty-fourth year, he came to Lowville, Lewis county, and hired out by the month to Daniel T. Buck, a farmer, on what is known as the West road. He remained in this town until the succeeding fall, 1823, when he returned to Lanesboro, and on the 23d day of December of that year was married to Electa Maria Farnam, daughter of John and Electa Farnam. With her he soon after returned to the town of Lowville and engaged in farming on rented lands, having no means with which to purchase a farm of his own. In the years 1830 and 1831, he and his wife were employed by the late Isaac W. Bostwick to oversee and carry on his farm of five hundred acres in the western part of the town.

In 1833, he moved on a small farm of seventy-five acres, for which he had previously contracted, just off the West road, and early identified himself with the dairy interests of the county. He began his career as a dairyman under discouraging circumstances. His stock was limited to fifteen cows, and his only press for cheese was the rude pry of those days — one end of a beam under a corner of the house, a weight on the other end, and the cheese beneath the pry near the house. There were then no cash sales in this locality for butter and cheese, and his first products, in the fall of that year, were loaded on wagons and carried to Deerfield, near Utica, where they were sold to John Leland, a produce dealer at that place, the butter for nine cents and the cheese for five cents per pound.*

(* This was the first cheese ever taken out of the county for market.)

Feeling like the lucky diggers who, in the placer days of California, struck a gold mine, he returned home elated and reported his success to his neighbors. The next year his stock was increased to thirty cows, and the dairy products brought an increased price.

From these small beginnings he built up an extensive dairy trade, and increased his acreage until he possessed some seven hundred acres of land.

Between the years 1860 and 1865, he sold this land at an advanced price over the original cost, and in 1866, purchased a residence in the village of Lowville to which he removed in April of that year.  Here he resided until his death, which occurred March 31, 1871, in his 72d year.  He was buried in the family vault in the cemetery on the West road, which he had constructed in 1866. His wife resided on the homestead until her death, Feb. 12, 1882.

In the days of militia men, Mr. Bowen held the rank of Captain of Riflemen in the 101st Regiment of infantry of our State, with rank from Aug. 14, 1830. This was a picked company of one hundred and sixty men from the several towns.

His commission was signed by Enos T. Throop, Lieutenant-Governor, then in the administration of the government. This commission he held four or five years, and resigned rather than rank higher. Possessing a staunch integrity of character, a kind and social disposition, few men were as much respected in the community as Levi Bowen. His children were :— Electa C, born March 30, 1825, married A. M. Searl; Almena L., born April 10, 1827, married Bela Hough ; Farnam J., born July 26, 1830; Orin F., born March 5, 1833.

Of these children, Farnam J., the subject of the portrait accompanying, was born in Lowville July 26, 1830. His early life was passed at home on the farm, and in the common schools and Lowville Academy, from whence he derived his education.

He followed quite successfully the occupation of farmer on the West road until 1865, when he removed to the village of Lowville and began the business of general produce and commission merchant, associating with Charles H. Curtis, under the firm name of Curtis & Bowen, in which business he is still engaged. Upon the organization of the Black River National Bank in 1879, Mr. Bowen became one of the directors, and in 1881 was chosen as its Vice-President. On the 26th of September, 1853, he married Sarah Frances Sterling, of Lowville. Their children are John F., born Sept. 3, 1868, died Oct. 22, 1875; Jay Sterling, born April 22, 1871.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

BURDICK, LUTHER

LUTHER CALVIN BURDICK was born in the town of Turin, N. Y., April 7, 1846. His parents were Albert Burdick, who was born in the town of Root, Columbia county, March 31, 1823, and Emily M. Berrus. who was born in the town of Richmond, New Hampshire, August 9, 1814. He was raised on the farm where he was born, attended to the duties incumbent upon a farmer’s son, went to the district school, and in August, 1864, he entered the "Teachers' Class" at Lowville Academy (the worthy Wm. R. Adams, principal,) and remained to the end of the term, when he engaged in teaching common schools, in winter only, and was a successful teacher seven terms. In summer he supplied the people with, fresh meat for several seasons. In 1871 he settled in Greig village and in 1872 began his career as a merchant, in general store, where he sold goods ten years. In 1.882 he removed to Lowville and there continued his mercantile business, in which he is still engaged, and having a continuous successful career nearly a quarter of a century. A longer business carrer than but very few merchants ever reach.

In 1872 he was clerk of the town of Greig, supervisor in 1879 and 1880, and postmaster ten years. In 1880 he was elected a coroner of the county for a term of three years, and in 1889 he was elected superintendent of the poor of Lewis county, a term of three years. In all of his positions and business affairs he has acquitted himself with credit and honor.

June 4, 1867, he united in marriage with Miss Sarah M. Stevens of West Turin.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

BURNHAM, JOSEPH

JOSEPH S. BURNHAM.
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch was a resident of Middletown, Conn. He was a sea-faring man, and, contracting small-pox, died in Middletown when Joseph, the father of Joseph S., was a small boy.

Joseph Burnham was born in Middletown, Conn., January 7, 1787, and came to the town of Leyden at the age of fifteen, where he remained until the year 1808. In that year he went south, traveling through Virginia and North Carolina as a dealer in tinware, and there remained until the breaking out of the War of 1812, when he returned to Leyden and was drafted and furnished a substitute. In 1814, he went into trade in the old house situated on the farm now owned by Noah C. Brooks, and; was for seventeen years a merchant in the town of Leyden. On the l0th of July, 1814, he was married to Eliza Rice, and settled on the farm now owned by Joseph S., where he remained until his death, which occurred May 22, 1864. He was for a number of years Supervisor and Loan Commissioner. He was a member of the Universalist church, and was regarded as a man of sound and liberal views. His wife, Eliza, who was born March 4, 1788, died December 21, 1865. Their children were: Louisa, born April 12, 1815, married Orrin Hutchinson, and settled in New York; Juliet, born September 23, 1817, married Dr. Charles N. Bass, and is now a widow in Boonville, N. Y.; Joseph S., the third child, was born in Leyden October 6, 1825. He was born in the house in which he now lives, and received his education in the common schools and at Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. On the 4th of June, 1867, he married Elvira S. Brooks, daughter of Matthew T. Brooks, of Leyden, who was born April 29, 1834. Their children were: Eliza M., born November 22, 1869; Frederic C. J., born June 4, 1871.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

BUSH, HORACEHoarace Bush

HORACE BUSH was born in Lowville April 3, 1831. After obtaining a thorough education and serving a clerkship, he went in 1855 to Canajoharie, where he was a druggist and pharmacist. He returned to Lowville in 1867, and has continued the business begun in Canajoharie more than forty years.

Mr. Bush has been president of the village of Lowville and has been one of the board of trustees of Lowville Academy, and its president, for many years. He has aided in safely and profitably investing its endowments, and has held many position of trust and responsibility. He is an able and safe adviser, and has settled quite a number of important estates as sole executor. He is a life-long and zealous Republican, but has never desired office. He is an influential member of the Masonic Fraternity and is a past High Priest of Lowville Chapter No. 223, R. A. M., and a pillar in the M. E. church; and one whose liberality and generosity is extended to the poor and needy.

Aug. 2, 1854, he united in marriage with Miss Ellen P. Hodge of Canajoharie, and has one son, Wm. T., who is associated with him in business.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)
BUSH, HORATIO

Horatio Nelson Bush, the subject of this sketch, was born in Harrisburgh, August 10th, 1808, and was the third son in this family.  The eldest son had died in infancy before his parents removed into the Black River country. - His next elder brother, Sylvester, died January 21st, 1826, aged twenty-four years, and his youngest brother, Francis L., died May 13, 1844, aged twenty-eight years, leaving a widow and child.  Of his four sisters, the eldest married as above stated; Sally married Jedediah Scott, and died in 1829; Melissa married Sanford Safford, now of Lowville, and died in 1833, and Paulina, died in 1830, unmarried.

He was reared upon the farm, sharing in its labors, and receiving as his only education, excepting what was afterwards supplied by his own reading, the advantages of a common district school.  He was heard, in after life, to regret the want of ampler early opportunities but his subsequent course in life shows, that he made an exceedingly good account of the means of education that were placed within his reach.  He evidently appreciated the importance of a thorough preparation in youth for the duties of active life, and perhaps a sense of his truth, impressed by his own observation, may have determined his course, in closing his temporal affairs in reference to this end.

In early life, he professed a practical acquaintance with the truths and realities of religion, and united with the Free Communion Baptist Church of Harrisburgh, with which he long maintained a relation; and through life, his daily walk evinced the presence and controlling influence of a religious sentiment in the heart.  Few persons have had more blameless lives in every thing that pertains to reverence to the Supreme Being, and a steady regard of the duties and obligations of religion in its habitual influence upon the conduct.

Upon the death of his father, which occurred a few months before he attained his majority, he was left in principal charge of the paternal homestead, with which, in after years he was associated with his younger brother, who was but thirteen years of age, when his father died.  With prudence and economy he gradually acquired a competence, while the fair and manly traits of his character gained him the confidence of his townsmen.  He was entrusted with various minor offices, and from 1843 to 1847, inclusive, he held the office of Supervisor, by annual election.  His associates, in the Board of Supervisors, remember and speak with pleasure of the sound and intelligent manner in which he discharged his duties in this relation, while his constituents found no cease to regret their choice.

In the fall of 1848, he removed to Wisconsin, and took up his residence at Janesville, where he resided several years.  His previous earnings enabled him to make investments to great advantages, and as the times favored, he was enabled, by his foresight and prudence, to bring in returns with large profits, and thus, in a comparatively short time, he found his pecuniary resources largely increased, with the prospect of their amounting to what is considered an ample fortune.  In all his business transactions, he was governed by a sense of honor and honestly, which never suffered from the taint of calumny or gave occasion for reproach.  - He exposed himself to no loses, by making others confident to his own business affairs, and he never sought to inquire into the business of others, except so far as to satisfy himself of his own safety in transacting business with them.  His purchases of lands and loaning of money, having led him to the vicinity of Madison, Wisconsin, he, about two of the last years of his western residence lived, and managed an improved farm, which he owned there.

Still his preferences tested with the County and the town of his birth, and in speaking of his early associations, in conversation with a friend, he expressed an intention of returning to settle in Harrisburgh should he ever find himself the owner of an estate, worth a certain amount, which he names, as sufficient to satisfy his temporal wants, and which would be enough.  A turn in the tide of business affairs, delayed this period, and the premonitions of a slow and insidious, but fatal disease, which he had inherited, brought him back to die, before this wish was fully gratified.  - He returned a few months since and in July last, visited Washington on business.  His health, already feeble, and for four years declining, admonished him of the danger of remaining among strangers, and he returned to the home of his sister, in Harrisburgh, where, after nine weeks of confinement to his room and towards the end suffering greatly from bodily pain, and emaciation to the last degree, by the ravages of consumption.  He died at nine o'clock on Tuesday evening, October 1st, 1861.  He was never married. 

(Source: The Journal And Republican (Lowville, NY) – Wednesday, October 9, 1861)

BUSH, WILLIAMWilliam Bush

WILLIAM T. BUSH, son of Horace and Ellen P. (Hodge) Bush, was born in Canajoharie, N. Y., Sept. 30, 1860. He received his education In the public school of Lowville, Lowville Academy, from which he graduated in 1879, and entered Hamilton College the ensuing fall, and graduated in 1883 with the degree of A. B. and received his A. M. from that institution in 1886. He also bore off the second prize for proficiency in chemistry.

Jan. 1, 1884, he became his father's partner, who is a druggist in Lowville, in which they are still engaged. Mr. Bush is a prominent Mason and a past master of Lowville Lodge, No. 134, F. and A. M., and past high priest of Lowville Chapter, No. 223, R, A. M. July 8, 1893, he was appointed assistant grand lecturer of the 16th Masonic district. He is the citizens' member of the board of health of the town of Lowville, and for several years has been the chairman of the board of inspectors of election of the first election district of his town. Mr. Bush is very capable, conscientious and faithful in the discharge of all duties.

Oct. 2, 1884, he married Miss Hattie Benedict Settle, daughter of the late Eli Settle of Watertown, N. Y. They are blessed with a daughter, Vera Isabell.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

CAMPBELL, JAMESJames Campbell

JAMES T. CAMPBELL was born in the town of Little Falls, Herkimer County, N. Y., Jan. 30, 1840, where he resided until 1867, when he removed to Lowville village. In 1869 he united in marriage with Miss Carrie E., daughter of Lewis Campbell. Mr. Campbell is a successful contractor and builder, and owns a fine farm, with farm buildings and residence within the village incorporation. A few of the many structures that he has erected are the Engine House on Dayan street, the Railroad House at the depot, the Smiley Block, corner of State and Dayan streets; the Asylum Buildings at the County Alms House, and the Baptist Church on State street.

Mr. Campbell was a trustee of the village several years. In 1884 he was elected supervisor of Lowville, and the only Democrat honored with the office in sixty years. He also served as county superintendent of the poor, and was connected with the Lewis County Agricultural Society, and was from 1891 to 1895 (three years) superintendent of the Black River Canal.

He is a man of good judgment, and alive for the interest of his village.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

CHICKERING, CHARLESCharles Chickering

HON. CHARLES A. CHICKERING of Copenhagen was born in Harrisburgh, Lewis county, Nov. 26, 1843. Received his education in the common schools and at Lowville Academy, and learned habits of industry on his father's farm, where he was born. He taught common schools and for a time in Lowville Academy. He was school commissioner of the second district of Lewis county from 1865 to 1875, and Member of Assembly in 1879, 1880 and 1881. He was elected clerk of the Assembly from 1884 to 1890 inclusive. He has served as chairman of Lewis County Republican committee; secretary of the Republican State committee, and also member of the executive committee of that body. He was elected to the Fifty-third and re-elected to the Fifty-fourth Congress, as a Republican; received 23,320 votes, against 13,473 votes for Washington T. Henderson, Democrat, and 1,255 votes for Sheldon, Prohibitionist.

Dec. 15, 1869, Mr. Chickering united in marriage with Miss Emma B. Stanton of Copenhagen, an accomplished and amiable lady, the daughter of the late Dr. Stanton.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

CLARK, ADDISONAddison Clark

ADDISON L. CLARK, son of Hon. Lucian and Louisa J. (Babcock) Clark, was born in the town of Denmark on the farm which he now owns. July 7, 1843. He was educated in the common schools. Lowville Academy, the State Normal School at Albany and Eastman's Commercial College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He taught district schools two years, and settled as a farmer on the homestead with his father, and later purchased the farm. March, 1877, he removed to Copenhagen, an account of poor health. Since 1879 he has been engaged in fire and life insurance.

Mr. Clark has the confidence of his large acquaintance, and has served as executor and administrator and settled many important estates, and has also assisted many administrators and executors in their duties. He has served as a committee and trustee in several cases of lunacy. He was an assessor of his town four years, and supervisor four years, and served as town clerk a few months to All a vacancy and refused to serve longer. He has served the village of Copenhagen as chief of the fire department several terms, and as clerk and president. He has been president of the board of education the past ten years and since the organization of the Union Free school. He has been a representative of his county in quite a number of the State and Congressional conventions, and in his county conventions as often as he will consent to attend He has been a director of the First National Bank of Carthage and a trustee of Carthage Savings Bank since their organization.

Dec. 14, 1870, he united in marriage with Miss Mary K., daughter of the late John M. Paris, an amiable and accomplished lady of fine abilities. They are parents of an only daughter, Mary Louise, now a student in Wellesley College of Massachusetts.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

CLARK, JOHN & LUCIAN

 JOHN AND LUCIAN CLARK.
The first of the ancestors of this Clark family in America, of whom we have any information, was a merchant in Boston, several years before the Revolution.

William Clark, the father of John Clark, 1st, of Denmark, at the beginning of the Revolutionary war was living at, or near, Cambridge, in the vicinity of Boston, with his father, whose remote ancestors were from Scotland.

His father, three brothers, and himself were among the skirmishers who annoyed the British troops in their retreat after destroying the military stores at Concord, and at night not one of them knew whether the others were dead or alive. All, however, were found safe at home in the morning. William was afterward wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill. He was standing by a comrade with the breech of his gun upon the ground, (having exhausted his ammunition) trying to see if his neighbor's cartridges would fit his weapon, when a grape-shot passed through the body of the man at his side, struck and shivered the stock of his gun, and glancing aside passed through his wrist. He had previously been married to Phebe Fuller, whose early ancestors were from England. During, or soon after, the war, they removed to a farm in Barre, Worcester county, Mass., and became the parents of six children, four boys and two girls. William, the oldest boy, studied surveying, and made the first survey of the State of Vermont, in which occupation he was engaged when caught in a heavy snow storm with a scanty supply of provisions, and, with his companions, suffered untold hardships from cold and starvation, from which he never fully recovered, and in consequence of which he died a few years after. Mary and Abigail were the girls, and the next in age, and neither ever married. Mary lived about seventy years; Abigail, less than forty. Josiah and Jonathan were younger than John. Soon after John came to Black River, Josiah with his father removed to Gill, Franklin county, Mass., where the father and mother died. He was a bachelor, and acquired a large estate, engaged extensively in purchasing cattle for the Boston market, failed in business about 1836, and came to Denmark, where he died in the winter of 1865.

Jonathan, the youngest brother, learned the trade of a printer, and was for a few years, in Albany, with the firm of Packard, Benthuysen & Co. While there, he published a biography of the life of George Washington. He then went to Ohio, to locate bounty land, which his father had earned in the Revolution, and had given him. He settled in Zanesville, where he became the editor and publisher for several years, of the Zanesville Express. He was also land agent and the owner of a township, which he sold to actual settlers. The town of Clarksville was named for him. He left home one day, to transact business, and on the next day, his horse, with saddle and bridle on, was found grazing by the roadside, not far from the place he had started for. A search of several days, revealed his body suspended by the neck, in a log cabin in the middle of a large cornfield, and it was never satisfactorily known whether he committed suicide, or was murdered and placed there. He left a wife, to whom a child was born soon after his death, but died in infancy.

John Clark, was born at Barre, Worcester county, Mass., Aug. 18, 1778, and until he attained his majority, lived and worked with his father, on his farm and in his brewery. He enjoyed but limited educational opportunities, attending the common schools but about three months in a year, till he was sixteen years of age. When he became of age, he procured a set of tools for boring and laying aqueducts, and followed that business two or three years, in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In the spring of 1801, he came to the Black River country, in search of a place for a home, and located a farm of 125 acres, in the town of Lowville, now Denmark, about three-fourths of a mile southeast of the present village of Copenhagen, at the junction of what are now known as Number Three and West roads. The land was held at three and one-half dollars per acre. He paid one-half of the purchase money down, made a small clearing, and built a log house, covering it with bark, as there was no saw-mill within ten miles, and no roads.

He then returned to Massachusetts, and in the winter following, married Abigail White, daughter of William White (then dead,) whose ancestors were of English origin.

Early in the spring of 1802, he placed his tools and household goods upon a wagon, hitched a yoke of oxen and a horse before it, and with his wife, started for the Black River country. After a toilsome journey of eighteen days, he arrived at his log house, and immediately proceeded to extend his clearing, and put in such crops as he was able that season, and during several years, struggled under many difficulties and deprivations. In 1805, he built a framed barn, and in 1809, a house, and finished paying for his farm in 1815. Upon the organization of the town of Denmark, in 1807, he was chosen one of the commissioners of highways, which office he held many years. In 1812, when war with England was declared, he was Lieutenant of a militia company, was three times called to the defense of the frontier at Sackett's Harbor, and served, it is believed, in the capacity of Brigadier-Inspector. He was often called to sit as arbitrator in the settlement of difficulties, and to act as administrator on intestate estates. He was, for several years, justice of the peace, and held the office of supervisor of the town thirteen years in succession, from 1824 to 1837, inclusive. He was originally a Federalist in politics.

In 1829, he was nominated for Member of the Legislature, but was defeated by John W. Martin by a small vote. He enjoyed in an eminent degree the confidence of his neighbors. In 1840, he was a Whig in politics, and took an active part in the Presidential campaign of General Harrison. He was an extensive reader, possessed a retentive memory, and was consequently well versed, not only in the history of his own country, but also of foreign countries. When about seventy years of age his eye-sight began to fail, and during the last ten years of his life he was entirely blind, but bore his infirmities with fortitude and cheerfulness. He died September 11, 1865, at the age of eighty-seven years.

His wife's opportunities for education were even more limited than his own. In her time it was not deemed necessary that girls should be educated further than to be able to read and write. She was a woman of good mind, remarkable industry, energy, perseverance and economy, and to her may be attributed much of the husband's success in life. She was in stature not above the medium, had a mild disposition, and was an affectionate wife and mother. She joined the Presbyterian church in Copenhagen in 1815, and was a consistent and honored member until her death, which occurred September 9, 1850, at the age of seventy-three years.

They were the parents of seven children, three sons and four daughters, six of whom grew to maturity. William, the oldest, was born in 1803; was educated in the common schools and Lowville Academy; worked on his father's farm until of age; taught school several terms, and spent the remainder of his life in the manufacture of wagons and carriages. He held the office of Justice of the Peace several years, was County Superintendent of the Poor one or two terms, and was much respected. He died at the age of sixty-two.

Caroline, the third child, lived to the age of about seventy years, and never married.

Louisa, the fourth, married Harvey M. Whiting.

Josiah, the fifth, died in infancy.

Phebe, the sixth, became the wife of Lyman Cunningham, and died at Fond-du-Lac, Wis., at about the age of thirty.

Lydia, the youngest of the family, was born in March, 1821, and became the second wife of Lyman Cunningham, who died in July, 1876, leaving her a widow.

Lucian Clark, the second son of John Clark, 1st, and Abigail White, was born February 27, 1808, in a log cabin at the juncture of the Number Three and West roads, in the town of Denmark, and at a time when nine-tenths of the county of Lewis was a dense wilderness. He labored on his father's farm during his minority, attending the district school some three months each winter till he was nineteen years of age. During the next ten years, after attaining his majority, he continued to labor for his father in the summer season, and teaching district schools in the winter, in which profession he was eminently successful. In the fall of 1838, he purchased of his father 170 acres of land, on what was then called Halifax street, some of which was partially cleared, and on which was an old barn. He took possession the next spring, and during the summer built the house now (1883) on the farm. On the 7th of January, 1840, he was married to Louisa J. Babcock, daughter of Caleb Babcock, of West Lowville, and moved into his new house on the 8th of January, 1840.

Having exhausted his purse in building the house, and the land but partly paid for; having a team, but no stock and but few farming tools, his progress was slow. By hard work, perseverance and economy, he erected new barns and had them ready to receive the next harvest, and had not increased his indebtedness. But money being scarce and produce low, it was seven years before the farm was paid for, during which time his pockets were generally empty, but all other debts were paid at the time agreed upon. In the spring of 1838, he was chosen one of the School Inspectors for the town, and held that office two years. In 1840, he was chosen Assessor, holding the office three years, and was then elected Town Superintendent of Common Schools, which office he held four years. In the fall of 1846, he was elected County Clerk on the Whig ticket. He rented his farm and moved to Martinsburgh, and during the next three years he passed most of his time in the clerk's office, and performed nearly all of the duties connected with it. In February, 1850, he removed back to his farm, to the care of which he directed his whole attention for a number of years, and holding no offices but minor ones until 1855. In the spring of that year he was elected Supervisor of the town, and was re-elected in 1856. He was chairman of the first Republican Convention held in Lewis county, in the fall of 1855; was chosen to represent the county in the Legislature the next year, and was a member of the committee on public printing. He was several times called to act as administrator in the settlement of intestate estates. In the spring of 1861, when the War of the Rebellion broke out, he was chosen one of the committee to raise volunteers and funds for the support of their families while they were absent on duty, serving on that committee until the war ended. In 1871, he sold his farm to his son and moved to the village of Copenhagen, purchasing the place owned by the late Apollos Stephens. Since, he has held no office of importance but president of the village three years. In all of his business relations, he has been earnestly and efficiently assisted by his wife, and to her efforts must be ascribed much of his success in the various positions in which he has been placed. The children of Lucian and Louisa Clark are Addison L. and Marinus W.

Addison L. was born July 7, 1843. He was educated in the common schools, Lowville Academy, the Normal School at Albany, Eastman's Commercial College at Poughkeepsie, and afterward engaged for some years in school-teaching. He married Mary K. Paris, daughter of John M. Paris, in January, 1871. He was Supervisor of the town in 1878, and was three times re-elected, and was president of the village two years.

Marinus W. Clark was born October 2, 1845. He died suddenly at Lowville, on the 4th of March, 1865, in the twentieth year of his age, while attending school at the academy.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

CLARK, WAYNE

WAYNE CLARK.
John Clark, of the first generation of this family in America, who came to Massachusetts about the year 1718, was born in Ireland about 1665. He belonged to that class known as the "Scotch Irish," his forefathers having emigrated to Ireland from Argylshire, Scotland, during the time of the great confiscations.

He was married in Ireland in the year 1699. In 1718, he first settled with his family in Rutland, Massachusetts, from whence he moved with his sons and daughters to Colerain, then in Hampshire county, in 1738 or 1739. His family of the second generation consisted of Matthew, Thomas, John, William, Samuel, James, George, Sarah and Elizabeth all of whom were born in Ireland.

Matthew Clark,* of this second generation, was born in the year 1700, and was about eighteen years of age when the family came to America. Alexander Bothd, of the first generation, married Jane Doneice in Ireland about 1702, and emigrated to America in 1716, locating in Rutland, Massachusetts. The issue of the second generation was Janet, Alexander and Anne, all born in Ireland. Jane Bothd, wife of Alexander, died on the passage to America.

(* On the 10th day of May, 1746, Matthew Clark, of the second generation, thinking he saw indications of hostile Indians in his neighborhood, deemed it safe to have his family go to the nearest fort for protection. The fort was about one mile away. He sent his family in advance; they arrived at the fort safely. He remained behind to see what discoveries he could make. The Indians soon discovered him, and made chase, and gained so fast on him, he thought his only chance for life was to hide. When one hundred and fifty rods from the fort he had to cross a small stream, over which was a rude log bridge, under which he secreted himself. The Indians here discovered and shot him. His was the first death by violence of a white person that occurred at Colerain.)

Matthew Clark, of the second generation, married Janette Bothd, of Rutland, Massachusetts, in which place he resided until 1738 or '39, when, with his father, brothers and sisters, he removed to Colerain. The issue of Matthew Clark, of the second generation, was Jane, John, Alexander, Agnes, William, Hannah, and Elizabeth, all of whom were born in Rutland, Massachusetts; James, Margaret, Sarah, and Matthew born in Colerain, these being of the third generation.

James Clark, son of this Matthew, was born in Colerain, Massachusetts, in 1739, and was seven years of age at the death of his father. He was made a Captain during the French war which began in 1754, and ended in 1763. He was sent to garrison Fort Stanwix, located near the present site of Rome, New York. He retained his rank during the Revolutionary war which soon followed. He died in Chester, Massachusetts, but at what date is unknown. He had six sons and one daughter — John Scott, Royal, Silas, David, James, (the latter twins), Orrin, and Betsey. Of these. Royal was in the army some time during the Revolution and died in the New London hospital.

Silas emigrated to Wyoming county. New York, and died there. James was of a wandering disposition. He died in Lewis county in June, 1848. Orrin, the youngest son, moved to Herkimer county. New York, and died in the town of Russia. Betsey, the only daughter of Captain James Clark, married Reuben Porks; was born in Chester, lived in Russell, and died in Blanford, Massachusetts. She had ten children — Reuben, Sally, Charlotte, Robert, Lucindy, Betsy, Roland, Sylvester, Israel and Polly, all born in Russell, Massachusetts. She was nearly one hundred years old at the time of her death.

John Scott, the oldest son of Captain James Clark, was born April 1, 1762, in Chester, Massachusetts, and was the first white male child born in that town. He entered the Revolutionary army at the age of fifteen and was stationed at New London, Connecticut, in charge of property taken from General Burgoyne at Saratoga. About the year 1790, he married Selah Anderson, of Chesterfield, Massachusetts, the wedding being held in Chesterfield "meeting house."

The fruit of this marriage was Orrin, Osenath, Electa, John and Lucinda. Electa died in infancy. The family lived in Chester until the spring of 1804, when the)' returned to Lewis county, and located near Copenhagen. The village then contained but two or three houses.  John Scott Clark resided in the home he had chosen until his death, which occurred March 1, 1850, in the 88th year of his age. He was one of the number that organized the first religious society at Copenhagen, and was a leading member of the Baptist church until his death. He loved justice and mercy, and in return was beloved and honored by all who knew him. Selah Anderson Clark, his wife, died June 23, 1838.

Asenath, eldest daughter of John Scott Clark, married Abner Whiting. She died February 15, 1861.

Lucinda married Francis Wright, and died in Copenhagen in the summer of 1874. She was mother of the late John C. Wright.

John, the youngest son, married Phebe Keene. He lived most of his life in Denmark, and died in 1875.

Orrin, the eldest son of John Scott Clark, married Rebecca White, of Templeton, Worcester county, Mass., and had as children Electa, Betsey, Orrin, Sarah, Rebecca, Nathan, Wayne, George W., and John Scott. During the War of 1812, Orrin, the father, served for a time with Captain Israel Kellogg, then stationed at Sackett's Harbor. He died in Copenhagen January 13, 1840, in the 49th year of his age. His wife, Rebecca, died September 23, 1855, aged sixty-eight. Mrs. Rebecca White Clark had two brothers, William and Nathan, and four sisters, Abigail, Sally, Lydia and Hannah; also four half-sisters, Polly, Dorcas, Susan and Elizabeth. Abigail White married John Clark, 1st, who came from Worcester county, Mass., in 1802, and settled at Copenhagen. He belonged to some other branch of the Clark family, of whose genealogy we are not informed.

Wayne Clark, the third son of Orrin and Rebecca, was born in Copenhagen February 16, 1825. His educational privileges were those of the common schools, with a short term at Denmark Academy, then taught by Johnson Clark. Elizabeth Clark, his wife, was born in Watertown, N. Y., December 21, 1831, and received her education at what was then called the Jefferson County Literary and Religious Institute. They were married November 6, 1854. The children of this marriage are George W., Frances L., John N., and William Grant. The family have resided since 1854, in Harrisburgh. Wayne Clark was elected town superintendent of schools for 1856. He afterwards held the office of school commissioner for three successive terms for the second district of Lewis county. He was supervisor of Harrisburgh during 1872-73, and has held other minor offices.

Of the brothers of Wayne Clark, George Washington emigrated to the territory of Minnesota in 1851, and settled at Wabasha Prairie (now Winona). The country was then occupied by the Sioux Indians, and the place a missionary station of the Jesuits many years previous. La Crosse, Wis., was the nearest white settlement, and the now great State of Minnesota then contained only a few straggling settlements on the Mississippi. He is the oldest settler in this county. John Scott Clark removed to the same place in 1852, where he died two years after. Orrin followed his brothers to Winona in 1854, where he now (1883) resides. Nathan lives on the homestead of his grandfather, John Scott Clark, near Copenhagen. Of the sisters, two reside in Livingston county, and two in Mannsville, Jefferson county, N. Y.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

COLLINS, JONATHAN

Jonathan Collins was a descendant of Lewis Collins, who emigrated to America in 1630, and was born at Wallingford, Ct., May 3, 1755. He enlisted December 10, 1775, in Captain John Crouch's company. Colonel Wadsworth's regiment, and went to Dorchester, where he helped to build the fort there. He was discharged in 1776, went to New York, in Captain John Hough's company. Colonel Baldwin's regiment, and enlisted again to go on the lines at Horse Neck, April 1, 1778. He married Sarah Crouch, January 10, 1775, and emigrated from Meriden to this town in 1797. He arrived in March, and had great difficulty in crossing Sugar river then swollen by the spring flood. The goods were got across on a tree, the horses were made to swim the stream, and the sleigh was drawn over by a rope attached to the neap. He selected a valuable tract for a farm, (lots 49, 50, 70 and 98, for which he received deeds January 3, 1799), and having considerable means, he was enabled to begin settlement to advantage, and to maintain through life an independence in property, which was surpassed by but a few in the county. He was early selected as a magistrate and Judge, and from 1809 to 1815 he served as the First Judge of the county court. In 1820 he was chosen a Presidential Elector. Few citizens have enjoyed to a greater degree the confidence of the public, and in the various trusts reposed in him by the town and county, he uniformly evinced strict integrity, sound judgment, and a scrupulous regard for the public welfare. He died April 6, 1845, aged 90 years. His brother, General Oliver Collins, of Oneida county, was in service on the frontier in the War of 1812-'15. His sons were: —

Levi, born February 24, 1778, long a merchant at Collinsville, and a member of Assembly in 1813. He died March 31, 1819.

Selden, born May 22, 1780. Died at Ogdensburgh, June 13, 1857. His son Bryan R. Collins, died in the army at Harrison's Landing, Va., June 15, 1862, aged 61 years. The latter married Elizabeth Inman, daughter of William Inman, and died March 13, 1865, aged 43 years.

Homer, born May 15, 1788; member of Assembly in 1858; resided at Collinsville until old age. He lived for a time in Whitestown, but died in Leyden, October 22, 1870, aged 82 years. He was generally known as “Homer Collins, of Collinsville." He held for some years the office of County Judge, and was a member of Assembly in 1858.

Anthony Wayne, born February 10, 1797; resided at Turin village, where he died May 17, 1870, aged 70 years.

Jonathan C, born January 30, 1804; Presidential elector in 1852, and member of Assembly in 1854; resides at Talcottville.

The daughters of Jonathan Collins were: —

Keturah, born December 24, 1775, married Oliver Allis, and died April 1, 1839.

Lament, born October 6, 1783, married David Waters, of Martinsburgh.

Deuel, born April 22, 1785, married Dr. Walter Dewey, of Collinsville.

Sarah, born August 5, 1792, died March 30, 1794.

Sally, born March 31, 1795, married Martin Hart, of Turin.

Mrs. Sarah Collins, wife of Jonathan Collins, died March 22, 1840, aged 83 years.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

CONSTABLE FAMILY

William Constable, the Purchaser.

We may in this connection record a notice of the family so intimately associated with the land titles of Northern New York.

William Constable was born in Dublin, January 1, 1752. His father. Dr. John Constable, was a surgeon in the British army, and came to Montreal during the French war, and brought his son William, then an infant, with him. In 1762 Governor Cadwallader Colden granted him a commission as surgeon in the first regiment, in the pay of the province of New York. He then removed to Schenectady, where his daughter married Mr. James Phyn, who was there engaged in the Indian trade, in correspondence with Colonel Sir William Johnson.

Dr. Constable sent his son William to Dublin for his education, to the care of his paternal aunt, Mrs. White, with whom he resided while a student at Trinity college. By inheritance he became possessed of a valuable estate near Dublin. On his return to America his kinsman, Mr. Phyn, associated him in his business at Schenectady. On the breaking out of the war of the Revolution Mr. Phyn and his friend Mr. Alexander Ellice, removed to England under a pass from the Committee of Safety, in consequence of which their property was not confiscated. These gentlemen established in England the firm of Phyn, Ellice & Inglis — a firm which gave two members to the Privy Council in the persons of their sons, Sir Robert Inglis and the right honorable Edward Ellice. Dr. John Constable died in New York April 17, 1785, aged 57 years.

Mr. William Constable went to England a little before the Revolution and returned while the British were in possession of Philadelphia, in 1777.

We have no further information upon the subject referred to in the above correspondence, but infer from the fact of his appearing in New York not long afterwards, that no objections were made to his return. From the intense suspicion attached to the private conduct of individuals of that period, it is fair to infer, that there existed no reason for regarding his absence and return, as influenced by any other motive than his own private business.

In the trial of General Arnold for matters growing out of his civil administration in Philadelphia, which led to a sentence of reprimand from the Commander-in-Chief, Mr. Constable is mentioned as one of the owners of a cargo of goods that had been captured by the Americans on the New Jersey coast. From this it appears that he was engaged in commercial pursuits at New York at a later period in the war.

As soon as the war was over, opportunity was given for expanding this business in extraordinary degree, and as Philadelphia and Charleston were at that time the chief commercial ports of the country, Mr. Constable associated himself with Mr. James Seagrove and established a commercial house at Philadelphia, while his partner settled in Charleston. Their trade was mainly with the West Indies, and Mr. Constable, in the course of his business, visited Havana, and there took the yellow fever, of which he nearly died. He married in 1782, Ann White, daughter of Townsend White of Philadelphia; a lady of beauty of person, and of character, who had been a school friend of Miss Dandridge, and who afterwards became Mrs. Gen. Washington, whose friendship she retained, After the peace, Mr. Constable, in 1784, removed to New York, and established the firm of Constable, Rucker & Co. On the death of Mr. Rucker, shortly afterwards, the firm of Constable & Co., in which Robert Morris and Gouverneur Morris were partners, contributed £50,000 as their share of the capital. The National debt, and that of the several States, not being yet funded, offered great field for speculation, which the firm was largely concerned in, as they were also in furnishing supplies to Europe. Mr. Robert Morris, who was the chief financial agent of our government, remained in Philadelphia, while Gouverneur Morris, who was sent Minister Plenipotentiary to France, aided by procuring contracts, and by his advices from thence. The war between France and England threw the carrying trade into the hands of neutrals. The firm of Constable & Co. took early advantage of this, and in 1786 sent the ship Empress to India and China, and made a very profitable voyage. In 1788 the ship America, of 600 tons, which was the finest ship that had been built at New York, was built by Mr. Constable for that trade. In 1790 he proposed to build a ship of one thousand tons, but the demand for China goods in this country did not warrant it, and he abandoned the enterprise. He fulfilled a large contract with the British government for the supply of their troops in the West Indies. Through the agency of Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth of Hartford and Joseph Howland of New London, he shipped seventy-eight cargoes of cattle from Connecticut.

The Family of William Constable, The Purchaser.

Mr. Constable died May 22, 1803, leaving a widow and seven children. As in questions of title in this county, the names of his heirs are often required, we will add a list of them.

Anna Maria, born in 1783, died in 1859. She married Hezekiah B. Pierrepont, who died in 1838.

Eweretta was born in 1784. She married James McVickar, who died in 1835. Her death occurred April 21, 1830, at the age of 41 years.

William Constable, Jr., born April 4, 1786, was carefully educated in Europe, married Eliza, daughter of John McVickar, and in June, 1810, came to reside at Constableville, first occupying the house built by Shaler. He received from his father townships 3 and 4, of the Four Towns, subject to the contract with Shaler, and a bond to Daniel McCormick. He died May 28, 1821.

The elegant mansion erected by Mr. Constable in 18 19, a little east of Constableville, has since remained the homestead of the family. This seat for quiet seclusion, elegant surroundings and classic beaut}^ is not surpassed by any in northern New York. The management of the landed interests remaining with this family, chiefly devolved upon his son, John Constable, whose indulgence towards settlers, and whose urbane manners have rendered him deservedly popular in the community where he resides.

John Constable, a son of William the Purchaser, was born in 1788, and resided in Philadelphia. He first married Susan Livingston and afterwards Alida Kane.

Harriet, born in 1794, married James Duane, of Schenectady county, and settled in the town of Duane, Franklin county, which was named from him. The town of Harrietstown, Franklin county, was named from Mrs. Duane. James Duane died in 1859.

Emily, born in 1795, married Dr. Samuel W. Moore, and died in 1844. Dr. Moore died in 1854.

Francis Matilda, born in 1797, married Edward McVickar, and died May 3, 1871.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

CROFOOT, ELISHA

ELISHA CROFOOT.
Elisha Crofoot, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, came from Middletown, Conn., in 1797, with his family, of whom his son James, was then but eleven years old. At the age of twenty-three, James Crofoot was united in marriage with Clarissa Burnham, also a native of Connecticut. They settled in what was then an unbroken wilderness near Cbnstableville, and passed through all the hardships common to the early settlers of this county. To them were born ten children, of whom Elisha, our subject, was the ninth.

Elisha Crofoot, was born in West Turin, November 29, 1825. His early life was passed on his father's farm until the age of eighteen. He attended a short course of study at Gouverneur Seminary, in addition to his attendance in the common schools, and then engaged in the profession of school teaching in his native town and Turin, which he followed four years, attending Lowville Academy during the fall terms.

He then learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, at which he worked for a few years. He was married January 8, 1850, to Mary B. Killham, and settled in Turin, residing in the same place to the present time.

In 1862, he was appointed Assistant Revenue Assessor, and held that office for nine years. He was elected Sheriff of Lewis County in November, 1864, holding the position three years. Besides these positions of responsibility, he held the office of Supervisor for four years, from 1868 to 1872. He has taken an active part in political and temperance movements, and all matters pertaining to the public welfare. It may be said of him that in these matters he has been conscientious and honorable, and in politics has always considered principle more sacred than party ties.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

CROFOOT, JOHN

JOHN CROFOOT.
The first of this family name of which anything is known was the great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, who came from England to this country about 1730. His name it is believed was Seth Crofoot, and he settled in Berlin, Conn. His son Elisha, who was born in Berlin, Conn., in the year 1753, came to Lewis county in 1797. locating near Constableville, on the farm now owned by Truman Damuth. During the first year of his residence here he helped build the first grist and saw-mill ever built in the town. It stood near what is now the McConnell residence, and was burned soon after its erection.

He died March 29, 1813, aged 60. His son, James Crofoot, was born Oct. 20, 1786, in Connecticut, but whether in Meriden or Middletown is not known. His wife was Clarissa Burnham, born Feb. 22, 1785, to whom he was married September 17, 1809. James Crofoot died February 7, 1861, aged 74. Clarissa, his wife, died April 11, 1853, aged 68. Their children were: —

Jerusha, born September 13, 1810, married Lyman Smith, November 26, 1833, died November 15, 1879; John; Rachel, born April 17, 181 3, died February --, 1850; William, born January 18, 1815, died March 30, 1864; George, born June 13, 1816, died March 30, 1864; Levi, born December 10, 1817, died May 12, 1877; James, Jr., born October 3, 1820, died February 19, 1854; Benjamin P., born March 6, 1823, died May 30, 1863; Elisha, born November 29, 1825, now (1883) living in Turin; Simeon B., born June 14, 1827, died August 7, 1846.

John Crofoot, the second child, was born November 21, 1811. His life has been passed in this town. He received the meagre education afforded by the district schools of his early days, and aided by his inherent, common sense, practice and study, secured a much more beneficial knowledge than many derive from the lessons of the schools. His business through life has been principally that of a farmer. He was Supervisor of the town in 1879, and has held various other local offices of trust. He is known as a man of strict integrity and worth, religiously a man of broad and liberal views, believing in the religion of justice and humanity, he has given largely of his means to aid societies whose aim was to do good, and the M. E. church, known as Crofoot church, was in its erection greatly aided by his generous contributions.

Mr. Crofoot married April 24, 1836, Louisa Rea, sister to Rutson Rea, of Lowville. Their children are: —

Peter, born September 25, 1839, married first, Eva Dickenson, who died in 1870, second, Clara Morse Bennett, January 15, 1880; Clarissa E., born February 18, 1842, died July 25, 1850; Cyrus S., born February 9, 1847, married Mary E. Hough, daughter of Franklin B. Hough, October 27, 1875, died May 14, 1881, in Cleveland, Ohio; John H., born July 13, 1848, married Julia Seymour June 12, 1878; Robert Wellington, born February 14, 1850; died December 13, 1870.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
CROGHAN, GEORGE

George Croghan was a native of Locust Grove near the falls of the Ohio, where he was born November 15, 1791. His father was Major Wm. Croghan, an Irishman who had rendered efficient service int he revolution, and his mother was sister of William Clark, who with Capt. Lewis explored the Missouri country in 1805-7. In 1810, Croghan graduated at William and Mary's college, and began the study of law; but the war soon opened a more inviting field of enterprise, and in the battle of Tippecanoe, and the sieges of fort Meigs and fort Stephenson, he won the applause of the Union. He rose from the rank of captain to that of inspector general; and in 1825 he received from congress a gold medal for his brilliant military services. He died at New Orleans, January 8, 1849. His name was prounced Craw-an, although that of the town, is uniformly spoken Crogan.

(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson)

CROSBY, ALEXANDER

HON. ALEXANDER H. CROSBY, M. D., son of Hopkins and Mary (Porter) Crosby, was born in tire town of Martinsburgh, Oct. 18, 1836. His great grandfather was Alexander CrosbyCaptain Prince Crosby, who sailed a merchant vessel between an Eastern port and the West Indies. He married, in Cuba, a Spanish lady of great beauty. He died at sea, but so near port that he was buried on the island of Cuba. A son of his, Jeremiah, emigrated from New Hampshire to this county about 1800. His father, before mentioned, was a farmer, and Alexander H. received an education from the district schools, supplemented with a year at Wellsboro Academy, Penn., two years at Mansfield, Penn., and one term, in 1857, at Lowville Academy.

He began the study of medicine with his uncle, Lyman Buckley, of Oswego county, N. Y., and later returned to Martinsburgh and entered the office of Dr. James T. Peden, with whom he completed his studies. During the time he was thus engaged he taught several terms in the common schools. He subsequently attended one course of lectures at Albany Medical College, and was licensed to practice medicine by the Lewis County Medical Society. January, 1862, he began the practice of his profession in the town of Martinsburgh. On the 29th of February, 1863, he married Addle M. Macoy. daughter of Nathan Macoy. In March, 1867, he removed to the village of Lowville, where he has since resided. He has been a. member of the County Medical Society since he entered the profession, and has represented it several years in the State Medical Society. He was chosen delegate by that society to the Pennsylvania State Medical Society in 1875. In 1875 he was elected to the Assembly and appointed upon the Committee of Canals and Public Health. In 1877-78 he represented the 22nd Congressional district on the State central and executive committee, and has been chairman of the county executive committee several times. Upon several occasions he has been a prominent expert witness in criminal cases. He is an excellent surgeon, and there have been few physicians in Northern New York who have been more successful in the treatment of disease. He has a large and lucrative practice, and has the confidence of those who are best qualified to Judge of his ability. He is a member of Trinity Episcopal church, and has served several years as one of its vestrymen.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)



HON. ALEXANDER H. CROSBY, M. D.
The various families of this name in the United States are of English or rather Scotch origin, and most of them we believe, trace their descent from New England ancestors of the colonial period. The great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch was Captain Prince Crosby, who sailed a merchant vessel between an Eastern port and the West Indies. He married in Cuba, a Spanish lady of great beauty. He died at sea on a voyage out, but so near the end of his voyage that he was buried on the Island of Cuba. A son of this person, Jeremiah Crosby, emigrated from New Hampshire to this county, about the year 1800, and located in the eastern part of the town of Martinsburgh. About the year 1805, he with several others, attracted by the liberal offers made by John Brown, then owner of a large tract of land in the wilderness on the east side of the Black river, and known to the present day as "John Brown's Tract," moved with their families into this barren region. After living here two years they were starved out and returned to Martinsburgh.

While living on "Brown's Tract" 'Hopkins Crosby was born in 1806, who in time became a farmer and married Mary Porter, whose family had emigrated from one of the Eastern States. Their first child, Alexander H., was born in the town of Martinsburgh, October 18, 1836. He passed his earlier years in that town, but when nine years of age, his father with a family of four small children, removed to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, on account of failing health. From this cause he had not prospered, but the change proved beneficial; he regained his health and soon found himself in comfortable circumstances, and continued to live here until the time of his death, which occurred in December, 1876. His wife died in October, 1877, while on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Henry Gaudy, in Brookfield, Missouri, where the daughter still resides. Two other children of Hopkins Crosby are living — Jeremiah H., in Kansas and the youngest, Monroe, in Franklin county. Pa.

Alexander grew up on the farm, receiving his education at home and in the district school. He afterward attended the academy at Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, for one year and the seminary at Mansfield, Pennsylvania, for two years, and one term at the Lowville Academy in 1857. Having chosen the medical profession, he began the study of medicine with his uncle, Dr. Lyman Buckley, of Oswego county, New York, and afterward returned to Martinsburgh and entered the office of Dr. James T. Feden, with whom he completed his studies. During the time he was thus engaged, he taught school several terms. He subsequently attended one course of lectures at the Albany Medical College, and was licensed to practice medicine by the Lewis County Medical Society.

He began the practice of his profession m the village of Martinsburgh, in January, 1862. On the 29th of February, 1863, he married Addie M. Macoy, daughter of Nathan Macoy of Martinsburgh. In March, 1867, he removed to the village of Lowville, where he has since resided. He has been a member of the County Medical Society, since he entered the profession, and has held successively the offices of Secretary, Treasurer, Censor, and President. He represented the society several years in the State Medical Society, in which he is eligible as a permanent member, and was chosen by that organization as delegate to the Pennsylvania State Medical Society in 1875.

In politics. Doctor Crosby is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Stephen A. Douglass in 1860. In 1875, he was elected to the Assembly of the State, against Henry J. Botchford. He was appointed upon the standing committees of Canals and Public Health, and discharged the duties of his position with marked ability. In 1877 and 1878, he represented the 22d Congressional District on the State Central and Executive committees, and has been chairman the County Executive committee [sev]eral times. In 1879, the Democratic County Convention, after spending some time, were unable to find a candidate who would take the nomination for Member of Assembly, and Doctor Crosby finally allowed them to use his name, but with no expectation of being elected; for the reason that some of the leaders of the party were following the fortunes of John Kelly, and had determined to defeat all who had the courage to accept a nomination at the hands of any convention not controlled by them. Owing to this, the elections in general went Republican that year. Upon several occasions. Dr. Crosby has been a prominent witness in criminal trials, and the clear and logical manner in which his testimony was given, reflected great credit upon his reputation as a thoroughly informed physician and a careful observer. He has proved himself an excellent surgeon, and there are few physicians in Northern New York who have been more successful in the treatment of disease. He has a large and lucrative practice, and is, we believe, gaining every year in the confidence of the people, and most among those who are best qualified to judge of his ability. He is a member of the Episcopal church, and has been for several years a vestryman in Trinity church, of Lowville.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
CUNNINGHAM, CHESTER

CHESTER S. CUNNINGHAM.
Aaron Cunningham, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Royalston, Mass., August 31, 1789. He came to Denmark, Lewis county, in the winter of 1817, where he resided until his death, which occurred in Copenhagen September 15, 1864. His wife was Mary Dimock, of Norwich, Mass., who was born March 29, 1791, and to whom he was married November 14, 1813. She died December 31, 1859.

They had four children, namely:— Lyman, born in Norwich, Mass., September 17, 1814, died July 22, 1876; Dorothy E., born April 21, 1819, married L W. Dickenson; Chester S.; Mary E., born June 21, 1828, died May 14, 1830.

Chester S. Cunningham was born in Copenhagen, April 19, 1825. He was educated in the district schools, and worked for a number of years at the trade of leather tanning with his father, who was engaged in that business at Charles Corners, near Copenhagen. He afterward took up the occupation of farming which he has since followed.

He was married to Nancy M. Snyder, of Picton, Canada, March 4, 1855, who died August 5, 1864, leaving one son and two daughters — Ellen M., born April 19, 1856, died August 4, 1856; William C, born January 23, 1858; and Hattie E., born August 3, 1861. He was again married to Maria H. Millard, of Copenhagen, October 11, 1865, by whom he had one child, a daughter, Mary L., born May 12, 1868.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

DEWEY, CALDWELL

CALDWELL DEWEY
The first that is known of the ancestors of the Dewey family was Thomas Dewey, who came in 1633 from Sandwich, Kent, England, near the ancient town of Dover, and settled in Dorchester, Mass, He married the widow Frances Clarke, in 1638, by whom he had five children. He died April 27, 1648.

Aaron Dewey 4th, grandfather to Cad well, was born January 26, 1750. He married March 12, 1777, Sybel Cadwell, born August 7, 1755, daughter of Abel Cadwell, of Westfield, and Anna Dwight, great-aunt to President Timothy Dwight, of Yale College. They had eight children.

Aaron Dewey 5th, father of Cadwell, was one of this number, and was born October 10, 1777. He married in 1807 for his second wife Betsey Vail, of Long Island, N. Y. He moved from this State to Ohio, and from there to Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming. He died August 20, 1849.

Cadwell Dewey was born in the town of Franklin, Delaware county, N. Y., October 5, i8og. In that town his earlier years were passed at the home of his grandparents until about the age of thirteen, when he came to Turin, with his uncle, Dr. Royal Dwight Dewey, who wished him to study for the practice of medicine. With this uncle he remained a few years attending school, but preferring an active business life to the medical profession, he returned to his home, and soon after went to the town of Unadilla, Otsego county, N. Y., where he learned the trade of cloth dressing and manufacturing, with the firm of Crooker & Williams.

In 1831, at the solicitation of his uncle, he came to Turin, and engaged in business with Lyman Lane, as partner, and began the manufacture of woolen goods. Coming to this town when the country was comparatively new, he entered actively into the pursuit of business, and for many years carried on a successful enterprise.

Mr. Dewey was identified both in business and social interests with the people of this vicinity for more than fifty years. He was a man of great activity, of pleasing address and affable manners. His family associations were pleasant and tender. He was for a number of years a member of the Methodist church, and was held in esteem by all with whom he came in contact. He died at his home in Deweyville, April 25, 1882, aged 72 years 6 months 20 days.

Cadwell Dewey married in Turin, January 8, 1835, Frances C. Foster, who was born February 22, 1818, in the town of Islip, Suffolk county. Long Island, and who came with her parents to Turin, in 1830, where she has since resided- Their children were, William C, born December 6, 1835, (married in New York, February 11, 1859, Sarah D. Hammond, who died in Brooklyn, July 7, 1866, and who married for his second wife Louise B. Neff, November 6, 1872, and resides in New York ;) Charles D. Dewey, born May 12, 1838, (married in Lowville, February 27, 1861, Amanda C. Foster, who died September 13, 1869, and who was again married, in Medina, N. Y., September 5, 1877, to Nancy L. Johnston, and lives now in Batavia ;) S. Foster, born June 14, 1840, resides in New York; John S., born September 24, 1842, resides in Batavia, N. Y.; R. Dwight, born April 8, 1850, married in Brockport, N. Y., October 22, 1879, Alma Bann, and lives in Batavia; Albert A., born May 17, 1845, died April 3, 1850; Frances E., born May 27, 1860, died March 16, 1863.

Of these children William C, is a prominent wholesale grocer and produce merchant, in New York. Foster is known upon Wall street, and in the Stock Exchange. Charles D., is general manager of the celebrated Johnston Harvester Works, of Batavia, N, Y., and also connected with that manufactory are John S. and R. Dwight Dewey.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

DEWEY, EDWIN

E. P. DEWEY.
Edwin Pelton Dewey, was born in Westfield, Mass., September 26, 1830. His father was Abner Dewey, a native of the same place, who married Cynthia Shepard, and came to Lewis County when Edwin was about seven years of age. Here he passed his earlier years, receiving the education of the district schools, and the practical education derived from contact with the world. Men are made by their environments, and living in a region where subsistence in even those days was derived only from the soil, Edwin naturally adopted the occupation of farming, which he has followed through life with more than the average measure of success. In politics, Mr. Dewey is a Republican, but has taken no unusually active part in political matters. Religiously, he is liberal in his views, and a believer in the Christianity of deeds rather than words.

He married March 23, 1852, Esther S. Shepard, who was born in Turin, January 26, 1827. Their children were: George E., born July 10, 1856; Etta A., born June 1, 1864; Effie M., born March 7, 1867, died May 10, 1867; John M., born July 15, 1870.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

DOIG, CHARLESCharles Doig

CHARLES K. DOIG, son of John and Maria (Knox) Doig, was born Nov. 28, 1853. He was educated at Lowville Academy. In 1874 he entered the drug store of Doig & Pelton, as clerk. In this capacity he served two years, when he bought out the interest of Mr. Pelton, and entered into partnership with his brother, Frank C, with the firm name of Doig Bros. Their business has been successfully conducted, and is still continued.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

DOIG, FRANKFrank Doig

FRANK C. DOIG was born at Lowville, N. Y., and educated at Lowville Academy. He learned the drug business in his father's store, and with Butler & Hamilton of Utica, N. Y.; where he served four years. In 1874 he purchased the interest of F. P. Kirley in the firm of Kirley & Pelton, and has continued in the business since that time as a member of the firms of Doig & Pelton and Doig Bros. Mr. Doig was active in reorganizing the Asbestos Burial Casket Co., and has been chairman of the executive committee and general business manager of the company since 1888. He is a member of the Masonic order and has served as master of the Lodge and high priest of the Chapter. He has been a trustee of the village of Lowville, and is a trustee of Lowville Academy.

When the question of supplying the village with water was brought up, he was chairman of the committee appointed by the citizens to investigate the matter, and was a member of the first board of water commissioners, but resigned after serving one year.

On the 12th of February, 1877, he was married to Miss Kate Jones.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
)

DOIG, JOHN

JOHN DOIG.
John Doig, the son of Andrew and Polly Thompson Doig, was born in Lowville May 15, 1820. With the exception of two years which were passed in New York as a clerk, his early life was spent in Lowville where, in the Academy at that place he received his education.

On the first of May, 1848, he was married to Maria Knox, by whom he had two children — Frank C. and Charles K.

He followed for years the occupation of druggist, and built up a substantial business which is now conducted by his sons.

His reputation for probity and honor, established by years of conscientious dealing, still survives him. Though often solicited to hold official positions he declined all except those pertaining to the welfare of the village, of which he was Trustee, Treasurer, and President. In the enterprises and advancement of Lowville he was one of the most public spirited men of his day and was also Trustee of Lowville Academy and many years Treasurer of the Board of Trustees.

He was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, and was one of the first Masters of" Lowville Lodge, No. 134, F. & A. M.

He died November 15, 1867.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

DOUGLAS, WALLACE

DOUGLAS, Wallace B, St Paul. Res 2245 Knapp st, office N Y Life bldg. Lawyer. Born Sept 21, 1852 in Leyden Lewis county N Y, son of Asahel M and Alma E (Miller) Douglas. Attended district schools at Leyden N Y; district and high school Momence Ill; Cazenovia Seminary Cazenovia N Y; graduated from law dept of the Univ of Mich after taking a 2 years' course. Began practice in June 1875; was attorney of Moorhead Minn for 5 years; county atty Clay county for 6 years; member of the Board of Education of Moorhead for 13 years; atty gen of Minn 1899-1904; associate justice of the supreme court of Minn 1904-1905. Now engaged in gen practice and is associated with Franklin H Griggs as Douglas & Griggs.

(Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

DOUGLASS, CHARLES

CHARLES EUGENE DOUGLASS, M. D., was born in Denmark, Lewis county, Jan. 9, 1846, and is of Scotch ancestry. His parents were John and Olive (Sage) Douglass. Their children were Adelbert O., born in 1837; Charles E., Allison O. and Alice O. (twins), born in 1855. All of these brothers were educated in the medical profession, and all are now in practice: one in Illion, one in Little Falls, and the subject of this sketch in Lowville, N. Y.Charles Douglass

Dr. Chas. E. Douglass attended the schools of Oneida county, and in 1865 he became a student of Ann Arbor University. In 1873 he graduated from Long Island College Hospital. In 1881 he entered the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Pa., and graduated therefrom in 1882. Dr. Douglass had practiced before this time in Oneida and Lewis counties. In 1867 he was appointed pension surgeon, which office he still holds. In 1879 he was president of Lewis County Medical Society, and in 1880 he was elected, for three years, a delegate to the State Medical Society, of which he is a permanent member. Dr. Douglass has had under his tuition several students who have become physicians of reputation, among whom are his brothers before mentioned and William Powell and G. P. English. Dr. Douglass has an immense practice, not alone in Lowville and surrounding towns, but also all over his county.

He has the earnestness of his Scotch race, and is a devoted student in his chosen profession, and has attained high distinction as a practitioner. He is regarded as an expert witness in criminal trials and his testimony is valuable to the jury in aiding its members in forming a verdict. He makes a specialty of gynecology and general surgery.

He first united in marriage with Miss Julia A. Brown, daughter of George W. Brown, ex-sheriff of Oneida county, who died; and Jan. 24, 1869, he married Miss Esther H. Bacon, daughter of David and Sarah. (Parsons) Bacon of Leyden.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)



CHARLES EUGENE DOUGLASS, M. D.
The subject of this sketch was born in Denmark, Lewis county, January 9, 1846. His parents, who were of Scottish descent, were John and Olive Sage Douglass. Their children were Adelbert J., born in 1837; Charles E.; Alison O. and Alice O., born in 1855. Each one of the brothers was educated to the medical profession, and is engaged in its practice, one in Ilion and the other in Grayville, Herkimer county. The early life of Doctor Douglass was passed in the schools of Oneida county, and in 1865 he became a student of Ann Arbor University, Mich. In 1873, he entered Long Island College Hospital from which he graduated the same year.

In 1881, he became a student of the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., graduating therefrom in 1882. During these years from 1865 he has been in the active practice of his profession in Oneida and Lewis counties, and has built up a large and lucrative business. In 1867 he was appointed government pension surgeon by the Pension Bureau at Washington, which position he still holds. He held in 1879 the office of President of the Lewis County Medical Society, and in 1882 was elected for three years as delegate to the Medical Society of the State. Among the students who have studied the profession of medicine under his tuition are his brothers, A. J. and A. O. Douglass, William Powell and G. P English; Mr. Powell from 1877 to 1880; English from 1879 to 1882; A. O. Douglass from 1869 to 1873; and A. J. Douglass from 1871 until his graduation. Mr. Douglass inherits all the earnestness of the Scotch blood, has been a devoted student in his chosen profession and has become an expert in its practice. His first wife was Julia A., daughter of George W. Brown, ex-sheriff of Oneida county, who died. He married again, January 24, 1869, Esther H. Bacon, daughter to David and Sarah Parsons Bacon, of Leyden.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
DOUGLASS, DAVID

DAVID D. DOUGLASS, M. D.
The first that is known of the ancestors of this branch of the Douglass family was Israel, grandfather to the subject of this sketch, who came from Scotland to America at an early day and settled in Middletown, Connecticut, and from thence removed to Lewis county. His children were Lydia, Annie, Jonathan,* Israel, Nathan, Salmon. One, Ruth, died with small-pox.

----------------.
* Father of Norton Douglass.
----------------.

Salmon was born in Saybrook, Connecticut, February 24, 1786. He married Roxie Hubbard, of Saybrook, Connecticut, in 1798. He died in Ellisburgh, Jefferson county, August 25, 1851.

His wife died October 14, 1826. Their children were: Marilla, born September 23, 1809, married John A. Clarke, of Leyden; Julia H., born January 2, 1812, married Joseph Kenyon, of Lee, Oneida county; Roxana, born February 16, 1814, married Orrin Kenyon, of Lee, Oneida county, died August 11, 1875; Lydia S., born March 20, 1815, married William H. Jacobie, of Port Leyden; David D., born February 2, 1817; Achsah, born June 22, 1819, married William Post, of Leyden; Salmon J., born April 11, 1821, died in Sandy Creek, Oswego county, August 28, 1876.

Salmon Douglass married for his second wife Prudence Halley, of Wethersfield, Conn., March 13, 1827. By her he had five children — Horace L., born in Sandy Creek, March 12, 1828, dead; Prudency, born in Sandy Creek, February 6, 1831, married Ogden Edwards, of Ellisburgh, N. Y., is now in Minnesota;

Charles, born in Sandy Creek, September 1, 1834, killed July 3, 1854, in California, by the caving in of a mining shaft while digging for gold; Harriet L., born March 13, 1837, at Sandy Creek, married Allen M. Johnston, of Lee, Oneida county, died in 1872; Frances A., born June 6, 1841, at Sandy Creek, married first, Joel Merills, second, Allen M. Johnston.

Salmon, father to David D., was a physician who began his practice after the age of thirty-five, and pursued it successfully in Oswego and Jefferson counties until his death. Three of his sons were also physicians of some repute of the Eclectic practice.

David D. Douglass was born in Leyden, New York, February 2, 1817, in which place he passed his early life. He passed through the studies of the common schools, and attended the academy at Mexico, Oswego county, two years, and also at Geddes, Onondaga county, nearly two years more. At this latter place was located a school of Physicians where he studied medicine, and from there went to Sandy Creek, where for five years he practiced his chosen profession with his father. At the expiration of that time he came to Leyden where he remained some two years, and then returned to Sandy Creek where he resided one year. He then removed to Oswego City for three years' practice, then to Leyden where he has since remained in the practice of his profession. At that time the village of Port Leyden was but a hamlet. Here he invested largely in real estate, built numerous buildings, and interested himself generally in the welfare of the village and town. In 1859, he began business as a druggist, in connection with his profession, and continued it until 1879, when he sold to E. D. Spencer, his son-in-law. In 1870, he built the Douglass House, the leading hotel of Port Leyden, and in 1879 and 1880, erected the Douglass Block, a commodious and beautiful brick edifice on the main street, devoted to mercantile and official pursuits. In these and many other ways Dr. Douglass has been instrumental in the upbuilding of the village.

On the 29th day of September, 1839, he married Harriet L. Clark, of Leyden, daughter of Elder John Clark,* a Baptist minister, and one of the first settlers in the town of Leyden. Their children were: — Eugene C, born September 3, 1843, in Leyden — a bright, intelligent young man, was drowned at Midland City, Michigan, in the Titawaboise river, February 28, 1863, body found March 8th, and brought to Port Leyden for burial; — Emogene B., born November 20, 1845, in Sandy Creek, married Edward D. Spencer, of Port Leyden.

(* The first Baptist church at Talcottville was organized with five members, (four males and one female,) at the house of Thomas Brayton, April 22, 1803, by Elder John Clark, its first pastor.)

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

DOUGLASS, NORTON

NORTON DOUGLASS.
The family of the subject of this sketch is descended from two Scotchmen, brothers, who emigrated to this country at an early day. One of these brothers settled in Vermont, the other in Connecticut, and from the latter is descended this branch of the family. The celebrated Stephen A. Douglass, it is said, was a descendant of the brother who settled in Vermont.

The father of Norton was Jonathan Douglass who was born, probably in Connecticut, September 21, 1774, and who came to Lewis county in 1802, locating on a farm in the town of Leyden, now owned by George Banning. His wife was Rachel Allen, whom he married in Saybrook, Conn., in October, 1798. She was born January 25, 1778, and died in 1843. Jonathan Douglass died in Port Leyden, in 1860. His children were Rachel, born May 4, 1801; Jonathan Jr., born July 11, 1803; Allen, born June 25, 1805; Norton; Amanda, born August 17, 1813; Asa, born December — , 1815. Rachel married Sylvanus Heath. Amanda married Warren Allen.

Norton Douglass was born in the town of Leyden, June 27, 1809. He passed his earlier years on his father's farm, receiving the education of the district schools, and at the age of eighteen, went to Utica to learn the trade of edge-tool maker. Here he served a three years' apprenticeship under Alfred Windsor, and then for four years worked as journeyman for Windsor & Morris. He then went to Newport, Herkimer county, where he engaged in the manufacture of axes, in which business he continued four years. At the expiration of that time he returned to Utica and hired the manufactory of his former employers, which he conducted one year. From there he moved to Clarksville, near Auburn, where for four years he was engaged in the manufacture of hoes. He next established a trip-hammer shop at Seneca Falls, which he run one year and sold to Alfred Gould, and went to Watertown, N. Y., where he hired a water trip-hammer shop and engaged for some ten or twelve years in the manufacture of axes. This business he sold out, and bought a farm about two miles from Watertown where he remained four years, and from there went to Clayville, Oneida county, where he worked one year for S. A. Millard, in the manufacture of hoes and forks. He then went to Baldwinsville, Onondaga county, and worked four years for the Morris Axe and Tool Company. In 1867, he removed from there to Leyden, and engaged in the flour and feed business, purchasing in 1875, the Port Leyden steam mill, which is now (1883), under his management.

On the 14th of September, 1832, Mr. Douglass was married to Sally B. Shaw, of Utica. She died on the second of July of the following year, and on the 15th of April, 1834, he married Charlotte Elizabeth Furman, of Utica, by whom he had six children. She died March 4. 1879. The children were: Helen, born January 8, 1836, married E. G. Hutchinson, of Phoenix, N. Y.; Eugene, born August 20, 1837, died November 15, 1838; Frances Josephene, born August 22, 1843, died June 22, 1847; Gertrude M., born July 22, 1845, died June 22, 1847; Mary R., born April 15, 1849, married Oscar Howard, of Baldwinsville, N. Y.

In 1881, Mr. Douglass was married to his present wife, Elizabeth McNeal, of Coldbrook, Herkimer county, N. Y.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

EASTON, RUSSEL

RUSSEL J. EASTON.
It is only occasionally that enough of unusual interest and action can be found to make the life of any individual prominent above the restless surging of the present age. But there are some, however, who catching the first flood of the tide of our modern life, so well understand its direction, and so successfully keep abreast of it, that they fairly epitomize the movement and become its exponents. It is always a subject of regret when, as is too often the case in our busy world, the lives of such prominent and useful men are permitted to pass into oblivion when the grave closes over their career. A life of useful labor is an object of contemplation far too fruitful and suggestive to be suffered to pass quickly out of memory. The man may live, may toil, may shape the tendency of his time, and the restless waves of busy human life, despite family tradition and family love, soon erase the most cherished recollections, unless gathered up and crystalized into some more permanent and abiding form. To preserve in some measure from oblivion, the deeds and memory of those whose honorable and useful lives demand our reverence, this history of Lewis county is given to the public. Of the men and families who deserve to be remembered when the dark river shall have swept them forever from our sight, none are more worthy than those mentioned in this sketch.

Of the first of this family name in America, there is no positive record. Tradition says that three Scotch brothers left their native land at an early day and emigrated to America, one of whom went to Canada, one to Pennsylvania, and one to Connecticut. It is also probable that the town called Easton, in Pennsylvania, was named for some of the descendants of the brother who settled there. Of the one who went to Canada, Storr Star Easton, a prominent man of the Dominion, was undoubtedly a descendant.

The first of whom anything definite is known, was Giles Easton, 1st, grandfather of Russel J., who was born in East Hartford, Conn., April 22, 1766, and who married Anna Haskins, born in Bloomfield, Conn., April 24, 1773. He died June 28, 1829. She died April 24, 1853, aged eighty years. They had three children — Giles, 2d; Sophia; and Henry R., who died June 22, 1848.

Giles Easton, 2d, was born in Hartford, Conn., December 13, 1797, and in 1809, at the age of twelve years, came on foot to Lewis county and located one-half mile north of West Martinsburgh, where he contracted for twenty acres of land, some of which is included in the homestead now owned by his son, Russel J., joining on the south the farm now owned by Rutson Rea. With such help as he could procure, he cleared the trees away, planted some of the land to potatoes, built a rude log cabin, and in the fall returned to Hartford and came back with his parents, and in that cabin passed the winter.

At that time this country was nearly a wilderness; Lowville had but a few log houses and a hotel. Jonathan Rogers, the veteran pioneer, was then living there. The next season his father, Giles 1st, who was by trade a blacksmith, built on that land a blacksmith shop, in which for some years he did the work of his neighborhood. Giles, 2d, added to his farm by additional purchases, first twenty acres, then forty, sixty, and so on, as money and opportunity offered, until he had acquired something over 300 acres. On the 22d of February, 1822, he married Olive Green, daughter of Oliver Green, of Denmark, who was born in Pittsburgh, Mass., March 14, 1802, and lived on this farm until his death, which occurred August 16, 1856. His wife died June 7, 1874, in West Martinsburgh, on the old homestead. The children of Giles 2d, and Olive Green were: — Jason C, born May 12, 1823; Giles C, born November 21, i824, died in West Martinsburgh, January 26, 1867; Russel J.; Harriet N., born July 28, 1829, married Seymour Shumway; Francis M., born March 10, 1833, died in Lowville, February 13, 1868; Augusta O., born February 19, 1836, married Rev. T. B. Shepherd, now (1883) living in Ilion, N. Y.; John V., born October 20, 1841, died in West Martinsburgh, February 9, 1874.

Of these children, Jason C. was educated in the common and select schools of his neighborhood, and attended several terms in the Lowville Academy. From the latter institution he went to Yale College, where he studied a few years. He then returned and for a year or two worked on the farm, and afterward purchased a small farm adjacent to that of his father's. This occupation however, was not one for which his talents were fitted. He remained but one year on the farm, and giving up that business, went to Lowville and purchased with Homer Hunt, the Northern Journal, which he conducted several years. He then went to Chatfield, Minn., where he engaged in a general banking business. He is now (1883) a prosperous banker, and largely interested in railroad management, being director of the Southern Minnesota railroad, and President of the Chippewa Valley & Superior, and the Chicago & Evanston Railroad Companies.

Russel James Easton was born March 7, 1827. He was educated in the common school at West Martinsburgh, and in a select school kept by John Vary. At the age of seventeen he took up his father's occupation of farming and general merchandising. His first venture was in the purchase of wool with Aaron Wood for a partner. This experiment, which led them a long distance from home, proved discouraging to Wood, who sold his interest in the business to Mr. Easton and withdrew from the partnership. His next partner was William Rook, with whom he continued the business, to which was afterward added the manufacture of potash. Beginning at the lowest round of the commercial ladder, and "despising not the day of small things," he built up a large and lucrative trade, having for his partners at different times, his father and his brothers, Francis and Giles.

In 1861, the real active business of his life began. On the 24th of January of that year, he formed a partnership with his brother, Giles, at Lowville, under the firm name of G. C. & R. J. Easton, General Commission Merchants. He continued to live on the old farm until the spring of 1863, when he moved his family to Lowville, locating on Dayan street, in what is known as the Bowen house. He there entered actively into the labors which have resulted in the improvement of that village. During the year 1863-'64, he purchased in the central part of Lowville, 33 acres of land, most of which was then a rude cow-pasture, owned by men mostly of no enterprise, and erected thereon, in the same year, five buildings, the first built on Easton street, which thoroughfare he opened and which was named for him. He has been an extensive dealer in real-estate, and the western part of the village owes its growth to his enterprise. This once neglected tract of land is now occupied by fine residences and, has become the homes of the solid men of Lowville. His business as commission merchant increased during these years and from the small beginning of the youth of seventeen, has grown to proportions which place him in the front rank of the business men of the county. In this department of the business of his life he has probably done as large a trade, as any man in the county, if not larger, averaging fully a yearly sum of a quarter-million of dollars. On the 12th of February, 1875, he took his son Gilbert into partnership, and on the 1st of April, 1881, his son Giles was added to the firm. The firm name was then changed to the one it now bears — R. J. Easton & Sons.

In 1869, Mr. Easton was appointed United States Assistant Supervisor of Internal Revenue, under the administration of President Grant. At the breaking out of the Rebellion, Mr. Easton furnished a substitute, and at the call of President Lincoln for 500,000 volunteers, was appointed chairman of the War Committee of Lowville, and promptly filled the quota of the town. The quota consisted of forty-six men, which he filled mostly by procuring substitutes in New York City, and the balance by securing volunteers from Lowville and Watertown. In this work of raising soldiers to put down the Rebellion and to secure a united country, Mr. Easton did valuable work which entitles him to the gratitude of the people of Lowville.

Commencing life under discouraging circumstances; struggling upward with an earnest desire to accomplish some good work in this life, he is emphatically a self-made man, and deserves to rank among those men whose names we should not willingly let die.

In 1840, his father, Giles, 2d, Henry Curtis, and Noah Harger built the Methodist Episcopal church in West Martinsburgh, now standing there. Mr. Easton joined the society of that church in 1838, in which he has been Steward for thirty-one years.

On the 23d of September, 1851, he was married to Jane Rogers, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Rogers of Lowville, one of the pioneers of Lewis county, who was born in Lowville, April 18, 1832. The children of this marriage were:— Gilbert Russel, born in Martinsburgh September 18, 1857; Giles Nelson, born in Martinsburgh May, 17, i860; and Frank Rogers, born in Lowville October 30, 1869.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
EASTON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM L. EASTON.
William Lyman Easton was born in the town of Hancock, Berkshire county, Mass., on the 13th day of March, 1806.

His parents were Elijah Easton and Hannah Locke, who came from an old and distinguished family; the early Locke ancestors having first settled at Woburn, near Boston, from whence the different branches of the Locke family came.

Elijah Easton died in 1815, and very soon thereafter his widow came with her children, to live at Cedarville, Herkimer county, N. Y. William L., being one of the youngest of a family of eight children who were dependent upon a mother for support, and hence he was able to attend only the common schools existing at that time. At the early age of fourteen years he went to Little Falls, in this State, and apprenticed himself to learn the trade of printer, working in the office of the Little Falls Courier.

His elder brother, Henry L. Easton, having traveled through Lewis county, was pleased with the surroundings of Lowville, to which place he induced William L. to go and establish himself in the printing business. He accordingly came to Lewis county on the 10th of October, 1825, where, in Lowville in that year he established the neutral journal known as the Black River Gazette. Nearly three years later, or on the 5th of February, 1828, he was married to Emeline Henry, daughter of James Henry, by whom there were born thirteen children, eight of whom are now living, namely: James Henry and William Lyman, of Decorah, Iowa; Charles Locke, of Chicago, Ill.; Frederick Shaw, of Lowville, and the following daughters — Emma H. West, Mary E. Crawford and Amelia C. Norcross, of Lowville, and Ella Rulison, of Watertown, N. Y. Mr. Easton was succeeded in the proprietorship of the Gazette by Joseph Farr, when the paper advocated the election of Wirt for the presidency.

He then embarked in mercantile business, in which he continued with slight interruptions till his death. As a merchant he was successful. From the small beginning of nearly half a century ago, at his death the house in which he was a partner (De Witt C. West & Co.), was one of the largest in Northern New York.

In 1839, when the Bank of Lowville was organized, he was one of its incorporators, and was for eighteen years a director thereof, and held successively the offices of cashier, vice-president, and president of that institution. He held also for some twenty years the position of trustee of Lowville Academy.

In 1840, he was appointed by Governor William H. Seward to the office of Surrogate of Lewis county, which position he filled acceptably for four years. In the year 1852, he was chosen as delegate to the National Whig Convention at Baltimore — the last Whig National Convention ever held — that nominated General Winfield Scott for the presidency. In that year he was also one of the presidential electors.

In 1855, on account of failing health, and the consequent necessity of seeking a change of climate, he went to Decorah, Iowa, intending to locate, but decided not to move his family away from the advantages of Eastern associations. At that point he established the banking, house of Easton, Cooley & Company, which business was afterward conducted by his son, James H. Easton, under the firm name of William L. Easton & Son, now the First National Bank of Decorah.

In all the varied avocations of his eventful life, Mr. Easton comprehended in their fullest extent the duties and responsibilities entrusted to him.

As the youthful compositor and editor, his journal was sold for the conciseness and force of its editorials, and the high moral and religious tone of the miscellaneous departments.

As a leading and prominent merchant, he acquired a reputation such as can be earned only by men of the strictest integrity, largest comprehension and keenest discrimination.

In disposition kind, yet firm and decided in all his dealings with men, he was prompt in the fulfillment of all his obligations, and exacted no more of others. In all local and public improvements he evinced energy and interest. From the inauguration of the Black River Canal enterprise, he was one of the original and firmest friends of that measure. In the public press of the county he manifested much interest, often aiding in the local and literary departments, and contributing greatly by his sound advice to the success of the county journals.

Though not an office seeker — yet often urged by his friends to permit his name to be used — he wielded a power in the political world; his influence over men through forty years of active life, was almost magnetic, and to his honor it can be said that, in successes or in reverses, his friends found him ever true and faithful.

He rarely failed in what he sought to accomplish, for his counsel followed, invariably led to successful results. Even his political opponents were ofttimes struck with admiration at his well organized and admirably executed plans, and many of them who sought him in times of need, remembered with gratitude the lessons of advice and counsel that fell from his lips.

His friends "he grappled by the soul with hooks of steel," and when, on the 7th of March, 1865, they learned of his death, they felt that there had passed from this earth the spirit of one of God's noblest works — an honest, capable, upright man.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

FENTON, CHARLES
Charles Fenton
CHARLES FENTON, son of Orin and Lucy (Weller) Fenton, was born at Number Four in the town of Watson, June 5, 1829. He attended the common schools and Lowville Academy, and labored with his father, who was a farmer at Number Four, until he was of legal age.

Mr. Fenton was fond of the forest where he was reared, and often served as a guide in the Adirondack regions, in his early manhood. He was also a lumberman; but is better known as the proprietor of "The Fenton House" at Number Four, a summer resort, and famous throughout the United States. Since he purchased this beautiful resort on Beaver Lake in 1872 he has constantly improved and beautified the premises, and now has fine accommodations for 150 guests. His table is bountifully supplied with fresh trout and venison in its season.

He was instrumental in establishing a daily mail at Number Four in 1881, and has been its postmaster since that date. Mr. Fenton is the owner of the "Brown Homestead" of his wife's father, at Watson, containing 320 acres, and also has a private park of over 30,000 acres, of hunting and fishing grounds.

Oct. 20, 1858, he married Miss Annis Brown of Watson. This genial landlord and his worthy lady extend a hearty welcome to their guests, and make their house home-like and a resting place. They are blessed with two daughters, Cora L. and Julia E., who reside with their parents.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

FITCH, WARREN

WARREN R. FITCH, son of the late Augustus and Emily Fitch, was born in the town of Rodman, Jefferson county, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1836. When about two years of age his parents removed to Morristown, St. Lawrence county, where they resided until their death. Mr. Fitch received his education In the common schools and at Ogdensburgh Academy and Gouverneur Wesleyan Seminary. At sixteen years of age he engaged in teaching and followed that occupation until May, 1860, when he embarked in the mercantile business in the town where he lived, and continued the same until March, 1873, when he removed to Lowville, where he has since resided. For several years after coming to Lowville he was engaged In the mercantile business, both in that village and Carthage, and subsequently purchased the office of the Lowville Times, of which he was editor and publisher for twelve years.Warren Fitch

Before removing to Lowville he served as supervisor of the town of Morristown seven years, was a justice of the peace for twelve years, and postmaster eleven years, resigning all of those offices on removing from the county. He was a director in the Morristown and Black River R. R. company from the time of its incorporation until the completion of the road from Morristown to Philadelphia, N. Y., and final consolidation with the Utica and Black River R. R. company. He was one of the incorporators of the Lowville Asbestos Burial Casket company, and has been the president of the company since its organization. He is now serving his third term as treasurer of the village where he resides.

In politics he has always been a Republican, his first vote for president having been cast for Abraham Lincoln in 1860. During the war of the rebellion he was active in the support of the government and in securing volunteers for the service, in whose interests he visited their camps several times, assisting the families of those who perished in battle, and rendering aid to many others. Mr. Pitch was converted in early life and soon after united with the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is still a member. In 1874 he was ordained' as minister in that church by Bishop Randolph S. Poster of Boston. In 1892 he was elected a lay delegate to the General Conference of the M. E. church, which convened in Omaha, Neb., May 1st of that year, and continued in session four weeks, serving on some of the most important committees. At present he is treasurer of the Thousand Island Park Association, giving most of his time to the management of that business, and spending his summers mostly at the Thousand Island Park, one of the most popular resorts on the St. Lawrence river.

Mr. Fitch has been twice married, his first wife, Lydia J. Blackstone, dying April 11, 1873, and his last wife, Edna L. Arthur, very suddenly, Feb. 13, 1895. He has two children, both daughters, by his first marriage, the eldest, Leoni Adelle, being the wife of Rev. H. G. Coddington, rector of Grace Episcopal church, Syracuse, N. Y., and the youngest, Inez Genevieve, being the wife of R. Rea Smiley of Lowville, N. Y.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

FOOTE, DUANE

DUANE DOTY FOOTE, son of Capt. Adoniram and Emily (Brainard) Foote, was born in the village of Martinsburgh, May 13, 1822. The generations of his family in America were Nathaniel Foote 1st, the settler," who married Elizabeth Deming in England in 1615, landed at Massachusetts Bay about 1630, and settled permanently in Weathersfield, Con., in 1635; Nathaniel, Daniel, Jehiel, George, John and Adoniram, who was born in Arlington, Vt., July 10, 1780; married Nancy Doty of Washington county, N. Y., in 1804, who died June 15, 1815. Jan. 28, 1817, he married Miss Emily Brainard of East Hartford, Conn., who was born June 1, 1789. In 1806 he settled in Martinsburgh and was the first shoemaker in the town. A few years later Capt. Foote built the first tannery in Martinsburgh, and carried on an extensive business for that period in tanning, harnessmaking and shoemaking. He worked on his shoe-bench from the age of ten years till about two weeks before his death, which occurred April 28, 1866, a period of 75 years. Capt. Foote commanded a company of cavalry several years, hence his military title. He served Lewis county as superintendent of the poor three or four terms of three years each, and was an ordained elder of the Presbyterian church from 1833 until a few years before his death. He left at his decease 95 living descendants.Duane Foote

Duane D. Foote was the tenth of a family of twelve children, only three of whom are now living, viz: Norman B. of Rome, Duane D. of Lowville, and Rev. John B., an itinerant minister of the Methodist church.

The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools, attended Denmark Academy one term and the academy at Martinsburgh several terms, taught by the late Rev. Calvin Yale.

In 1843 he purchased the farm of his father, entirely on his credit, and began a successful business as a farmer. Having sold the homestead he removed to a farm in Turin in 1852, accompanied by his aged father and mother, wife and two children, where he was "a tiller of the soil" until 1869, when he removed to Lowville and where he still resides.

Mr. Foote is credited with being the first to introduce mowing machines into the county, having commenced the sale of the Walter A. Wood mower as early as 1854, and conducted its sale and other agricultural implements so successfully that his extensive trade demanded his whole time, and, as before stated, he removed to Lowville and became an extensive and general dealer In all kinds of agricultural machines and implements. In 1873 he formed a co-partnership with his sons and added to it produce and provisions, etc. For a number of years he has been out of the business and is giving some attention to his farming lands. Mr. Foote follows the instruction and example of his mother, who was a woman of great faith and ardent piety. He united with the Presbyterian church of Martinsburgh in July, 1843, and has led an exemplary Christian life. He has officiated as elder in the Presbyterian church of Turin and of Lowville over forty years, and has officiated as teacher and superintendent of the Sunday schools of these churches as many years, and has been a consistent and hard worker in the church, in the Sunday school, and in the temeprance cause all through his long Christian career. His motto is "Live at peace with all men." Consequently he has never sued a debtor nor never been sued.

Feb. 27, 1849, he united in marriage with Miss Margaret Evans of New Bremen. To them have been born five sons and three daughters. A daughter died at two and one-half years of age. Their son, Robert Duane, born Aug. 2, 1856, died Feb. 28, 1883, in the beginning of a prosperous and promising manhood.

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)



DUANE D. FOOT.
Duane D. Foot was born in Martinsburgh village, N. Y., May 13, 1822, and his boyhood days were spent in his native town. In 1852, in company with his father, mother, wife and two children, he removed to Turin, where he spent the meridian of his life, thence removing to Lowville in 1869, where he now resides. He was the son of Adoniram, who was the son of John Foot, who was the son of George, who was the son of Jehiel, who was the son of Daniel, who was the son of " Nathaniel Foot the settler," who was married in England to Elizabeth Deming in 161 5, landed at Massachusetts Bay about 1630, took the oath of a freeman in 1633, settled permanently in Wethersfield, Conn., in 1635, (where reposes the dust of nine generations).* He was a man of devoted piety, and much respected in all the walks of life.

(* It is said his posterity had much to do in cultivating the famous Wethersfield onions.)

Adoniram Foot was born in Arlington, Vt., July 10, 1780; was united in marriage with Nancy Doty, of Washington county, in 1804, and removed to Martinsburgh in 1806. Mrs. Foot died June 28, 1815, and Mr. Foot was again married Jan. 28, 18 1 7, to Emily Brainard, of East Hartford, Conn., who was born June 1, 1789. He was ordained Elder in the Presbyterian church in 1833, and continued in active service until a few years before his death, which occurred April 28, 1866, at the age of nearly eighty-six years. He left at the time ninety-five living descendants, there having been in all one hundred and sixteen.

Duane D. Foot was the tenth of a family of twelve children, of whom four are now living, viz:— Duane D.; Giles, of Glensdale; Norman B., of Rome; and Rev. John B., of Syracuse. Mr. Foot is credited with being the first to introduce mowing machines in the county, having commenced the sale of the Walter A. Wood mower as early as 1854. The sale of other implements being added to his business from year to year, he found, in 1869, that his labors had increased to such an extent as to render it impracticable to carry on the same in connection with farming, and he removed to Lowville, where he established an extensive trade as a general dealer in all kinds of agricultural machines and implements.

In 1873, his sons having grown into the business, he purchased the property known as the Greeley Block, located at Nos. 1 and 3 Dayan street, also the produce and provision business formerly carried on by Curtis & Bowen, in the same building, and formed a copartnership with his sons, under which firm the business has since been conducted.

Mr. Foot spent his early days at home with his parents, where he attended the district school and assisted in grinding bark in a mill where the horse went round and round. His father at the time carried on tanning and shoemaking quite extensively for those days, and Duane D. assisted in farming. He attended school at Denmark Academy in the summer of 1836, and the academy at Martinsburgh several terms, under Rev. Calvin Yale, from whom he received much of scientific, moral and religious instruction.

In 1843, he purchased of his father, the farm, running in debt for the entire amount, and started in farming as the business of his life, pursuing the same economically and faithfully till his removal to Lowville in 1869.

February 27, 1849, he was united in marriage with Margaret Evans, of New Bremen, and to them have been born five sons and three daughters, one daughter dying when two and one-half years of age. Religiously instructed by his mother, who was a woman of great faith and ardent devotion, and also in the Sunday school, when added to these means, he felt the Spirit of God pressing hard, he gave himself to his Saviour in March, 1843, and commenced an active christian life, uniting with the Presbyterian church in Martinsburgh, in July of the same year. He was a teacher in the Sunday school in the latter place for several years, and on his removal to Turin in 1852, he became Superintendent of the Sunday school in the Presbyterian church at that place. He was also elected and ordained an elder in that church, continuing active in these relations and m all religious and temperance work, during the seventeen years he remained in Turin. In the absence of a stated minister, (in some cases many months at a time,) he conducted services on the Sabbath, reading a sermon, etc., also the weekly prayer-meeting, which, together with the Sunday school were seldom omitted. Upon removing to Lowville, besides being continued as Elder in the church, he was soon elected Superintendent of the Presbyterian school in that place, which position he held till March, 1881, since which time he has acted as teacher. His connection with the Sunday school has been uninterrupted from his childhood, and has been more than nominal and local. By vigorously sustaining town and county conventions, he has contributed much to aid the cause throughout the county. He has also been an earnest temperance worker; he signed the Washingtonian pledge in 1840, maintaining the total abstinence practice ever afterward, and is doubtless as well known at the present time among the temperance and Sunday school people through the county, and indeed among the inhabitants generally, as any other individual. He is as favorably known also, having never had a contested suit at law, or been sued for his own business, — his motto being "to live at peace with all men." He has represented the churches of Turin and Lowville in presbytery, most of the time of his connection with them, and in the centennial year of 1876, attended the General Assembly of the Presbyterian church, held in the Tabernacle church of Brooklyn, N. Y., being elected as commissioner by the presbytery of Utica. He has never aspired to political distinction, but has faithfully and conscientiously voted at every election and town meeting, since he was twenty-one years of age.

Robert Duane Foot, the fourth son of D. D. Foot, died February 28, 1883, aged twenty-six years and seven months. He was born August 2, 1856, at the then farm home of the family about half a mile south of the village of Turin, N. Y., and with his parents removed to Lowville in March, 1869. He shortly after became a student at the academy, continuing somewhat steadily as such until the fall of 1875, when he left home to take a course of instruction at Eastman's College, in Poughkeepsie. The following spring, he, in company with Frank J. Murray, embarked in the grocery business on Dayan street, in this place. At the expiration of a year he bought out his partner's interest and succeeded to the entire business, which he carried on till the spring of 1881, when he sold his business to the firm of D. D. Foot & Son, and went West, hoping to find an encouraging opening for himself there. Failing in this, he returned in July, and buying out his father's interest in the agricultural machine and grocer business at the old stand, he became partner with his older brother, Aldis, in conducting the same under the firm name of A. D. & R. D. Foot.

As a business man he had many friends and was building up for himself a thriving trade. He was eminently genial in his nature and a favorite in the circles among whom he moved socially.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

FOSTER, ANSEL

ANSEL FOSTER.
The family of Fosters are of English and Huguenot descent.

The first to settle in America was the great-grandfather Foster, who came in the reign of Queen Anne and located in what was afterward the town of Meriden, Conn.

He married a lady of the name of Dubarre, or, as it is sometimes spelled, Dubarry. Their son Thomas inherited the estate, which was an original purchase of the Indians. His son Aaron, father to Ansel, was born in Meriden, Conn., January 4, 1771, and came to Lewis county in 1802, locating in the town of Turin, and following through life the occupation of farming. He was married Dec. 23, 1795, to Abigail Baldwin, of Branford, Conn., who was born July 19, 1772.

Aaron died April 3, 1858, and his wife died Sept. 7, 1872. Their children were: —Anna, born March 7, 1799, died in July, 1822; Alburn, who died in infancy; Alburn, born Feb. 17, 1804, died March 14, 1882; Abigail, born Dec. 18, 1807, died in February, 1823; and Ansel, the subject of the appended portrait.

Ansel Foster was born in Turin, Lewis county, Sept. 3, 1810. He received his education at the Lowville Academy, but of far greater importance than the learning he obtained there were the principles of manhood, truth and sobriety which were instilled by his earlier educators — his parents.

It is unquestionable that from them he derived something of the keen insight of human nature that has characterized his life. They taught him a lesson too often unheeded — the necessity of securing a knowledge of men and things, as well as to become deeply versed in the lore of books.

The result of this training was that he studied mankind as some men study books, until there were revealed to him, in a somewhat remarkable degree, the motive springs of the human mind.

In his younger days he studied law, but never entered upon its practice. He has enjoyed the confidence of the electors of his town, county and state, and now, in his older years, is content to round out his life in forming the connecting link between this world and the next. On the 16th of July, 1833, he was united in marriage to Christina Hoffnagle, who died May 30, 1875. Two children were the result of this marriage: — Clinton, born July 2, 1835, died Feb. 3, 1874; and Amanda, born July 4, 1837, died Sept. 13, 1868.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

FOWLER, EDWARDEdward Fowler

EDWARD E. FOWLER, the eldest son of George W. and Elizabeth (Knox) Fowler, was born in Lowville, July 1, 1853. He was educated in the common and select schools of that village and in Lowville Academy, from which institution he graduated June 27, 1872.  He then entered the hardware store of his father, and for the past twenty-three years has been successfully engaged in the hardware trade, first as a member of the firm of George W. Fowler & Sons, and later as one of the firm of Fowler Brothers. On November 5, 1879, he married Miss Josephine A. Sackrider of Lowville. Their children are two sons and one daughter. Mr. Fowler has been prominently identified as a member of his firm in the different commercial and manufacturing enterprises for establishing industries in his native village, and also for all other enterprises for its advancement and benefit.

Fowler Brothers are men of fine business abilities, who have a large trade, and carry quite as heavy stock in their line as any dealers in Lewis county.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

FOWLER, GEORGEGeorge Fowler

G. W. FOWLER, born in Trenton, Oneida county, Nov. 20, 1820, removed to Oxbow, Jefferson county, N. Y., in 1824, to Lowville in 1840. Engaged in the dry goods business in 1846, continued about ten years. Married Elizabeth, daughter of Z. Knox, Esq., in 1848. Five children were born to them; two daughters and three sons: Edward E., Philip S. and Thomas B. The daughters are deceased. In 1856 he purchased the Northern Journal and conducted the same till 1859. Subsequently, in 1860, engaged in the hardware trade with Mr. Jno. Pfister, continuing till 1865, at which time, with the assistance of the three sons, he purchased the building and business, which they have conducted for 31 years with success. Neither business nor family need eulogies, they speak for themselves. Mr. Fowler is a close thinker, forms his opinions independently, and has the courage to sustain his convictions. He is a good citizen, and alive to the interests of his village.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


FOWLER, PHILIPPhilip Fowler

PHILIP S. FOWLER, second son of George W. Fowler, junior partner of the present firm of Fowler Bros., was born in Lowville, July 1, 1855. He received an academic education in Lowville Academy, and at the age of seventeen years he entered the hardware store of his father, where he was a clerk until he was twenty-three years of age. With his father and brother, Edward E., he then became a member of the firm of George W. Fowler & Sons. Ten years later their father, George W, Fowler, retired from the business, and the firm of Fowler Bros, was organized and consisted of the brothers, Edward E., Philip S. and Thomas B. Fowler. The firm of Fowler Bros., as thus constituted continued in successful business until the early part of this year (1896), when the youngest brother, Thomas B., sold his interest to his brothers, who continue, with the title of Fowler Bros. Mr. Fowler is also interested in the "Allis & Fowler Watering Apparatus" for watering cattle in stanchions.

Oct. 21, 1878, Mr. Philip S. Fowler married Miss Harriet Cady Campbell of Mohawk, N, Y., who died September, 1890, Five children were born to them, viz: Lyndsay D., John C., Cora E., George W. 2nd, and Hattie C., all of whom are living.  August, 1894, he married Evelyn T. Goldthrite, and their union is blessed with a son, Philip S., Jr.

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)
FRANK, J. H.

FRANK J H, Anoka. Physician (R). Born Jan 1, 1853 in Lewis county N Y, son of Robert R and Ruth (Green) Frank. Married July 29, 1896 to Mrs Charlotte Thayer. Educated in high school Ilion N Y; Fairfield N Y Seminary 1869-70; Minn Coll Hospital 1881-82 and American Medical Coll 1882-83; has served as health officer, coroner, county physician, member Board of Education and Public Library Board Anoka; physician to Anoka State Asylum; member U S Pension Board.

(Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Anna Parks)

FRENCH, ABEL

It is a prevalent belief among the first purchasers, that Mr. French saved a valuable tract of land to himself, by this arrangement. He represented Oneida county in assembly in 1799, 1801, '02, '03, and Albany county in 1810. He died in Albany, where he had resided most of his life, on the 17th of November, 1843 aged 78 years.

(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson
)

GLENN, WILLIAM

WILLIAM GLENN.
The subject of this sketch was born November 8, 1822, in Ballynochen, county Down, Ireland. His parents, William and Jane Glenn, were of Scottish descent. In 1833 his father moved to Ballycairn, where William remained with him until 1844, doing farm work and attending school a portion of the time.

At the age of eighteen years he united with the Presbyterian church, of Ballycairn, of which his father was deacon many years. In 1844 he left Ireland and went to Canada West, to the town of Amsley. In 1845 he removed to Greene county, N. Y., where he remained one year, and then removed to the town of Watson, Lewis county. Having in his possession about one hundred and fifty-dollars, he invested one hundred of that sum in land near Crystal lake, and spent the winter in chopping and clearing some twenty-five acres. On the 8th of December, 1848, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob and Margaret VanAtta, who was born in the town of Lowville, Lewis county. For about three years he was engaged in farming and jobbing, furnishing material for Beach bridge across Black river, and other improvements, under construction at this time. From 1849 to 1859 he worked the farm of N. J. Beach upon shares, then purchasing a farm three miles up the river he settled there, where he has since remained. In the year 1864 he paid a visit to his father in Ireland, who was then alive. Returning from there he built and run an ashery for two years. He then engaged in the lumbering business in a small way, enlarging gradually to a heavy business, handling the lumber from five or six mills, and owning three at one time. He is an extensive land owner in the Town of Watson, Martinsburgh, and Montague, having in his possession some seven thousand acres. A steam saw-mill in Watson and another in Montague, owned by him, gives employment to from forty to seventy-five men most of the time.

His life has been one of great physical as well as mental labor, a man of earnestness and energy in whatever undertaking he engaged, and of strict integrity of character, he is held in high esteem by all with whom he has dealing. His last ambition in a business way was to make a success of the manufacture of spruce lumber, and get it placed on the market from the town of Montague, which has been fully realized and is at present being carried out to his satisfaction.

His children are Eliza Amelia, born August, 1850, and Mary Elizabeth, born in September, 1851. The former married in September 1869, Samuel Studer, of Watson, who remains in business with the father. The latter married Lester B. Parker, in February, 1877. The father and the two sons-in-law compose the firm of William Glenn & Co., now engaged in farming and lumbering.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
GORDON, SOLON

SOLON GORDON.
The first of this name of whom there is any definite record was Timothy Gordon — the grandfather of Solon, the subject of this portrait — who was born in October, 1756, but at what place is not known. It is known that he was a soldier of the Revolution, and in his old age drew from the government a pension for services rendered to his country.

He married Althe Vandervear, February 9, 1780, in Monmouth, New Jersey. She was born May 2, 1760. Timothy died February 28, 1835, aged 78 years. Althe, his wife, died July 21, 1844, aged 84 years, 2 months, 19 days. Their children were:— Hannah Lloyd, born December 21, 1780, married Michael Sweetman, and moved to Boylestown, where she died February, 1844; Jacob Vandervear, born September 23, 1782, died in the town of Boylston, Oswego county, November 1, 1857; Daniel T., born April 11, 1785, in New Jersey, died Saturday, August 9, 1840, buried near the center of West Martinsburgh cemetery; Althe Wikoff, born June 9, 1787, married Daniel Chase of the town of Boylston, Oswego county, moved to Canada about 1848; Elizabeth, born January 24, 1790, married Samuel Wells, died in the town of Adams, Jefferson county, about 1877; Tunis, born August 20, 1791, died in Minnesota in October, 1866; Phebe G., born June 5, 1793, died August 11, 1844; Joseph Vandervear, born November 5, 1795, died in

Minnesota, July 10, 1866; Timothy, Jr., born August 23, 1802, died January 3, 1805.

David T. Gordon, the third child of Timothy and Althe Vandervear Gordon, was a millwright and farmer, of some repute in his day.

He married Emily Carter, of this county, daughter of Seboam Carter, October 31, 1821; she was born November 28, 1802. After the death of David T. in 1840, she married Oliver Bingham, in July, 1854. She died October 28, 1876.

The children of David T. and Emily were:— Solon, born September 30, 1822; Cyrus, born November 11, 1824, now in Chicago ; Milton C, born October 6, 1826, now (1883) in Martinsburgh; Carter Z., born July 14, 1828, now in Oakfield, Wis.; Jane, born July 28, 1830, died July 20, 1832; Andrew Jackson, born August 28, 1832, now in Lowville; Francis, born February 15, 1835, now in Iowa; Elvira M., born June 30, 1839, married Alvin T. Rice, now in Reno, Nevada.

Solon Gordon, the first of these children, and the subject of the portrait herewith connected, was born in Martinsburgh in a log house which stood just across the town line between that town and Lowville, about one and one-half miles from the village.

His early life was passed in that vicinity, and his education was obtained in the common schools of Lowville'.

At the age of sixteen he began to learn the trade of carpenter and joiner, which occupation he followed until about 1865, when he began a farmer's life, having purchased the Farewell farm on the first of March of the previous year.

From that time on he has lived the life of an independent, sturdy farmer.

Springing from a family of honest, industrious men whose lives have been disgraced by no dishonest acts, he has amassed a competence by the inheritance of their industry and honor.

On the 1st of January, 1855, he married Hetta E. Crane, of Marcy, Oneida county. New York, who was born April 13, 1834. Their children were:— Anna H., born August 18, 1857, married Ashley W. Davenport — was killed by being thrown from a wagon June 21, 1880, aged 22 years, 10 months, 3 days; Webster S., born February 9, 1860; Cora E., born September 21, 1862, married George F. Wilson, of Harrisburgh, August 17, 1881; Charley C. and Fay C, (twins,) born November 20, 1873.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

GOULD, G. HENRY

G. HENRY P. GOULD.
Christopher Gould, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born on Long Island in 1790. In 1825, or 1826, he came to Lewis county, settling in the town of Greig, where he followed for years the occupation of farmer, and carpenter and joiner. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and in 1813 he married Catherine Van Valkenburg, who was born in Albany county in 1793. He died in Lyons Falls, Aug. 7, 1882.

His son, Gordias H. Gould, was born in Albany county, N. Y., Sept. 12, 1818, and came with his parents to Greig. He learned the trade of millwright, and built the first steamboat on Black river. He was active in business and politics, but never an office seeker. He married, in 1847, Mary, daughter of Ebenezer Plumb, who was born August 26, 1825. Their children were: — H. Anna, Minnie E., Sarah M., Katie M., and Henry, the subject of this sketch.

Gordias Henry P. Gould was born in Lyons Falls, June 10, 1848. His early life was passed in the vicinity of the place of his birth. He was educated at Fairfield, Herkimer county, and at Lowville Academy, and afterwards was engaged for three years with the firm of Snyder Bros., tanners at Port Leyden, as bookkeeper. In 1869, he engaged in business for himself in the manufacture of lumber at Moose River, where he remained until 1874. He then formed a copartnership with the heirs of Lyman R. Lyon, in the same business. They purchased the property formerly owned by Marshall and Henry Shedd, located near the junction of Moose and Black rivers, and the copartnership continued till 1877, when Mr. Gould leased their half interest in the property and conducted the business in his own name. In 1880, he built a wood-pulp mill and began the manufacture of wood pulp from the forests of spruce abounding in that vicinity. The capacity of this mill is 750 tons per year of dry pulp. The saw-mill has a capacity of ten million feet per year. Mr. Gould has taken quite an active interest in political issues, though not a politician in the commonly accepted sense of the term. In 1877, he was elected Supervisor of the town of Lyonsdale, and has served the town in that capacity each year since. In the fall of 1881, he was elected to the Assembly on the Democratic ticket, and served during the term of 1882. His opponent was Charles A. Chickering, and Mr. Gould's majority was 43, the vote standing 3.441 to 3,398. During that session he was chairman of the Committee on Game Laws, and member of the Committee on General Laws, Canals, and Claims. In every year since 1873, Mr. Gould has been on his party ticket in the town and county, which shows the esteem in which he is held by his friends and the public.

On the 15th of September, 1870, he was married to Elizabeth Pritchard, of Boonville, who was born in Steuben, Oneida county, in 1846. Their children are:— Lua E., born Aug. 15, 1871; Harry P., born July 22, 1873; and Anna C, born May 12, 1880, and died March 6, 1881.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

GRAVES, LEWIS

Mr. Graves was from Greenfield, Saratoga co., N. Y. He represented this county, Jefferson and St. Lawrence in assembly in 1808, and this county alone in 1810. He was several years judge and supervisor, and died May 10, 1816, aged 61 years. His widow survived until 1852. A brother named David also became an early settler.

(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson)



GOULD, G. HENRY
G. Henry Gould
HON. G. HENRY P. GOULD, son of Gordias H. and Mary (Plumb) Gould, was born at Lyons Falls, June 10, 1848. His grandfather, Christopher Gould, was born on Long Island in 1790. In 1825-26 he came to Lewis county, and settled in the town of Greig, where he followed the occupation of farmer, and carpenter and joiner. He was a soldier in the War of 1812 and died at Lyons Falls, Aug. 7. 1882.

His father was a millwright, and built the first steamboat on Black River. He was active in business and politics, but never an office-seeker. G. Henry was educated at Fairfield, Herkimer county, and at Lowville Academy, and afterward was engaged as bookkeeper with the Snyder Brothers, tanners, of Port Leyden. He began business for himself in 1869, in the manufacture of lumber at Moose River, where he remained until 1874. He then formed a co-partnership with the heirs of Lyman R. Lyon, in the same business. They purchased the property formerly owned by Marshall and Henry Shedd, located near the junction of Moose and Black Rivers. This co-partnership continued until 1877, when Mr. Gould conducted the business in his own name. In 1880 he built a wood pulp mill, the capacity of which is 750 tons per year of dry pulp. The saw mill has a capacity of 10,000,000 feet per year. He is now a member of the Lyons Falls Pulp and Paper Co., incorporated, in which he holds a controlling interest. This company is building an immense pulp and paper mill at Lyons Falls.

In 1877, he was elected supervisor of his town, which position he held many years, and for several years was chairman of the board. In the fall of 1881 he was elected to the Assembly on the Democratic ticket, and served in the session of 1882, and again in 1885, 1891, 1892.

September 15, 1870, he married Elizabeth Pritchard of Boonville, who was born in Steuben, Oneida county. 1846.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

GREENLEY, CHARLES
Charles Greenley
CHARLES EDWARDS GREENLEY, born In Rodman, N. Y., Feb. 4, 1842, is the only son of the late Robert Greenley, and a grandson of Charles E. Greenley, who was born in Glastonbury, Conn., May 20, 1768. Sept. 4, 1802, he purchased 2669 1-2 acres of land in Rodman, N. Y., and settled thereon, where he resided to the close of his life, Feb. 19, 1852. He reared a family of ten children. His son Robert, before mentioned, born Oct. 8, 1810, married Lucetta Edwards. Their son, Charles E., married Miss Frances V. Brown, daughter of Joseph Brown of Rodman, July 17, 1861. They had one daughter, Metta C, who married O. J. Woolworth, who now resides in Watertown, N. Y. Mr. Greenley married his present wife, Ella A., daughter of the late Francis Butts of Rodman, Aug. 10, 1890, who has been a successful teacher in the public schools of Jefferson and Lewis counties.

Mr. Greenley was a farmer on the homestead in Rodman until 1878, when he removed to Barnes Corners, where he still resides. In 1881 he formed a partnership with his son-in-law and conducted a general mercantile und undertaking business at Barnes Corners, which they successfully managed ten years and then separated, Mr. Woolworth assuming the undertaking and Mr. Greenley continuing the mercantile trade, in which he is now engaged.

Mr. Greenley has always been a staunch Republican and generally represents his town (Pinckney) in the county conventions.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

HABERER, GEORGE
George Haberer
GEORGE J. HABERBR, son of Henry and Julia (Keiser) Haberer, was born in Carthage, Jefferson Co., N. Y., Aug. 20, 1853. He receievd his education in Cartilage, and there learned his trade as cabinetmaker, of the late Richard Galliger. Like his brother, John E. Haberer, he came to Lowville and was an employe of John Conover, until these brothers organized the firm of Haberer Bros., in 1876. This business firm had a prosperous career, and closed their partnership in 1891. Mr. George Haberer preferred the retail trade in furniture and undertaking, and is now located on State street, Lowville, where he has a large and lucrative trade in both branches of his business. His stock and store will compare favorably with any establishment of its kind in Northern New York.

Mr. Haberer is one of the solid men of his village, and is a ready contributor to all the enterprises for its real interests. He has served two years as one of its board of trustees. His family consists of his wife and a son, George LeRoy, aged seventeen years.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


HABERER, JOHN
John Haberer
JOHN E. HABERER, son of Henry and Julia (Keiser), Haberer, was born in Utica, N. Y., Nov. 21, 1851. He received a practical education in the common schools, and at the Academy in Carthage, N. Y. He came to Lowville in 1870 and engaged as a journeyman with John Conover in the manufacture of furniture, and remained with him (except a year spent in Watertown), until 1876. He then, with his brother George, purchased the manufactory and stock of his employer, Mr. Conover, which was situated on Valley street, and then gave employment to five or six men.

In 1880, finding their business had outgrown their manufactory, they purchased a site of Hon. D. C. West, near the railroad depot and contiguous to the railroad track, and there erected a part of the buildings he now occupies, and has added to them from time to time until this mammoth plant now covers an area of five acres, and gives employment to a force of 100 men.

In 1891 the firm of Haberer Bros, was dissolved by mutual consent, George J. Haberer taking the retail trade and John E. continued the manufactory and wholesale trade.

Besides conducting this large business. John B, Haberer is a stockholder, director and vice president of the Gould Paper Co., with buildings at Fowlerville, Port Leyden. This company is now building one of the largest pulp and paper mills in the Empire State, and will use the enormous water power at Lyons Falls, estimated at 5,000 horse power.

Mr. Haberer gives his personal attention to every detail of his large business, hence it is unnecessary to say that he is a busy man and seldom has a leisure hour. He consented to serve his village as trustee one term. Mr. Haberer has also valuable timberland in Montague.

April 15, 1885, he united in marriage with Miss Florence A., daughter of Henry C. Northam of Lowville. Their children are H. Northam and Muriel A.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

HALL FAMILY

THE HALL FAMILY.
Among the early settlers in the Black River country, was Isaac Hall, who came from Wallingford, Conn., about the year 1802, and settled on a tract of land lying on the West road, adjacent to the village of Talcottville.

This was a part of a purchase, in sections, made by him, of some six hundred acres. The farm owned and occupied by Eli Hall, his grandson, is the old homestead, and the old frame house at the intersection of the Talcottville road with the West road, was built by him, where he resided till his death, in the year 1810.

His sons were, John, Isaac, Jonathan, Abijah, and Joseph who was born at the old homestead in Leyden. The elder sons came from Connecticut, and settled on sections of land near by, a part being from the original purchase by their father.

Mary, his eldest daughter, married William Topping, who settled on the farm now occupied by Loren Drake. He was the first settler in Lewis County. Isaac Hall's ancestor, "John Hall, the emigrant," as he is called by Henry Stanley Davis, in his history of Wallingford, Conn., emigrated to this country about the year 1639, landing in Boston, and settling in New Haven, Conn. It is not recorded from what country he emigrated, but it is probable that he came from England.

He and his sons, John, Thomas, and Samuel, removed to Wallingford about the year 1669, as their names appear on the Plantation Covenant of 1669-'70-'72. In 1675, he and his son, John, were chosen selectmen of Wallingford. He died early in 1676, aged seventy-one years.

Lyman Hall, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and afterwards Governor of Georgia, was great-grandson of "John Hall, the emigrant," and grandson of Samuel Hall.

Thomas, son of "John Hall, the emigrant," was born March 25, 1649, died September 17, 1731, aged sixty-two years, five months, seventeen days.

Jonathan, son of Thomas and Grace Hall, was born July 25, 1675, died January 15, 1760, aged eighty years, seventeen days.

Dr. Isaac Hall, son of Jonathan and Dinah (Andrews) Hall, was born July 11, 1714, died March 7, 1781, aged sixty-six years. He married Mary Moss. He was the first practicing physician in Meriden, Conn. His great-grandson, Nathan Kelsey Hall, was Postmaster-General under Fillmore's administration, and afterwards United States Judge for the Northern District of New York.

The mother of one of the early settlers in Lewis county, John Ives, Esq., father of the late Selden Ives, Esq., of Turin, was the eldest daughter of Dr. Isaac Hall.

Isaac Hall, an early settler in the Black River country, son of Dr. Isaac and Mary (Moss) Hall, was born March 7, 1745, died February 17, 1810, aged sixty-four years, eleven months, ten days. He married first, Phebe Ives, second, Lois Buckley, mother of his youngest son, Joseph.

Jonathan, son of Isaac and Phebe (Ives) Hall, was born August 22, 1776, died February 22, 1841, aged sixty-four years, five months and twenty-nine days. He married first, Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. John Hoadley, second, Sally Jenks, daughter of William Jenks. His sons were Jehiel Hoadley, Daniel, Jonathan, Isaac, William Jenks, and Newton.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

HALL, ISAAC

One of the pioneer settlers of Lewis county was Isaac Hall, Jr. He came from Wallingford, Conn., now Meriden, in 1 80 1 or 1802, and built a log house at the northeast corner of lot No. 59, of Leyden — adjoining the first settled lot of the county — having purchased seven acres of that lot of Joel Coe, on which to build, and that he might have access to Sugar river. He priorly owned lot No. 49, directly east. The seven acres above named, is now owned by Horatio Coe, grandson of said Joel, and the remains of the old log-house cellar are plainly visible in the bend of the road that runs from Sugar River cheese factory to the Leyden depot, and is memorable not only on account of its antiquity, but also by reason of an exciting incident of pioneer life — related further on — that occurred near it. Jonathan, the brother of Isaac Hall, Jr., soon came on, having received in January, 1802, a deed of lot No. 48, of his father, Isaac Hall, Sr., then of Wallingford, Conn., and being then unmarried, he boarded with his elder brother, and the brothers changed works with one another in clearing up their respective lots.

Early in the fall of 1803 or 1804, the younger brother, who slept in the upper part of the house, was awakened by the running of the cow and calf near the house, and soon after a sound so peculiar to swine when suddenly alarmed; a bounce, and then the sharp squeal of a hog, in the pen near the house, was heard, which brought him from his bed, with an outcry to his brother that a bear had caught one of his hogs. The elder brother, already alarmed, arrived at the door in time to see — in the dim darkness — the bear drag the hog over the top rail of the pen. The brothers gave chase, but the cow preceded them, and followed up so closely, that bruin was glad to leave his prey at the fence near by and save himself. The hog's back was badly lacerated, and deep incisions were made by the animal's teeth, rendering its slaughter necessary. The younger brother subsequently bought out the elder, and resided upon the farm till his death, which occurred February 22, 1841*

The Isaac Hall above mentioned was one of seven males and five females, who organized the first Baptist church in the town of Meriden, Conn.

* Isaac Hall, the settler, died in February, 1810. He was a descendant of John Hall, who came over in 1672, and died at Wallingford in 1676, aged seventy-one. Ason Thomas, born March 25, 1679, had a son Isaac, the first physician in Meriden, born July 11, 1714; was the father of Isaac, the settler in Leyden, who was born in 1745. His sons were John, Isaac, Jonathan, Abijah and Joseph, — the last one born in the county.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

HALL, ISAAC

MAJ. ISAAC HALL, son of Jonathan and Sally (Jenks) Hall, was born in Leyden. Lewis county, Nov. 6, 1818, and is of sturdy English ancestry. His father, above mentioned, was born in Wallingford, Conn., (now Meriden), Aug. 22, 1776. He was a pioneer of Leyden, and received his first deed of lands from his father, Isaac, and Martha, his wife, in 1802. Here he resided to the close of his life and raised six sons and seven daughters. He was a soldier in the war of 1812.

Isaac Hall, Jr., father of Jonathan and grandfather of the Major, was also a pioneer of Leyden, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, with the rank of lieutenant. His captain being ill, he succeeded him and commanded his company of "Light Horse" under Gen. Woster, from Oct. 25, 1776, till the ensuing December 31. After the death of his second wife, Martha, he married Miss Laura Bulkley. He died in Leyden, Feb. 17, 1810.Isaac Hall

The subject of this sketch, Maj. Isaac Hall, during his minority, attended the district school and labored on his father's farm. Later he supplemented his education with a few trms at Suffield Academy in Connecticut, and thus prepared, he taught in the town of Springfield, Mass.. and in his native state twelve terms of common schools.

May 1, 1845, he united in marriage with Miss Amanda Thayer, daughter of the late Ira Thayer, and settled as a farmer on the farm now occupied by Fred Malcolm, and continued this vocation and that of cattle dealer, on that place and on 133 acres of his father's homestead, until the beginning of the war to save our Union. Nov. 30, 1861, he volunteered to serve his country, and enrolled as a private soldier in the 97th Regt. of N. Y. Volunteers, and served to the close of the war, and was mustered out of the service with his regiment July 18, 1865, and honorably discharged at Syracuse, N. Y., the ensuing 5th of August. He was promoted from time to time and held the office of captain at the time he was discharged. And Oct. 17, 1866, Gov. R. E. Fenton commissioned Capt. Hall, "Brevet Major of New York State Volunteers, for gallant and meritorious services in the late war."

Major Hall returned to his home, broken in health, without much means; he looked for a business to support his family. He turned his attention to gardening and the insurance business, and finally, by request of Dr. Franklin B. Hough and other comrades of his regiment, he was induced to compile its history (which Dr. Hough commenced), but in consequence of injured eyes he was compelled to desist. His eyes having improved, two years later, at a reunion of the regiment in September, 1888, he was unanimously constituted its historian, and was enabled to complete and publish its history in 1890. It is a meritorious work which is an invaluable souvenir for every member and friend of the gallant 97th. Maj. Hall was a census enumerator in President Harrison's administration, and is now a notary public.

The children of Maj. and Mrs. Hall are: Etta H. (Mrs. John J. Bassett), Harriet H. (Mrs. Frank M. Shedd), and Arthur, who married Susan. Hutchins. Ira, Herbert died in early childhood.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

HARTWELL, WILLIAM

WILLIAM HARTWELL, JR. During the Revolutionary war two brothers of the name of Hartwell came from England to America to aid in subduing the Rebels. Both were officers in the British army. At the close of the war, one of the brothers returned to England, but the other, choosing to remain in America, settled in New York, where he married an English lady of the name of Mary Cable. They had nine children, of whom William Hart well was the oldest. He married Elizabeth Cooper, daughter of William Cooper. They were of French descent and lived in Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

William Hartwell settled in Duchess county, N. Y., and came to the Black River country in 1804. His family then consisted of four children — Ransom, Hannah, Morris and Abigail. The country was then in its infancy, and they were among the first settlers in the town of Denmark. Six children were added to their family after coming to Denmark — William J., Laura, James, Almon, Charles, and Benjamin.

William Hartwell, Sr., was a soldier in the War of 1812, and after his death his widow received the soldier's land bounty. He died Sept. 18, 1845, aged 68 years. Elizabeth, his wife, died Jan. 6, 1871, aged 92.

Their children were Ransom, born in 1797, died in 1850; Hannah, born in 1799, died April 3, 1810; Morris, born July 18, 1801, died August 25, 1880; Abigail L., born July 12, 1803; William, Jr.; Laura, born July 27, 1808; James, born in 1810; Almon N., born in 1812; Charles S., born in 1814; Benjamin, born December 11, 1817, died January 25, 1881.

William Hartwell, Jr., the first child born to them after coming to this country, was born in Denmark Sept. 27, 1806, where he was educated and where he has always lived. He began life first as a mechanic, which occupation he afterward relinquished for farming. A man of sound common sense and trusted by his townsmen, he has held numerous offices of the town, scarcely a year passing since he attained his majority that he has not filled some official position. He was at one time nominated and elected sheriff on the Republican ticket, but lost the office through some illegality in the returns in one election district. On the 25th of October, 1854, he married E. Catherine Squire, daughter of Dr. Charles Squire, who was for nearly sixty years a physician in Denmark. He was the son of Stoddard Squire, an Englishman by birth, who, on the 24th of October, 1781, married a lady from France by the name of Theadocius French, by whom he had four children — Charles, born Nov. 5, 1783; John G., born May 5, 1785; Fanny, born June 19, 1788, and Truman, born May 27, 1791. Doctor Charles Squire was born in Duchess county, studied medicine with Dr. Willoughby, of Newport, attended the Medical College at Fairfield, where he received his diploma, and came to Denmark in 18 10. He was a surgeon in the army in the War of 18 12. He married Eliza Evens, of Fairfield, N. Y., January 15, 1814. They had two children, Charles D., born November 23, 1815, and E. Catherine, born January 24, 1824. He lived a useful life, and died in Denmark, September 15, 1867.

The children of Wm. Hartwell, Jr., are: Mary Eliza, born April 9, 1858, married Richard C. Otis; Ada E., born Nov. 9, 1859; Walton S., born June 18, 1861.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

HILL, WALLACEWallace Hill

WALLACE R. HILL was born in Jefferson county, N. Y., and began his mercantile career as a clerk at Dexter, N. Y., in 1855. He entered the Union Army, in the 10th N. Y. Vol. Artillery, and was mustered out .July, 1865. He was in mercantile trade from 1865 to 1876, at Dexter, N. Y., and Toledo, Ohio. He has resided in Lewis county since 1878, and was engaged in farming until 1883, when he located at Deer River, and purchased the store he occupies of E. D. Hulbert, and is dealing In general merchandise. He was appointed postmaster in 1884, and has continued in office since, and has served the town of Denmark since 1883. He has fine abilities and represents his town ably at the board of supervisors. He married Ellen L. Bassett.

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


HOFFMAN, JOSIAH OGDEN

Josiah Hoffman while concerned in these titles, was attorney-general. He was seven years in assembly, in 1810-13, '14; was recorder of New York; and at the time of his death, which occurred January 24, 1838, he was associate judge of the superior court of that city. He was a lawyer of great ability and strict integrity.

(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson
)

HOUGH, ELI

ELI B. HOUGH.
The only authentic records of the ancestors of the subject of this sketch are those pertaining to Captain John Hough, the grandfather, who was born in Meriden, Conn., in 1736, and who died there in. 1788.

He served as an officer in the War of the Revolution. Mrs. John Hough died in West Martinsburgh in 1812. The family is of English descent. One of the children of Captain John Hough was Asahel, born in Meriden, Conn., December 1, 1769. He was a farmer, a scholarly man, and held for some years offices of town trust.

He married May 28, 1794, Abigail Bacon, who was born in Middletown, Conn., in 1773. She was a daughter of Nathaniel Bacon, of that place.

They removed to the eastern part of New York, near the Catskill mountains, and in 1795, came to Lewis county, and settled in the town of Leyden, where Mr. Hough began the first improvements on the farm afterwards owned by General Ela Merriam.

Here they encountered the full share of hardship incident to pioneer life, and witnessed the beginning of settlement in that beautiful portion of the county. In 1802, Mr. Hough purchased land and cleared a farm, still owned by his son, near the village of West Martinsburgh, where he died October 6, 1842, aged seventy-three years. His wife died in the same place June 26, 1870, aged ninety-seven years. They had five children, Keturah, born May 8, 1795, married Apollos Rogers, died September 3, 1831; Philomela, born May 18, 1798, married Z. Chapman, now living (1883); Clarissa, born May 22, 1800, married Elijah Phillips, May 24, 1827, still living (1883); Lorinda, born August 1, 1804, married Apollos Rogers, died June 16, 1835.

The fifth child was Eli B., who was born in West Martinsburgh, January 15, 1810. He passed his early life in West Martinsburgh, on the farm his father cleared and settled, on which he was born, and on which he yet lives. He was educated in the common schools, and has always followed the business of farming.

He married Abigail Rogers, of Martinsburgh, January 12, 1836, by whom he had two children: Theodore D., 1st, born February 26, 1838, died September 6, 1841; Theodore D., 2d, born July 25, 1843, now on the farm with his father. Abigail died October 5, 1843.

Mr. Hough then married Malvina M. Wright, of Greene county, N. Y., June 12, 1844. Gertrude, born November 5, 1845, is a child of this marriage. She married James M. Patch, of Rose Creek, Minnesota, where she now lives.

Religiously, Mr. Hough is a Universalist, liberal in his views, and is a man of honor and probity, much respected by all with whom he comes in contact.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
HOUGH, HORATIO

Horatio G. Hough son of Thomas, son of Daniel, son of James, son of Samuel, son of William, the first emigrant of this branch of the family in New England, was born in Meriden, Ct., January 5, 1778, and at the age of three years, removed with his parents to Southwick, Mass. When sixteen years old he entered the office of Dr. Coit of that place, and in four years was admitted to practice medicine. His classical studies were pursued with the Rev. Isaac Clinton, pastor of the church of which his father was an active member, and a warm personal friendship continued between preceptor and pupil through life.

In 1798, the newly licensed physician received as his only patrimony, a horse, saddle, bridle, and a few dollars' worth of medicine, made a tour into Maine with the view of settlement, but not finding an attractive location returned and joined the current of emigration then setting towards the Black River country. He came to Constableville and settled as the first regular physician in the county, taking up a small farm, afterwards owned by Willard Allen, and laboring in the" intervals of his professional employment. In the winter of 1803-'04 he taught a school near Constableville. In the fall of 1803, he married Martha, daughter of Reuben Pitcher, and early in 1805 removed to Martinsburgh, and settled on a farm, a mile and a quarter south of the village, where he resided till his death, which occurred from an organic disease of the heart, Sept. 3, 1830.

He was an original member, and at his death. President of the County Medical Society, and on many occasions he read at its meetings essays upon professional and scientific subjects, which evinced a strong attachment to philosophical studies, and much proficiency in them. In an obituary notice, written by his friend Dr. Sylvester Miller, the hardships of the pioneer physician are thus graphically described: —

"How often has he been seen traveling on foot with his saddle bags on his shoulders, making his way through the woods by the aid of marked trees, to some distant log house, the abode of sickness and distress ! There has he been seen almost exhausted by fatigue, and suffering from want of sleep and food, reaching forth his hand to restore the sick, and by his cheerful voice pouring consolation into the minds of the afflicted family. He was an obliging neighbor, a kind husband and an affectionate father. In his death literature has lost a friend, and the world a valuable citizen." — Black River Gazette, Sept. 15, 1830.

Dr. H. G. Hough left two sons and three daughters. The older son, Horatio Hough, resides upon the homestead in this town. The younger son, Franklin B. Hough, is the author of this volume. The oldest daughter, Almira, married Warren Arthur, and resides a mile north of the village. The second daughter, Martha, married Orrin Woolworth, and lives in Turin village. Both are widows. The third daughter, Dema R., married Richard C. Smith, of Philadelphia. They afterwards resided in Gouverneur and Canton, and finally settled in Martinsburgh, about midway between Martinsburgh and Lowville village, where they both died. They were the parents of W. H. Smith a prominent business man in Lowville village, and of Miss Celestia M. Smith, of that place.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
HOUGHTON, JAMES

HOUGHTON, JAMES H -- a native of Lewis County, New York, was born May 18, 1839. His parents were Richardson and Sarah (Bennett) Houghton. He was married November 27, 1870, to Cyrilda Hunsaker, daughter of Bradford and Leah (Dyee) Hunsaker. Mrs. Houghton was born near Kirksville, January 13, 1850. They had five children: Clarence R, born August 26, 1872, died October 09, 1882; Arthur J, July 06, 1874, died December 06, 1902; Henderson W, May 08, 1876 died March 13, 1908; Jessie J, February 05, 1879, now Mrs. Perry C Wimer of Iowa; Minnie S, January 13, 1881, now Mrs. Robert Reed. Mr. Houghton remained on the farm in New York where he was born, til 1862, when he joined Company K, Fifth New York Heavy Artillery, serving a little over three years. He saw much hard service in the South. He returned to new york after the war, and remained a short time. From there he went to Illinois, then to Iowa, and finally to Adair County {Mo}, landing here in 1868. He has been engaged in farming since. In 1885 he bought his present farm, where he has since lived. the farm consists of twelve acres, two miles west of town. James Houghton is a Prohibitionist in politics, and a member of the Methodist Church. He belongs to the G.A.R.

(Source Info: "The History of Adair County Missouri" by E.M. Violette (1911) -- JR - Sub by FoFG)

HOUSE, HENRY

HENRY R. HOUSE.
Henry Risley House was a son of Cyprian House, a native of Connecticut, born April 5, 1797, who married Sophia Risley, born in the same State, June 25, 1798. Cyprian House came to Lewis County in i8ig, and settled in Turin, on the East road, on the farm now owned by Walter Miller. His wife died June 16, 1873. They were Methodists, and estimable members of the community in which they lived. John House, grandfather to Henry R., was a soldier of the Revolution. Henry was born in Turin, December 10, 1821, and was educated in the district schools, and at Lowville Academy under the tuition of Professors D. P. Youmans and Mayhew, and chose for his life vocation the independent life of a farmer, in which he has been successful. A Republican in politics, he has held some town offices, but has been more content to adhere to his farm and its duties, than to seek political preferment. He married, March 7, 1846, Mary Hills, who was born in Martinsburgh, February 25, 1824. But two children were born to him, George, born March 24, 1848, and John, a merchant in Glendale, born September 20, 1860.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
HUNGER, ABNER

ABNER HUNGER.
In the spring of 1801, the Nathan Mungers, (father and son,) millwrights, having had their attention called to the Black river country, came down the river and followed up Deer river to half a mile above the falls, where they selected a site for mills, and in that season finished a saw-mill and got it in operation. The proprietors, to encourage the enterprise, gave them the water privilege from the High falls up over two miles. In 1803, they got a small grist-mill, with one run of burr stone in operation in time to grind the first wheat raised in town as soon as it was in condition for use. The mill stood directly below the upper saw-mill in Copenhagen village, and the place soon acquired the name of "Mungers Mills."

Nathan Munger, the father of Abner, was born in Ludlow, Mass., and came to this section of New York State in the spring of 1801. He married Louisa Bishop, who was also from Massachusetts. Their children were: Nathan, who was killed in 1811, by the falling of timbers in a house which he was repairing; Isaac, who was born in 1780, and died April 20, 1855; Solomon, who died Oct. 16, 1863; Sylvester, who died in Holyoke, Mass., at what date is unknown; Roswell, who died July 12, 1870, aged 82; Anthony, who died Oct. 30, 1869; Elijah, who died June 2, 1877, aged 86; Sylvanus who died Aug. 1, 1877; Champion, who left home in 1834, and has never been heard from since; Betsey, the first woman who came to this part of the town, married Calvin Blodgett, and died August 26, 1874, aged 91 years; Folly, who married first, Eleazer Nash, second, Jeremiah Babcock, and who died September 26, 1864; Maria, who married Jason Millard, and died March 25, 1864, aged 65; and Samantha, who married Abijah Tisdale, and died September 15, 1860, aged 60 years.

Abner Munger, the tenth child, was born May 29, 1801, in Paris, Oneida county, and came with his parents to Lewis county when about two years old. His early life was passed amid the hardships of pioneer days. He received the scanty education of the schools of those times, which was afterward enlarged by reading and commingling with men, and adopted the occupation of carpenter, in which business he was for some years engaged with his brother, Elijah. He afterward entered upon the life of a farmer, which he followed successfully for a number of years. He then retired from that business and took up his residence in the village of Copenhagen where he now (1883) resides.

In 1825, he was married to Amelia Boswell, of Champion, Jefferson county. New York, by whom he had children as follows: — Russell, born Feb. 20, 1826, died Jan. 1, 1830; Louisa C, born July 20, 1830, died April 3, 1848. Mr. Munger's wife died April 3, 1858, and on the 9th of February, 1859, he married Elizabeth Hunt Boynton, who died Jan. 13, 1869. He then married Olive J. Lewis Collins, a native of Petersburg, Rensselaer county, Feb. 18, 1873, now living.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

HUNT, CALVIN

C. B. HUNT.

The genealogy of the Connecticut division, Northampton line, of the Hunt family, is briefly as follows: —

Elisha Reynolds Hunt, born July 12, 1781, was son of Elijah Hunt, of Lebanon, Conn., son of Stephen Hunt, being one of a family of eight children, three sons and five daughters. His mother was Abigail Reynolds, daughter of Elisha Reynolds, of Norwich, Conn., who was born in 1773 and died in October 1820. Elisha died in the town of Lewis, then Leyden, April 22, 1822. Only one daughter of this family married, Sally, who married Calvin Billings, of Somers, Conn., and died in New York State May 6, 1810. Elijah Hunt, of Lebanon, father of Elisha R. Hunt, was son of Stephen Hunt, was son of Ebenezer, born in 1730, died July 6, 1751. His wife's name was Esther Jones. The family is of English origin.

Elisha R. Hunt came to Lewis county for a permanent residence in June, 1815, and located in the town of Lewis, then known as Leyden. He was a farmer of some repute. He married November 17, 1808, Persis Billings Perkins, who was born in Somers, Conn., March 29, 1777, and died October 14, 1865. They had the following children: — Samuel, born September 7, 1809, died August 5, 1875; Sally, born May 25, 1811, died August 3, 1814; Persis Malvina, born May 10, 1813, married Alpheus Pease, March 7, 1833, died October 12, 1865; Roxana, born September 23, 1815, married Thomas Richards; Hannah Adelia, born September 29, 1817, died March 27, 1818; Calvin B.

Calvin Billings Hunt was born in the town of Lewis, July 21, 1819, where his life has been passed. He received a common school education and took up the business of farming in which he has been more prosperous than the average of men engaged in that pursuit. He is quite an extensive land owner, having in his possession over a thousand acres, and is largely interested in the dairy business.

Some fifteen years ago he engaged in the manufacture of lumber in which he is now doing a thrifty trade. During his busy life Mr. Hunt has taken much interest in political matters, not as an office seeker, but as an opponent or advocate of the questions and issues of the day. On the questions which involved principles he has often been in the minority, but has had the satisfaction of knowing that he acted conscientiously, and was possessed of the courage that never barters honest convictions for temporary political triumphs. In the antebellum days he was a pronounced abolitionist, in times when it required a rare moral courage to befriend the slave and denounce slavery; and when the war for their freedom broke forth he was an ardent friend of the Union cause.

Mr. Hunt has never united with any church. His parents were Presbyterians, but he has regulated his life by the rules of right, and endeavors to so live that he need not fear to meet any of his fellow men. He married December 14, 1848, Charlotte L. Bush, daughter of Walter Bush of Turin, who was born May 4, 1819. But one child was born to this marriage, which died in infancy.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

IVES, JOHN

JOHN IVES.
John Ives was the father of Major John Ives, and grandfather of Selden Ives. He lived on a farm at Meriden, Conn. He married Mary Hall, daughter of Dr. Isaac Hall, the first physician of Meriden, Conn.; they had twelve children. He died in February, 1774, aged 88 years. She died October 9, 1791.

The homestead, at Meriden, Conn., is still in the possession of the Ives family.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

IVES, MATHER

MATHER S. IVES.
Mather S. Ives, oldest son of Selden Ives, was born at the homestead, March 30, 1833. He received his education at Clinton Liberal Institute and at Lowville Academy. On completing his education he passed four years of his life in the capacity of clerk in the mercantile business, at Rome, N. Y., and New Albany, Ind. From the latter place, in 1855, he went to Chicago, and entered into partnership in the mercantile business with his uncle, George Ives. He continued business there until 1861, when he returned to Turin, where he has since been engaged in farming. He was Supervisor of his town in 1882 and 1883, and is an influential citizen. He married in Chicago, Ill., September 15, 1859, Jennie M. Moshier, who was born in Lexington, Ky., July 8, 1843. His children are Cornelia Lucretia, born in Chicago, Ill., April 6, 1861, and Estella, born on the homestead, October 16, 1862.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

IVES, SELDEN

SELDEN IVES.
The father of the subject of this sketch was Major John Ives, whose wife was Martha Merriam, of Meriden, Conn. The)' were the parents of fourteen children, all of whom are now dead. He was a pioneer settler in the Black River country, moving here in 1796, and locating first on the present site of the village of Constableville, where he lived a few years, and then removed two miles north of Turin, the present home of M. S. Ives. Here he died March 13, 1828. His wife died February 12, 1841, at the residence of her son, George Ives, who then lived in Turin.

John Ives was a prominent man and possessed of unusual energy and force of character. He was appointed Sheriff of Lewis county in 1810, and was Supervisor of his town in 1801, 1809, and 1813. He left at his death a will in which he bequeathed to the Presbyterian church of Turin, three hundred dollars, to be kept at interest until it amounted to one thousand dollars, and then to be devoted to the support of the gospel.

Of his children, he lost five of the oldest from scarlet fever in as many days. The oldest of those that lived was John, who died in California; Samuel, died in Ohio; Eli, at Great Bend, Jefferson county; Isaac, at Ravenna, Ohio; George, at Chicago, Ill.; Selden, at Turin; Julia, who married Walter Martin, of Martinsburgh, died in Michigan; Lucretia, married Horace Clapp, of Houseville, and died in Martinsburgh; and Martha married Enoch Roberts, and died in Meriden, Conn. John Ives owned 1,800 acres of land in Turin, and gave each of his children a farm.

Selden Ives was the fourth son of Major John Ives. He was born in Turin, September i8, 1806. In the common schools of this town he received his education, and here his life was passed, up to 1871, on the farm given to him by his father, and now owned by M. S. Ives, his son. He was for many years a prominent farmer and citizen of Turin. He never held public office, being naturally averse to political life. He contributed largely to the building of the Presbyterian church of Turin, and gave liberally of his means to support the preaching of the gospel. He lived for years on his farm, two miles north of Turin, on which he had erected a fine residence and laid out beautiful grounds, and which was destroyed by fire November 30, 1871. He then purchased a residence in the village of Turin, where he lived until his death, which occurred September 11, 1874. He married July 13, 1830, Lucretia Stephens, who was born in Martinsburgh, May 18, 1805. They had three children, one daughter and two sons: Cornelia L., born in Turin, April 3, 1831, married J. Harvey Smith, of Fort Plain, Montgomery county, August 27, 1851, and died in Turin, February 9, 1854; Marcellus H. Ives, was born at Turin, June 9, 1839, was educated at Lowville and Fort Plain Academies, died at Rome, N. Y., April 8, 1860, aged 20 years and 10 months; and Mathew S.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


JOHNSON, GILBERT

GILBERT B. JOHNSON.
The family of Johnson is of English ancestry. Jacob Johnson, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and married Esther Hotchkiss. Both were born in Connecticut. Their son, Abner A. Johnson, the father of Gilbert B., was born in Connecticut, January 11, 1788. He married at Cranberry Creek, Montgomery county, (now Fulton county,) N. Y., April 29, 1820, Annah W. Gilbert, born in Connecticut, December 3, 1802, the daughter of Hon. Samuel A. Gilbert, for many years Judge of Montgomery county. They lived at Kingsboro until March, 1834, when they moved to Deer River, Lewis county. They both lived honored, trusted and respected, and left their impress for good on the social, moral, and religious interests of the community where they lived.  Abner A. Johnson held here for several terms, the office of supervisor. He died in Deer River April 17, 1867. His wife died in the same place January 14, 1864. They had eight children, as follows: —

Lucien A., now (1883), living at Chatfield, Minn.; Gilbert B.; Sarah, wife of Jason C. Easton, Chatfield, Minn.; Samuel W., Professor in Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut; Esther A., wife of Giles C. Easton, died in Lowville, October 20, 1862; Elizabeth, wife of John W. Clark, now (1883) living at Carthage, N. Y.; Abigail W., and Annah G., twins; the former the wife of Rev. John Moore, of Ripon, Wis., and the latter the wife of George H. Haven, of Chatfield, Minn.

Gilbert B. Johnson, was born in Kingsboro, town of Johnstown, N. Y., October 10, 1823. He passed the first ten years of his life in Kingsboro, and came with his parents to Deer River, in 1834, where he received the education of the common schools, and Lowville Academy, and the practical education of his father's farm. He has obtained the reputation of being a sound, shrewd, business man, and has held in his town numerous positions of responsibility and trust. He has been justice of the peace from and including 1851 to 1883, except one term, and was supervisor from 1864 to 1869, both years included, and also in 1876, and 1877. He assisted in the organization of the First National Bank of Carthage, which commenced business in January, 1880, and was elected President, which position he has since held.

On the 2d of January, 1850, he married at Deer River, Elizabeth Easton, who was born in Johnstown, April 30, 1830. The result of this marriage was seven children, three of whom are still living: —

Mary E., born October 16, 1855, married Charles H. Loomis, August 18, 1874, now (1883) living at West Carthage, N. Y.; Annah Nellie, born October 1, 1860; Lucien Gilbert, born August 11, 1868.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

JOHNSON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM H. JOHNSON, M. D.
The subject of this sketch is descended from James Johnson, a native of England, who went to Ireland and married an Irish lady of the name of Dority, and in that country died, at what date is unknown. The children of James Johnson were Charles, William, James, John, Margaret, Mary and Elizabeth. Of these children, James came to America, entered the Union army at the outbreak of the Rebellion, and was killed at the siege of Petersburgh; Margaret died in Columbus, Ohio; Mary died in New York; Elizabeth died in Ohio; William is now living at Florence Court, County Fermanaugh, Ireland; and John is a colonel in the English service.

Charles, the father of William H., was born at Florence Court, County Fermanaugh, Ireland, about the year 1820, and came to America about 1832, at the age of twelve years; locating first in Canada, then in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., from whence he removed to Norway, Herkimer county, N. Y., where he died in 1873. He followed for some years the occupations of farmer and merchant; was for four years an officer in the New York State Senate, and during the last fourteen years of his life was an officer in the House of Representatives.

He married Rachel Emery, of Duanesburg, Montgomery county, N. Y. To them were born the following children: — George G., born May 5, 1838; William H.; Allen J., born May 24, 1842; Sarah L., born August 2, 1845; Catherine E., born February 23, 1848, died in September, 1875.

William Henry Johnson, the second child, was born October 9, 1840. His early life was passed in Herkimer county upon the farm, and in attendance at the common schools in the village of Graysville. He afterwards attended the Seminary at Whitestown, Oneida county. His father intended that he should lead the life of a farmer, and in obedience to his wishes, William for a few years plodded the weary way of the ploughman with uncongenial footsteps. He resolved at last to break away from labor so entirely at variance with his tastes and inclinations, and hew out for himself a newer and a better path. He had that faith in himself without which success in life is impossible in any calling, and added to that, he had the gift of patient labor. It is said that genius consists, in the main, of a prodigious capacity for hard work. His secret longings, during the uncongenial routine of farm work, were toward the study of medicine, — to wield the scalpel rather than to hold the plow, — and he determined to enter upon a course of instruction that would gratify those longings; to shrink from no labors, however hard, that would tend to that result, and to study, without an attempt to practice, until he had mastered, as far as it was possible, the intricacies of his chosen profession. Accordingly, in 1868, at the age of twenty-eight, he entered the office of Dr. S. R. Millington, in Poland, Herkimer county, and began his medical studies. The first few years of his new life were years of up-hill work; but possessing a resolute and determined spirit, he fought his way against many obstacles, and with the one idea of becoming a skillful physician, he studied in season and out of season, to perfect himself in the calling of his choice. Studying diligently for some time in Poland, he attended his first course of lectures at the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and immediately after attended three successive courses of lectures at Bellevue Hospital College, New York City, in 1869, '70, '71, graduating therefrom the 2d of March of the latter year. On the 26th of April, 1871, he came to Port Leyden and established a practice that has been both successful and lucrative. He was chosen as the President of the Lewis County Medical Society, and has been a delegate to the State Medical Society for the past six years. In 1882, he was elected a permanent member of that society, probably the first permanent member ever elected in Lewis county.

On the 6th of March, 1872, he was married to Mary J. Nichols, of Fairfield, Herkimer county, who died on the 16th of July in the following year; and on the 18th of August, 1875, he married Mary B. Lord, daughter of John D. Lord, of Leyden. His children are: May Lord, born August 9, 1876; John Emery, born May 21, 1878; Ruth Mabel, born February 7, 1880; and Helen Edith, born June 20, 1882.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

JONES, RUMA Ruma Jones

RUMA B. L. JONES, Accompanist
Miss Ruma B. L. Jones is a pupil-graduate of the Elliott School of Music, a young lady who is very popular among all who make her acquaintance, a most charming pianist and an exceptionally good accompanist.  The Festival is very fortunate in being able to secure her services as one of the accompanist. 

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y.
J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


KELLER, LORENLoren Keller

LOREN E. KELLER, son of Christopher and Margaret (L'Huillier) Keller, was born in Lowville Aug. 12, 1855. He began to contribute to his own support when he was but eight years old, and in a short time became self-supporting. He attended the common schools and later attended the evening schools in Lowville, and thus gained a practical business education. At the age of fifteen he began the trade of harnessmaker with the late S. C. Boyce ,with whom he remained three years. He was a journeyman harnessmaker, four or five years. July 3, 1876, he united in marriage with Miss Nettie Parsons, daughter of Elon G. and H. Jane (Rogers) Parsons, and on March 1, 1877, he began business at his trade in Lowville, which he has successfully followed to the present time. Mr. Keller began "at the foot of the ladder," and with sharp competition; but by constant industry and close attention to his business he has made his business a success, and to-day he has the largest and finest harness store in Northern New York.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

KELLOGG, K. COLLINS
K. Collins Kellogg
K. COLLINS KELLOGG was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, March 26, 1823. His father, Collins Kellogg, born Feb. 17, 1802, married Cynthia Loomis in 1822, and when K. Collins was but a child, emigrated from Massachusetts and settled in the town of Turin. Mr. Kellogg received his education in the common schools, and in March, 1840, entered the employ of William L, Easton and A. G. Dayan, merchants of Lowville, as clerk. He began with the determination to master the minutest details of his calling, and after a faithful clerkship, received, in 1846, an interest in the business of his employer, William L. Easton, which continued two years. On the 13th of June, 1855, he married Eliza Boshart, the youngest daughter of Garret Boshart. He was again an employe until 1856, when he again became a merchant. In 1857-58 his brother-in-law, James H. Boshart, was a partner with him. In 1869 he loaned $20,000 to the building of the hotel in Lowville, that bears his name, and of which he afterward became owner and proprietor. He now owns two fine farms, one of 300 acres, on which his brother, Halsey E., now resides. He also owns the "Henry Kitts" farm on Black River, one and a half miles east of Lowville,

Mr. Kellogg has been remarkably successful in all his business enterprises, owing to his industry, perseverance, business ability and integrity.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)



K. COLLINS KELLOGG.
In all that has been written concerning the business men of Lewis county, no better illustration of success in life achieved under difficulties, is presented than in the life of the man who forms the subject of this sketch. The first settlers of this name in America came from Scotland. The name was originally known as Kelloch from Kel — "wood,” and Loch — "lake."

K. Collins Kellogg was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, March 26, 1823. His father was Collins Kellogg, born February 17, 1802, who married Cynthia Loomis in 1822, and when K. Collins was but a child, emigrated from Massachusetts and settled in the town of Turin. They had two other children — Halsey E., born July 24, 1824; and Hester Anne, born July 29, 1825, who married Sylvester W. Stimpson, of Leyden, and died November 26, 1849, aged twenty-four years. Collins Kellogg, the father, died in Cleveland, Ohio, March 31, 1881. His wife died December 21, 1860. She was the mother of K. C. Kellogg.

Mr. Kellogg received the education of the common schools, supplemented by a course of study in Collinsville Institute, Turin, New York. In March, 1840, when seventeen years of age, he entered the employ of William L. Easton and A. G. Dayan, merchants of Lowville. Here as a poor clerk, on a meager salary, he found his feet on the bottom round of the ladder up which he has persistently climbed to a position of fortune and influence. Born with the true business instinct, and actuated by those principles which alone insure success in this life, he began with the determination to master the minutest details of his calling, and after a few years' faithful clerkship, began to rank as a skillful merchant. In 1846, he received an interest in the business of his employer, William L. Easton, and although a young man, was intrusted with the purchase of merchandise for the firm, visiting New York for that purpose. His business connection with Mr. Easton continued two years. Subsequently he was with Cornelius P. Leonard, as an employe.

On the 13th of June, 1855, he married Elisha Boshart, youngest daughter of Garret Boshart, one of the earliest settlers in Lowville. He did not again engage in trade for himself until 1856. In that year he bought of John Stevens, the store formerly occupied by Jess Brown on the west side of Main street, next door north of the drug store of Horace Bush, where for fourteen years he conducted a prosperous business. From that time since, there has been no interruption to Mr. Kellogg's mercantile career. During the year 1857-58, he had with him as partner, his brother-in-law, James H. Boshart. He sold this store to R. J. Easton, and in January, 1870, removed to the store in the Kellogg House block, which he now occupies, and where in March, 1881, he associated with himself Henry F. Weber as partner.

In his efforts to build for himself a business and a name, Mr. Kellogg has been peculiarly fortunate in securing the services of efficient clerks to whose interests he was uniformly devoted, and to whom he often refers with a feeling of kindness, not unmixed with pride, that he should have been instrumental in advancing their welfare. Among those who have thus contributed to his success, may be mentioned Eli T. Jones, who entered his employ in April, 1860, and continued to 1875; D. Franklin Dodge, from December, 1857, eight years; K. Collins Kellogg, 2d, his nephew, from March, 1870, to March, 1881, now (1883) in the dry-goods store of Robert Frazier of Utica; George Gordinier, 1861, to March, 1882; and George S. Fisher, clerk in the Kellogg House office several years, who was elected sheriff of Lewis county in the fall of 1882.

Within the sphere in which he has moved, Mr. Kellogg has been remarkably successful; a success due to a peculiar combination of gifts — industry, perseverance, integrity, honesty, calculation, and a genius for surmounting the difficulties in his way. Mr. Kellogg's business life has been by no means purely mercantile. He has been largely interested in real estate and farm property. In 1864-65, he owned several farms in this vicinity, and now owns one of three hundred acres, one mile west of Lowville, upon which his brother resides. He also owns the Henry Kitts farm, situated on Black River Flats, 1 ½ miles east of Lowville, which cost $15,000, and is now occupied by Jess. J. Kellogg, his nephew.

In 1869, he loaned $20,000 to the builder of the hotel in Lowville, which bears his name. He afterward became the owner of this property and for several years was proprietor of the house. Possessed of rare business ability, to which was added a prodigious capacity for hard work, he has lived plainly and toiled hard many years, and by close application to his duties, has arisen from poverty and obscurity to wealth and influence, and has won an enviable position as a merchant and financier.

Mr. Kellogg is not naturally of a social turn, generally keeps himself in as much retirement as possible, and has always avoided public station or office. His has been a life of intense industry, in which there has been but little of social joy, and those have loved him most who have known him best. Preserving his years by a life of steady habits, at the age of sixty, he is not a decayed gentleman, but possesses his gentility and business capacity in full vigor. Believing that there is a glory in work when by it one can achieve success, Mr. Kellogg has not allowed the fire of his business ambition to burn out, and in his life-time is meeting with what is called success, the way to which has been paved with years of incessant labor. It can be said of him that he has never been a drone in the hive. Whatever his hands have found to do he has done with a will, and in summing up the secret of his success here, we may say that it is found in his energy of purpose, his indomitable will, and his habits of economy. For the past forty years, he has been a regular attendant at the Presbyterian church in Lowville. From the lives of such men as he, others may learn a lesson.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

KELLOGG HOUSE

THE KELLOGG HOUSE.
One of the finest inland hotels in the State, a view of which is given herewith, is the Kellogg House, in Lowville, N. Y. It was built in 1869, and stands on the site once occupied by the Bostwick House, which was destroyed by fire Sunday morning, January 17th, of that year.

It is built of brick, four stories in height, with a frontage of 110 feet on State street, and 200 feet, land and yard, on Shady Avenue. It is of handsome architectural proportions, equipped with every convenience, and in one of the most desirable summer resorts in the country, being in close proximity to the hunting and fishing regions of the North Woods. There are few hotels that have so good a reputation for comfortable accommodations and prompt and courteous attention to the wants of travelers.

The house was opened to the public in January, 1870. On Friday, September 26, 1873, the property passed into the hands of K. Collins Kellogg, who, in the year 1869, had furnished $20,000 for its erection. July 16, 1874, Mr. Kellogg took possession as proprietor of the hotel, and for a number of years conducted it successfully, until June, 1881. He made considerable improvements both in the building and the property, erecting the hotel livery barns in June and July of 1874, and laying the marble floor in the office in October, 1876. The yearly average receipts of this house are over $20,000.

The Kellogg House is now (1883) under the skillful management of S. V. Warner, a landlord well-known to the traveling public. A door opens out from the hotel hall to the Ruscoe Opera House. The patrons will here find in all its appointments that well-bred courtesy so necessary and always appreciated by patrons.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


KELLY, WILLIAM

WM. A. KELLY was born in Sherburne, Shenango Co., N. Y., Feb, 2, 1856. He completed his education at St. Michael's College, at Toronto, Canada. He studied dentistry in Rome, N. Y., where he resided six years. He practiced in Adams, N. Y., three years, and permanently settled in Lowville, Dec. 29, 1879, where he continues to reside and where he has, by industry and close attention to his numerous patrons, gained a large and lucrative practice. Dr. Kelly is a courteous and affable gentleman and has a host of friends. He has officiated as a vestryman of Trinity church since 1889. He is a spirited citizen and responds to every interest for the success of his adopted village.

June 17, 1884, he united in marriage with Miss Mary L., daughter of W. B. Buckley of Cape Vincent, N. Y.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

KILHAM, JAMES

JAMES KILHAM.
Thomas Kilham, grandfather to the wubject of this sketch, came from Westfield, Mass., in 1802. The next year his son, Heman, came with an ox team and brought the family. A journey that distance in those days was an arduous undertaking, and their settlement was in a region of almost unbroken wilderness.

Heman married Pamelia Noble. Of this marriage James, the subject of this sketch, was born in Turin, August 2, 1816. His early life was passed at home where he received the education of the common schools, supplemented by a course of study in Westfield Academy. He adopted the life of a farmer, and afterward became somewhat extensively engaged in speculating. He married Livonia House, March 10, 1852, by whom he had one child, which was born November 5, 1856, and died in infancy.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

KOSTER, JOHN
John Koster
MAJ. JOHN S. KOSTER was born in Lee, Mass., June 11, 1841, His father was a skillful and widely known manufacturer of paper on the Housatonic River in the town of Lee. John S. inherited much of the genius of his father, was reared among the buzzing wheels in his father's mills and early learned his art of paper making, and was thus fully equipped to enter upon a successful career. Early in his history he was employed in a newspaper office in the city of Springfield, but soon returned to his father's mills. His father died about this period and Maj. Koster accepted the position of foreman in the extensive mills of the Seymour Paper Co., at Windsor Locks, Conn., and soon after a more lucrative position at Palmer, Mass., and here, busy with his art as a skilled workman, with bright prospects before him, reverberations of the thunder of Fort Sumpter burst upon him and the nation, and the cruel war of the Rebellion was upon us. The whole nation was aroused and was springing to arms. Young Kosters' soul was fired with the patriotic spirit, and he was among the first to offer his services. The history of his regiment (the 21st Mass.) in its varied service, and many sanguinary battles in the Carolinas, Virgina, Maryland, Kentucky and Tennesee is the history of Maj. Koster. The second day of June, 1864, was a terrible and sanguinary day on the bloody battlefield at Cold Harbor. The long day closed and with it Maj. Koster's fighting days also closed. With his body pierced and his good right arm shattered, he was borne from the field. This sacrifice was made for his country. He had done what he could. He recovered and returned to Massachusetts with an empty sleeve, and as a reward, the war Gov. Andrew tendered Sergeant Koster the commission of major. Since the war Major Koster has been a government officer seven years at Boston. Mass., and was superintendent of paper manufacturing in Lancaster, N. H. In 1876 he came to his present residence at Kosterville in Lyonsdale, Lewis county, where he is the business manager of Herkimer Paper Co.'s mills and business and a stockholder in the company. He was a presidential elector in 1888, and messenger to U. S. court. He now represents Lewis county in the Assembly.

April 6, 1865, Major Koster united in marriage with Miss Mary L. Kinzey, daughter of Owen Kinzey of New York city. They have three daughters and two sons. The latter are engaged in the mills at Kosterville.

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

LAKE, LEVI

LEVI C. LAKE.
The great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Garrett Lake, was a resident of the town of Jackson, Washington county, New York, and was a farmer by occupation. He had three sons and one daughter — James, Abraham, John and Catharine, all of whom married and had families, and lived to good and useful old age. Abraham and Catharine after marriage went to Canada and settled on the Reade river, at a place called Merrick's Falls, where they remained until they died. John L. moved from Washington county and settled in the town of Alexander, Jefferson county, where he lived and raised a large family, the most of whom moved to Michigan about the year 1802.

It is believed that the family is of German descent. James, the oldest son of Garrett Lake, grandfather to the subject of this sketch, was born in the town of Jackson, August 9, 1765, and died in the town of Gouverneur, March 7, 1841. His wife was Hannah Jackson, who was of Irish descent, and who was born in the same town and county in which he was born, July 15, 1767. They were married September 9, 1790, and moved soon after to the town of Naples, Ontario county. New York. There they settled on a farm and lived until they had five children, four sons and one daughter — Thomas, Jesse, Stuart, Abraham and Catharine.

Jesse, father to Levi C, was born in the town of Naples, May, 2, 1795, and died in the town of DeKalb, St. Lawrence county, January 7, 1865. About the year 1810, he moved with his parents from Naples and settled in Canada on Reade river, at Merrick's Falls. Here two more children were born, John and Henry. Sometime during the War of 1812, James, the father, was requested to take an oath of allegiance to England. This he refused to do, and in consequence was obliged to leave his home in order to escape bearing arms against his native country. Soon after the close of the war he returned with his family, except Jesse and his brother Thomas, who had come before to New York State, and settled in the town of Gouverneur, where he lived until his death.

During the War of 1812, when the British were trying to take Ogdensburg, Jesse, although a young boy, together with his brother Thomas, older, was pressed into the British service and ordered to be present to guard that place. Not liking the idea of fighting against their own flag, they, together with their cousin, crossed the St. Lawrence river upon the ice, at a place about five miles above Prunet, and landed at Ministua. From thence they went to Ogdensburgh, and reported to the commander, who gave them a pass to go where they chose.

From Ogdensburgh, Jesse went to the town of Perrinton, Monroe county, N. Y. Here he became acquainted with Lovina Cook, who was of English parentage, and who was born in the town of Plainfield, Hampshire county, Mass., November 16, 1799, and died in the town of Gouverneur, St. Lawrence county, June 4, 1882. This acquaintance led to their marriage in Perrinton, October 3, 1816, where they lived about one year, when they went to Gouverneur and settled on a piece of wild land, in the northwestern part of the town, about five miles from the present village of Gouverneur.

While living there they had four children: —

Thomas, born December 27, 1818, now (1883) in Michigan.

Laura, born August 5, 1821, married John Cooper, — by whom she had three children, — died February 18, 1866.

Catharine, born December 20, 1822, married Elecum Hunt, by whom she has three children.

Garrett, born August 28, 1824, died February 26, 1848.

In 1825, the family moved back to the town of Perrinton, and settled on a farm near to the spot where the father and mother were married.

There they had two daughters as follows: Hannah, born June 6, 1826, and Orrissa Jane, born August 10, 1828, — the latter of whom married Morris G. Smith. From here they moved and located on a farm in the town of Macedon, Wayne county, where three sons were born: —

Joseph, January 3, 1832.
Levi C.
Christopher, born May 8, 1838.

In the winter of 1838, at the request of his father, Jesse returned with his family to Gouverneur to take care of his parents, who had returned from Canada shortly after the War of 1812, and had taken up a farm in the northeastern part of that town. Here Jesse had born another son, — making ten children in all, — Edwin, August 14, 1840, who died January 10, 1873.

Upon this farm and in this neighborhood the children were brought up and schooled, all of them receiving a limited common school education.

Levi C. Lake was born in the town of Macedon, Wayne county, N. Y., November 26, 1835. He remained at home until the age of twenty, and the spring following, his father gave him his time and he apprenticed himself to Charles Fisk, to learn the trade of carpenter and joiner.

Charles Fisk was a contractor and builder in Ogdensburgh, who, some eight months after Levi's engagement, became involved in business difficulties and left the country. The young apprentice then returned to Gouverneur, and entered the employ of C. A. & S. B. VanDuyn, to work at the same trade, serving with that firm six years.

On the 13th of October, 1859, he was married to Louisa A. Blood, youngest daughter of Israel P., and Esther Blood, of Diana, Lewis county, who was born in the town of Scriba, Oswego county, N. Y., May 15, 1839. Mr. Lake continued in the employment of C. A. & S. B. VanDuyn, until April 12, 1861, when he moved to the village of Harrisville, where from that date to May 1, 1875, he was engaged in mechanical business.

In May of that year, he entered into a co-partnership with C. N. Blood, his brother-in-law, in mercantile business, under the firm name of Lake & Blood, in which he still continues. They also built, and are now (1883), the proprietors of the Adirondack House in that village. Mr. Lake has been supervisor of his town two terms, and may be counted among the enterprising and useful men of the county.

He has three children — two sons and one daughter: —

Elmer P., born in Harrisville, September 29, 1863.
Charles E., born in Harrisville, February 8, 1868.
Maude M., born in Harrisville, January 24, 1873.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

LANPHER, HARRY
Harry Lanpher

HARRY MARCELLUS LANPHER, Accompanist
Harry Marcellus Lanpher has been the Club accompanist the past season and proved a most competent one.  Mr. Lanpher is a pupil of the Elliot School of Music, a hard worker and one of great promise. 


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y.
J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

LANPHER, HIRAM

HIRAM B. LANPHER.
Hiram B. Lanpher, the subject of this brief sketch, was born in Harrisburgh October 14, 1837. His parents were

Nathan and Harriet Bailey Lanpher. Nathan, the son of Pardon Lanpher, was born in Lowville in 1801, and is still (1883) living. Pardon Lanpher came to Lewis county in 1800 from Rhode Island. The early life of Hiram B. was passed in Harrisburgh, where he was educated in the common schools. His business through life has been that of a farmer and dairyman, in which by hard work he has amassed a competency. He is a retiring, pleasant, honest-faced gentleman, with a supply of good common sense, broad and liberal in his religious and political views. In the matter of politics he has taken no very active part, and the only office of importance held by him was that of supervisor, on the Republican ticket, in 1877-78. He was married to Elizabeth Roberts of Pinckney, Lewis county, January 23, 1861, and has no children.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

LEE, ALFRED

ALFRED H. LEE.
Enoch Lee, grandfather to the subject of this sketch, was born in Westfield, Mass. He was twice married. His first wife was a Shepard, the second a Williams. The date of marriage of these ancestors is unknown. The first died before Enoch came to this State. The second wife died in Martinsburgh. What occupation he followed before he came here is unknown, but in this State and county he was an inn keeper and a farmer. He was the father of thirteen sons and daughters, who grew to manhood and womanhood. The dates of their births and deaths are also unknown. By his first wife the children were: Winthrop, Charles, Enoch, Shepard, Dolly, Pamelia, Electa, and Betsey. The children of the second wife were: William, Lewis, Almira, Cynthia, and Emeline. Enoch Lee died June 14, 1834, aged 76 years.

Enoch Lee, his son, and the father of Alfred H., was born in Westfield, Mass. September 8, 1796. The family, consisting of several brothers and sisters, came to Lewis county in 1807, and settled in the town of Martinsburgh. In 1836, Mr. Lee moved into the town of Turin, and ranked as one of its leading citizens from that time until his death, which occurred May 11, 1874, in his 78th year. He was a man of great energy of character, honest, industrious, economical, and won for himself respect and competency. As a man and citizen, a friend and neighbor, he was loved and respected by all with whom he came in contact.

He married February 12, 1824, Alma Baldwin, who was born in Middletown. Conn., July 7, 1798, and who came in early childhood with her parents to live in Turin. She was an active and energetic woman, and was much respected in the community in which she lived. She died in Turin, August 10, 1856, aged 58 years. Their children were: Alfred H., Alexander Seymour, born December 14, 1826, died January 13, 1830; Anson Reuel, born November 7, 1829, died September 28, 1878; Charles Russell, born June 1, 1832, died December 29, 1862.

Alfred H. Lee, was born in Martinsburgh, November 6, 1824. His early life was passed on his father's farm. He received the education of the common and select schools of Martinsburgh and Turin, and passed one term at Lowville Academy. In his early life he was for three years a clerk in a store, and afterward devoted his attention to farming, which occupation he has since followed. From 1864 to 1868, he was senior partner of the firm of Lee Brothers, running a line of stages from Boonville to Lowville, Boonville to Port Leyden, Boonville to Constableville, and from Turin to Rome. He inherited his father's earnestness, integrity and honor, and has proved himself a worthy successor of the sire who was respected by all. Mr. Lee has held the office of Justice of the Peace over seventeen years, and is now serving his fifth term. For the past twenty-five years or more he has been an officer of the Lewis County Agricultural Society, either as Treasurer or Director, and one year as President; also Loan Commissioner, and has been for several years a member of the Board of Education, and Trustee and President of the village of Turin.

Religiously, Mr. Lee is a Presbyterian, and has held the offices of Trustee and Treasurer of the First Presbyterian Society of his town. He married February 19, 1851, Elizabeth Hunt, who was born in Martinsburgh, May 9, 1826. Their children are: Homer Hunt, born November 27, 1851, died July 23, 1857; George Maurice, born June 3, 1855; Kate Alma, born December 26, 1857, died October 25, 1869; Carrie Hunt, born April 5, 1860; Mary Lizzie, born August 15, 1863; Louis Homer, born December 4, 1869.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
LEFEVER, LEONARDLeonard Lefever

MARTIN R. LEFEVER was born in Blenheim, Schoharie Co., N. Y., in 1837. In 184.5 he removed with his father's family to Northville, Fulton county, where he resided until 1864. lie received an academic education, and learned the tanner's trade in his father's tannery. In 1864 he settled in the village of Beaver Falls, and engaged in the business of fanning, where he conducted a successful business in that line thirty-one years. In the winter season he gave employment in bark drawing and in the tannery to a force of fifty men and forty teams. He is now engaged in merchandise and clearing his large tract, from which he has exhausted the bark. He resides in a heretofore strong Democratic town, has held the office of notary public, and was instrumental in establishing the postoffice in Beaver Falls, and was postmaster the ensuing eighteen consecutive years; and again in President Harrison's administration.

Aug. 24, 1864, he united in marriage with Miss Hannah M. Lewis. Their children are: Minnie M. (Mrs. Dr. W. W. Jamieson) of Syracuse and Howard I. Lefever of the firm of Lewis, Slocum & Lefever.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

LEONARD, CHARLES
Charles Leonard
CHARLES PINCKNEY LEONARD, son of Stephen and Jane Martin, daughter of Gen. Walter Martin, founder and first resident proprietor of Martinsburgh, was born in Lowville. He is of sturdy New England stock. His first ancestor known in America was John Leonard, who emigrated from England and settled in Springfield, Mass., in 1636. He married there Sarah Heath, Nov. 12, 1640, and was killed by the Indians in 1676. The generation succeeding John Leonard were (2nd) Joseph, (3d) Joseph, (4th) Moses, (5th) Phineas, (6th) Stephen.

Stephen Leonard was born in West Springfield, Mass., Oct. 29, 1783, and where he resided until 1802. In the winter of 1804-05 he came to Lowville from Manlius, N. Y., and formed a mercantile partnership with James Harvey Leonard, with whom he continued in business twenty-four years. In 1809 he was appointed postmaster by President Madison and continued in that position thirty-six years. In 1808, with twenty-three other prominent citizens, made application to the Regents of the University for the incorporation of Lowville Academy, and was one of its board of trustees nearly forty years. He was one of the founders of the Presbyterian church and one of its first trustees. He labored assiduously for the prosperity of Lowville, and was a noble and worthy man.

Charles P. Leonard, before mentioned, was educated in the common school and Lowville Academy, in which institution ho was under the instruction of Professors D, P. Youmans and D. P. Mayhew. He is industrious, energetic and enterprising, and has been a merchant, miller and manufacturer. At present he is giving his attention to his large farming; interests. In 1879 he was one of the founders of the Black River National Bank, of which he is president. The interests of Lowville receive much of his care and attention. The Academy, the State Street Graded school, of which he has been sole trustee for many years, and under whose supervision it has attained high excellence, and the Lowville system of waterworks, all have had his aid, push and energy.

Jan. 11, 1849, he married Sarah Tyler. Their daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, is his only surviving child. Mrs. Leonard died May 27, 1865, and Nov. 11, 1869, he united in marriage with Elizabeth (Glasgow) Pelton, a widow with one son, Charles E, Pelton,

Mr. Leonard's twin brother, George C, was a patriotic soldier in Co. B., 94th Regt, N. Y„ at the breaking out of the war, and died a martyr for his country Dec. 1, 1863.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

LEONARD, JAMES

JAMES L. LEONARD.
The first that is known of this family name is John Leonard, who lived in Springfield, Mass., and who is supposed to have emigrated from Bilstan, county of Stanford, England, about 1639. The first adventurers from England to this country who were skilled in the forged iron manufacture were two brothers, James and Henry Leonard, who came to the town of Raynham, Massachusetts, in the year 1652, which was about two years after the first settlers had established themselves upon this spot. In that same year these brothers built here the first forge in America. Henry not long after moved from this place to the Jerseys, where he settled. James, who was the progenitor from whom sprang the whole race of the Leonards here, lived and died in this town. He came from Pauterpool, in Monmouthshire, England, and brought with him his son Thomas, then a mere lad, who afterward worked at the bloomery art with his father in the forge. Within a mile and a quarter of this forge was a pond known as Pawling Pond, on the north side of which once stood King Philip's house, where he used to spend the hunting season. Philip and these Leonards were on friendly terms and often traded with each other. Such was Philip's friendship that when his war broke out in 1675, he gave strict orders to his warriors never to molest the Leonards. During that war, two houses near the forge were constantly garrisoned, and one of these was built by James Leonard long before King Philip's war. The generations of the family were John Leonard, 1; Josiah, 2; Reuben, 3; Elias, 4; James Harvey, 5.

James Harvey Leonard was the father of James L., the subject of this sketch. He was born in West Springfield, Mass., September 22, 1780, and died in Syracuse, N.Y., March 14, 1845. He came to Lowville with his cousin, Stephen Leonard, in 1804, on horseback from Skaneateles, N.Y., where they had been employed as clerks in stores. The rude aspect of the country at first discouraged them, but they were made of sturdy material and determined to stay. James H. began business in Lowville in 1804, and in January, 1805, was joined by Stephen Leonard. This firm became widely known through Northern New York. They supplied rations to troops passing through the country, and in embargo times were largely engaged in business transactions with Canada. James H. Leonard continued in the firm just a quarter of a century. He was a prominent and public spirited man, and among the foremost in every measure of public utility. He was an original trustee of the Lowville Academy, and an elder in the Presbyterian church. He was also postmaster at Lowville many years. His remains were interred at Lowville.

His wife was Mary Parish, daughter of Captain John Parish, (lost at sea), of Branford, Conn. They were married in May, 1805. She was born July 10, 1785, and died in Lowville, May 19, 1871, aged 86 years.

From an humble beginning as a merchant's clerk, and with no advantages or opportunities derived from patronage or influence of others, but gifted with foresight and financial tact which proved adequate for his station, he gradually acquired, by a course of honorable dealing and prudent management, what is regarded with us as a large estate. Naturally liberal, enterprising and public spirited, he every year found new occasions for the promotion of some new measure of public utility, and he appeared to take an honest pride in witnessing and promoting the prosperity of every interest which tended to advance the moral, intellectual and social condition of those around him. His influence was felt throughout the growing spheres of his business relations, and our people had learned to place confidence in his opinions and to seek his aid and counsel in whatever tended to the public good.

James Loren Leonard was the fifth and youngest son of James Harvey Leonard, and was born in Lowville on the 5th of June, 1821. Of the five brothers and three sisters, but one, Mr. Francis K. Leonard, now remains of this family.

The subject of this sketch received his education at the Lowville Academy, and is remembered as an industrious student, especially fond of mathematics, obedient and attentive to all his duties. The limited means of his father, arising from a pecuniary loss, prevented him from attempting a more extended course of study, and at the age of seventeen he entered the store of J. P. Ellis,, at Carthage, N. Y., as a merchant clerk. A few months after, he entered the store of the late William L. Easton of the village of Lowville, as a clerk, and after serving about seven years in this capacity became a partner with a one-third interest in the establishment. With a natural aptitude for financial management that expanded to meet the growing spheres of his opportunities, Mr. Leonard at an early stage of his business career, began to lay those foundations of confidence and esteem in the public mind which time only served to strengthen and confirm. While with Mr. Easton, Mr. Leonard entered the Bank of Lowville and on the nth day of April, 1840, he appeared as book-keeper. He was appointed teller on the 19th of June, 1841, and on the 1st of April, 1846, he was elected cashier.

He was chosen Vice-President, April 19, 1855, and on the 19th of September, 1857, became President of the bank. This office he held at the time of his death. For several years Mr. Leonard had a pecuniary interest in the clothing store at Lowville, conducted by D. A. Smith. This interest had previously been represented by his brother-in-law, Mr. Loren M. Brown, at whose death he assumed it. At an early period of his connection with the bank, he began to buy up stock as opportunities offered and his means allowed, until nearly the whole was owned by himself and Mr. Easton, and finally, in 1856, Mr. Leonard purchased the larger interest of his associate and became almost sole proprietor of the institution.

At an early period in the history of the bank, a part of its capital had been invested in the State bonds of Arkansas, and subsequently fell to a merely nominal value, and in consequence of this decline, the bank stock was for several years much depressed, and although its credit was maintained, the stockholders received no returns from their investments. By prudent management this error was gradually retrieved, and the capital, placed on a sound basis, began to yield its due returns to its owners. The financial crisis of 1857, was felt by the Bank of Lowville, in common with all others, and led Mr. Leonard to apply for the appointment of a receiver to close up its business; but the general suspension of banks throughout the country, which occurred simultaneously stayed the proceedings, and as the assets were much above its liabilities, no serious apprehensions of ultimate loss were entertained. The injunction was granted by Judge Hubbard on the loth of October of that year, and dissolved by Judge Denio on the 27th. The Hon. De Witt C. West was, during this brief period, the Receiver. As a proof of the confidence of his fellow citizens in the integrity of Mr. Leonard and in the stability of his bank, it should in this connection be recorded that at a public meeting held in Lowville on the 13th of October, it was agreed to receive the bills at par as usual, and no serious embarrassment occurred in consequence of this momentary shock. The bank did not commence a single suit against its customers during the crisis and lost no debts from discounts during that period. Of Mr. Leonard's business habits, financial tact in the management of the bank of Lowville, and public and domestic life, the writer of a notice in the Lewis County Democrat of January 30, 1867, who is understood to have been the Hon. D. C. West, says :—

"Since his connection with the chief financial institution of the country, his reputation and acquaintances have been co-extensive with the country, and indeed in some of his financial operations he discharged practically some of the duties which but for the enlarged confidence reposed in him by the county officials would more properly have devolved upon the county officers themselves. His management as a banker was commendable. With a sharp eye to the interests of its owners, it is believed that no undue advantage of necessitous creditors was ever taken by him. We remember no "Dummy" or other devices (which occasionally degrades the true banker, into the shaver and usurer) on the part of Mr. Leonard as a condition for loans, and his honorable management in that respect gave a high character to his business operations."

Of the bank of Lowville, in operation as the chief financial institution in Lewis county, since July 1, 1839, Mr. Leonard was teller from June 19, 1844, to April I, 1846, and cashier from last named date to September 19, 1857. In 1852, he became the purchaser and was interested in stock of the late I. W. Bostwick to the extent of six hundred and twenty-nine shares; and in 1853, to one hundred and eighty-five shares, or about $37,000, and after that period became the owner of the entire capital stock of the bank, except in so far as requisite to maintain its organization.

The Valley bank was organized in 1851, with a circulation of $60,287 and the Bank of the People in 1852, with a circulation of $40,480, by Mr. Leonard as individual banks at Lowville. The former was disposed of and the latter wound up voluntarily. These banks were all organized under the general State banking laws of New York.

Successful in the rapid accumulation of wealth, he was a leading contributor to almost every subscription paper here circulated. To the religious and educational institutions, like the men of our town preceding him, he was the firm friend, undaunted by opposition, undismayed by disaster. Usually placid, he gradually controlled those associated with him without difficulty. Associated and active in almost every enterprise of a public character, his loss even at this time cannot be over-estimated to this county in a business or social point of view. He left no issue. For a brief period only glided the smooth current of domestic joy. A wedded life of a few months closed by the untimely death of his youthful bride. To his aged mother (now deceased,) and more immediate relatives and friends, his constant solicitude and charities were given ending only with existence. Fond of travel, and partaking largely of the National spirit which carried our country through the crisis of the Rebellion, he was one of the few from this country at the restoration of the flag exercises at Fort Sumter, the review of our armies at Washington at the close of the war, visiting also Richmond in its desolation and the unleveled and abandoned defenses about Petersburg. The dangerous financial condition of the country in the winter of 1859 and '60 alone prevented his journeying through the South and to the Isthmus, and he was looking forward to the relief from active business in a brief period, when he might have perhaps indulged his declared wish to travel on the Continent.

James L. Leonard was no common man. This will be more apparent when we consider that he died young. Had he been permitted to go on accumulating his strength for twenty years to come as he had for the last ten, he would have become a power in the land. His will met few obstacles it did not conquer. He could enjoy the convivialities of social life without becoming degraded by its dissipations. He could devote himself to the duties of religion without being a bigot. He could rapidly accumulate wealth and still keep his heart and hand open as day for meeting charity. In a word, he could live for himself much and still live for others more. No such life as his is ever lost to the world. When a man dies, some sort of subtle influence seems to follow it which vivifies the coming years with the spirit of progress. Already the citizens of Lowville have taken fresh interest in the improvements which he projected, and had near his heart, and seem to accept them as trusts which they must execute in accordance with his wishes. Through many discouragements and trials, he pursued his even course along the rugged way which leads from poverty to affluence — unsullied by passion, untarnished by guile — and was stricken down in life's meridian with his labors seemingly half accomplished; yet in his two score and seven he accomplished much more than most men do who are blessed with their three score and ten. Mr.' Leonard conducted his business to the common advancement of his own interests and those of the public generally, and as his means increased his native generosity and public spirit expanded to meet the growing impulses of a noble soul. The erection of a session room in 1853, and the latter costly renovation of the Presbyterian church of Lowville are largely due to his beneficent aid and early counsels. In 1860, Mr. Leonard took an active part in the enlargement of the building of the Lowville Academy, setting a noble example by a heavy subscription, lending funds from his ample means sufficient for the occasion, and devoting much time to business details.

The publication of the history of Lewis county by F. B. Hough, in 1860, was almost entirely due to Mr. Leonard, who, with persevering industry, and entirely without expectation of pecuniary reward, secured a subscription sufficient to justify the expense of the undertaking. His mind was admirably fitted to enjoy historical inquiries, and he took especial pleasure in the collection and preservation of memorials of the early settlement of the county. His files of county newspapers were almost complete, and his knowledge of the local and personal history of the town and county was extensive. The formation of a County Historical Society was a subject he had much at heart. Plans were often discussed with those of a kindred spirit, and there is no occasion to doubt but that a suitable hall for a public library and cabinet, and for the preservation of memorials of the pioneers of our valley, would have been erected within a few years, and mainly at his own expense, had his life been spared. His lamented death before the execution of any part of the plan should impose upon surviving friends a kind remembrance of this intention and lead to its realization at the earliest practicable period. Upon the outbreak of the late war few persons felt a deeper interest in the final triumph of the National arms. He was an ardent patriot in spirit, and confident in the final issues of the right. His private aid to those enlisting in the services was frequently bestowed entirely without ostentation, and often known to none but those receiving it. He was one of a committee appointed at an early period in the town of Lowville to raise funds for the support of the families of soldiers and he subsequently served on other committees formed to promote the success of the cause. At an early stage in the conflict he expressed his confidence in the stability of our government by advancing money for its stock when pecuniary means were most needed, and the final issue of events most doubtful. The stocks eventually proved to be a highly remunerative investment, but they were taken in the darkest hour of the Republic, when to the common observer lowering clouds and thick darkness overhung the future and cast a dismal gloom over the present.

Although thus incidentally enriched by the war, he will never be mentioned with those who watched the tide of events and waited till success was manifest and doubts were dissipated. He reasoned correctly that bands and obligations upon property or against individuals were only good so far as government gave origin and effect to laws for their enforcement, and that whatever tended to weaken or destroy this, aimed at the vital elements of the social compact and hastened to aid the speedy and certain overthrow of every institution and of every interest. Mr. Leonard was from the first, an earnest advocate of measures tending to secure the construction of a railroad through the valley, urging its importance upon every occasion, hiring engineers to run partial lines in search of feasible routes, and liberally subscribing for all expenses of preliminary measures. A few months before his death he was appointed in conjunction with Senator O'Donnell and Hon. De Witt C. West as a committee to ascertain the final terms of the Utica and Black River Railroad Company for extending their line to this village, and had his life been spared he would have labored with untiring zeal for the promotion of this measure. His death cast a heavy load of responsibility upon his associates and the public. He constantly regarded this road as destined to become a good investment, and had he lived he would probably have proved the sincerity of these opinions by a liberal subscription to its stock.

In 1865, after fruitless efforts to procure a telegraphic connection with this village, Mr. Leonard, upon his own account, made a contract for the erection of poles between Lowville and Port Leyden, and was about procuring the wires when the Montreal Telegraph Company, judging from this proof of confidence that the line would be remunerative, assumed the contract and completed the communication. He had previously made unsuccessful appeals to the proprietors of connecting lines, and had it not been for his enterprise Lowville might not yet have realized this great public benefit. For many years he had cherished the project of a Rural Cemetery adjacent to our village, and about 1861, he purchased the then only available grounds for this purpose. A few days before his death the measure was again brought forward under his encouraging advice. Preliminary meetings were held and the day but one before his death he conversed long and cheerfully with a friend on this subject. An Association was finally formed on the evening of the day he died, and it became the sad duty of loving friends, as the first business transaction to pass resolutions of sorrow at the sad bereavement occasioned by his death. On opening his will he is found to have bequeathed lands for cemetery purposes, and to have provided that the income arising from the sale of lots should be entirely expended in improving and beautifying the grounds. Mr. Leonard was for many years a member of the Presbyterian church and society, and at the time of his death was a trustee in common with his generous and earnest friend, Giles C. Easton, who died on the evening of the same day with Mr. Leonard, and who had been closely associated through life in various social and business relations. United in life and in death, the names of James L. Leonard and Giles C. Easton will long claim the grateful remembrance of our citizens. Upon the death of Isaac W. Bostwick, in 1857, Mr. Leonard was chosen a trustee of Lowville Academy, and he was one of the most active and laborious members of the Board. Having repeatedly given for the benefit of the academy, he provided in his will for a further bequest of $10,000, and a residuary interest of one-fifth in his estate to aid its endowment. During the last few weeks of his life, Mr. Leonard was excessively burdened with business cares. The completion of a noble block of buildings at a central point in the village of Lowville, intended in part for his bank, an unexpected complication of business from an endowment for others which he was called upon to meet, and above all, a constant and exhausting solicitude for the health of his aged and feeble mother, with whom he watched with the tenderest devotion, proved altogether too much for a constitution not naturally rugged, and for several days before he gave up business he was a fit subject for a physician's care. On Sunday, the 20th of January, 1867, he was obliged to acknowledge himself too sick to leave his room, and his symptoms assumed the form of typhoid fever with congestion. He was still unwilling to take active medicine, and he said he could not afford to be sick least his mother should need his care.

His condition was not considered dangerous until Friday, when he became delirious. Diphtheritic symptoms appeared and he rapidly sank until death closed the scene at four o'clock on the afternoon of Saturday, the 26th of January, 1867. Mr. Leonard was married on the 25th of January, 1858, to Miss Mary M. Willard, only daughter of General Joseph A. Willard, of Lowville, who died on the 11th of August, following their marriage. Mr. Leonard never again married, and to the last, evinced toward the parents of his loving bride, that tender regard which proved the earnestness of his affection and the permanent impression which this loss had occasioned. In the spring of 1865, Mr. Leonard made an excursion to Charleston, South Carolina, as one of a party on board the steamship Oceanus, to witness the, raising of the American flag upon Fort Sumter. Before leaving home upon this journey, he drew up a will which was found among his papers after his death, and which was to govern the distribution of his estate. Had this instrument been reviewed a month before his death, his increasing means and more recent events might have led to a somewhat different disposition of his estate. As it was, the citizens of his native county, town and village, had lasting and substantial reasons for cherishing a lively gratitude for his munificence and a tender regard for his memory.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
LEONARD, STEPHEN & CHARLES

STEPHEN AND CHARLES LEONARD.
Among the distinguished men and early settlers of Lewis county whose lives of usefulness have left an impress upon Northern New York, none were more conspicuous than Stephen Leonard, and none more prominent and more interested in the enterprises of those latter days than his son, Charles P. Leonard. The first of the family name known in this county was John Leonard, who settled in Springfield, Mass., in 1636, and held m that town the then highly respectable office of Constable. His wife was Sarah Heath, whom he married November 12, 1640. He was killed by the Indians early in 1676. His widow then married Benjamin Parsons, February 21, 1677. He died in 1690, and she married Peter Tilton. She died in Springfield, Mass., November 23, 1711.

The generations succeeding John Leonard were:— Joseph (second); Joseph (third); Moses (fourth); Phineas (fifth); Stephen (sixth).

The latter was a son of Phineas, who was born August 19, 1751, and was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. He, too, was a resident of Springfield, Mass., where he died November 16, 1847, aged 96 years.

Stephen Leonard was born in West Springfield, Mass., October 29, 1783, where he lived until the year 1802. In that year, at the age of nineteen, he left his native town and went to Skaneateles, N. Y., where he remained some six months, and from there went to Manlius, N. Y., where he resided until the winter of 1804-'05, when he came to Lowville, and soon after formed a mercantile co-partnership with the late James H. Leonard, a relative, with whom he continued in business during a period of twenty-four years. In 1809, he was appointed postmaster by President Madison, and served in that capacity thirty-six years, or until the presidential administration of Polk, in 1845. He was one of twenty-four other prominent citizens who, in March, 1808, made application to the Regents of the University of this State for the incorporation of Lowville Academy, in which institution he was a trustee for nearly forty years; watching its progress with care and solicitude, aiding it by his judicious counsels in its hours of prosperity, and assisting it by generous gifts of his means, in its times of adversity. At the organization of the Lowville Presbyterian Society, in November, 1820, Mr. Leonard was appointed one of the first trustees, holding that position many times during the subsequent years, and being one of the most regular attendants on its services. Every enterprise tending to the public good, found in him an earnest advocate, and he labored earnestly and faithfully during many long years for the prosperity of his adopted town. A man of generous impulse, those in distress found in him a true and liberal friend, and his memory ranks with those whom posterity reveres as worthy citizens and noble men.

On the 11th of December, 1806, Mr. Leonard was united in marriage with Jane Martin, daughter of General Walter Martin, founder and first resident proprietor of Martinsburgh. She was born in Salem, Washington county, N. Y., February 16, 1788, and came with her parents to Lewis county in March, 1802, to encounter many of the discomforts of pioneer fife in what was then a remote and almost unbroken wilderness. She was a resident of Lowville from the date of her marriage until her death, which occurred May 4, 1871, surviving her husband but two years, he having died March 13, 1869.

The children that were born to this marriage were:— Jane Anne, born September 4, 1807, died July 22, 1810; Christina, born August 14, 1809, died August 22, 1812; Martin, born September 29, 1811, died August 22, 1814; Alexander, born December 25, 1813, died December 22, 18 19: Jane Maria, born July 10, 1 8 16, married Francis B. Morse; Cornelia, born December 20, 1819; Elizabeth, born December 29, 1821, married Rev. L. W. Norton; John, born April 8, 1824; Charles P., and George C, (twins,) born August 22, 1826; Lewis, born March 20, 1832, died August 27, 1855.

At the breaking out of the Rebellion, George C. became a soldier of Company B, 94th Regiment N. Y. Vols. He was a brave and faithful soldier and participated in the battles of Bull Run, Cedar Mountain, Rappahannock, and the famous battle of Gettysburg. He died at Ely's Ford, on the Rapidan River, Va., December 1, 1863.

Charles Pinckney Leonard, the subject of the portrait, passed his early life in Lowville, in the common schools and the academy, of which place he received his education, in the latter institution, being under the instruction of Professors D. P. Youmans and D. P. Mayhew. He followed in the line of his father's business — that of merchant and milling, to which he afterwards added the manufacture of chairs, lumber, etc., beginning in the latter industry in 1875. He was also in 1879, one of the founders of the Black River National Bank, of which he is now President.

Possessing much of his father's industry, energy and genial nature, he has become prominent in the enterprises and welfare of the town, and has won the esteem of his fellowmen. He was married to Sarah Tyler, of Lowville, January 11, 1849, by whom he had two children:— Charlotte Jane, born September 6, 1851, died October 5, 1866; and Sarah Elizabeth, born August 28, 1860.

Mrs. Leonard died May 27, 1865, and on the nth of November, 1869, he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Glasgow Pelton, of Lowville, a widow with one son — Charles E. Pelton. There was born to them one child — Stephen, born December 26, 1874, died while in infancy.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
LEWIS, JAMES
James Lewis
JAMES P. LEWIS was born in Northville, N. Y.. Feb. 14, 1845, and was there educated in the public schools. He resided at Beaver Falls when a small boy, five or six years. His father then owning a tannery there which occupied the site of the present one, Oct. 11, 1871, Mr. Lewis settled permanently in Beaver Falls, and in the first eight years thereafter he was connected with the tannery operated by Mr. M. R. Lefever, and two years run a general store connected with the tannery. About 1880, the Beaver Falls Pulp Co. was organized, comprising James P. Lewis, M. R. Lefever and Charles Nuffer, three capable business men, who built the first pulp mill in the place; and five years later he purchased his partner's interest and continued the business alone. Ten years later Mr. Lewis erected the Riverside Pulp Mill, the first hydraulic pulp mill in Northern New York (a system that has revolutionized the manufacturing of pulp). Two years later the first paper mill was added to one of these plants, and has since been run by the firm of Lewis and Slocum. In 1892 he commenced the erection of the J. P. Lewis Co.'s paper mill, completed it in the spring of 1S92 and incorporated it in the fall of 1894. At this date it is the largest in the county. He is also one of the firm of Lewis, Slocum and Lefever, who erected a pulp mill on the site of the old saw mill and tannery in 1893. All of these mills are in successful operation and give employment to a large force of men. Besides his immense business as a manufacturer at Beaver Falls, Mr. Lewis is the first vice president of the National Wood Pulp-Board Co., which comprises all the mills making this grade of product in the United States, with headquarters at New York city. During Mr. Lewis' residence at Beaver Falls, he has served his town as justice of the peace twelve years, and also served it on the board of Supervisors. His church relations are with the M. E. church, and he is a trustee of Cazenovia Seminary and one of the executive committee of the Thousand Island Park Association.

Jan. 5, 1871, he united in marriage with Miss Julia E. Slocum, a lady of worth and ability. They arc blessed with a daughter, Grace Edna, and a son, Harry S.


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)
LEWIS, MORGAN

MORGAN LEWIS.
The first known of this name were John and James Lewis, two brothers, who came from England at a very early day, and settled in Barnstable, Mass. James was the father of six sons. John, the eldest of these moved to Hingham, Mass. He had three sons, of whom the oldest was John, who moved eastward and lived in North Yarmouth. James Lewis, the second born, and great-grandfather to Morgan, was born December 27, 1724. His family was as follows: —

Lydia 1st. born May 26, 1750, died in infancy; Lydia 2d, born December 10, 1751; John, born Jan. 3, 1754; Betsey, born March 10, 1756; Rachel, born Nov. 24, 1757; James, born Dec. 6, 1759; Hannah, born Jan. 27, 1762; Laban, born April 12, 1764; Benjamin, born Nov. 13, 1766; Lucy, born March 3, 1769. Elijah, born March 3, 1773. The father of these died April 3, 1802. The mother, Lydia Pratt, also died.

Of these children, John, born in 1754, on the 27th of June, 1782, married Mary Phelps, who was born May 27, 1762. He died Feb. 3, 1828, aged 74; she died March 9, 1840, aged 77 years, 9 months.  Their children were: — Seth, born Feb. 4, 1783 ; John, born Feb. 16, 1784 ; James, born Oct. 10, 1785; Calvin, born Jan. 18, 1788; Polly, born Sept. 18,1789; Luther, born April 9, 1791 ; Lydia 1st. born Oct. 11, 1792, died Sept. 4, 1793; Lydia 2d, born May 25, 1794; Lucy, born Nov. 13, 1795; Betsey, born April 18, 1797; Warren, born June 6, 1799; Fanny, born Dec. 18, 1804; Hannah, born Dec. 27, 1806, died Oct. 26, 1827.

John Lewis, the father of Morgan, was born in Suffield, Conn. He came to Harrisburgh, Lewis county, in 1804. His occupation was that of farmer. On the 15th of January, 1803, he married Betsey Winchell, who was born in Springfield, Mass., September 9, 1786. John died in Harrisburgh, December 1, 1865; his wife died in the same place, March 20, 1867. They had ten children, as follows: —

Mary A., born Aug. 1, 1803, died June 24, 1848; Caroline, born April 3, 1806, died Nov. 24, 1827; Morgan, born April 27, 1808; Julia, born April 14, 1810, died Feb. 1, 1842; George, born Aug, 31, 1812, died Aug. 27, 1882; John, Jr., born Jan. 11, 1815; Betsey, born March 26, 1817, married Abel Bickford, Jan. 6, 1838, died Sept. 10, 1875; Warren, born Feb. 14, 1820, died in Rockford, Ill., Oct. 14, 1845; Franklin, born May 10, 1822, died in Utah, May 11, 1850; Fanny, born Feb. II, 1825, married Amos Lasher, of Harrisburgh, Feb. 16, 1848.

Morgan Lewis, the third child, was born April 27, 1808. His early life was passed in Harrisburgh, where he was born. He was educated in the common schools, and adopted the occupation of farming, which he has always followed. He married Betsey Hazen, daughter of Sewall Hazen, of Denmark, Feb. 19, 1846, who was born June 15, 1820. Their children are: — John Morgan, born March 15, 1847; Ledru Lycurgus, born Oct. 3, 1849; Wilson Hazen, born Dec. 24, 1851 ; Mary Eugene, born March 5, 1854, died Oct. 7, 1874; Bessie Edith, born Nov. 14, 1859; Emma Anna, born May 20, 1865.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

LEWIS, MORGAN

A concise notice of the man from whom the county derives its name, may interest its citizens.

Morgan Lewis of Welch ancestry, a son of Francis Lewis, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, was born in New York city, October 16, 1754, graduated at Princeton College in 1773, and entered the law office of John Jay. In June, 1775, he joined the army before Boston, as a volunteer, in a rifle company of which he was chosen captain, in August; In November, he was appointed major of the 2d regiment of which John Jay was colonel, but as public duties withdrew the latter from the command, it fell upon Lewis. In June, 1776, he accompanied General Gates into Canada, as chief of his staff, and was soon after appointed Quarter-Master General for the Northern Department, with the rank of colonel. In 1777, he was appointed to receive the British troops, surrendered by Burgoyne, and in 1778, he was sent with General Clinton on an expedition up the Mohawk against a body of partizan troops under Sir John Johnson. In 1780, he accompanied Clinton to Crown Point to intercept the enemy who had made an incursion upon that frontier. At the close of the war he was appointed Colonel-Commandant of a volunteer corps, and had the honor of escorting General Washington at his first inauguration as President. He settled in the town of Clinton, Duchess county, in the part since known as Hyde Park, and in 1792, erected a house there, which was burned in 1832.

In 1790 and 1792, he was elected to the Assembly from New York city; in 1791, appointed Attorney-General, and in 1804, elected Governor for a term of three years, against Aaron Burr, by a vote of 30,829 to 22,139, and at the next election for Governor he was beaten by Daniel D. Tompkins. In 1810, he was chosen to the State Senate from Duchess county, by a large majority than had ever before been given, and served four years. He was appointed Quarter-Master-General of the Army of the United States, April 3, 1812, and on the 2d of March, 1813, he was promoted to the rank of Major-General.

The descent on Niagara, in April, 1813, was planned and conducted solely by General Lewis, as General Dearborn, the senior officer, was confined to his tent by indisposition. After the evacuation of Fort George, Lewis set off in pursuit, but when just arrived within sight he was recalled by a peremptory order from Dearborn. The next morning the latter ordered Generals Chandler and Winder to pursue the enemy, but upon coming up with them, the latter, considering their situation desperate, turned upon their pursuers. In the darkness, both of these officers fell into the hands of the enemy, and the American troops returned to Fort George. Late in the fall of 1813, General Lewis accompanied General Wilkinson's inglorious expedition down the St. Lawrence. He continued in the service until disbanded, in June, 1815, when he resumed the practice of his profession. While on the Canada frontier, he advanced large sums from his private means to pay the expenses of exchanged prisoners, at a time when drafts upon the government would not be received. His indulgence towards such of his tenants as had served during the war, either as militia or in the regular army, is especially worthy of commendation.

General Lewis married in 1777, Gertrude, fourth daughter of Judge Robert Livingston, of Clermont, Manor of Livingston. This union lasted fifty-four years. He was a member of the New York Society of the Cincinnati, and president at the time of his death, which occurred in New York city, April 7, 1844. His remains were interred in the Episcopal cemetery at Hyde Park.

The commissioners appointed under the fifth section of the act organizing the county, were Matthew Dorr* of Columbia county, David Rogers of Washington county, and John Van Benthuysen of Duchess county. The names of the Council of Appointment were at that time, John Schenck, Joshua H. Brett, Stephen Thorn and Jedediah Peck, of whom Thorn was an intimate personal friend of Walter Martin, through whose influence the appointments are said to have been arranged. It has been reported upon very reliable authority, that the driver of the coach, in which the commissioners came in from Utica, overheard from their conversation that the location of the seat of Lewis county was already decided upon, and that he made an affidavit to that effect.#

In 1805-'06 the sum of $74 was paid to Dorr, a like amount to Rogers, and $82 to Van Benthuysen as compensation for their services in locating the county seat. The county drew $293.54, from Oneida in 1806, as its share of the public money that then happened to be on hand, when the division was made.

* - Mr. Dorr, was a native of Lyme, Conn., and at the time of his appointment lived at Chatham, Columbia county, N. Y. His business was that of clothier, and he died in Dansville, Livingston county, N. Y., at an advanced age.

# - This information was given the author by Isaac W. Bostwick, in 1852.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
LORD, JOHN

JOHN D. LORD.
The family of Lord is of English origin. Nathan Lord, grandfather of John D., and the first of the name of whom anything definite is known, was a resident of Franklin, Connecticut, where he died at the age of 95, probably about the year 1830. He was twice married. His first wife was Abigail Ingraham, and his second wife was Mary Nevins. Their children were Asa, Peggy, Hannah, Charles, Mary, Gurdon, Rufus L., Nathan, Lydia, Lynds, Eleazer, Henry, David and Thomas. Of these children, Asa was born in Franklin, Connecticut, October 6, 1767, and settled in Leyden, Lewis county, in 1794, on the farm now owned by Leonard S. Loomis, being one of the first three pioneers of that town. He was drowned on the 9th of April, 1818, by being swept over a mill-dam during a freshet at Madrid, St. Lawrence county.

Gurdon, the father of John D., was born in Franklin, Connecticut, July 5, 1780. He came to Lewis county at the age of 21, worked one summer, and in the next year, bought a farm in the town of Leyden, one portion of which is now owned by the sons of the late James S. Jackson, and another portion by John D. Lord. His life was the quiet and uneventful life of a farmer. He married Sally Dewey, daughter of John Dewey, of Leyden, December 19, 1804. His death occurred October 18, 1866, and that of his wife April 13, 1861. Their children were: —

Mary Rudd, born August 12, 1807, died October 12, 1809; Lydia Axie, born September 20, 1810, married first, William Horr, second, Abner Horr, and now a widow living in Cleveland, Ohio; John D.; Sarah Naomi, born July 3, 1813, married Ruel Kimball, Jr., and now a widow living in Utica; Nathan Lynds, born August 23, 1715, a Presbyterian minister, now (1883), in Rochester, Ind.; Mary Ann, born August 1, 1818, died December 11, 1881.

John D. Lord, the third child of Gurdon Lord and Sally Dewey, was born April 1, 1812. His life has been passed in the pursuit of farming, in which he has been successful, and is owner of some of the finest land in the town. He received the education of the common schools, and to the learning thus derived, was added a well-poised mind of the rugged and independent type. He was united in marriage January 20, 1842, with Mary Bailey, of Lowville, who died July 11, 1852; and on the 23d of October, 1855, he married Samantha Sawyer, a native of Brandon, Vt. His children were: —

Sarah Elizabeth, born November 22, 1843, married December 21, 1871, to Rev. Everett R. Sawyer, a native of New London, N. H., now a clergyman at Sandy Hill, Washington county, N. Y.; Mary Bailey, born April 7, 1846, married August 18, 1875, to William H. Johnson, M. D., of Port Leyden; John Albert, born January 17, 1851, and died in infancy.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

LOUCKS, DANIEL

DANIEL LOUCKS.
The family of Loucks is of German descent on both the father's and mother's side. Peter Loucks, his grandfather, the fourth generation from Germany, was a lieutenant in the war of the Revolution, under General Herkimer, and took part in the battle of Oriskany, in which he was wounded.

His son, Peter Loucks, Jr., was born September 11, 1770. He married Annie Clark, January 21, 1798, who died on the 15th of the following May, and in 1805 be married Margaret Moyer. He died in 1847 at the age of 77 years. His children were: Nancy, born April 3, 1799; Peter, born January 26, 1805; Margaret, born August 24, 1806; Jacob, born April 8, 1810; John, born February 27, 1812; Mary, born May 4, 1814; Betsey, born May 17, 1817; Katherine, born May 30, 1819; William, born July 21, 1821; Benjamin, born February 13, 1829, died October 10, 18.M; and Daniel, whose portrait appears in this connection.

Daniel Loucks, the fourth child, was horn in the town of Manheim, Montgomery county — now in Herkimer county - July 31, 1808. In March, 1822, his parents removed to Lowville, Lewis County, and at the age of seventeen he went to the town of Herkimer, in the county of that name, as an apprentice in the tanning and shoemaking trade. There he remained about two years; but his father, old and in feeble health, required his aid in oaring for the family, and he returned to Lewis County, and engaged in the multifarious labors of farm life until he was twenty-four years old. He received his education in the common schools of Lowville, and remained at home until twenty-four years of age when on the 10th day of December, 1831, he married Julia Ann Strader, and took up his residence in the town of Martinsburgh. In the spring of 1832, he took a contract for a tract of land on which he remained a few years and then removed to West Martinsburgh where he has since resided. He worked at the trade of shoemaking until the year 1863, when he and his two eldest sons, Hudson and Charles, engaged in the hop growing industry, in which they continued until the death of Hudson. After that he and Charles kept up the business until the death of the latter, and since that time he has virtually retired from business.

On the 14th of December, 1854, his wife died of consumption. He has served as Justice of the Peace in Martinsburgh thirty-six years, and is numbered among the estimable and representative men of the town. His children were seven in number, as follows: Hudson, born September 2, 1832, died October 11, 1877; Eliza, born December 28, 1834, married Daniel Vanderburg, of Martinsburgh, July 17, 1858; Charles, born February 24, 1837, died June 20, 1880; Melville, born February 13, 1841, a graduate of West Point, died February 20, 1872; Delevan, born August 7, 1843, died. June 4, 1867; Mariette, born March 21, 1847, died December 21, 1854; Sedate, born November 2, 1851, died December 16, 1854.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

LOW, NICHOLAS

Sketch of Nicholas Low.

Nicholas Low, the fifth son of Cornelius Low, and Margarette, his wife, was born near New Brunswick, on the Raritan, N. J., March 30, 1739. His grandfather Cornelius Low, was born at Kingston, Ulster county, in 1670, and his father Cornelius Low, in the city of New York, in March, 1700. His mother was a daughter of Isaac Gouverneur, and a descendant of Governor Jacob Leisler, of the early English Colonial period. Of his boyhood we have no trace, but it may be assumed from the position and easy circumstances of his parents, as well as from his character in after life, that he received careful training. He entered at an early day upon the career of a merchant, in the city of New York, where his eldest brother Isaac had made himself conspicuous. In 1786, his store was at 218 Water street. New York. Both brothers, at the commencement of the dispute between Great Britain and her colonies, embraced the American cause. Isaac Low, in 1774, was chosen by the city a member of the Committee of Public Safety, and also one of the Delegates of the Continental Congress of that year, having for colleagues, John Jay, John Alsop, James Duane and Philip Livingston, but as the quarrel became embittered, Isaac Low adhered to his allegiance to the Crown, while Nicholas cast his lot in with his countrymen,* and when the British troops entered New York, he abandoned it and only returned after the peace. He then resumed business there as a merchant, enjoying the confidence and friendship of the most eminent men of the nation — Washington, Jay, Hamilton, Gouverneur Morris, Rufus King, the Livingstons and others.

(*Isaac Low withdrew to England in 1783, having been attainted and banished by an act of the Legislature in 1779. He died in that country in 1791. He was one of the first members of the Chamber of Commerce in the city of New York, and a member of the first Provincial Convention that was held, to give expression to the grievances of which the Colonies complained. But he was in favor of reconciliation, and not of separation, and when the latter became inevitable, he adhered to the government party, and shared its misfortunes, as stated in the text.)

Mr. Low was alive to all the great political questions which agitated his countrymen, and taking such part as he deemed obligatory upon every good citizen, was ever averse to political life, and office he never sought. He was nevertheless sought out by his fellow citizens on occasions of moment. He was a member of the convention that adopted the Federal Constitution, and in 1788 and 1789, was in Assembly. His political sentiments were then of the Federal party, as inaugurated under the auspices of Washington, but he was of too independent mind and habits, ever to be a mere partizan.

Late in life, Mr. Low married Alice Fleming, widow of S Fleming, and by her he had three children — Cornelius, Nicholas and Henrietta. The latter became the wife of Charles King, a brother of Governor John A. King, and at the time of his death, President of Columbia College, in the city of New York.

In 1796, he made the purchase of the Black River Tract with others, as we have elsewhere related. He had inherited from his father a considerable amount of landed estate at Ballston, Saratoga county, which town, in the early part of the century, became a place of much summer resort, by reason of its medicinal springs, and Mr. Low built there, for the accommodation of this travel, a large hotel known as " Sans-Souci."

When, the embargo of 1807, and war of 1812, cut us off from the supply of manufactured goods usually received from England, Mr. Low conceived the project of a great manufactory of cotton at Ballston, and accordingly with his accustomed energy and decision of character, went to work at the enterprise, investing very large sums himself, and inducing friends to do likewise. For the brief period of the war, the undertaking was remarkably successful, but with peace came ruin to home manufactures, and those at Ballston did not escape the common lot. The capital invested was almost a total loss, and Mr. Low soon after sold all his property at Ballston, of which as a watering place moreover the glories had been eclipsed by the neighboring Saratoga Springs.

With declining years Mr. Low withdrew from business, occupied himself mainly with the care of his estate and in the society of his family and of attached friends, exempt, until within the last year or two of his life, to a remarkable degree, from bodily suffering, though with eyesight and hearing somewhat impaired, yet with mind unclouded, he passed serenely on to death, November 15, 1826, being then in his 83d year.

In personal character, Mr. Low was distinguished for sterling qualities. With a clear head, great self-reliance and independence, much observation and knowledge of men and affairs, he combined a high sense of honor, the most scrupulous integrity, and the most exact justice and truth. His yea was always yea, and his nay, nay, whatever might betide. He was a consistent member of the Episcopal church, and for many years a warden of Grace Church in the city of New York. In personal appearance he was of compact and robust frame, with a full head, broad forehead, clear, steady blue eyes, fine complexion and an expression indicative at once of great kindness and great firmness. His manner was courteous and polished, yet very direct. He was the very type of an independent, upright, honest gentlemen.

Mr. Low was accustomed to visit the town annually upon business during many years. His son, Cornelius, was appointed, in 1818, agent with Mr. Bostwick, and remained at Lowville a law partner with him until the death of his father. He died June 30, 1849, aged 54 years. Nicholas Low, the second son, died in New York in the fall of 1859.

As noticed elsewhere, the Low family afforded some aid to the town by a loan to the Academy, secured by a mortgage, running indefinitely and without interest, so long as it remained an institution upon its then existing plan. They afforded also some assistance to Trinity church in the beginning, but otherwise they have left no memento deserving of notice beyond the name.

We find the same name applied to postoffices in the States of Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Minnesota, and conjecture that in some, if not in all of these cases, it was borrowed from this town, which has at least priority of date, and prestige in importance.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
LYON, LYMAN

LYMAN RASSELAS LYON.
Lyman Rasselas Lyon, than whom no citizen of Lewis County, past or present, is more entitled to the touch of the biographer's pen, was born in what is now Walworth, Wayne County, N. Y., in 1806, and came a lad of twelve years with his father to Lewis County. He was educated under the Rev. John Sherman, at Trenton, and at the Lowville Academy, and at an early age evinced a decided interest in public affairs. From 1830 to 1835, he was Deputy Clerk in the Assembly, and was several years Cashier and President of the Lewis County Bank. In 1859, he was elected to the Assembly, and by his active efforts secured to the people the locks and dams on Black river, which completed the water connection between Carthage and the Erie canal; to which object he devoted much time and energy in laboring for the Black River canal, which was finally built from Boonville and Lyons Falls. He built in 1856, a steamer on the river, modeled after those on the Ohio, to tow up the canal boats, thus securing forty miles of additional navigation. In his younger years, he was largely interested in western government contracts, and his favorite remark was, that if he made his money abroad he desired only to expend it at home to benefit his own town and county. It was his energy and capital that started the business enterprises known as Moose River and Otter Lake tanneries, still in operation. Mr. Lyon was one of the largest land proprietors in Northern New York, and his reputation as a successful, energetic, and reliable business man is well known. At the outbreak of the Rebellion, he manifested much interest in the Union cause, and proffered his services in defense of the government, which were declined on account of his age. He gave a musket to every young man who enlisted from his town, and contributed in various other ways to the success of our arms. His deep anxiety during that struggle, in addition to his extended business cares, affected his health, and in 1867, he went abroad with his family. He traveled through Southern Europe, Palestine, and Egypt, and was somewhat benefited; but returning, died on the 7th of April, 1869, at Savannah, Georgia, on his way home from Florida.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


MALCOLM, ANDREWAndrew Malcolm

ANDREW J. MALCOLM, son of Armstrong and Cynthia (Porter) Malcolm, of Scotch origin on his paternal side, was born in West Turin, Feb. 23, 1825; received a practical education, and began business life a carpenter and house painter, which he followed about twelve years, and then changed to Are insurance, which he has industriously pursued about thirty years. He is now ably assisted by his son Howard A. Malcolm, who plies the laboring oar. He has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in risks on property and has always been able through his responsible companies to satisfactorily adjust all losses and settle his own accounts, so as to merit the praise of his companies.

At the age of two years his parents came from West Turin and settled in Talcottville in Leyden, where Mr. Malcolm has since resided and where he has earned the confidence and respect of a very large acquaintance.

Dec. 11, 1848, he married Miss Emily Miller, daughter of Dennis Miller of Leyden. Their children are: Laura V. (Mrs. Peter Weist) of Talcottville and Jennie E. (Mrs. D. Z. Owens), merchant of Boonville. Mrs. Malcolm died March 5, 1853, and Dec. 11, 1855, he united in marriage with Miss Eimly H. Rockwell of Turin. They are blessed with a son, Howard A., before mentioned.

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

MARENESS, JAMESJames Mareness

JAMES A. MARENESS, son of Abram M. and Clarissa (Ruscoe) Mareness, was born Nov. 20, 1844, in Montgomery county. His father was born in Schoharie county, Jan 15, 1808, and followed the occupation of tailor. For several years he resided in Montgomery county. In the fall or 1861, he removed to Lowville. James A. came to Lowville the spring preceding, and entered the drug and grocery store of George D. Ruggles, as clerk, where he remained until September, 1862, when at the death of Mr. Ruggles, L. B. Richardson purchased the store. Mr. Mareness was employed by him until 1864, when he enlisted in Co. H., 26th Regt., Cavalry, under Captain Henry E. Turner, at Sackett's Harbor. He was honorably discharged July 10, 1865. He then went "west," where he remained but a short time, and, returning to Lowville, was employed as bookkeper in the clothing house of L. B. Richardson. In 1872 he began business tor himself, entering upon several speculations, until 1877, when he conducted a grocery store in the Morse Building. In 1880 he leased the R. J. Easton Block, where he successfully conducted a grocery store until 1894, when he sold his interest to F. A. Sherwood, September 23, 1895, he again commenced business in the same block, which had been rebuilt, where he is successfully conducting a lagre grocery and crockery trade. Mr. Mareness is a man who has by his long experience in trade learned the minutest details of his business, and is one of Lowville's most energetic, sagacious and successful business men.

On the 18th of June, 1873, he married Addie Dezotell of Deer River.  


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


MARKHAM, DeWITTDeWitt Markham

DE WITT C. MARKHAM, son of Silas and Louisa (Hubbard) Markham, was born in West Turin, March 21, 1846. He is of English origin and his first progenitor, William Markham, was a nephew of William Penn, in whose honor Pennsylvania received its name. Both his paternal and maternal grandfathers were natives of Connecticut, and both served our country in the war of 1812.

He received his education in the common schools (the people's colleges) and early learned to labor on his father's farm. His parents settled on a farm near Collinsville. He remained with them until he was of legal age. In 1870 he became interested in the manufacture and sale of the Eureka Mower, and continued it until 1889. In 1885 he purchased the "Hoyt farm" and has since conducted it as a Stock Farm.

He was elected sheriff of Lewis county in the fall of 1893, assumed the duties of the office .Jan. 1. 1894. and is now serving on the last year of his term.

.July, 1867, he united in marriage with Miss Margaret P. Barnes, daughter of Lyman W. and Nellie (Adams) Barnes. They are parents of one son, Fred D., born March 3, 1871. a graduate of the Ontario Veterinary College at Toronto, Canada.  

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

McCARTEY, CHARLES

Charles C. McCartey, President of the Anniston Bloomary, is a native of Lewis County, N. Y.; son of Francis and Loxina (Dorwin) McCartey, respectively of the States of Massachusetts and New York; was born May 14, 1828. When eight years old, he, with his parents, emigrated to Green Bay, Wis. While there he learned the arts of the different tribes of Indians, to speak seven different languages (the French as fluently as his own), to excel in the use of the gun and the bow and arrow, and to paddle a canoe to the admiration of the red men.

When eleven years old, he was pursued by hostile Indians, and ran ten miles to save his life, on a very hot day. For some time the white settlers lived in constant fear of being scalped. All retired at night with their clothes on, to be ready for the signal (which was the ringing of a bell) to flee to Fort Howard, Soon after this reign of terror, old Zack Taylor removed the hostile Indians to the Rocky Mountains.

Mr. McCartey moved to Fon du Lac in 1842. While living there he engaged in different branches of business. He went to Glen Arbor, Mich., in 1855, and engaged in lumbering, wooding and milling; working between 300 and 500 men. At that point he built one of the largest and finest piers on the chain of lakes; it is known as Mack's Dock. He was also agent for the Northern Transportation Company of Ohio, running a daily line of steamers from Ogdensburg to Chicago. From Glen Arbor Mr. McCartey moved to Pontiac, Mich., and engaged in the hardware business and farming. He went to Knoxville, Tenn., in 1876 for his health, and there embarked in the wholesale drug trade, and in 1887 came to Anniston (Ala). While in partnership with Morrison Bros., he organized what is now known as the Anniston Bloomary, an incorporated concern, with a capital stock of $50,000.

Mr. McCartey started in the world without money, but he was a genius, and in many things an expert. The results of his undertakings attest these facts.

He was married in January, 1850, to Miss Elizabeth Darwin, of New York, daughter of Hubby and Elizabeth (Jones) Darwin. He and wife are Episcopalians, and Mr. McCartey is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities.

This branch of the McCartey family sprang from an Earl of Scotland.

Francis McCartey was a soldier in the War of 1812, and drew the first pay-roll at Sackets' Harbor. He was the son of Clark McCartey, who was an officer under General Washington, and who was with that General in his historical crossing of the Delaware in December, 1776. Tradition says that Washington asked who was in charge of the crossing, and when told "McCartey," exclaimed, " Thank God! it is in safe hands."

The McCarteys were all a large, brave and powerful race.

(Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney)

McGOVERN, PETERPeter McGovern

PETER McGOVERN, son of Peter and Katharine (McMannis) McGovern, was born Feb. 22. 1857. His father came from Ireland to this country in the spring of 1836, and in 1840, settled in the town of High Market, built a log cabin, and cleared the farm on which lie now resides. Here Peter, Jr., was born. Like other farmers' sons, he spent his youth alternately at the district schools, where he received a practical education, supplemented with one term at Lowville Academy, and hard labor. Nov. 8, 1875, he came to Lowville and entered the wagon shop of Louis Campbell & Son, where he remained three years. He was then employed in the wagon shop of Michael Diver, of Turin, for over two years. June 14, 1882, he purchased the wagon shop of Louis Campbell & Son, of Lowville, in which he had learned his trade, and has since enlarged the shop and employs from seven to twelve men. On Nov. 22, 1884, he was married to Julia E. Dunn, daughter of Dennis Dunn, Jr.

As the above sketch indicates Mr. McGovern is an energetic End enterprising business man; is prosperous and an honorable dealer, and now holds the important position of trustee of Lowville village. 


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


McMORROW, CHARLESCharles McMorrow

THE VERY REVEREND DEAN CHARLES J. McMORROW was born at Cohoes. N. Y., in 1853. and made his classical studies at St. Michael's College, at Toronto, Canada; and took his philosophical and theological course at the Seminary of St. Sulpice, Montreal. He was ordained by Bishop Wadhams, in 1883. He remained at the Cathedral a few months, and was appointed to the parish of Fort Covington, where he officiated until he was transferred to Lowville, N. Y., June 1st, 1893, and where he is still the pastor of St. Peter's Church.

When Father McMorrow arrived in Lowville, he found the congregation sadly demoralized; many prominent members had not seen the the inside of the church edifice in several months; but he went steadily to work with a Christian spirit and with his usual genial way and business tact, and soon had the love of his people and the esteem of the whole population. Although hampered with a debt of $1,684.70, at the end of the year he had it paid and raised besides $1,736.37 for repairs, pastor's salary, and two furnaces for heating. The ensuing year he added a new building to the church. In 1894 he was appointed Dean of Lewis county. Father McMorrow is a genial gentlemen, an eloquent speaker, "is of the people and with the people," and frequently mounts the rostrum on public days, and special occasions. 


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
)

McVICKAR FAMILY

The McVickar Families.

John McVickar was an Irish linen merchant in the city of New York, and one of the executors of William Constable's great landed estate, and died in 1812. His family was as follows: —

Archibald McVickar, married a daughter of Brockholst Livingston, and died in one of the Western States, in 1848, aged 64 years. He resided on the place now owned by Emory Allen, not far from the site of the first St. Paul's church, before its removal. His sons were Dr. Brockholst Livingston McVickar, of Chicago; Archibald McVickar, contractor, etc., residing at Lyons Falls; Catharine, and Susan. The latter married ---- Devereaux, of Utica.

Edward McVickar, married Frances Matilda Constable, and settled upon a farm still owned by his family, adjacent to that formerly owned by Archibald McVickar, on the road towards Collinsville. We believe he came to reside in this town in 1818, and died December 6, 1866, aged 72 years. His son Henry McVickar, an active and prominent citizen, died at Brighton, England, January 1, 1882, aged 56 years, and is buried in the old St. Paul's church cemetery.

James McVickar, came to Constableville in 1813; was a County Judge, and removed from this town in 1830. He married Eweretta Constable, and died in New York City in 1835. He had two sons and a daughter, viz: William McVickar, who removed to Louisville, St. Lawrence county; John McVickar, who became a physician and settled in New York; and Mary, who married and settled in New York.

John McVickar did not settle in the county. He was many years a Professor in Columbia College, New York City.

Henry McVickar, died at sea; unmarried.

Nathan McVickar, died in this town, and also unmarried.

Benjamin McVickar, settled at Milwaukee, Wis., as a physician.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
MERRELL, ELIADA

ELIADA MERRELL.
THE ancestors of Hon. Eliada S. Merrell were among the early settlers of New England. His great-grandparents were Caleb Merrell and Susannah Tompkins, a relative of Gov. Daniel D. Tompkins, of this State. They lived and died in Waterbury, Conn. The great-grandfather on his mother's side was a Sanford and his wife was an Ives.

They were English people and settled at North Haven, Connecticut, at an early day. His grandfather on his paternal side was Nathaniel Merrell, who emigrated with his family to Jefferson, Schoharie county, N. Y., where he died in 1823. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, and was the father of eight sons and one daughter — Caleb, Chester, Seth, Jared, Erastus, Mark, Ebenezer P., John, and Chloe. His maternal grandparents were John Sanford and Susannah Thorp, daughter of Capt. Amos Thorp, who fell in the old French war. These grandparents lived and died at North Haven, Connecticut. The parents of Eliada Sanford Merrell were Seth Merrell and Mabel (Sanford) Merrell. They had four sons and one daughter, Lorenzo D., who died at Richmond, Ky., September 18, 1852; Jared Lewis, who died at Copenhagen, November 17, 1877; Mrs. Chloe M. Robb, and Hon. Nathaniel A. Merrell, who reside at De Witt, Clinton county, Iowa. Seth Merrell died at Copenhagen, December 31, 1852, and his wife died at Lowville, September 1, 1862.

The subject of this sketch, the third son of Seth Merrell and Mabel (Sanford) Merrell, was born at Jefferson, Schoharie county, N. Y., November 21, 1820, and removed with his parents to Copenhagen, in this county, in 1826. His early life, when not at school, was passed on the farm and as a teacher in the common schools, to which latter employment he devoted six winters. His education was obtained in the common schools, in select schools, in Denmark High School, Lowville Academy, and the Black River Literary and Religious Institute, at Watertown, N. Y. He read law in the office of Ruger & Moore, at Watertown, N. Y., with Dayan & Parish, at Lowville, N. Y., and with Hon. Francis Seger, at Lyons Falls. He was admitted to the Bar in May, 1846, as an attorney at law and SoHcitor in Chancery. His father gave him such advantages at school as his limited pecuniary circumstances would permit, but he was dependent for education mainly upon his own efforts.

He was married June 17, 1850, to Emeline A. Clark, daughter of the late John Clark, 2d, and Phebe (Keene) Clark, of Copenhagen. Their children were two sons, viz: — Lorenzo Eliada, born at Copenhagen, June 9, 1851, died at Lowville, May 20, 1862; and Edgar Sanford Keene, born at Lowville, May 21, 1865. He was elected District Attorney in 1852, was re-elected in 1855, and was again elected in 1867. He was elected County Judge and Surrogate in 1874, and reelected in 1880, which office he now holds. Since he arrived at his majority, he has ever been identified with the Democratic party, and from the time of the organization of the Republican party, in 1855, for many years, in common with other young and energetic men of the county, he took an active part in the struggle for political ascendency, and the nearly equal division of parties at the present time, is illustrative of the energy and determination with which political contests have been maintained in the county.

Since his admission to the Bar, he has always practiced his profession in this locality, with the varied success which usually meets the country practitioner, whose efforts are necessarily confined to the humbler walks of professional life.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

MERWIN FAMILY

THE MERWINS.
Alanson, Amanda, M. H. and James A. Merwin.

The ancestor of the Merwins in America, was Miles Merwin, who was born about 1623, in the north of Wales, or England, and in 1645, being then by trade a tanner, emigrated to New England, and settled in the town of Milford, Connecticut, there becoming the owner of a large tract of land, on Long Island Sound, and now known as Pond Point, or Merwin's Point — a quite celebrated local summer resort. This town was originally known as "Wepowage," and its settlement commenced in 1639, the pioneers being mostly from the counties of Essex, Hereford, and York, in England. At this place, Milford Miles died, April 23, 1697, aged 74. His family was as follows:—

Eliza, who married a Mr. Canfield; John, born in 1650, who settled at the homestead; Abigail, who married Abel Holbrook; Thomas, who settled at Norwalk. Conn.; Samuel, born August 21, 1656, married Sarah Woodin, and settled at New Haven; Miles, born December 14, 1658; Daniel, born in 1661, and died young; Martha; Mary; Hannah, and Deborah, who married a Mr. Burwell.

Miles, the son, was married in September, 1681, and had a son Daniel, who was born in Milford, Conn., about 1685. This Daniel moved to Durham, Conn., about 1710, and was a proprietor there in 1724. He had a son Daniel, Jr., born about 1716, who married Elizabeth Wells, December 20, 1738. Of this marriage was born James Merwin, grandfather to Alanson, October 19, 1739. The wife Elizabeth, died October 29, 1739, and the husband married again in 1741, and had other children, some of whose descendants are now living in the vicinity of Kingston and Prescott, Canada. James Merwin married Martha Smith, who was born in 1736, and died August 2, 1808. They lived in Haddam, Conn., where James died, February 13, 1790. Of this marriage, there were born, Hemon Merwin, August 1, 1767, died January 1, 1844; Elizabeth, born 1769, died young; Rebecca, born May 13, 1771, married Daniel Carter, about 1803, died in 1849; Anna, born in 1773, died young; Martha, born December 1, 1774, married James Clark, in 1789, died in 1849; James, father to Alanson, born June 5, 1777; Daniel, born December 1, 1779, died in 1836.

James Merwin, father to Alanson, was born during the struggles of the Revolution, and his childhood was familiar with its trials and successes. Early left fatherless and poor, his education was but sufficient to enable him to read and write, and he depended on experience to give him whatever else he needed. At about sixteen years of age, he was apprenticed to learn the trade of blacksmith, and at that practical school he graduated with a reputation second to none for industry, knowledge of his trade, and faithfulness to the interest of his employer. With this capital and a good constitution he started in life, and for several years was engaged at his trade in Haddam, Middletown, and the sea coast, being much employed as a ship blacksmith upon vessels being built on the Connecticut river. The desire to obtain a home, which operated then as it does now, led him with others, in the year 1800 to the Black River valley, whither the tide of immigration from his locality tended. The settlements then in New York State, west of Albany, were few and scattering. Utica was but a hamlet in a swampy valley. Boonville had but two or three houses, and here and there in the woods beyond was a settler, who had built his log house, and was clearing and burning the woods for cultivation. Travel then was by the ox team or on foot. The bear and the Indian were the neighbors mostly seen. Men then were hardy and industrious, and foremost among them was James Merwin. At first he could buy and pay for but ten acres of land, and his practice was not to run in debt.

To this region, then a wilderness, he came with his wife Esther, from Haddam, Conn., in 1800, and settled in Leyden, on the farm he owned and occupied until his death. Here he built a log house for himself and wife, and began to clear and till his few acres of land. During the day he worked on his farm, and at night he was at his forge, as work might come in. One fall, within a year or two after his arrival, he went on foot back to Connecticut, worked there during the winter at his trade, in ship building, and in the spring returned with funds enough to purchase another ten acres. During the War of 1812, he served with the militia, when called out to Sackett's Harbor. After the war he continued his farming, always attending faithfully to his business, and performing all his engagements; careful in all things, temperate, kind and humane, intellectually strong and sound in judgment, never neglecting his duties to his family, to society, or as a citizen; modest in his demeanor, and never intruding himself in the way of others. For sixty-five years, he, with his faithful, intelligent and capable wife, sharing his labors and burdens and pleasures, lived upon the farm which in their youth they had selected for a home, and lived to see the wilderness turned into fruitful fields; their child and grand-children grown up and become settled in life, and their great-grandchildren gather about them, and lisp their names with affection and veneration.

James Merwin died in Leyden, February 13, 1865. Esther Smith, his wife, died April 30th, of the same year. She was born in Haddam, Connecticut, February 5, 1782, and was the daughter of Lewis Smith and Anne Hubbard, his wife. This couple had two other children, Hannah, wife of Allen Augur, and Catharine, wife of Joseph Stimpson, both of whom settled early in Leyden. The sole representative of the family of Mrs. Augur, is Lewis Augur, of San Francisco, Cal. The family of Mrs. Stimpson, were Sydney, deceased; Nelson, Joseph, Catharine, now deceased; Lucinda, Sabra, Clinton, Mary Ann, now deceased; Sylvester, now deceased, and Martin.

The only child of James and Esther Merwin was Alanson, who was born in the town of Leyden, February 23, 1801. Here he passed his early life where he was educated, and here through life he has been the architect of an honest name which men respect and his children revere. On the 13th of January, 1825, he married Amanda Kimball, and immediately thereafter went to live upon their farm on the East road, in Leyden. Their children were James A.; Huldah Kimball, born January 18, 1829, married Rev. George G. Saxe, now of New York; Milton H., born June 16, 1832, now of Utica, N. Y.

The wife of Alanson Merwin died in 1878. She was descended from the Kimballs who were at Ipswich, Mass., from 1650, and were numerous, originating probably with Richard Kimball, who came from Ipswich, England, in 1634. Henry, son probably of Richard, was at Ipswich in 1640, and Thomas was at Charlestown in 1653. Boyce Kimball, a descendant of Richard, was born at Ipswich, June 26, 1731, and the record of the family of himself and Rebecca, his wife, is thus: —

Boyce, born March 4, 1757; Rebecca, July 9, 1759; Jonathan, July 23, 1761; Ebenezer, December 3, 1764; Mary, September 11, 1767; Susanna, July 24, 1769; Priscilla, November 21, 1771; Timothy, December 21, 1773; Richard, May 19, 1775; Amasa, May 23, 1777; Ruel, December 20, 1778.

This Ruel was a Presbyterian minister, and about the 1st of January, 1799, married Hannah Mather, and settled in Marlboro, Vermont. Their family record is as follows:-

Ruel, born December 24, 1799; Amanda, April 13, 1802, at Marlboro, Vt.; Cotton, June 7, 1804; Huldah, August 1, 1806, at LeRay, died August 22, 1827; Alonzo, November 20, 1808; David M., November 25, 1810, died August 1, 1813; David M., August 26, 1813, died October 23, 1857; Lucy, July 31, 1815, married Rev. Henry Bannister; Mary, December 18, 1817, died March 4, 1852; Harriet, January 14, 1820, died February 12, 1823 ; Martin L., September 24, 1826.

Ruel Kimball, Sr., died October 1, 1847, at East Hampton, Mass., and his wife Hannah died at Leyden, March 9,

1860. She was the daughter of Timothy Mather and Hannah Church. Timothy Mather was descended from Richard Mather, who was born of an ancient family in Lowton, Parish of Winwick, Lancashire, England, and settled as a minister at Dorchester, Mass., in 1635, and was the grandfather of the celebrated Cotton Mather.

In the life and character of Rev. Ruel Kimball, as well as in that of his wife, Hannah, there was much that is interesting and instructive, and that deserves a place in the memoirs of their descendants. Mr. Kimball, with but a common education, prepared himself for the ministry, at a time when its duties were more than ordinarily laborious and self-denying, and when the burdens, too, rested heavily on the wives. He at first located in Marlboro, Vermont, and left there about 1805, for Leroy, Jefferson county, where he remained until about 1816, when he moved to Leyden, where he lived until his death. Though strict in his religious views and habits, he was still paternal and kind, with a heart always open to the unfortunate, and with a benevolence that was constant and up to the Scriptural standard. His wife was well fitted for her position, and was a woman of more than ordinary ability, and with an elevated standard both morally and intellectually.

Of the children of Alanson Merwin and Amanda Kimball, James Merwin was born in Leyden, January 8, 1827. His early life was passed in this town, where he received the education of the common schools, and of Lowville Academy, supplemented by a two years' course in Wiliston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. From the latter place he returned to Leyden in 1846, and for four years worked on his father's farm. He then went on to a farm of his own, where he remained one year, and in the fall of 1851, came to Port Leyden, and engaged for three years in mercantile and lumbering business. He then devoted his attention to the lumber trade, and built his present saw-mill in 1860. He has held the office of supervisor for four years, being elected by the Democratic party. In the fall of 1874, he was elected by that party as Member of Assembly, and served one term, defeating Sydney Sylvester, by a majority of 202. In September 1850, he married Julia Church, of Antwerp, Jefferson county, N. Y. She died in August, 1856. Their children were: — Julia, born August 9, 1853, married John L. Bickford, of Lowville; Jane, born August 13, 1856, died in August, 1859. He was married again October 28, 1857, to Susan Scrafford, daughter of George Scrafford, of Albany.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

MILLER, JAMES

JAMES MILLER.
One of the most pleasing characteristics of the history of our county as it shall be read in the future, will be its specifications of names and localities by which the coming generations may identify the place where a distant ancestor settled in the wilderness, built his log house with pioneer-will and muscle, cleared away the forest, and reared the commodious and comfortable dwelling of to-day. To the present generation it is a matter of interest to know who felled the first tree in settling the town of his residence, to know where and by whom the first house or barn was built, and by whom each farm was cultivated in pioneer days.

Among the names of the early pioneers who have passed away from their career of usefulness, none are more entitled to the remembrance of the present generation, than that of the subject of this sketch. The Millers were among the earliest settlers of New England, coming to this country from Scotland. The first of this name, of whom anything definite is known, was Richard Miller, father of James, who married Anna Ward.

James Miller was born in Middletown, Conn., in 1776. In the spring of 1796, in company with Ebenezer Allen, James Ward, and Nathan Coe, he left Middletown, and emigrated to what was then termed "the wilds of the West." With two yoke of oxen and a loaded cart, they traversed the Mohawk Valley to Utica, where two years before, there was a small cluster of log houses, and nineteen families. From there to Trenton, a road had been cut through the woods, but from Trenton to Turin, they found their way by marked trees, and encountered and overcame many obstacles in fording and crossing streams and gulfs.

On arriving at the place of their destination, tired and drenched through with rain which was then pouring down in torrents upon them; after loosening the oxen from the cart to feed in the woods, they proceeded to build a fire. Mr. Allen, pulling off his coat, commenced with a will to fell a large tree, against which they succeeded with great difficulty in kindling a fire, it being finally done by Mr. Miller crawling under a log, where he succeeded in flashing some powder, and raising a flame. Here they remained through the night, with nothing for a covering but the body of the cart, under which Ward and Allen lay down to rest, while Mr. Miller watched the oxen and kept the fire.

On the following day they built a temporary house, where they remained the first season, building a saw-mill, and making preparations for their future home, experiencing and overcoming hardships unknown to any but early settlers. At the age of nineteen, his humble cottage in the wilderness was cheered, and his hopes and prospects brightened by his marriage to Sally Coe, of Paris, N. Y., who shared for many years, his toils, his joys, and his sorrows. While the forest was slowly receding, and their fields enlarged, they reared a family of seven children. In 1819, he married his second wife. Miss Rebecca Brooks, of Meriden, Conn., who became the mother of his eighth child. Good evidence of his own integrity, and of his confidence in his neighbors, is furnished in the exposed condition of large sums of specie which he kept in his private dwelling; for the more upright a man is, the more confiding he is in others, while the miser, the extortioner, and the rogue, are ever distrustful and concealing. His estate was the fruit of persevering industry, economy, and integrity. Upon the farm where he first settled, he lived from 1796, to 1863, retaining his mental faculties in vigor to the last. He died October 6, 1863, aged 86 years. He left besides a competency for his family, examples of honesty and frugality, worthy of imitation. Long will he be remembered as the obliging neighbor, whose hard earned resources relieved the embarrassed from trouble, and stimulated others to industry and competency.

His children were: — Volney, who died in infancy; Orra, born in 1800, married Fellus C. Taylor, now (1883) living at the age of 83 years; Volney, 2d, born in 1802, married Ann Duff, died in 1850; Richard, born in 1804, died in. 1823; Elmina, born in 1806, married G. S. Sackett, of Houseville, died in 1882; Lucina, born in 1806, twin to Elmina, married Amos Bush, of Turin, died in 1876; Sally, born in 1811, married Emory Allen, of Constableville; Betsey, born in 1821, married Alson Clark, the author of "Historical Sketches of Lewis County," who died in 1856, and Betsey afterward married John Roberts, of Leyden, in 1872.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

MILLER, SETH

COL. SETH MILLER.
Colonel Seth Miller, son of Seth Miller and Mary Wadsworth, of Farmington, Conn., was born November 9, 1797, in the new settlement situated in the vicinity of what is now known as the village of Constableville. Settlement was begun in this locality by people from Connecticut, in 1796. His father was among these early pioneers, and with them experienced the discomforts and rigors of life in a new and unbroken region. He as well as others of these hardy adventurers, was obliged to journey to Whitestown to procure the necessary seed for his crudely broken soil, to procure the necessaries of life for his family, and to find a grist-mill for grinding his scanty supply of grain, and each inhabitant in those primitive days was his own beast of burden, carrying the necessary loads on their backs a distance of some thirty-five miles. Here in this region, which seems to the people of this generation, so uninviting, Mr. Miller was born, and lived his life of usefulness. In 1819, he commenced business as a merchant at Constableville, which he continued successfully upon the same spot of ground where he began, until his death, October 28, 1867. Merchandising in those days, as well as farming, was attended with difficulties: During the early part of his mercantile career, when going to New York to buy goods, he went as far as Albany on horseback. But the men of those days were made of sturdy material, and hardships did not daunt, nor long journeys discourage them.

Mr. Miller was interested in all the improvements in the new country, being one of the proprietors of the Rome Turnpike and the Rome and Turin Plank road, in both of which he was a director during their continuance. He was the first Postmaster in Constableville, and held that office from its establishment in 1826, with an interruption of three or four months, until September, 1853. The receipts of this office for the first quarter of its existence, were $4.12, and for the last quarter of his official term, about $65.00. Politically, Mr. Miller was an active Whig and Republican, and was a warm supporter of the government.

Colonel Miller acquired his military title from his connection with the State militia, in which he held the rank of Colonel, and in the prosperity of which he took much interest.

He married, June 11, 1822, Laura Todd, of Salisbury. He used to amuse his grandchildren by describing the carriage in which he brought home his bride, which was a strong, well-painted, two-horse lumber wagon. As this was as stylish a conveyance as could be found in those days, it was entirely satisfactory. Perhaps a lack of the false pride which characterizes too many of the present generation, had something to do with the satisfaction of the bride and groom on that memorable day in their lives. Mr. Miller's wife survived him nearly thirteen years.

They had nine children: Stephen T.; M. Eliza, who married Rev. H. W. Morris; Cornelia D., who married P. M. Kent; Watts T.; Emily S., who married Isaac Burrell; Charles; Jane L., who married John H. Stotsenburg; Charles A.; and Helen M., who married Dr. James T. Young, all of whom survived him, except Charles, who died at about two years of age, and Mrs. Morris, who died about two years before his death.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

MILLER, SETH

Seth Miller was from Canaan, Conn., and the son of Benjamin Miller. He settled a short distance west of Constableville, and died February 20, 1855, aged 75 years. His sons were: —

Dr. Sylvester Miller, who settled at Lowville, and whose death is mentioned in our account of that town.

Dr. James Miller, settled at Johnstown, N. Y.

Timothy Miller, first merchant at Constableville.

Benjamin Miller, who removed West and died there.

Seth Miller, long a prominent merchant in Constableville, and elsewhere noticed.

Colvin Miller, who resided on the homestead.

Mr. Seth Miller, the settler, had four daughters.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


MILLS, DELOSS

DELOSS MILLS.
The father of Deloss Mills was Timothy, son of Frederick Mills and Roxey Stores, who was born in the parish of Wintonbury, in the State of Connecticut, December 15, 1789. On the 16th of September, 1813, at Canajoharie, Montgomery county, N. Y., he was married to Catharine Taylor, daughter of Henry Taylor and Phebe Herrington, who was born at Kortright, Delaware county, N. Y., December 15, 1792. They had nine children as follows:—

Susan, born in Watson, Lewis county, October 4, 1814, married N. Hart Morris, of Lowville, July 22, 1844; Roxey, born in town of Lowville, June 15, 1816, married Charles Chase, of Lowville, September 8, 1834; Dwight, born at Lowville, November 5, 1819, married Hannahrett White, of Ames, Montgomery county, N. Y., September 5, 1848; Jane, born at Lowville, May 27, 1821, married Isaac Bingham, of Lowville, July 23, 1844; Maria, born in Lowville, September 19, 1823, married Norman B. Foot, of Lowville, October 31, 1848; Frederick, born at Lowville, August 9, 1826, died March 13, 1827; Melissa, born in Lowville, March 17, 1828, married Professor William Root Adams, of Lowville, August 17, 1852 ; Duane, born in Lowville, July 25, 1835, died March 2, 1836.

Deloss, the third child, was born in Lowville, January 8, 1818. His early life was passed upon the farm, in the common schools and in Lowville Academy, where he received his education. Like his ancestors, he followed the business of farming, in which he has been successful. He was married to Emily Storrs, of Watson, February nth, 1845. She died on the 6th of March following, and he married Pamelia Lansing, of Ames, Montgomery county, June 6, 1849, who was born at Saratoga, May 30, 1828. Their children are:—

Harriet M., born January 11, 1851; Charles A., born January 2, 1854; Emily A., born July 28, 1855; Nellie J., born December 17, 1861.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

MOSHIER, JOHNJohn Moshier

JOHN GIGER MOSHIER, son of David and Caroline M. (Freeman) Moshier, was born in 1825 in the town of Jerusalem, Yates county, N. Y. Oct. 20, 1847, he united in marriage with Miss Sarah M. Merriman. They first settled in the town of Russia, Herkimer county. N. Y., Mrs. Moshier's native town. March 22, 1855, they removed to a fine farm at West Martinsburgh. During the war, besides the cultivation of his farm, Mr. Moshier dealt extensively in horses and cattle, and later principally in dairy cows. Besides conducting a large dairy of cows and the ordinary cultivation of his farm, Mr. Moshier was some years an extensive grower of hops. In 1891 Mr. and Mrs. Moshier removed to Lowville where they now reside.  


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


MOSHIER, SARAHSarah Moshier

MRS. .JOHN G. MOSHIER, nee Sarah M. Merriman. daughter of Isaac G. and Lucy (Sheldon) Merriman, was born in the town of Russia, Herkimer county, Oct. 23, 1828. After marrying John G. Moshier, she dutifully followed her husband and his fortune, which was also her fortune, and hand in hand they have travelled life's journey together almost half a century. Mr. and Mrs. Moshier were blessed with six children. Those living are Caroline (Mrs. A. C. Boshart) of Lowville, Sarah (Mrs. H. N. Shumway) of Houseville, John of Chicago, Ill., Charles and Wm. D., the firm of Moshier Bros., wholesale dealers in tea, coffee, extracts and perfumes, of Utica, N. Y. Their fifth child, Isaac M., died in Chicago. 

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

MOORE, D.C.

D.C. MOORE is a native of Lewis county, New York, and was born in 1851. He was reared and educated in his native state and went to Iowa in 1872 and engaged in the real estate business there until 1875 at Decorah, and then followed the practice of law until 1879, and was then elected sheriff of the county and again served in that capacity in 1881. He resigned his office to go to Grafton, North Dakota, and has been associated with the bank of which he now has the management since that date. He is a man of excellent business qualifications and whatever enlists his attention is almost sure of meeting with success. He is careful and systematic in all details and has a clear head and a good education, and is well-known as a man of the highest honor and is respected by all with whom he has to do so. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He does not seek public preferment and takes no part in political affairs.

(Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler
)

MORGAN, LUTHER

LUTHER MORGAN.
Luther Morgan was a grandson of Isaac Morgan, of West Springfield, Hampden county, Mass., who was born in the year 1737, and who died at Houseville, Lewis County, at the home of his son, Rollin Morgan, August 2, 1814. Of his wife, nothing is known. His son, Rollin Morgan, was born in West Springfield, Mass., December 24, 1779.  In 1805, he went to Trenton, N. Y., where he became acquainted with, and afterward married, June 9, 1806, Roxy Flagg. She was born in Berlin, Conn., April 23, 1787, and with her parents removed to Trenton, N. Y., in 1804; traveling with an ox team, and being some three weeks making the journey. Rollin lived in Trenton until about 1812, when he moved to Lewis county, settling in Houseville. He began life as a shoe maker, which occupation, after a few years, he abandoned for farming.

He died at Houseville, February 1, 1839. His wife died at the residence of her daughter, in Southampton, Mass., February 18, 1861. Their children were, Olive H., born July 16, 1808, died at Houseville, October 12, 1833 ; Cyrus B., born January 24, 1812, married Emeline Woodruff, of Watertown, N. Y., and died in Watertown, February 16, 1868; Harrison, born August 14, 1814, married Mary Chapman, of Greenwich, Mass., and is now a minister at Grand Rapids, Mich.; Sally Maria, born November 2, 1816, married Sardis Chapman, of Southampton, Mass., February 17, 1846, and died in that place, September 4, 1865; Luther; Lucy Ann, born December 5, 1820, died in Houseville, February 28, 1833; Ralph, born March 18, 1824, married Martha Ann Chase, of Chicopee, Mass., December 25, 1851, and died in Southampton, Mass., December 31, 1878; Clarissa, born January 4, 1826, died in Houseville, February 26, 1833; Mary, born July 4, 1831, married Ansel Searle, of Southampton, April 9, 1877, where she now (1883) resides.

Luther Morgan was born in Turin, November 19, 1818, where he passed nearly all of his life. He was educated at Wilbraham, Mass., and adopted the occupation of farming. To this he afterwards added manufacturing, and became quite extensively engaged in the manufacture of lumber and cheese-boxes — a business which is now conducted by his son, G. G. Morgan. He was a man of considerable force of character and energy, and was highly esteemed by his townsmen. Politically, Mr. Morgan was a Republican, and an earnest advocate of the principles of that party. He was for several terms elected Justice of the Peace, the duties of which office he satisfactorily performed. For thirty years he was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died triumphant in its faith, July 9, 1869.

His wife was Lucy Fuller, who was born in Pamelia, Jefferson county, November 27, 1821, to whom he was married August 4, 1845, and who still survives him (1883). The children of this marriage were seven in number — William L., born November 24, 1848, died June 21, 1869; Emery R., born December 22, 1850, died January 6, 1851; George Gary, born March 5, 1852, married Frances B. Sayles, of Albany; Helen C, born April 15, 1855, died February 17, 1861; Carrie J., born November 10, 1859, died March 20, 1861; Clara E., born February 11, 1862; Minnie L., born November 29, 1868.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
MUNN, THADDEUS

THADDEUS E. MUNN.
Among the genial, intelligent and enterprising citizens of Lewis county, none deserve more favorable mention than Thaddeus E. Munn. His father was Otis Munn, who was born in Greenfield, Mass., November 20, 1792, and who removed from that place to Champion, Jefferson county, N. Y., in 1812. There he remained a short time and returned home, and on the 15th of April, 1815, married Parmelia Jenings, of Greenfield, Mass. Soon after his marriage he removed to Rochester, N. Y., where he purchased a large tract of land near Carthage Landing. He remained there a short time and sold this land and removed to the town of Greig, Lewis county, where he entered upon the occupation of carpenter and joiner and bridge builder, which he followed for a number of years. In that town he bought a farm which he sold, and moved to Leyden about 1839, where he purchased the farm now owned by Thaddeus. Here for nearly forty years he lived the life of a farmer, and died Aug. 31, 1880. His wife died May 5, 1876. Their children were: —

Franklin Lyon, born October 2, 1816, died December 29, 1847; Margaret J., born February 25, 1819, married Francis W. Northrop, of Lowville, now of Utica; Mary P., born August 20, 1821, married Walter Whittlesey, of Lyons Falls, died March 25, 1860; Chester J., born July 16, 1824; George W., born October 6, 1827, died August 23, 1839; Helen M., born February 9, 1830, married Henry Shedd, of Lyons Falls, died October 30, 1863.

Thaddeus Eugene Munn, the seventh child, was born July 29, 1835. His early life was passed about home in attendance on the common schools. At the age of thirteen he entered the Lowville Academy, under the tuition of Professor Mayhew, where he studied two and a half years. At the expiration of that time he engaged as clerk in the store of F. W. Northrop, at Lowville, where he remained one year, and went with him to Zanesville, Ohio, where he was connected with him in the dry-goods business nearly two years. He then returned and entered upon a preparatory course of study for college at Fairfield, Herkimer county. Here he studied one year, and went to Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass., where he remained another year, and entered the second term as freshman in Union College, Schenectady, graduating therefrom in 1861. During the next four years, through the eventful struggle of the Rebellion, he devoted much of his time to public speaking at the patriotic war meetings that were held to raise funds and volunteers, and gained for himself a respectable name as a champion of the Federal cause. A member of the Republican party, yet not an office seeker or a politician in the corrupted sense, he was elected by that party as supervisor in 1870, and held that office six consecutive terms. On the 3d of September, 1868, Mr. Munn married Adeline S. Baker, daughter of Thomas Baker, of Talcottville, who was born September 23, 1836. The only child of this marriage is Thaddeus Eugene, Jr., born May 13, 1869.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

MURPHY, STEPHENStephen Murphy

STEPHEN H. MURPHY, M. D., was born in the town of Greig m 1853, He was educated in Fairfield and Whitestown academies, and in his early manhood taught common schools in the states of New York, Illinois and Wisconsin. He chose the medical profession and entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1876 and graduated therefrom in 1879.

He settled at once at Glendale in the town of Martinsburgh, where he is still in practice. He now holds the office of coroner, having been elected to that position by a large majority. Dr. Murphy is energetic, studious and is popular as a man and as a practitioner.

He united in marriage with Mary A. Dorn.

 
(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

O'DONNELL, JOHNJohn O'Donnell

HON. JOHN O'DONNELL, one of the most generally known men in Northern New York, came to Lowville in 1852, and was for many years successfully engaged in the clothing trade. In 1863 he represented Lewis county in the Assembly, and was a member of the Republican State committee for a number of years. In 1864 he was a delegate to the Republican National convention that nominated President Lincoln and Andy Johnson. From 1864 to 1868 he represented Jefferson and Lewis counties in the Senate, and was chairman of finance. He was the author of the bills to tax corporations, to suppress obscene literature, the primary election law, local prohibition, civil damage law, and other reform measures. In 1869 he was appointed U. S. supervisor of internal revenue for the Northern Judicial district of New York. His annual collections were over $5,000,000. During his term of office not a single dollar was lost to the government. Soon after the enactment of the Railroad Commission law in 1882, he was appointed one of the three commissioners, on the unanimous recommendation of New York Chamber of Commerce, the New York Board of Trade and Transportation and the Anti-Monopoly League, and held this office four years, and was known through out the State as the Anti-Monopoly commissioner. During all these years he has been active in local interests, and has erected more than one hundred buildings in Lowville.

Within the last year he received a patent on a steel-track road for common highways, which it is claimed will revolutionize the carrying of freight and passengers. Its first public exhibition was made at the Atlanta National Road Congress last November, when it received the unanimous approval of that body, which passed a resolution suggesting the construction of experimental steel track highways at various points throughout the states for public trial. Mr. O'Donnell is a good speaker, and very generally known as a temperance and labor reformer. 
 

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

OLIVER, SQUIRESquire Oliver

SQUIRE H. OLIVER was born June 3, 1832, in the east part of the town of Martinsburgh, Lewis Co., N. Y. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Oliver, were pioneer settlers of this section. Opportunities for education for the sons and daughters of the early settlers were very limited, from the fact that their parents had a struggle to gather funds to make their small payments on their land contracts. Consequently the subject of this sketch had more days at hard labor than days at school, and did not attend school after he was ten years of age in the summer; but he says, "I am glad to say I was well occupied winter evenings beside the old fire-place in studying and reading." He attended Lowville Academy two terms, taught common schools three terms, and has followed civil engineering and surveying to quite an extent since 1852. Has served as station and express agent at Glendale, since the completion of Black River R. R. in 1868; a longer period of time than that of any other agent on the line; which is conclusive evidence of his appreciation by its managers, of his integrity and business ability. He has served his town twlve years as justice of the peace — declined to serve longer — was postmaster of Glendale six years, and has always resided in the town of Martinsburgh, and is one its most reliable citizens.

Jan. 16, 1856. he married Miss Ada A. Chapman. Pour children have blessed their union: Maturin S., born June 17, 1858; Sarah C. (Mrs. Dr. Littlefield), born Oct. 7, 1868; Jessie A. (Mrs. Van Allen), born June 27, 1870; and Mary E. Oliver, born Nov. 24, 1875, who are all living.  


 
(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

PAHUD, JOSEPH

HON. JOSEPH PAHUD.
Joseph Pahud the subject of the accompanying portrait, was born on the 5th of January, 1824, at Yverdon, Switzerland. His ancestors were Huguenots, who found refuge in that country at the time of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. He was educated at National schools and at the Pestalozzy College, at that time an institution of great repute. He emigrated to America in 1847, when twenty-three years of age, and located at Alpine, in the town of Diana, where a company of his countrymen had erected mills and a charcoal furnace in connection with a purchase of 17,000 acres of timber land. During his management of this property, Mr. Pahud disposed of some 8,000 acres to actual settlers, and in 1853, sold the remainder, including furnace, mills and appurtenances, to Colonel Z. H. Benton, and associates. The following year he removed to Harrisville, then a small hamlet located on the Oswegatchie river, and at present a prosperous village. In 1857, he built a large grist and flouring mill and a saw-mill, followed by the erection of a large sole-leather tannery and other establishments.

Mr. Pahud has been for many years, and is yet, the agent, co-owner and manager of large landed interests in the town of Diana, once the property of Joseph Bonaparte, ex-king of Naples and Spain. His intercourse with settlers was always kind and humane, and it is said that he never ejected a tenant holding land from under him. He has taken an active part in most of the improvements made in his town, and has been of late years engaged in the investigation and opening of valuable veins of Bessemer Magnetic Iron Ore, found in this locality, which at present promise important results and will lead at an early day to the construction of a railroad connecting these mines with the Utica and Black River railroad and the Black River canal, thus opening an outlet to the vast forest yet covering a part of the town of Diana, and adjacent townships in St. Lawrence and Herkimer counties. Although spending most of his life in contact with pioneers and rude workers of the forest, he has retained the social courtesy and refinement of his early training. Always a friend to progress and freedom, he has remained an earnest and devoted follower of the Republican party from the earliest day of its formation.  For several years he was supervisor of the town, elected to that position without a dissenting vote and was a Member of Assembly from the county of Lewis in 1871. Mr. Pahud was married in 1853. His wife Mary and daughter Annette, are yet spared to him. Although never connected with any denomination, he holds Christianity in reverence, and continues in the faith of his forefathers.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

PALMER, WILLIAM

WILLIAM PALMER.
William Palmer was born in the town of Midfield, Otsego county, N. Y., on the 13th day of January, 1826. His ancestors came from England to Columbia county, N. Y., in the middle of the last century. His grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. His father, James Palmer, and family, removed from Otsego county to the town of LeRay, Jefferson county, in 1828, thence to the town of Diana, Lewis county, in 1830. The town was then a wilderness — he located in that part of it known as the Oswegatchie Settlement, purchasing land from Joseph Bonaparte, ex-King of Spain and Naples, — and died in 1853, when sixty-eight years of age. His wife, Olive, mother of William Palmer, died in 1862, at the age of seventy-four. Their surviving children were as follows: —

David, now living in Jefferson county.
James.
William.
Maria, wife of Horace Clarke.
Harriett, wife of Heman Roberts, still residing in the town of Diana.
Peter, who resides in the State of Minnesota.
Albert, who resides in the State of Minnesota.
Sylva, wife of Benjamin Shultz, who died in the year 1879.

James Palmer has buried two of his children — Richard, in 1830, who was accidentally shot by his brother David; and daughter Electa, in 1831.

In the year 1852, William Palmer married Deha Humes, daughter of Nahum Humes, a hunter of fame. Six children were given to them as follows: —

Ella Emilia, wife of Myron Dobson.
Emma E., who died in June, 1878.
Willie E.
Ida L., wife of Sidney Kearns.
Etta L., wife of Elmer Lake.
Freddie E.

He has been a life-long Democrat, and became, in 1868, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of which he is at present a trustee, and has held several town offices, such as commissioner of highways, assessor, etc. Although his educational opportunities had been limited to the inferior common school teaching of his early days, his native intelligence, energy, untiring industry, steadfastness to principles, combined with kindness and modesty, have raised him to an enviable and well-earned position. From humble beginnings in a locality remote, offering few opportunities of acquiring wealth, he is to-day the owner of about 800 acres of land, the most of which is well improved and stocked. He is also interested in a cheese factory and various other matters. Of his wealth he makes a generous use, assisting his children as they start in life. William Palmer resides at present in the village of Harrisville, in the fine dwelling erected by him in 1877, and continues the general supervision of his large farming interest.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

PARIS, J. DUANEJ. Duane Paris

J. DUANE PARIS, the youngest son of the late John M , was born in the town of Harrisburgh Jan. 5, 1848, and was educated in the common schools at Lowville Academy and at Cazenovia Seminary. For some time he was engaged in teaching, and later was employed in the Lewis county clerk's office for a time, under the late D. A. Stewart. Mr. Paris represented the town of Denmark on the board of supervisors continuously from 1884 to 1892, and served two years as chairman of that body. He was elected treasurer of Lewis county in 1892 and served his term of three years; is a magistrate of the town of Denmark and has impartially filled that position since 1883; has been president of the village of Copenhagen, and is now serving as clerk.

Mr. Paris is a member of Orient Lodge, No. 238, F. & A. M., of Court Ganega, No. 1533, I. O. F., and of Copenhagen Grange, No. 90, P. of H., holding positions of honor and trust in all of them, and is one of Coepnhagen's most useful and energetic business men. 
 

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y
.)

PATTON, DANIEL

DANIEL PATTEN.
Jeremiah Patten, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, is supposed to have been the seventh generation from England. He settled in Massachusetts, in the town of Billerica, Middlesex county, but at what date is unknown.

He had five sons, William, Josiah, Jonathan, Thomas and David. The two youngest of these sons settled in Boston, Mass., and the three eldest removed to the town of Westmoreland, Oneida county, N. Y., about the year 1792.

Jonathan Patten was born November 23, 1769. His wife was Wealthy Davenport, to whom he was married March 18, 1799. They came to Lowville, Lewis county, in 1801, where Wealthy died, in 1807. They had five sons — George W., born December 10, 1800, died November 3, 1846; John A., born September 22, 1801, died January 8, 1849; Thomas J., born December 23, 1802; Alanson, born September 26, 1804; David, born September 28, 1806, died May 6, 1826.

Jonathan married for his second wife, June 1, 1808, Betsey Bacon Rice, a native of the town of Natick, Mass. She was the widow of David Rice, to whom she was married in 1796, and with whom she came to Lowville in the year 1800. They had six children. David Rice, died in 1808; Jonathan Patten, died June 18, 1838, aged 70 years; and Betsey, his second wife, died April 27, 1872, aged 92 years.

The children of this second marriage were Daniel Wealthy, born September 16, 1811, died September 20, 1814; Mary Jane, born July 3, 1815, married David Waters in 1844, died April 1, 1869; Rhoda B., born December 9, 1817; Julia Evelina, born August 18, 1829, died April 1, 1831.

Daniel Patten, the oldest of these children, was born in Lowville, March 16, 1809, in which town he has always lived. In 1846, he married Abigail Hardy, daughter of the late Robert Hardy, of Rutland, Jefferson county, N. Y., who died February 28th, of the following year, at the age of twenty-eight. One child was the result of this marriage — Abby H., who was born November 15, 1846, and died May 8, 1864.

On the 1st of January, 1849, he was married for the second time, to Rebecca R. Adams, daughter of the late Dr. Ira Adams, of Lowville. She died September 30, 1851, leaving one son, B. Frank Patten, who was born August 8, 1851, and who married Mary C, daughter of Byron Bamrau, of Harrisburgh, October 28, 1874. They have one child, Frank R. Weston, born April 6, 1878, and still occupy the farm that was taken up in 1801.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

PEEBLES, CHARLES

CHARLES PEEBLES.
The subject of this sketch, Charles Peebles, son of John and Mary Peebles, was born in the town of Martinsburgh,

Lewis county, May i8, 1821. He received the education of the common schools of the town, and followed through life the occupation of farmer, in which he was industrious and successful. He was married December 14, 1843, to Miss Pamelia Arthur, who was a daughter of Levi and Sally Arthur, and born in Martinsburgh, August, 20, 1820. They had seven children, as follows: Ferman F., born September 22, 1844; Venendo F., born January 9, 1846; Elizabeth C, born March 2, 1847; Edna A., born January 2, 1851; Mary I., born March 22, 1856; Ruhamah P., born November 22, 1857; Elmer E., born January 27, 1862. Mr. Peebles experienced religion in 1857, and was chosen deacon in the Union church, at Martinsburgh. He gave liberally of his means to all church and religious purposes. In sickness and in trouble he was ever ready and willing to assist, and all who came to him for help found a friend.

This is the greatest tribute to the life of any man — that he recognized all men as brothers, and extended a helping hand to the afflicted and distressed. Mr. Peebles died April 14, 1864. His wife and children survive him.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

PFISTER, JOHNJohn Pfister

JOHN PFISTER of Lowville was born at Weisenbach, near Heidelburg, Baden, Germany, July 29, 1830, and emigrated to America in 1845. In 1847 he engaged with D. D. Otis of Water town, Jefferson county, N. Y a dealer in hardware, stoves and tin, and there learned the trade of tinsmith. He remained in the employ of Mr. Otis until Aug. 1, 1852. He worked as a journeyman tinner in Martinsburgh and Watertown until Sept 1, 1853 when he settled in Lowville and opened a hardware store and tin store the first store of its kind in the village. This infant industry soon grew to a large and prosperous business, in which he was engaged twenty-one years.

In 1865 he was elected a director of the First National Bank of Lowville, which position he still holds. He is also its vice president. In 1866 he erected the large foundry and machine shop on Valley street, which he conducted until April 2, 1887, when he sold the Lowville Iron Works to Messrs. Hughes & Horton. In 1871, he purchased the old burned site of the "Lower Grist Mill," (now known as Lowville Steam Mills) and erected thereon a grist, flouring and circular saw mill, and conducted the same until December, 1872. He then exchanged this mill property for a farm at Great Bend, on Black River, in the town of Champion containing 312 acres (known as the Lossee farm.) April, 1890, he purchased the Prentice farm adjoining, of 198 acres, making a total of 510 acres of good and valuable land and nearly surrounded by Black River. Since disposing of his mills and the iron works, Mr. Pfister has given his attention to his fine farm and has benefitted Lowville by erecting several dwelling houses. Mr, Pfister was a trustee of his village in 1866 and its president in 1870.

He united in marriage with Miss Emily J. Winchel, daughter of Morris and Deborah Winchel. Their sons are Manford J. and Pay B. Pfister; daughters are Carrie E., wife of J. Howard Crosby, M. D., of South Dakota, and Minnie G., wife of Jess J. Kellogg of Lowville. 


(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)
PHILLIPS, HENRYHenry Phillips

HON. HENRY A. PHILLIPS, son of Elijah and Clarissa (Hough) Phillips, was born July 20, 1834, in Middletown, Con., and moved to Martinsburgh, N. Y., with his parents when five years old. He received his education in the common schools, at Lowville Academy, at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. H., and graduated at Albany State Normal College. He taught school several years in Lewis county and in Gloucester, Mass. In 1867 he was elected Member of Assembly. He was editor of the Northern Journal and Journal and Republican from October 1858 to January, 1864. Prom 1870 to 1878 he was engaged in business at Fort Scott, Kan. But in 1878 again purchased the Journal and Republican and since that time has lived in Lowville.

He was chairman of the Republican County committee eight years from 1884 to 1892. In 1888 he was a delegate to the Republican National convention at Chicago, representing Oneida and Lewis counties In 189" he was elected a trustee of Lowville Academy. Under President Harrison s administration he was postmaster at Lowville, N. Y In December 1866, he was united in marriage with Miss Christine, daughter of Ex-Judge C. P. Scovil of Lowville. They have four children living: three sons. George S.. McGregor A. and Henry S., and one daughter. Mrs Frank T. Post of Spokane, Washington. 
 

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

PICKAND, JAMES D.

Mr. Pickand was from Phila. He was eccentric and peculiar in his manners and removed west, where he ran a strange career at Akron, O., as a Second advent preacher.

(Source: "History of Lewis County, In the State of New York, from the Beginning of its Settlement to the Present Time," by Franklin B. Hough, 1860, transcribed by Peggy Thompson)

PIERREPONT FAMILY

The Pierrepont Family.
Although none of this family settled in the county of Lewis, the name is inseparably linked with the titles, and this fact renders it proper for us to notice them in this connection.

Hezekiah Beers Pierrepont of Brooklyn, was known in Lewis county through his extensive landed possessions in the county, and the intercourse, in consequence, he had with the inhabitants.  He was born at New Haven, Conn., November 3, 1768, and was descended from the Rev. James Pierrepont, the first minister settled in that colony after its establishment. It was remarked in 1860 that the town plat apportioned to him in 1684, has ever since belonged to the family, and been occupied by them. It had thus never been sold since it was ceded by the aborigines. The immediate ancestor of the Rev. James Pierrepont was John Pierrepont, who belonged to the family of Holme Pierrepont, in Nottinghamshire, which family was descended from Robert de Pierrepont, of Normandy. John came to America about the year 1640, with his youngest brother Robert, as tradition says, merely to visit the country, but married and settled near Boston, where he purchased in 1656, three hundred acres, since the site of the town of Roxbury. The family name being French, became Anglicized in this country, and was spelt Pierpont. The correct spelling has been resumed by this branch of the family.

The subject of this memoir displayed at an early age an enterprising active spirit. While at college he became dissatisfied with the study of Latin and Greek, and the prospect of a professional life. He proposed to his father if he would permit him to leave his studies, he would provide for himself, and not receive a share of his estate. His father consented, and he fulfilled his promise to him, and thereafter provided for himself. He first entered the office of his uncle, Mr. Isaac Beers, at New Haven, to obtain a knowledge of business. In 1790 he went to New York and engaged in the custom house, with the view of obtaining a better knowledge of commercial business. The next year he associated himself with Messrs. Watson and Greenleaf, and acted with them in Philadelphia in the purchase of National debt, in which he realized a small fortune. In 1793 he formed a partnership with his cousin, William Leffingwell, and established in New York the house of Leffingwell & Pierrepont.

France being then in revolution, neglected agriculture, and derived large supplies of provisions from America. Mr. Pierrepont went to France to attend the shipments of his firm. The seizures of his vessels by England, then at war with France, so embarrassed the trade that he abandoned it, and in 1795 purchased a fine ship named the Confederacy, on which he made a trading voyage to India and China, acting as his own supercargo. On his return voyage his ship with a valuable cargo was seized by a French privateer, and condemned and sold, contrary to the laws of nations and our treaty stipulations. He remained in France making reclamations against that government, with a good prospect of recovering the value of his property, when a treaty was made between the two countries, by the terms of which our government agreed to assume the claims of its citizens against France and France agreed to assume the claims of its own citizens against the United States. To the disgrace of the government of the United States, these claims, among other similar claims known as "claims for French spoliations prior to 1800," though brought constantly before Congress, have never been paid, in 1860, twenty-one reports had been made in their favor, and the bill had twice been passed and been vetoed. The best men of this country have admitted their justice and advocated them.

Mr. Pierrepont was in Paris during the most bloody days of the Revolution, and saw Robespierre beheaded. He was detained in England also by the legal steps necessary to obtain his insurance, part of which he recovered. Though war prevailed, his character as a neutral enabled him to travel between England and France. Our country being represented in those countries by able men, as well in as out of the diplomatic circle, he enjoyed their society and cemented friendships which lasted during life. That with Mr. Constable was one, and also that with Robert Fulton, in compliment to whom Mr. Pierrepont named a son Robert Fulton, who died in infancy. After an absence of seven years Mr. Pierrepont returned to New York. He married in 1802, Anna Maria, eldest daughter of William Constable. After his marriage, wishing to engage in some business of less hazard than foreign trade, he traveled through New England to examine its manufacturing establishments, and finding distilling profitable, he in 1802 purchased at Brooklyn a brewery belonging to Philip Livingston, and turned it into a manufactory of gin which attained a high reputation, and was very profitable as it was at that time the only manufactory of the kind in the State. He purchased also a country seat on Brooklyn Heights, which afterwards became his permanent residence. He was at that time one of only twenty-six freeholders, who owned the village of Brooklyn, now a city the third in population in the United States. When the profits of his manufactory were diminished by competition Mr. Pierrepont abandoned it, and thereafter gave his attention exclusively to the management of his extensive landed estate in Northern New York and his real estate in Brooklyn. He purchased in 1806 the town of Pierrepont and subsequently half of Stockholm in St. Lawrence county. He made large additions to his landed estate in the five northern counties by purchases from the heirs of Wm. Constable and others, and became the owner of nearly half a million of acres of land, one hundred and fifty thousand acres of which were in this county. He made annual visits to this county to direct the making of roads and other improvements to facilitate settlements, and spent large sums on turnpike roads, aiding in constructing, among others, the St. Lawrence turnpike, of which he was president, and which extended from the Black river to Franklin county a distance of seventy miles. He was also one of the principal proprietors of the turnpike from Rome to Constableville, and was interested in the Albany and Schenectady rail road, which was the first constructed in the State of New York.

His first visit to this county was in 1803, with Mr. James Constable. It was then an almost unbroken forest, and he was obliged to travel on horseback. He had the gratification to witness its gradual settlement and improvement, much of which was the result of his own exertions, seconded by his agents, Mr. Isaac W. Bostwick, Mr. Harvey Stephens, Mr. Diodate Pease, and Mr. David Stiles and others. In the treatment of settlers Mr. Pierrepont was uniformly kind and lenient, extending his indulgence in the collection of their indebtedness, much to his own inconvenience. He surrendered the care and management of his lands in Lewis county for five years previous to his death, and by the provisions of his will, to his son Henry E. Pierrepont, who continued in their active management, till the year 1853, when they were partitioned among the members of the family.

Mr. Pierrepont died 11th August, 1838, leaving a widow, two sons and eight daughters. His widow died in 1859. We add a list of the children of Mr. Pierrepont, to whom his possessions in this county have descended.

William Constable Pierrepont, residing at Pierrepont Manor, Jefferson County.

Henry Evelyn Pierrepont, residing at Brooklyn.

Anna Constable Pierrepont who died in 1839.

Emily Constable Pierrepont, who married Joseph A. Perry.

Frances Matilda Pierrepont, who married Rev. Frederick S. Wiley.

Mary Montague Pierrepont, who died in 1853.

Harriet Constable Pierrepont, who married Edgar J. Barton. She died in 1850.

Maria Theresa Pierrepont, who married Joseph S. Bicknell.

Julia Josephine Pierrepont, who married John Constable of Constableville.

Ellen A. Pierrepont, who married Dr. James M. Minor.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
PITCHER, REUBEN

Reuben Pitcher, the first of the name in this town, was a son of Elijah Pitcher, and a brother of Daniel Pitcher. The latter settled in Boonville, and is the ancestor of a numerous family of this name, and of many of the name of Fisk and Jackson, from the inter-marriage of his daughters with men of these names.

The Pitchers are descendants of Andrew, who settled from England at Dorchester, Mass., in 1630. Governor Nathaniel Pitcher, of Sandy Hill, N. Y., also belonged to this family.

Reuben Pitcher died in this town February 15, 1844, aged 81 years. His wife, Martha (Barrett) Pitcher, died in 1829. Their sons were:—

David, died in Cecil county, Maryland, while working on the Delaware and Chesapeake canal, in 1826. His sons were: — Edward, Edwin, David, Charles and Hiram. He had three daughters who lived to adult age.

Daniel, died April 8, 1863, aged 78 years. Mrs. Rebecca (Rice) Pitcher, died April 24, 1874, aged 82 years. Their sons were:— Moses B., Lyman, Morrison R., Cyrus A., Seymour H., and Marcellus. All now living.

Reuben, died of cancer, August 5, 1865, aged 81 years. His widow, Lydia (Herrick) Pitcher, is still living at a very advanced age. Their sons were: — Leonard, James Harvey, and Lewis A. They had five daughters, who all married and have descendants.

Moses, drowned in Black River bay, December 3, 1846. Had sons: — Milton, (deceased,) and Rev. Oliver P. Pitcher, of Adams. He had two daughters, who married and have children.

Philander, drowned at mouth of Independence creek, in Black river, September 15, 1847. His sons were: — Horace, Francis, Duane, Almond, William and Leicester, who became heads of families. He had three daughters who married.

Almond, died in Gouverneur in November, 1882, aged 83 years. His sons were: — Albert A., and Orville. He had three daughters, of whom two married.

They had three daughters, who married as follows: —

Martha, married Dr. Horatio Gates Hough, in 1803, and about twenty years after his death, married Judge Ichabod Parsons, of Denmark. She died at the home of Warren Arthur, in this town, August 20, 1874, aged 87 years. Her sons were: — Horatio and Franklin B. Hough. Her daughters were: — Almira, Martha, and Dema R. Hough.

Roxana, married Stephen Ashley. Removed to Illinois and died there, leaving a large family.

Dema, married Paul B. Yale, died in Martinsburgh about a year alter marriage, leaving no children.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
PLUMMER, CHARLES

CHARLES PLUMMER.
Charles Plummer is the son of William and Ann Plummer, natives of Burton Leonard, Yorkshire, England, where Charles was born, January 12, 1811, and where he lived until 1832. In that year the family sailed for America, and landed in New York on the 24th of May. Remaining there no longer than necessity required, they went to Deerfield, Oneida county, where they purchased forty-five acres of woodland, and entered upon the active duties of life in their new country and new home.

On the first of the following May, 1833, the mother died, at the age of fifty-two. His father died December 10, 1848.

Mr. Plummer lived in Deerfield eight years, and in 1840, moved to High Market, which was at that time embraced in the town of West Turin, where he bought one hundred and seventy-six acres of wild land. Here he toiled manfully for years to clear his land and bring it to its present state of cultivation, to build for his family a home, and to accumulate a competency for the declining years of his life.

For the turmoil of politics, which produces cares and trials, as well as triumphs, Mr. Plummer has never been ambitious, although he has at different times acceptably filled the official positions to which his townsmen have elected him. He has served seven years as Supervisor of the town of High Market, was for three years Assessor, and for two years filled the position of Town Auditor. In all these public, as well as in all his private matters, he has conscientiously endeavored to do his duty, believing that he is the better man who acts the better part in all dealings with his fellow men. Such characters need no written eulogy. Their lives are remembered even alter they have passed away, and their characters stand as examples for the men of other .generations. As it is the deep waters that run with the greatest force and stillness, so it is the quiet and unobtrusive men who, to an extent greater than is imagined, shape the events of the day, and act as the moral, social, and business motive power of the world. They clear the wilderness, build the homes, develop the townships, and decide the social, moral, and religious tendency of their time. Of that class of men can be reckoned the subject of this sketch. He is respected by all who come in contact with him as a man of honor and integrity, and is one of those whose name should be preserved to the men of the coming years.

On the 27th of December, 1834, Mr. Plummer was married to Catherine Smith, daughter of John P. and Nancy Smith, of Deerfield, Oneida county, N. Y., by whom .he has had two children, George, born May 27, 1836, and Ann, born November 13, 1844. His wife died January 3, 1853, aged thirty-four years, George, the son, married Mary E. Shepard, daughter of Harlow Shepard, of Turin, December 1, 1858, and lives on the homestead. His children are: Emma C., Nellie M., Charles E., Jennie C., and George H.

The daughter, Ann, married Albert D. Blair, of High Market, January 1, 1863. Their children are: Charles R., Jennie C., Kittie B., George A., May B., and a child that died when an infant.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
PORTER, HENRYHenry Porter

HENRY B. PORTER, son of George S. and Thirclevia (Goodenough) Porter, was born in Watertown April 24, 1858. His parents removed to Lowville in 1866, and where he was educated in the public school and Lowville Academy. At the age of twenty-one years he represented the Singer Sewing Machine Co., as (heir general agent, the ensuing ten years, and then changed to the business of life insurance. He now represents the ("Old Reliable") New York Life Insurance Company.

Mr. Porter has written thousands of dollars in risks, and his prompt and reliable company have honorably adjusted all losses, and he has also settled his accounts in a manner to merit the approbation of his employers. Mr. Porter also represents the New England Mutual Accident Association, a substantial and prompt accident company.

Feb. 1, 1882, he married Miss Anna Gilroy of Lyons Falls, N. Y. Their children are Carroll H., Jessie C. and Donald A. and Dorothy A. (twins). Their second child, Bessie J., died at the age of three years. 
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
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POST FAMILY

The Post Family. — Josiah Post, ancestor of all of the name in Lewis county was the son of Nathan Post. He was born in Saybrook, Conn., April 12, 1761. April 19, 1781 he married Miss Lydia Platts, of the same town. Miss Platts was a granddaughter of Frederick Platts, from Germany, who carried the first mail between New York and Boston, requiring two weeks to make the round trip. Frederick Platts married an English lady, Miss Fox, of New London, Connecticut, and settled in Killingworth in 1670, and was the father of three sons, viz: Samuel, Ebenezer and Obadiah, the latter, father of Lydia. In 1802, Josiah Post bought of Abel Lyman, of Durham, Connecticut, a tract of land for six dollars per acre, located in Leyden, Lewis county, N. Y., one mile southwest of the High Falls, (now Lyons Falls) on the Black river. In the spring of 1803, Mr. Post, with his family of seven children, removed to the then almost unbroken wilderness, and settled on his new purchase, where he worked with a will in making the necessary improvements for a home. Being a good carpenter, his services were much needed by the hardy resolute settlers that were rapidly coming in at that date.

Mr. Post built for himself two good saw-mills, worked at his trade, continued to clear and make improvements on his farm until February 13, 1813, when he died, being the first victim of the terrible epidemic of that year, which carried off so many of the early settlers.

His wife remained a widow after his death, and died in Martinsburgh, November 15, 1836.

Of the children, —

Lydia was born March 9, 1772, married Elderkin Boardman; was the mother of two sons and died in Leyden, Aug. 25, 1814.

Josiah, Jr., was born April 13, 1784, and died in Leyden, February 26, 1827.

Josiah Post, Jr., married Miss Fanny Banning, of Leyden, by whom he was the father of ten children, five of whom are now (1883) living in Lewis county. The mother died September 8, 1833. Josiah, Jr., was remarkable for his courage, resolution and physical strength. When but sixteen years of age, he seized a large grey wolf which he had caught in a trap, bound it with barks, and carried him alive three miles on his back, receiving ten dollars bounty for his scalp.

Nancy Post was born July 26, 1788, and died in Randolph, Portage county, Ohio, May 8, 1865.

In 1832, Mr. Post moved with his family to Ohio. His two sons were in the army during the Rebellion, and the youngest, Jesse, Jr., died of starvation in Andersonville prison. John Post, was born October 21, 1801, and died in Olmstead county, Minnesota, January 13, 1877.

John Post married Miss Fidelia Lyon, August 28, 1825. Four children were born to these parents.
 
John Post, Jr., lost his life on the 9th of January, 1857, by accidentally falling into the Black river while cutting ice in a flume, and was instantly carried over the falls, his body not being recovered for some months afterward. John Post was for many years a justice of the peace and for a time one of the Associate Judges of Lewis county. He was the youngest of Josiah Post's seven children, and for a number of years the only survivor. July 5, 1813, Nancy married Joseph Brainerd of Leyden, by whom she was the mother of five children, four sons and one daughter. The husband died in Martinsburgh March 10, 1831, aged 48 years.

Rebecca Post was born August 25, 1791, died in Leyden November 12, 1813, (unmarried). Obadiah Post born May 6, 1793, died May 28, 1873 at Elkhart, Indiana, aged 80 years.

Obadiah married Lucretia Bailey, by whom he was the father of six children, four sons, and two daughters. The mother died at Elkhart, Indiana, Sept. 21, 1867.

Jesse D. Post, was born September 14, 1797, died in Stow, Summit county, Ohio, May 30, 1863. Jesse D. married Sybil Fisk, of Leyden, Nov. 16, 1820. She died ---- ---- leaving one daughter. June 19, 1822, he married Melancy Rogers, who bore him four sons and one daughter.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
POTTER, BENJAMIN

BENJAMIN F. POTTER.
Benjamin Franklin Potter, was born in the town of Floyd, Oneida county, September 29, 1817. His father was Joseph Potter, a native of Vermont, born March 16, 1775, who married Phebe Adams, February 1, 1795. She was born December 26, 1774, and was also a native of Vermont. Mr. Potter lived in Floyd with his parents, until he was sixteen years of age, when the family came to Lewis county, and located in Turin. He was the youngest of eight children, and inherited from his parents the energy and perseverance characteristic of natives of the Green Mountain State. Early in life he was thrown upon his own resources, and compelled to carve his name and fortune unaided. He received the education which the schools of those days afforded, and for some nine years taught school during the winters, and worked on a farm in the summer months. About the year 1840, he resolved to better his condition by removing to the West, and spent several months in traveling through the Western States in search of a site for a new home. It was his intention to locate somewhere near the Mississippi river, but sickness came upon him, and he returned to Lewis county, fully satisfied that this region was good enough for him.

In 1850, he moved upon the farm where he lived the remainder of his life, and on which he erected fine and spacious farm buildings. Mr. Potter was one of the most extensive hop growers in the county, and for nearly twenty years of his life was largely engaged in the shipment of venison to New York and other markets.

He was a life-long Democrat politically, and during the War of the Rebellion he was one of the most active in securing for his town her quota of volunteers, often neglecting his private business for his country's good. He was elected to represent his town on the Board of Supervisors, and for years held minor town offices, all of which, he filled to the satisfaction of his constituents. Mr. Potter was in every sense of the term a self-made man, and his life is an illustration of what can be accomplished by honor, energy and persevering effort. He was trusted by all who knew him, and was eminently the friend of the poor. He died after a brief illness, February 23, 1883, and in his death the world lost one of the men who had made it better by his presence.

In March, 1846, Mr. Potter married Rachel Ann Case, of Turin, who was born August 29, 1820, and who survives him (1883). The children of this marriage were — Fannie M., born August 16, 1848, who married Frank E. Wilson; E. Eugene, born February 16, 1850; Marshall N., born October 4, 1851; Flora A., born November 22, 1853, and married Charles Crofoot; Frank A., born February 3, 1856; Samuel C, born February 28, 1858; Ida L., born December 20, 1860; Alice M., born July 8, 1863.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
REA, RUSTON

RUTSON REA.
"In this world," said a profound thinker, "there are no 'great' or 'small' events. The smallest in appearance are often the most important." That applies with force to the lives of all men. Few realize that each well-ordered life is an important link in the chain of our existence, and exerts an influence for good over mankind; and had not that life been lived, the sum total of good would have been reduced to the extent of the influence of that one life, which so many unthinkingly regard as unimportant. Men act their part in the drama of life and die. Some build high the temple of fame in song or story, as soldiers, lawyers, ministers or statesmen, and are not forgotten. Others there are who, as pioneers in a new land, broke down the forests, and created the cultivated farms of the living generation ; who developed thrifty villages, formed townships, built school houses and churches, and gave life and vigor to the business interests of their time, and die and are forgotten. The generation that succeeds them and that has been made prosperous by their existence, knows them not. They pass from the memory of even their descendants, and fade into oblivion as though they had never been born. Each generation owes to the world the duty of preserving for the benefit of the future the names and deeds, humble though they may be, of the men whose energy gave impetus to the industries of their day, and whose honesty gave character to the time in which they lived. To preserve in some slight degree from entire oblivion the names and features of the worthy men of the past and present generations, this history of Lewis county is written, and among the names whom it commemorates none are worthier of preservation than the name of the subject of this sketch, whose life has been one of usefulness.

The ancestry can not definitely be traced back farther than the third generation. Hugh Rea, the grandfather, was born in Ireland, November 17, 1741, and came to America in 1764, settling in Duchess county, where he married, March 22, 1767, Margaret Knickerbocker. She was of German parentage, born in Duchess county, March 8, 1747. Shortly after their marriage they engaged in mercantile business near the place now known as Jackson's Corners, and had a large trade with the American army during the war of the Revolution, which proved disastrous to them on account of the depreciation of continental money.

Nine children were born to them, five sons and four daughters — Margery, born October 22, 1775, married Adam Silvernail and died May 31, 1835 ; Sarah, born May 22, 1783, married Benjamin Knickerbocker, died January 9, 1859; Marica, born October 7, 1787, married James Miller, died March 24, 1849; Rachel, born September 8, 1792, married James Coon, date of death unknown, supposed to have been buried in town of Butternuts, Otsego county; Hugh, born November 6, 1777, married Catharine Houck, and died March 10, 1849; Samuel, born May 19, 1781, married Mary Gilchrist, and died May 22, 1812; William, born May 22, 1785, married Catharine Stickele, and died October 1, 1841; Philip, born April 11, 1790, married Rebecca Millard, died November 16, 1875. Margery, Sarah, Marica, Hugh, Samuel and William were born and died in Duchess county. Philip and Peter were born in Duchess county and died in Lewis county.

Peter Rea was the father of the subject of this sketch, and was born in Duchess county, December 25, 1776. He married February 1 1, 1798, Elizabeth Hoisradt, who was born in Duchess county, March 1, 1781. For ten or twelve years they carried on farming in Duchess county, and then removed to the town of Hillsdale, Columbia county, where he was engaged in farming until the fall of 1823, when they removed to the town of Turin, in this county, settling in that portion now embraced in West Turin. Here they lived respected and useful lives until their death, which occurred, that of Peter July 23, 1862, and that of Elizabeth April 14, 1843. They were buried on the farm on which they settled, in the burying-ground on the West road leading from Turin village to Constableville. Peter Rea was several times elected Supervisor of his town and served several terms as Assessor and Justice of the Peace. There were born to them fourteen children, — Maria, Eve, Sarah, Margaret, Louisa, Sabrina, Delila, Peter, Parle, Jacob, Rutson, Van Rensselaer, Robert and Cyrus.

Rutson Rea was born March 17, 1816, in the town of Hillsdale, Columbia county. He came with his parents to Turin, Lewis county, in the fall of 1823, and with them remained, helping them through the hardships of a new country, until the spring of 1839. He received the education of the common schools, and at the age of twenty-three his father gave him four hundred dollars for his services and good behavior up to that time. With that money he bought fifty acres of land in the town of Turin. Here he toiled for a year alone, keeping batchelor's hall, and then on the 18th of March, 1840, married Clarissa A. Clark, daughter of Newton and Elizabeth Clark, of Turin, who was born February 18, 1818. He carried on farming in the town of Turin till the spring of 1852, when he sold his real estate there and bought the farm known as the John Buck farm, on the West road, in the town of Lowville. He added to his farming labors that spring the business of buying butter and cheese, and remained on the farm three years. He then moved to the village of Lowville, where he has since resided. He conducted his farming operations in connection with his produce business, in both of which he has been pre-eminently successful, being the owner of some thirty-five hundred acres of improved farming land besides some city and village property. In all of his dealings, Mr. Rea has been conscientious, and has gained the confidence and respect of his friends and neighbors, to whom he is known as "honest Rutson Rea," and says he envies no man's morals, that pays a just debt by statute of limitation or pleading usury. He has been purely a business man, and concerned in politics only as his fellow citizens have placed him in official positions. These occasions were few, he having served the town only several terms as Assessor, and twice as Supervisor. Mr. Rea's is one of the cordial, genial dispositions with which men, in this life of business austerity and hardships, delight to meet. His father added to his farming the business of inn keeping, which he continued a number of years. During those years Mr. Rea lived at home, surrounded by temptations that would have led many a youth astray. To his credit it can be said that he never succumbed to the temptation of drink, and never indulged in the habits of smoking or chewing. A man of energy and industry, of strict integrity of character, of broad views and genial disposition, he has won his way into the hearts of men within his world, and has lived a useful and honored life.

His married life was blessed with but one child, Frances Amelia, who was born May 13, 1844. She married Amos V. Smiley, the editor and proprietor of the Journal and Republican, May 13, 1863, and died July 20, 1869. Mr. Smiley, was born May 29, 1841, and died April 9, 1878. Two children were born to them Clara F., January 6, 1868; and Rutson R., July 14, 1869. Left orphans in their very infancy, they have found a home with Mr. Rea, and have found in their grandparents a father's and mother's love and care. The world is peopled with too few of such generous and noble hearts. In this age of greed, even the ties of blood are ignored, and this generation should not permit to pass into oblivion the names of those who have not forgotten their offspring and have remembered their fellow men.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

RALSTEN, FREDFred Ralsten

FRED HENRY RALSTEN, EDITOR OF THE LOWVILLE TIMES, is the son of James H. and Catherine Ralsten of Lowville. He was born. March 11, 1869, at Pinckney, N. Y. During the year 1871 the family took up their residence at West Martinsburgh, where James Ralsten conducted a general merchandise store for fifteen years. During this time Fred spent his time at the Old Red school house and in the store, and there acquired studious and industrious habits. 1885 the family came to Lowville and our subject began attending the Academy, graduating with honors in 1888. In the fall of '88 he entered Wesleyan University, Middletown, Ct., where he spent three years in the scientific course, paying special attention to literature, history and philosophy. During these three years he was very prominent in the college social life, a member of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity. He was president and captain of the' athletic team and a 'varsity foot ball man. In the fall of 1891 he received a call as physical director to the Railroad Men's Y. M. C. A. in New York. This position was filled with marked success, and time was found to do special law work in the city. The early spring of 1892 he received a call to Hamilton college, where he was placed at the head of the physical department and opened the first work in the new Soper gymnasium. He held this position for two years, and took special work in history, law and philosophy. July 1, 1894, Mr. Ralsten entered into partnership with R. R. Smiley and purchased the Lowville Times. He assumed the editorship from the first.

Mr. Ralsten is a young man of groat energy and fine abilities, who has changed the Times from an "independent" sheet to a decided Republican paper. He has also greatly enlarged and changed it from four pages to eight pages in form, and the Times now bears favorable comparison with any "county newspaper in Northern New York. Its subscribers have increased about 500 under his management.  
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
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RICE, WILLIAM

WILLIAM W. RICE.
The family of Rice is descended from Robert Rice, who was born in England about the year 1590. The name in the earlier days of the family was variously spelled as Royce, Roise, Roice, and Royse. At what time it was changed to the more simple form of Rice, is not known.

Robert, the ancestor mentioned, came to America in 1631, and settled first in Boston, Massachusetts, from whence he removed to New London, Connecticut, previous to 1657. He was constable there in 1660, and was a representative in the Colonial Legislature, in 1661. He was in good repute, and was the father of nine children — six sons and three daughters. His first wife, Elizabeth, was living on the estate in 1688. He died in 1676.

His third son, Samuel, married Hannah Churchell, of Wethersfield, Conn. He resided in New London, Conn., and was a freeman there in 1669, but removed from there to Wallingford, New Haven county, previous to 1677. He had two sons and three daughters. His eldest son, also named Samuel, resided in Wallingford, where he married, June 5, 1690, Sarah Baldwin, by whom he had four children. He died June 11, 1729. Of his children, Jacob, the youngest son, born April 11, 1697, married Sept. 28, 1724, Thankful Beach, daughter of Thos. and Phebe Beach. She was born Sept. 20, 1702. Jacob died Nov 13, 1727, aged 30.

The children of Jacob and Thankful Beach Rice, were Amos and Experience. Amos, born November 1, 1725, married Sarah Morse, about 1753, and resided in Wallingford, Conn. They had seven sons and four daughters. Their fifth son, Benajah, was born March 16, 1767, and married Sarah Hough, in January, 1793. Their only son Amos, was born August 22, 1800, in Windham, Greene county, N. Y. He married Loretta Susan Andrews, of Greene county, and came to Lewis county in 1857. Of the children of this marriage, two sons, William W. and Yale, have achieved some prominence in the business interests of Lewis county.

Yale Rice, the eldest, was born December 23, 1831, and received his education in Cortland and Ithaca. In 1849, he entered the leather establishment of Loring Andrews, in New York, where he remained as clerk and book-keeper until 1853. He then went to Sullivan county, where he became connected with a tannery, remaining some six years. In 1859, he removed to Wisconsin, where he was a merchant until 1864. In that year he came to Lewis county, and became a partner with his brother in the manufacture of leather, under the firm name of W. & Y. Rice.

William Wirt Rice, the subject of the accompanying portrait, was born in Lexington, Greene county. New York, August 13, 1833. At the age of two years his parents removed from Greene county to Homer, Cortland county, where his early life was passed, and where he received his education in the Cortland Academy, under Prof. S. B. Woolworth, since secretary of the Board of Regents. He lived on the farm until the age of twenty, and in 1853, left home and came to the town of Greig, Lewis county, where he worked for C. W. Pratt, a tanner, for three years at twelve dollars per month, during which time he mastered the trade of sole leather tanning. In 1856, in company with his oldest brother, B. B. Rice, he built a tannery at Dunning's Station, on the Delaware & Lackawanna Railroad, nine miles from Scranton, Pa., which he sold before its entire completion, and in December, 1856, came to Croghan, Lewis county. Here in the year following he built a tannery which was destroyed by fire in 1865, and the present tannery was built in its place at once. In 1863, B. B. Rice sold his interest in the business to the father, Amos, who in 1864, sold to his son Yale, the present partner with William W. The capacity of this tannery is 20,000 sides of sole leather per year, using during that time 3,000 cords of bark. In the spring of 1870 they purchased ten thousand acres of land in Croghan, principally for its growth of hemlock timber. They built also a tannery at Jordan Falls, on the Oswegatchie river, the capacity of which is 60,000 sides per annum. Here they erected twenty-five or thirty dwellings, a large boarding house, a store and school house. In 1873, they purchased some 18,000 acres more of land, for its hemlock timber, and now conduct probably the most extensive tannery in the county. In 1866, William W. Rice was elected Supervisor of the town, which office he held four years, and was elected to that position again in 1881, for one term. In 1876, he was elected to the Assembly of the State by the Democratic party, and served to the satisfaction of his constituents.

On the nth of October, 1864, Mr. Rice was married to Martha A. Gowdy daughter of Norman Gowdy of Lowville. His children are: —

Alice G., born October 24, 1865, died September 28, 1870; George Stanley, born August 20, 1867; Julia B., born October 23, 1869; Francis Yale, born November 12, 1871; Norman G., born January 12, 1874; Martha A., born September 12, 1876.

On the 27th of February, 1883, W. & Y. Rice sold their tanneries, and about 10,000 acres of bark land, to Messrs. Bullard & Co., of New York City, and will retire from business.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
RICH, ALONZO & ROLAND

ALONZO AND ROLAND J. RICH.
Josiah Rich, grandfather to Alonzo and Roland, emigrated from Claremont, New Hampshire, to Lewis county in 1816. His occupation through life was that of farmer. His wife was Elizabeth Stone. They were people of the Baptist persuasion, and were known far and near for their hospitable entertainment of the members and ministers of that denomination. Josiah died in 1834, aged 92 years. His wife died in 1819. They had a large family of children — Samuel, Josiah, Phebe, Eliza, Bazaleel Ives, Joseph, Benjamin H., and Ives Bazaleel.

Of these, Bazaleel Ives and Joseph Rich, came from Claremont to the Black River country, in 1801, where the latter took up the farm on which he resided for the most part of his life. He put up a log cabin there, made a clearing during the summer, and in the fall returned to New Hampshire for his family, who came back with him in the spring of 1802. Joseph was born in 1776, and died July 8, 1864. His wife. Avis Dean, was born in 1767, and died November 28, 1854. Their children were: Alonzo D., Roland J., and Horace B. The latter was born July 6, 1809, and died August 1, 1831.

Alonzo Dean Rich was born in what is now the town of Denmark, Oct. 26, 1803. Here his early life was passed, and here he was educated in the common schools, supplemented by after training in the Lowville Academy. He has devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, in which he has been successful. He married Louisa Merriam, of Denmark, Feb. 27, 1831. Their children were: Maria D., born July 23, 1832, married Duane M. Cook, a native of Rodman, Jefferson county, died March 7, 1857; Sidney M., born July 30, 1835, died Aug. 20, 1882, in Hudson, Bates county. Mo.; Lorenzo M., born Nov. 17, 1840, lives in Hudson, Mo.; Horace F., born Jan. 8, 1843; Henrietta A., born June 23, 1847, married the Rev. George B. Barnes, now (1883) in Ottawa, Illinois.

The wife of Alonzo D. died February 28, 1880, and he married for his second wife, Mrs. Isabel Pamelia Austin, of Denmark, December 5, 1880.

Roland Josiah Rich was born in Denmark April 15, 1805, where his life has been passed. He, too, received the education of the schools of those days and that to be obtained in the Lowville Academy, which was organized when he was a mere child. For some years he taught school, but abandoned that profession for farming, which business he has since followed. He married Louisa Blodget, in January, 1837, who died September 22, 1841, aged 33 years. She left a daughter, Louisa, who was born September 9, 1841, and married Ensworth D. Babcock, of Denmark. Mr. Rich then married Sally Maria, a sister of his former wife, in 1843, who also died Dec. 28, 1850, at the age of 33. She left two children, viz: Sarah Augusta, born July 15, 1845; and Roland Jay, born Aug. 10, 1849, died in March, 1852, aged two and a half years.

In January, 1852, Mr. Rich married Lucy Ann Blodget, who is still living.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

RICH, JOSIAH

JOSIAH D. RICH.
The father of the subject of this brief sketch was Bazaleel Ives Rich, brother to Joseph, the father of Alonzo and Roland J. Rich. Josiah was born in Copenhagen, September 25, 1816. His early life was passed in Denmark where he was educated. He early took up the occupation of farming, in which business he has amassed a competency. He was married to Lovina M. Horning, Jan. 2, 1845, who died July 5, 1875. Mr. Rich has passed his life in the town of his birth, and has witnessed the changes of nearly three-quarters of a century. In that time the forests have been removed, the blackened stump fields have given place to broad and fertile acres, and his hands have aided in the prosperity of the town. To that class of men, the hardy workers, the men of sturdy common sense, who feared no bodily labor, the towns of Lewis county owe their present advanced and prosperous condition, and the citizens should not willingly permit their name to pass into oblivion. Josiah Rich in a few more years will be gone.

The generation that knew him will have passed away; the labors which he and his contemporaries performed will be forgotten, except as recorded on historic page; but those of the newer generation who gaze upon the faces herein collected, will recognize him as one of the early and hardy men who bequeathed to the towns of the county the blessing of prosperity.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

RICHARDSON, R. J.R. J. Richardson

R. J. RICHARDSON was born in the town of Martinsburgh, Lewis county, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1843, and spent the early years of his lite on a farm. He was educated at Lowville Academy, and after leaving school he engaged in the drug and grocery trade. He was married in the year 1865 to Clara Salmon, and for a short time retired to the Salmon farm in the town of Martinsburgh, which he owned for a short period. He, however, returned to Lowville in 1868 and engaged in the produce business, and soon thereafter established the firm of R. J. Richardson & Co., which firm has been leaders in the butter and cheese trade for over thirty years. Mr. Richardson has always taken an active interest in public enterprises. As a young business man he earnestly championed the movement to change the location of the county seat from Martinsburgh to Lowville, and aided materially in making the success of that movement possible. He was the instigator of the first bill that passed the State Legislature providing for State game protectors, and in later years he lent his influence to the movement which has resulted in furnishing the village of Lowville with one of the purest and most complete gravity systems of water works in the Empire State. He is now president of the board of water commissioners, which position he has occupied since the first commissioners were elected in Lowville. Has always acted with the Republican party, and represented his district in the National convention in 1884 at Chicago, which nominated James G. Blaine.

Mr. Richardson is a man of untiring energy, who does business strictly on business principles. His long continuance in business has gained him a large acquaintance and a host of friends, who rely upon his integrity whatever he promises he fulfills. 
  

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)
RICHARDSON, S. BROWNS. Brown Richardson

S. BROWN RICHARDSON, son of Joel and Caroline Richardson, was born in the town of Martinsburgh, New York. Dec. 13, 1852. He was descended from Berkshire county, Mass.. stock. His grandfather, Jonathan Richardson, was a captain in the naval service of the colonies during the Revolutionary war. The early years of the subject of this subject of this sketch were passed upon a farm in the town of Martinsburg. Leaving the common school at the age of fifteen years he continued his studies in Lowville Academy and in 1872 entered Rochester Collegicle Institute, Rochester. N. Y., from which institution he graduated in 1874. In September of the latter year he was admitted to the freshamn class of the University of Rochester, from which he graduated wtih the title of Bachelor of Arts, in 1878. Failing health prevented him from preparing for a professional life at this time, and the following five years he spent as a commercial traveler, visiting nearly every state in the Union, and making one trip to the West Indies, where he saw the cities of Havana, Matanzes and Santiago De Cuba. He was married Aug. 11, 1881, to M. Frances Dickey of Lockport. N. Y. In the year 1883 he purchased the interest of his brother, Luther B. Richardson, in the produce firm of R. J. Richardson & Co.. of Lowville, N. Y., and since that time has continued in the produce business and lived in Lowville. He is an enthusiastic Free Mason, was elected master of Lowville Lodge, No. 134, four times, and served three years in that office. Was appointed district deputy grand master of the 16th Masonic district, comprising the counties of Lewis and Jefferson, for two terms, and was elected and served as president of the village of Lowville for five consecutive terms. In politics he has always been a Republican.

Mr. Richardson is a man of scholarly attainments, is a. good speaker, and deservedly popular. He has more than ordinary business ability and has materially aided his brother in making the firm of R. J. Richardson & Co. a leading house of its kind in Northern New York.  
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

RIGGS, CHARLES

CHARLES G. RIGGS.
Charles Giles Riggs, was born in the town of Lee, Oneida county, N. Y., November 17, 1814. His grandparents were James Riggs and Sarah Clark; the former born November 9, 1757, died September 22, 1839; the latter born August 7, 1757, died December 26, 1825. His father, Clark Riggs, was born in Connecticut, April 12, i791, and married Thankful Spinning, who was born April 3. 1788, and died April 3, 1831. He died February 26, 1866.

Charles G. Riggs passed his earlier life in Turin, to which town his parents had moved when he was four years old. At the age of fifteen his parents removed to Martinsburgh, where he lived four years, and then again took up their home in Turin, in which town Mr. Riggs has since lived. Being of a mechanical rather than of an agricultural turn of mind, he learned the trade of tinsmith, and on the 12th of September, 1833, began business for himself in that trade in the village of Turin. In the fall of 1838, his shop and store were destroyed by fire, but not discouraged by that misfortune, he re-established himself in trade, and added to his business a stock of stoves and hardware. This was the first hardware store established in Lewis county.

Mr. Riggs has been closely identified with all the business interests of the village, and has contributed largely to its development and prosperity. In 1870, he built the Riggs Block, which was a substantial addition to the business welfare of the village, and established some years ago, a carriage manufactory, an industry which has obtained some importance in the county. He is also the owner of considerable real estate, and as a merchant and business man has made for himself a reputation for enterprise and probity. Mr. Riggs has acceptably filled various offices within the gift of his townsmen, was Justice of the Peace tor some years, and held the office of Supervisor in the years 1856, 1873, and 1875. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church over fifty years, in which denomination he has been a steward for forty years, and a trustee for forty-five years.

He married, March 1, 1835, Julia A. Moulton, who was born in Floyd, Oneida county, May 5, 1818. Their children were as follows: — Helen Julia, born November 24, 1836; Charles William, born August 25, 1839, died January 28, 1876; Louise Maria, born October 25, 1841; Frances Rebecca, born January 26, 1844, died April 2, 1845; Horace M., born April 17, 1846; George Gary, born November 18, 1849; Sophia Wilcox, born November 2, 1852, died April 14, 1854.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
ROBERTS, CHAUNCEY

CHAUNCEY ROBERTS,
The ancestry of the subject of this sketch cannot be traced farther back than his father, Calvin Roberts, who was born in Connecticut, May 2, 1777, and who married Anna Brainard, March 6, 1799, who was born in the same month and year in which he was born. The earlier portion of the father's life was passed at the trade of shoemaking, and the latter portion was devoted to farming. Calvin Roberts died in West Turin, Lewis County, N. Y., in May, 1835. His wife died in August. 1855. Their children were six in number, Amanda, Clarinda, Ira, Priscilla, Chauncey, and Gilbert.

Chauncey Roberts was born in Turin, Lewis County, May 5, 1810. He was educated in the common schools, and lived in that town until 1839, when he moved to Leyden, where the remainder of his life was passed in the occupation of farming. He married, June 7, 1837, Mary A. Arthur, daughter of Bradford Arthur, of Martinsburgh, who was born November 27, 1815. Two children were born to this marriage, William M., born September 22, 1838, died February 1, 1864, and Mary E., born December 27, 1841, who married Walter D. Jackson, of Boonville, Oneida county, October 1, 1863.

Mr. Chauncey Roberts was for forty-five years a member of the Baptist Church, and enjoyed the esteem and respect of all who knew him. He died June 15, 1876, mourned by his family and regretted by his friends.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
ROBERTS, HARRIET

HARRIET E. ROBERTS.
Harriet Elizabeth Roberts was born in the town of Medfield, Otsego county, June 8, 1818. Her ancestors came from England to Columbia county, New York, in the middle of the last century. Her grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. Her father, James Palmer, and family removed from Otsego county in the year 1828, to the town of LeRay, Jefferson county, thence in 1830, to the town of Diana, Lewis county, then a vast wilderness.

In the year 1843, she was married to Heman Roberts. In i860, she became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Her father died in 1853, and her mother, Olive, in 1862. Their family consisted of ten children — six sons and four daughters — Richard, David, Peter, James, William and Albert, Sylva, Harriet Elizabeth, Maria and Electa. Of these, the following are living: —

David, in Jefferson county.
James.
William.
Harriet Elizabeth.
Maria, wife of Horace Clark, in the town of Diana.
Peter and Albert, in the State of Minnesota.

Richard died in 1830, meeting with a tragical end at the hand of his brother David. The two brothers had gone deer hunting on grounds adjacent to Lake Bonaparte, a few miles from their home. After parting for a while on game tracks, they soon, unaware, came again close to each other, when David, getting a glimpse of Richard's garment through the thicket, and mistaking it for the skin of a deer, took aim and the fatal bullet went crashing through the poor boy's heart.

Electa died in 1831, and Sylva, then widow of Benjamin Shultz, in 1879.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
ROBERTS, HEMAN

HEMAN ROBERTS.
Heman Roberts was born on the 4th day of November, 1816, in the town of Cherry Valley, Otsego county, New York, where his parents, formerly from Columbia county, had moved the previous year. His ancestors came to this country from Wales in the middle of the last century, and his grandfather and great-uncle served under General Washington during the Revolutionary war. His father, Daniel Roberts and family, in the year 1830, removed from Otsego county to the town of Diana, then a part of the great wilderness of northern New York, locating in the central part of the town, known as the Oswegatchie Settlement. In the year 1843, he married Harriett Elizabeth Palmer, yet his living consort. No children were given to them. Heman Roberts has been a life-long Democrat. Enjoying to a remarkable degree the good will and confidence of his fellow townsmen, he has held for 25 years, and yet retains the position of poor-master. Has been also commissioner of highway, collector, etc. In 1861, he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has been ever since a faithful adherent of this religious denomination. He has been eminently an upright and just man, and as a farmer, intelligent, industrious and successful. Deeply attached to each other, the old couple are at present resting from the labor of a long and useful life, surrounded by public esteem and the kind wishes of a large circle of friends. His father, Daniel Roberts, died in 1845, and his mother. Sally, in 1840, leaving eight children as follows: —

Rachel.
Heman.
Theresa.
Minerva.
John.
Richard.
Sally.
Erastus.

Three of these, besides the subject of this notice, are yet living — John, Richard and Sally, now residing in the State of Minnesota.

Rachel, then wife of Horace Clarke, died in 1843.
Theresa died in 1837.
Minerva died in 1837.
Erastus died in 1851.

Another child, Drusilla, met previously with accidental death, in 1821, when five years of age.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

ROGERS, ELI

Mr. Eli Rogers, died April 12, 1849, aged 80. He had a large family, most of whom died before he did. The names of several of them are mentioned in our account of Houseville, where they are mostly buried.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SACKETT, MARTIN

MARTIN J. SACKETT.
The subject of this sketch is of New England parentage, and was born in the town of Turin, September 15, 1832.

His parents were Gad Sheldon Sackett and Elmina Miller. Their other children were Lucina, born April 27, 1835, married A. L. Kellogg, October, 1856; Lydia, born January 11, 1839, married J. Lucius Seymour, February, 1866; George S., born May 7, 1842; Alson C, born August 27, 1844; Charles K., born March 26, 1848.

About 1830, the elder Sackett bought a farm in the woods in the western part of the town, on which there was a small clearing and a log cabin, in which Martin was born.

Those were the rude days of pioneer life, when the dwellings and the school houses were of logs; when stoves were unknown, and the roaring blaze went crackling up the broad fire-place, and men and women sturdily battled with the privations of such a life to insure to their children the future days of more comfort, and a higher place of prosperity. In a few years, the elder Sackett built a framed house, and here on the farm, Martin passed his early life.

He received his education in the common schools, and in Lowville Academy, and taught school seven years, three of which were passed in the schools of Long Island.

Relinquishing that profession, he became interested in farming and produce dealing, in which business he is now engaged. He is the owner of two hundred and seventy-five acres of land, and has under his control a total of four hundred and seventy-five acres. Mr. Sackett is most fortunate in the location of his farm, as it is situated in one of the pleasantest and most fertile portions of the town, deriving on this account a much enhanced value over lands less favorably located. He has always taken great pride in improving to the best of his ability, the lands in his possession, and the beneficial results of his labors are to be seen in every portion of his estate. The following article, written by the editor of the Lowville Journal and Republican, shows the writer's appreciation of the locality in which Mr. Sackett resides: —

"A ride at this season of the year on the East road, from the old Sheldon tavern, beyond Martinsburgh, is positive luxury. The road is smooth and hard, while the landscape, even to the hills west covered with verdure and noble trees, is pleasant to the view. The fine, large farm with its nice buildings, of Martin J. Sackett, attracts attention of the passer by; next come the fine farms of Charles J. Phelps, Almon Miller, Walter Miller, Albert Miller, Stephen Silvernail, James Kilham, John Strong, Charles Bush, Cadwell Dewey, and others whose names we do not now recall, many of them having beautiful and commodious farm buildings, handsome barns, with all the appurtenances j and conveniences necessary for successful farming. Beyond Deweyville, and on the road to Collinsville, we noticed the large and comfortable farm house of Albert Foster, and further on the rich farms of F. J. Newman and his father, William C. Newman, who lives near Collinsville. From the latter place direct to Constableville, the beautiful and extensive places of Emory Allen and Henry McVicker, are; especially attractive."

He has been assessor of his town three years, but has in general been more content to quietly follow his business than to identify himself too much with politics.

Mr. Sackett has been for the past twenty years one of the most liberal supporters of the Houseville Methodist Episcopal Church.

He was married September 15, 1859, to Susan E. Bush, by whom he had two children, Estella M., born December 13, 1864, died June 30, 1878; and Jennie May, born November 18, 1869.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SALMON, RANSOM & WARREN

RANSOM AND WARREN SALMON.
Ransom Salmon was born in Pawling, Duchess county, N. Y., in 1791. His parents were Daniel and Judy Caulkins Salmon. When he was three years of age the family removed to Schoharie, where soon after, during the absence of the family, his father's house was burned by the Indians, and in the same year his father died, leaving his mother with two small children to combat the world alone.

Left fatherless at that age, he made his way to manhood with an energy worthy of imitation. At the age of twenty-one he came to Martinsburgh, Lewis county, where he resided until his death, which occurred July 29, 1880, at the age of 89 years. In his twenty-third year he married Hannah Searl, related on her mother's side to Governor Wade, of Ohio, by whom he had nine children. She dying, he married Anna Whitaker, by whom he had two sons. She also died and he married the widow of the late Judge Goff. His fourth wife was Mary A. Humphrey, who still survives him.

Ransom Salmon's occupation in early life was that of a carpenter, and for years he had an extensive business. In later years he turned his attention to farming. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was one of the energetic and worthy pioneers of this new country, highly esteemed for his true moral worth and kindness to all. For over sixty years he was a member of the Free Will Baptist church, and for over fifty years of that time served its interests as a deacon.

Warren Salmon, a son by the first marriage, was born in Martinsburgh, August 12, 1819. His early life was passed on the farm and in the common schools, where he received the education of the early days of the county. He followed the later occupation of his father, engaging in farming and in the purchase and sale of live stock. Aspiring to no political office, he has devoted himself to his farm and its improvement, and ranks among the best farmers of the county.*

(*The first hay lifter used in the county, which runs on railroad tracks in the roof of the barn, was put up by him.)

Mr. Salmon has on his farm a stone wall which is regarded by all who have seen it as the best in the county. The manner of construction was somewhat as follows: — A ditch was first dug, four and one-half feet wide and about three feet deep, and filled with small stones. The wall was then begun with a tier of boulders in two rows, then a tier of flat limestone to bind across the wall, next a tier of smaller rocks drawn in four inches on both sides, the middle filled each time with small stones, and so on till the wall was four and one-half feet high. A course of flat stones was then added, and a round stone on top completed the wall, making it three feet in the ground and five on top. It is one hundred rods in length and cost about $2,000. Mr. Salmon was sixty years of age when he began the wall, which took him about four years to build, finishing it on the last day of October, 1880. Mr. James Burk, son-in-law of David Allen, laid this substantial structure.

On the 20th day of February, 1845, he married Emily Rusco, of Camden, Oneida county. Their children were — Clara I., born February 18, 1847, married September 13, 1866, Rufus I. Richardson, died December 13, 1869, aged 23 years; George P., born October 27, 1852, died June 16, 1853.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SCOVIL, CARLOSCarlos Scovil

HON, CARLOS P. SCOVIL son of Hezekiah and Catharine (Brown) Scovil, was born in Collinsville, in the town of West Turin, Feb. 26, 1804. His grandfather, Elisha Scovil, came from Meridan, Conn., in 179ti. His father, before mentioned, with Captain Deming of Denmark, raised a company of volunteers in the War of 1812, and was stationed at Sackett's Harbor, with the rank of first lieutenant. He afterward was promoted to a captaincy under Colonel Cox. He was a man of such popularity that he was nominated and elected by both existing parties in 1828, sheriff of the county.

Carlos P. received an academic education, and entered upon the study of law in the office of Henry Page, at Collinsville and Turin, and completed his studies with Thomas S. Conklin, at Martinsburgh. He was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court at the October term of 1830, and was in practice with Judge Seger, at Collinsville, during the year 1831. In the fall of that year he was elected county clerk; again in 1834, and again in 1837. In the fall of 1841, he was elected to the Assembly, and in 1842 was elected to the Senate for a term of four years. In the fall of 1863 Mr. Scovil was elected county judge and surrogate, to which office he was again elected in 1867 and 1871, serving in all eleven years, and serving out but half of his last term because of his age. Since that time he has been engaged in the practice of his profession in Lowville. where he has resided since 1856, with the exception of two or three years at Martinsburgh. On the 18th of August, 1834, he was married to Mary Rockwell, daughter of Philo Rockwell, and granddaughter of General Walter Martin.

Judge Scovil is now aged 92 years. His tall and upright figure is almost daily seen on our streets; his step is elastic, and he strides along with the vigor of manhood in its prime. We hope to have him with us after 1900. He now does a little law business, but Is practically on the retired list.  
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
)



CARLOS P. SCOVIL.
Elisha Scovil, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born in 1743. He came to West Turin, Lewis county, in 1796, and took up a farm on what was afterward known as Cox Hill, just above Collinsville. He was one of the first settlers in that town.

In the fall of that year he returned to Meriden, Connecticut, and in 1798, moved with his family to the new country and farm of his selection.

He was twice married and had eight children by his first wife, and one by his second. These children by the first wife were remarkable for longevity. Of these eight none died under the age of seventy-six, except Oliver, who died of yellow fever in New Orleans while a young man. The oldest died at the age of one hundred, and Lemuel the next oldest, at ninety-seven.

Of these children, Hezekiah, the youngest, and the father of Carlos P. Scovil, was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1770. When he came with his father to West Turin, he was about eighteen years of age, and he afterward purchased the homestead of his father and took care of him until his death in 1827, at the age of 84 years. In 1803, he married Catharine Brown, who was of English and Scotch descent — her father being English and her mother Scotch. He had by her thirteen children, of whom eight only lived to maturity. Hezekiah died in 1856, at the age of 76 years.

His wife, Catharine Brown, died in 1850, at the age of 66. In the War of 1812, Hezekiah Scovil and Captain Deming, of Denmark, raised a company of volunteers for four months' service, with Deming as Captain and Hezekiah as First Lieutenant. This company, with one from Jefferson county, was stationed at Sackett's Harbor. Afterwards, during the same struggle, he served as captain of a company in the regiment of Colonel Cox, and was several times called out with his company to Sackett's Harbor. He was a man of such popularity that, although he was very decided in his political convictions, he was nominated and elected by both existing parties in 1828, as sheriff of the county. Carlos P. Scovil, the subject of this portrait, was born in Collinsville, in the town of West Turin, February 26, 1804; and with the exception of two years' residence in the western part of Pennsylvania, has always been a resident of the county. He received an academic education, and entered upon the study of law in the office of Henry Page at Collinsville and Turin, and the last year with Thomas S. Conklin at Harrisburgh, then the county seat. He was admitted to practice in the supreme court at the October term of 1830, and was in practice with Judge Seger at Collinsville during the year 1831.

In the fall of that year he was elected county clerk; was again elected to that office in the fall of 1834, and again in the fall of 1837 — the latter term of office expiring on the last day of December, 1840.

In the fall of 1841, he was nominated and elected to the Assembly of the State and in the fall of 1842, was elected to the State Senate for four years — the State at that time being divided into eight Senatorial districts, with four Senators from each district.

In the fall of 1863, Mr. Scovil was elected County Judge and Surrogate, to which office he was again elected in 1867, and 1871, serving in all eleven years and serving out but half of his term by reason of his age. Since that time he has been engaged in the practice of his profession in Lowville, where he has lived since 1856, with the exception of two or three years at Martinsburgh.

On the 18th of August, 1834, he was married to Mary Rockwell, a daughter of Philo Rockwell. Her mother was a daughter of General Walter Martin.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SEYMOUR, J. LUCIUS

J. LUCIUS SEYMOUR.
The family of Seymour in all probability is descended from Sir Edward Seymour, first Duke of Somerset, England, Lord Protector of the Realm. The ancestral line of the subject of this biography is (1) Richard,* who settled in Hartford, Conn., about 1640; (2) John, of Hartford; (3) Zachariah, of Hartford; (4) Joseph, of Hartford and Colebrook; (5) Bildad, of Colebrook and Turin; (6) Alva, of Colebrook and Turin.

(* The Bible that once belonged to Richard Seymour is now in possession of one of his descendants, Charles J. Seymour, of Newport, and contains his Coat of Arms and the place of his residence in England, "Berry Pomeroy, Devonshire." This estate was given by the Protector Somerset to his eldest son whom tie disinherited to please his second wife, who wished her son to have his father's title and honors. This is a matter of history, and as Richard Seymour came from there, he no doubt belonged to the disinherited branch.)

Bildad Seymour, son of Joseph, was born January 15, 1776, and married Jemima Hurd in 1794. He died February 28, 1828. His wife died January 24, 1857. He was a carpenter and farmer, and a member of the Congregational Church, of Colebrook, Conn. His son, Alva Seymour, father of J. Lucius, was born in Colebrook, Litchfield county, Conn., November 13, 1795, and with his brother-in-law, Joseph Gaylord, bought of Squire Stickney and Dr. Royal Dewey, of Turin, the farm of two hundred acres, now in the possession of his son. In early life he was a teacher, and was a man of talent and ability. He married Sophronia C. Cowles, of Norfolk, Conn., March 16, 1825, and in the following May moved to the farm at Turin.

He united by letter with the Presbyterian church, of Turin, in 1825, services being then held by Ruel Kimball in the old Union church, now used as a school house. In this church he was soon after elected elder, and continued to hold the office of elder or deacon until his death. He assisted in 1825 to organize the first Sunday school held in the Union church of Turin, of which he was afterward superintendent and teacher. He took an active interest in religious work, was a consistent and faithful member of the church, an honest, conscientious and upright man, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. He held for a number of years the town offices of Assessor and Justice of the Peace.

He died suddenly of heart disease April, 19, 1868. His wife, who was the daughter of Capt. Amasa Cowles, of Norfolk, Conn., born February 19, 1803, is still living (1883). The names of their children were: — Celestia S., born December 17, 1827, married Dr. O. Wheelock, May. 7, 1856; Eliza Ann, born August 22, 1834; Chloe Amelia, born December 16, 1835, died November 8, 1845; Mary, born April 2, 1839, died April 16, 1841; Delia E., born June 13, 1845, died February 29, 1868.

J. Lucius Seymour, the only son, was born in Turin, March 31, 1831. His earlier years were passed on the farm close by his present home. He was educated in the district schools of his town and at Lowville Academy, and followed for some years the occupation of teacher, going West in the spring of 1847 for that purpose, and teaching successfully in Iowa and Minnesota. In the spring of 1863 he returned home, and in the following winter went to Virginia, in the service of the Christian Commission to care for the sick and wounded soldiers. He afterward became engaged in farming, and has also been quite extensively interested in lumbering and real estate transaction in Minnesota. Mr. Seymour since the age of fourteen has been an active worker in the religious field, following in this respect the footsteps of his worthy father.

He is an elder in the First Presbyterian church of Turin, in which, and in the community at large, he is regarded as a conscientious christian and an honorable man. On the 5th of February, 1866, Mr. Seymour married Lydia Sackett, daughter of G. Sheldon and Elmina Sackett, of Turin, who was born January 11, 1839. Their children are seven in number, as follows: — Arthur T., born December 17, 1866; Alva C, born December 14, 1868 ; Edward Lucius, born August 16, 1871 ; Mary Estelle, born July 23, 1873; Dwight Sheldon, born March 27, 1876; Theodore Lyman, born December 30, 1877; Eugene Howard, born July 4, 1880.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
SHARP, IRA

IRA SHARP.
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch, and the first of this family name to settle in America, was William Sharp, who was born in Worcester, Worcester county, England, in 1790. At the age of eighteen he entered the British army, where he served the time then required by the government. In the War of 1812, he served in the British army as a substitute, and with the troops came to Canada and was stationed at Quebec. At this place, not being satisfied with the nature of his service, he deserted, crossed the river in a skiff, and after four days' hungry journey, arrived in the town of Denmark, where for several years he worked as hired help on a farm. He married Betsey Kitts about 1814, and lived the life of a farmer, dying September 18, 1862. His wife died June 17, 1876.

Their children were: — James C, born in the town of Denmark, July 10, 1815; Mary, who married first, Albert Barnum, and second, David Gleason; Aaron; Electa, who married George Rogers, of Lowville, died in January, 1863; and Charles, who died in November, 1882; Maria married Henry Runyan, of Lowville.

James C. Sharp married Nancy Kitts February 19, 1839, who was born in the town of Lowville, June 6, 1816. The children of this marriage were Ursula C, born June 20, 1840, married George Merriman, of Lowville, and died Nov. 25, 1869; William H., born May 4, 1842, died Nov. 9, 1852; Ira; Victoria A., born Sept. 24, 1853; William J., born Nov. 26, 1855, died Oct. 28, 1877; Albert, born May 19, 1860.

Ira Sharp was born in the town of Lowville, February 11, 1847. His early life was passed in that town and the town of Denmark, on his father's farm. He was educated in the common schools of his vicinity and in the Academy at Lowville, and adopted the occupation of farmer and dealer in live stock, to which he afterward added a somewhat extensive trade in lumber. In 1872, he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he has since held. His wife is Ella S. Curtis, daughter of Bradley Curtis, of Martinsburgh, to whom he was married October 20, 1874.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SHELDON, ASA

Asa Lord Sheldon was born at Providence, R.I., Sept. 29, 1781, and died Nov. 8, 1869. His wife, Harriet (Holmes) Sheldon, died June 21, 1869. They were the parents of the late James H. Sheldon, formerly a merchant in this town, and of Martin Sheldon, for several years Supervisor. He lived on the State road about a mile south of the village. J. H. Sheldon died Sept. 4, 1871, aged 56 years.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SHEPARD, HARLOW

HARLOW SHEPARD.
All that is definitely known of the ancestry of the subject of this sketch, is concerning the great-grandfather. Deacon John Shepard, who settled in Westfield, Mass., about the year 1700. He had six sons and three daughters, and the sons were among the most prominent men of Westfield. General William Shepard was for some years in the French war, and also served in the War of the Revolution.

Winthrop Shepard, the father of Harlow, was waiter to General William Shepard, when he was in command of the arsenal, on Springfield Hill, Mass., at the time of Shay's Rebellion.

Another of the sons of Deacon John Shepard, was Charles, grandfather to Harlow, who was a Baptist minister.

Captain Winthrop Shepard, came to the town of Turin, Lewis county, in 1798, and bought a farm on the East road. He raised a family of eleven children, three daughters and eight sons. The sons were Winthrop, Jr., Noble, George, Joshua, Charles, Harlow, Eli, and Dewitt. Noble was an ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church; George, was Sheriff of Lewis County, three years.

Harlow Shepard, was born in Turin, December 12, 1809. He passed his early life attending the district schools of his native town, and in work on the farm, and has through life followed farming as a business.

He has had but little to do during his busy life with politics, and has held but the office of assessor eight years. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church many years ago, and in that society, taking the various terms of service, has held the offices of class leader, steward, and trustee, over thirty years, and is now (1883) treasurer of the Third Methodist Episcopal Church.

He married October 2, 1836, Mary C. Gaylord, who was born in Norfolk, Conn., August 15, 1818. They had eleven children, six sons and five daughters. The sons are: Joseph H., Edwin H., Charles L., Arthur W., George L., and Adelbert E. All of the sons and daughters are living, and the family circle as yet remains unbroken.

General William Shepard, son of Deacon John Shepard, enlisted as a soldier in the French war, at the age of seventeen. At twenty, he was a Lieutenant in the army of General Abercrombie, and at twenty-two he was one of the captains of General Amherst. He entered the Revolutionary struggle as Lieutenant-Colonel, under the command of Washington. He held the commission of General in the army of LaFayette, and was in twenty-two battles, remaining in the army until the capture of Burgoyne. He died at the age of 80 years.

Captain Winthrop Shepard, father of Harlow Shepard, was captain in the War of 1812. He lived to be 82 years old. Edwin H. Shepard, son of Harlow Shepard, served nearly two years in the War of the Rebellion.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

SHUMWAY, CHESTER

CHESTER SHUMWAY.
The first of this family of whom there is any record, was Pierre de Chamois, (afterward called Peter Shumway,) a Huguenot refugee who came to America from France, in 1695. It is said that among his companions of the voyage was one Faneuil, the father of Peter Faneuil, who was born about 1700, and who built and presented to the city of Boston the original Faneuil Hall. The following concerning this Peter or Pierre Shumway, is copied from the town records of Oxford, Massachusetts: —

"Peter or Pierre Shumway, or Shummer, came from France, A. D., 1695, and settled at Danvers* thence to Boston, where married an English lady of the name of Smith, whose father built the third house in Boston with a cellar under it. Afterward moved to Oxford, Massachusetts, where were born: Oliver, in 1701; Jeremiah, in 1703 ; David, in 1705; John, in 1707; Jacob, in 1709; Samuel, in 1711; and Amos in 1722."

(* The settlement at Danvers was broken up by the Indians.)

Of these, David, born December 24, 1705, migrated to Sturbridge, Massachusetts, where were born to him children, as follows: Asa, October 16, 1738; David, May 12, 1742; Solomon, April 1, 1745; Cyril, May 14, 1752; Elijah, July 24, 1753; Danforth, July 18, 1768; Leovinia, born November 4, 1761, became the wife of Nathan Cheney, of Martinsburgh, and was grandmother of Rev. Charles Edward Cheney, of Chicago, Ill., Bishop of the Reformed Episcopal Church.

Lieutenant David Shumway, removed to Belchertown, Massachusetts, and died May 10, 1796. His brother, Dr. Danforth Shumway, came to Martinsburgh about 1806, where he remained a few years, engaged in mercantile business, and afterwards removed to Malta, Saratoga county, where he died.

David was the father of the following children: —

David, born in 1775; Chester, March 4, 1778; Duty, in 1782 — Colonel Duty Shumway, of Granville, Washington county. New York; Eddy, in 1786; Horatio, in 1788 — Hon. Horatio Shumway, of Buffalo, New York; Zebina, in 1790; and Samuel, in 1793 — Hon Samuel Shumway, M. D., of Essex, afterwards of Whitehall, New York. Eddy and Zebina lived and died in Belchertown, Massachusetts.

About 1803, David and Chester left Brattleboro, Vermont, where' they had spent the season at work, with knapsacks on their backs, and axes on their shoulders, to carve out for themselves homes in the then almost unbroken forest of the Back River valley. They took what was known as the "northern route," which led through what was called the "Chateaugay woods," most of the way being little more than a trail following a line of marked trees. They struck the Black river at or near what is now Brownville, and proceeding up the river, finally located on adjoining farms in the town of Martinsburgh, on the West road, at a place since known as Shumway's Corners.

Besides clearing up their farms as they could, being blacksmiths, they erected a shop for that business. Besides what is now generally supposed to belong to that branch of industry, they manufactured by hand, nails, chains, hoes and axes, and also plows of that rude sort called " bull plows," having shares of wrought iron and mold-boards of slabs split from winding trees. The days of cut nails and cast-iron plows were not yet known. They also engaged considerably in the manufacture of potash or "black salts," hauling the products of their works to Utica, usually with a team of four pairs of oxen. David afterwards became quite noted throughout the county, and even beyond its limits for his skill and success in lifting and moving buildings with machinery of his own devising. He died December 6, 1849, aged seventy-four years.

Chester Shumway was married in March, 1805, to Phebe Hitchcock, daughter of Jesse Hitchcock, of Lowville, and she having died in December, 1839, he was again married November 19, 1842, to Anna Stanley, who died at South Rutland, Jefferson county. New York, May 3, 1873. Their children were:

Lucinda, born May 13, 1808, died February 11, 1830: Laura, born April 16, 1810, married May 5, 1852, to Samuel Dusinberre, died March 21, 1883 ; Porter, born December 31, 181 1, died September 9, 1864; Fannie, born May 12, 1813, died September 25, 1839; Sophia, born December 28, 1 8 14, married March 6, 1834, to Uri Bradley Curtis, of Martinsburgh, died December 4, 1872; Harriet, born March 23, 1816, married April 18, 1848, to Peter Viele; Chester; Luther, born January 20, 1819, died April 20, 1878; Phebe, born March 22 1821, married February 5, 1845, to Almon Rice, of Martinsburgh; Seymour, born January 2, 1823, now (1883) living in Chatfield, Minnesota ; Cordelia, born December 20, 1824, now (1883) in Lowville; Julia, born July 17, 1826, married January 2, 1850, to Evan Wilson Williams, now dead; Loren, born February 11, 1830, now in West Martinsburgh.

Chester Shumway, Sr., was one of the original trustees of the First Presbyterian Society of Martinsburgh, formed December 9, 1810, and was then or soon after, elected an elder, which office he held up to the time of his death. In 1814, he was elected one of three commissioners of public schools, the first elected in the town. A much respected citizen, he led a busy and energetic, though a quiet and uneventful life, and died in Martinsburgh, May 1, 1861, aged eighty-three years.

Chester Shumway, his son, whose portrait accompanies this sketch, was born at Martinsburgh, New York, August 23, 1817. The years of his minority were spent upon his father's farm. After attaining his majority, he engaged in school teaching, in which he was quite successful, and his services were sought for in some of the best common schools in the vicinity. He also improved his education by attending Lowville Academy several terms, and the Black River Institute, at Watertown, New York, where he ranked high in his classes. In 1842, he returned to the homestead, and resumed farming, and October 5th of that year, he was married to Clarissa Maria Rice, daughter of Abel S. Rice, of Lowville.

The military service required by law at that time was rendered mostly as a subaltern in a company of riflemen attached to the 46th Regiment of infantry. In August, 1843, he was elected to the command of the company, and received a captain's commission at the hand of Hon. William C. Bouck, then Governor.

In 1852, he located on the farm where he now resides, on the West road, near the old homestead, where he took rank as one of the progressive farmers of the county, and as an occasional writer on agricultural topics, his articles have been uniformly acceptable to the agricultural press. A letter addressed by him to a member of the Central New York Farmers' Club, upon a topic which had been selected for discussion at their next session, was read before the meeting and published in their proceedings, and led to his election as an honorary member of that noted body of agriculturists. He took an active interest in the cause of education and was for several years President of the Lewis County Teachers' Association.

In 1858, he was appointed by the Town Board to fill a vacancy in the office of assessor, and at the next town meeting was elected to that office. He also took an active interest in the extension of the Utica and Black River railroad from Lyons Falls to Lowville. Although not fully approving of bonding towns for the purpose of aiding in the construction of railroads, he thought it the only means by which the road could be secured to the west side of the river, and therefore, with others, entered earnestly into the work of obtaining the consent of tax payers to bond the town for $30,000, which was successfully accomplished. In 1867, he was appointed by County Judge Carlos P. Scovil, railroad commissioner of the town, with Alfred Stiles and William George as colleagues. He took upon himself the principal burden of the office, issued and sold the bonds, and subscribed for stock in the name of the town. The commissioners were appointed for five years, but no effort being made to supersede them, they remained in office till the bonds were all redeemed, — a term of twelve years. In 1871, he was appointed by the town meeting, a committee of one to obtain consent of the taxpayers to the sale of the railroad stock owned by the town. This was successfully accomplished, and from that time stock was sold from year to year, to redeem the bonds as they matured, till all was sold, and all the bonds redeemed to the general satisfaction of all concerned. In 1880, his oldest son, Herman N., was elected Justice of the Peace, to succeed Daniel Loucks, who had held the office thirty-six years. He entered upon the duties of this office in January, 1881. He was married December 2, 1880, to Sarah, daughter of John G. Moshier, and afterward engaged in farming on his father-in-law's farm. In 1875, Howard H. went to Iowa, and October 26, 1881, was married to Anna, daughter of Jonathan Roberts, of Marietta, Marshall county, Iowa. He afterward bought Roberts' farm and settled upon it. Eddy C, the youngest son, remains at the homestead. The three sons have engaged in school teaching from two to six terms each, to their own credit and the general satisfaction of their employers.

The children of Chester Shumway and Clarissa M. Rice were: — Amelia Elizabeth, born November 16, 1845, married October 3, 1865, to George W. Archer, of Martinsburgh; Ellen Clara, born May 7, 1848, died November 25, 1850; Sherman Rice, born December, 27, 1849, died January 2, 1851; Herman Norton, born June 28, 1851, married Sarah Moshier, of West Martinsburgh, December 1, 1880; Howard Haywood, born June 28, 1853, married Anna Roberts, of Marietta, Iowa, October 26, 1881; Charles Rice, born February 12, 1855, died April 6, 1859; Ellen Maria, born November 23, 1856, died April 1, 1859; Eddy Chester, born July 30, 1859; Cara E., born November 2, 1861; and Minnie L., born November 10, 1863, died April 16, 1881.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


SLYE, AMASAAmasa
          Slye

AMASA SLYE, son of Mills Slye, was born in Saratoga county, N. Y., Jan. 13, 1807, and was educated in the common schools. He came to Diana with his father about 1823 and settled in the woods, where his sou Martin V. B. now lives. The last few miles of the journey they were guided by marked trees. In 1830 he married Eliza Van Antwerp, and soon after he settled in a log cabin on twenty-five acres of wild land, where his sons William and George now live. He chopped, logged and cleared little by little and added to his small farm until it contained 160 acres. He was the father of fourteen children, and raised twelve to maturity, viz: Drucella, Martin V. B., Chloe, Esther A., Patia J., Truman E., Gideon, Harvey J., G. Rosalia, William J. , Nettie E. and George M. Mrs. Slye died in 1873, and in 1881 he married Amelia Allen, widow of Henry Allen. She died in 1894. Mr. Slye died on the homestead he cleared up. May 8, 1895. He was a man of the old school style, industrious, honest, and always kept his word.     

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

SMITH, ISAACIsaac
          Smith

ISAAC L. SMITH, born Feb. 10, 1851, whose portrait appears with this sketch, is a son of Lyman Smith and grandson of Trumbull Smith, who was one of three boys born at one birth in Connecticut. George Washington learned of the triple birth, called on their parents, and named one George Washington, after himself, another for Gen. Nathaniel Green and the third Geo. Trumbull. Trumbull Smith came to West Turin when a young man, was a pioneer farmer and reared twelve children, the oldest of whom was the father of the subject of this sketch. Lyman Smith was born Aug. 4, 1809, and died Jan. 27, 1892. Arriving at manhood he engaged in farming in West Turin. He possessed the virtues of economy, industry, enterprise and integrity, and amassed quite a fortune, consisting mainly of 1,000 acres of fine dairy lands. In 1833 he married Jerusha Crofott, who died in 1879. Their children were James C., Perry R., Willard B., who enlisted in the 5th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, was sergeant major, and died at the age of 36 of consumption contracted in the army, and Clara S., John L. and Isaac L., whose early life was passed on his father's farm, where he was well taught the principles of correct manhood by both his worthy parents. He received his education in the common schools and Cazenovia Seminary, and after assisting his father a few years he took a business trip through the Western States of a few years. Following this he was engaged in produce business two years in New York and Philadelphia. In 1878 he purchased of his father the homestead farm, containing 300 acres, where he was a successful farmer and produce dealer, and proprietor of a butter factory situated on his farm, until 1888. He then rented his farm and settled in his fine home in the village of Turin, where he now resides. His produce business has prospered and grown to such dimensions that it requires all of his time. He now stands in the front rank of the business men of Lewis county. Mr. Smith is a man of integrity, fair and honest in all his dealings, and merits and has the confidence of his large acquaintance. He is a staunch Republican, affable and courteous, and an agreeable companion, alive to every real interest of the community in which he resides, a contributor to the churches, and never forgets the little church of his childhood, situated on Crofoot Hill.

Dec. 18, 1884. he married Miss Eestella J., daughter of M. S. Ives, who has ably assisted her husband in all his business enterprises. Four bright boys have been born to them. Their second son died in infancy.  
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)
SMITH, JAMESJasmes Smith

JAMES D. SMITH, son of Benjamin and Lucy (Beebe) Smith, was born in Canaan, Columbia county, N. Y., ,Jan. 12, 1830. He resided with, his parents in Columbia county until 1837, when the family moved to the Adirondack forest, near Brantingham Lake in the town of Greig, in Lewis county, where he found congenial sport in fishing, hunting and trapping. He learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, and later purchased a timberland, built a saw mill and manufactured lumber. On discovering his education was insufficient to transact business successfully, he attended district school through the winter seasons. He next attended Lowville Academy and Fairfield Seminary several terms, and was in the latter institution the principal teacher of the commercial department. The ensuing three years after leaving school he was employed by the late L. C. Cone, as millwright. He built a sash and door and planing mill at Greig and was a jobber in building about twelve years. Next he built a grist mill, also in Greig, which he sold in 1881. During his residence in Greig he served as justice of the peace about twenty years, and his docket shows about 1,500 judgments rendered by him in that time. Having become somewhat acquainted with the law, he chose the profession and entered the Albany law school as a student in 1881, and graduated therefrom in May, 1882, with the degree of L. L. B. Since then he has practiced his profession and has resided in Glendale. He is also admitted to practice in the District and Circuit Courts of the United States.

Mr. Smith married Mary J., daughter of Aaron Ormsby of Lowville. They have two sons, Willard A. and Frank E.  
  

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)

STEPHENS, EHUD

Ehud Stephens, the first contractor for actual settlement, was a grandson of Thomas Stevens, who was born in December, 1692, emigrated to America, and died at or near Newgate, Conn., March 20, 1752. His sons were born as follows: Thomas, November 20, 1723, died October 17, 1783; Solomon, February 17, 1725; Jonathan, March 15, 1734, died in childhood; and Rufus, February 17, 1740, who accompanied his son to Lowville, and died June 26, 1816.

The sons of Rufus Stephens were:

Ehud, born February 17, 1771, died at Copenhagen, August 21, 1852, (his son Apollos was many years a merchant at Copenhagen, and died November 13, 1867, aged seventy-four years, — W. Hudson Stephens, son of Apollos, is a lawyer at Lowville, — Harvey Stephens, son of Ehud, was a merchant at Martinsburgh, and an agent of the Pierrepont estate, he died April 7, 1845 Truman, born October 20, 1782, settled in Lowville in June, 1802, and died November 24, 1868, aged eighty-seven; Ira, born November 29, 1777, settled in Lowville in 1801, and died June 21, 1852 ; Rufus, born November 20, 1779, settled in Lowville in June, 1802, and died January 13, 1865, aged eighty-five; Apollos, died in infancy.

His daughters were: Clarissa, married Barnabas Yale; Ruth, married Levi Adams, of Martinsburgh; Electa, married Preserved Finch, of Turin; Paulina, married Heman Stickney, of Lowville, and afterwards of Turin, died June 22, 1819, aged thirty-one.

Each of the above named, except Jonathan (son of Thomas) and Apollos, became heads of families, and their descendants are numerous.

Ehud Stephens married Mercy, a daughter of Jonathan Rogers, of Branford, Conn., who became the mother of the first white children born in Lowville and Martinsburgh. She was born September 28, 1769, and died May 31, 1849. Mr. Stephens was appointed sheriff in 1808 and 1820, holding the office, in all, about three years.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
STEVENS, SAMUEL

SAMUEL STEVENS.
The ancestors of the subject of this sketch came to this country in the "Mayflower" in 1620. His father had in the family for many years a Bible and a lignum vita mortar, which were brought over in that distinguished vessel. His great-grandfather was Timothy Stevens. He was installed the first Congregational minister of Glastonbury, Conn., in October, 1693. His son, Joseph Stevens, grandfather to Samuel, died in Glastonbury, aged 93 years. He had thirteen sons, of whom Elisha, died in Naugatuck, Conn., aged 64 years; John, died in Lanesborough, Mass.; Peter, died in Pawlet, Vt., aged 85 years; Elijah, died in Vermont; Samuel, died in Lanesborough, Mass.; Thomas, died in Glastonbury, Conn. One other son was named David, and another Ashpel. Of the rest of these sons nothing is known, except that two were said to have died of starvation in a British prison ship in New York, during the Revolution.

James Stevens, father to Samuel, was born in Glastonbury, Conn., in 1757. He served in the Revolutionary war six years and seven months, in which struggle seven of these brothers were engaged in the patriot cause. He drew for many years before his death a pension of $12.00 per month. He died in Michigan, in 1847, aged 90 years. His wife. Honor Talcott, was born in 1764, and died in Lowville, N. Y., in 1815, aged 51 years. They were married in 1782, and had eight children, all of whom are dead except the subject of this sketch.

James Stevens, one of these children, was scalded to death by falling into a large kettle of boiling water, and Horace was killed by the falling of a bent from a barn, which he was raising. James Stevens, the father, moved to Lowville, from Glastonbury, Conn., in March, 1807, with his wife and eight children on an ox sled drawn by one horse and a yoke of oxen. They settled on the farm now owned by Jesse Brown, on the Number Three road, three miles north of the village of Lowville. The family consisted of James, born in 1785, died as before mentioned, in Lowville, in 1809; Sally, born in 1787, died in Oswego, N. Y., in 1868 ; John, born in 1790, died in Lowville, in 1864; Lucy, born in 1795, died in Oswego in 1870; Horace, born in 1798, died as before mentioned, in Hammond, N. Y., in 1822; Clarissa, born in 1801, died in Cheshire, Mass., in 1861; Jerusha, born in 1804, died in Lowville, 1876.

Samuel Stevens, the subject of the portrait, was born April 28, 1806. He was for some fifteen years engaged in mercantile business, in what is now called New Bremen, and was postmaster there during the greater portion of that time. He was engaged in farming in the same place for twenty years, when he removed to Lowville and purchased the farm adjoining that which his father owned, on the Number Three road, where he now resides.

On the 5th of September, 1831, he married Minerva Rogers, daughter of John Rogers, who was born March 21, 1810. She died October 20, 1851. To this marriage were born six children, all of whom are dead except one — Sarah P Stevens, born October 14, 1833. Of these children three, Aurelia L., Henrietta M., and Minerva J., died within six months, of typhoid fever, aged 15, 18 and 24 years.

On the i6th of February, 1853, Mr. Stevens married Elizabeth Evans, daughter of Ellis Evans, who was born in Bala, North Wales, in 1816. The children of this marriage were James Ellis, born August 24, 1858, died of scarlet fever, after an illness of thirty-six hours. May 6, 1871, aged 12 years and 9 months; and R. Kent, born October 8, 1862.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

STILES FAMILY

THE STILES FAMILY.
Among the representatives of the quiet, industrious and useful class of farmers, whose uneventful lives yet give character and stability to the community in which they live, none are more worthy of notice than the Stiles family.

There are no laurels of fame upon their brows, and no romance thrills the brief pages of their history, yet to the men of their industry, steadiness of habit, and persistent, life-long effort, the prosperity of every town is more indebted than to the rays of genius that flash out here and there and fade, and leave no glory and no monument but to the individual.

The first of this family of whom anything definitely is known was John Stiles, grandfather to Jared Stiles, Sr., of Stafford, formerly of Bolton, Conn., who married Jemima Ellis, of the same place. He had no brothers, and but one sister, Deborah, who married a man by the name of Eaton. John Stiles came to Martinsburgh in 1808. His children were Jared, David, Solomon, and Timothy. Of these Jared, born in Tolland, Conn., March 25, 1785, married Lois Warriner, of Wilbraham, Conn., September 11, 1803, who was born November 21, 1786. In the year of his marriage he came to Turin, Lewis county, where he lived some eight years and moved to Martinsburgh, where he settled on the farm now owned by his son, Dwight. Here he lived a useful life and died September 15, 1867. His children were:— Belinda, born November 28, 1809, died March 20, 1875; Jared, born September 23, 1811; Alfred, born April 6, 1813, died August 30, 1815; Alfred, born April 5, 1815; Mary, born July 20, 1817, died September 28, 1834; Anson, born March 23, 1820, died May 9, 1820; Dwight, born April 22, 1825. Jared, born September 23, 1811, in Turin, now West Turin, was educated in the common schools and adopted the life of a farmer. January 31, 1837, he was united in marriage with Fanny Mills, who was born May 3, 1810, and by her he had three Children — Mary, born March 17, 1844, died June 10, 1847; Lewis H., born April 6, 1847; Mary B., born August 13, 1856.

Alfred, born in West Turin, April 15, 1815, passed his early life in Martinsburgh, in attendance on the district schools, and has lived the life of a farmer. He married Harriet Squires, January 20, 1841. She was born May 11, 1815. Their children were — Edward A., born September 29, 1844, married Ellen J. Pitcher, November 18, 1873; Francis D., born August 12, 1846, married Nett A. Hart, January 9, 1867; Dwight, born in Martinsburgh, April 22, 1825, was bred and drilled upon his father's farm, and received the education which the common schools afforded. January 1, 1851, he married Lucretia J. Stanton, who was born in Martinsburgh, June 10, 1828. Their children were: —

Charles D., born October 20, 1851, died October 4, 1875; Augusta L., born January 4, 1854, married February 13, 1879, Charles A. Mills; Eleazer J., born January 27, 1859; Ida A., born June 25, 1865.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

STODDARD, LORIN

LORIN A. STODDARD.
The earlier accounts of this family, relate that two brothers of the name of Stoddard came to this country from England, at an early day. One of these brothers located in Connecticut, but of the other all trace has been lost. The grandfather of Lorin A. was Ralph, who was born in New London, Conn., in 1750. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, and died in Harrisburgh, Dec. 31, 1831. His wife was Mabel Newton, who was also a native of Connecticut. She died Jan. 10, 1837, aged 87. They came to Lewis county about 1807, and settled in Harrisburgh. Their children were George A., Avery P., Charlotte, Waite, Amos, Susan and Simeon, all of whom are dead.

George A., the father of Lorin A., was born in 1772. From the age of sixteen until he was twenty-four, he was a sailor between the Indies and the United States. He came to Lewis county from Westfield, Mass., in the spring of 1805, performing the journey with an ox team and a horse in eighteen days. He located on the farm now owned by Lorin A., on which he passed his days, and died January 11, 1844. His wife was Temperance Allin, of New London, Conn., born April I, 1772, died November 6, 1847. Their children were as follows: —

Lydia, born May 6, 1798, married Wm. I. Lasher, June 8, 1820, both dead; Synthia, born October 7, 1800, married Wm. Thompson, March 16, 1820, both dead; Maria, born May 14, 1802, married Amasa Dodge, January 30, 1823; Anson, born October 21, 1804, died August 20, 1828; Polly, born October 10, 1806, married Henry Humphrey, June 22, 1828; Charles S., born March 23. 1809, married Nancy Humphrey; Lorin A., born Feb. 16, 1811, married Clarrissa Dewey, Feb. 19, 1835; Mabel, born March 16, 1813, married Avery Root, Nov. 10, 1853, died Jan. 6, 1881.

Lorin A. Stoddard was born in Harrisburgh, February 16, 1811, on the homestead where he has passed his life, and which he inherited at his father's death. He received a common school education which he enlarged by an extensive reading that has made him a man of broad and liberal views. In 1835, he married Clarrissa Dewey, a native of Westfield, Mass., born November 9, 1809. One child was the fruit of this marriage — Alfred L., born July 20, 1837.

Alfred L. was married to Elizabeth Searls, Feb. 16, 1859. To them was born, Nov. 17, 1859, a daughter, Jennie L., who was married Sept. 21, 1881, to Ralph W. Caperon.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

STOW, SILAS

Silas Stow, the first Local Agent.

Soon after the division of the Eleven Towns among the four proprietors of the Black River Tract, Mr. Low appointed Silas Stow, as his agent. A short account of Mr. Stow is proper in this connection.

He was born in Middlefield, Connecticut, December 21, 1773, and was the youngest of a family of eight children. His three older brothers, Elihu, Obed and Joshua, were all in the Revolution, and his father, a zealous patriot, rendered all the material aid that could be spared from his farm, and from principle, received continental money at par for everything he had to sell for the army. He was a farmer in very moderate circumstances. His wife was a woman of remarkable energy and devotion to the interests of her family. Mr. Stow was often heard to speak of her with tenderness and respect, and to her were her children largely indebted for whatever distinction they afterwards acquired. He received only a common school education, and his further acquirements were due to his mother's care and his own enthusiasm. He studied law at Middletown, but before settling in practice, became concerned in the agency of Leyden, and in 1797 was appointed by Low, agent for his towns on the Black River Tract. He came on with the first settlers, and on the 26th of July, 1801, he married Mary Ruggles, of Boston, a sister of General George D. Ruggles, formerly of this town. We will relate an incident of the courtship and marriage of Mr. Stow, of which there can be no doubt, as we have it in part from those who knew the circumstances, and partly from his own diary.

Before coming into the county he had become acquainted with Miss Ruggles, of Boston, and had agreed to marry, but during his absence in the Black River country, she changed her mind, and without giving him notice, married a Doctor Dix. In his diary at Lowville, June 17, 1790, is the following entry: —

"This day is one year since I heard of M. Ruggles' marriage, and I have devoted it to serious reflection and prayer. For three days after the news, I felt indescribable distress, but since that I have thought of it with a kind of solemn satisfaction. I consider it as one of the many evident manifestations of a Divine Providence, which I have witnessed, and an additional proof of what I have long believed, viz: — that infidelity in love is always punished in this life. This day I have received a letter from Daniel Hirshaw, announcing Dix's death, after flying from his wife and treating her with the greatest abuse. If this should ever fall into the hands of any person but myself, he may know that the writer believed that there is a God mindful of the affairs of men."

The mention of the death of Dr. Dix, in the above extract, anticipates somewhat the thread of the narrative which we will now resume: —

The course of love did not run smooth with Mr. and Mrs. Dix— in fact, he at once abandoned her, and she lost all trace of his whereabouts. But meeting a sea-captain of her acquaintance, one day, he told her that her husband was living at the Island of St. Thomas, in the West Indies. She took passage in his vessel for that place, and almost the first person she met upon landing, was her husband. He affected pleasure at meeting her, but as they were passing along, he entered a building under pretext of business, and left her standing in the street. This was the last she ever saw of him, and search being unavailing, she returned to Boston.

On the 10th and 11th of August, 1799, following, we find notice of his meeting Mrs. Dix, in Boston, and this time we may presume, the "indescribable distress " was on her side. About two years after this he married her, as above mentioned, but their married life was not a happy one — his habits having got the better of his judgment, long before the end ; and at a time when, under the influence of liquor, he was overheard to say, "I married you to punish you." He was sometimes, when intoxicated, even abusive, and seemed to watch for opportunities to humble her feelings in the presence of others.

Mr. Stow was appointed a Judge of Oneida county, January 28, 1801, and was elected to the Twelfth Congress, (1811-'13) from the tenth district, by the Federal party. Following the principles they advocated, he spoke and voted against the declaration of war with Great Britain. In 1814-15, he held the office of Sheriff, and from 1815 to 1823, that of First Judge of Lewis county. Although educated to the law, he never practiced at the Bar, but was regarded as a sound and judicious lawyer, and a man of great native talent. He was succeeded in the agency by Miller, in 1802, and an unfortunate land purchase in Malta (Lorraine) resulted in a pecuniary disaster, from which he never recovered. He died January 19, 1827, at the house of Lemuel Wood, aged 54 years. His remains are buried in the old town graveyard, on the East road, opposite the village of Lowville. where a humble headstone marks the place of his rest.

Judge Stow had three sons, Alexander W., Marcellus K., and Horatio J., all born in Lowville, and men of much talent. They were all of them educated at the Lowville Academy, but did not, we believe, receive a collegiate education.

Alexander W. Stow was a brilliant but erratic genius, and when quite a young man, without the knowledge, much less the aid of his family, made a tour through Europe. He had been absent a year from home without any knowledge as to his "whereabouts," when one day there came by mail a letter covered with strange foreign marks, that had been started at Rome, in Italy. After his return, he studied law, and his fine personal address and distinguished talents enabled him to attain a high position as a lawyer. He settled in Rochester, and in 1841, in Wisconsin, while it was still a Territory, and was for some years Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court of that State. He died at Milwaukee, September 14, 1854.

Horatio J. Stow settled as a lawyer in Buffalo. He was a man of distinguished talent, and was for several years Recorder of that city, in which position he displayed judicial talents of a high order. He was an influential member of the State Constitutional Convention of 1846, and in 1857, was elected to the State Senate, in which office he died at Clifton Springs, February 19, 1859. During several of the later years of his life, he resided at Lewiston, where he was engaged extensively in farming.

Marcellus K. Stow settled at Fond-du-Lac, Wis., where he was engaged in merchandise. If we are rightly informed, he is not now living.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
STRONG, JOHN

JOHN STRONG.
John Strong was born in New York City, January 2, 1821. His father was Thomas Strong, a native of England, who came to this country about 1790, and settled in New York, where his after life was passed. He was a farmer and brewer of some repute. His wife was Maria Peers, a native of New York, and a member of the Episcopal church. Both died when their children were young. Mr. Strong has one brother, Dr. James Strong, of Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J. John was educated in Fitch's Academy, Bloomingdale, in the vicinity of which place he lived till 1838, when he came to Turin, where he married Elizabeth Foster, June 22, 1841. She was a daughter of Sylvester Foster, and was born in Islip, Long Island, August 16, 1823, and died February 14, 1869. Mr. Strong again married September 29, 1869, his second wife being Mary E., only daughter of Joseph House, of Houseville, Lewis county, who was born March 5, 1836.

Mr. Strong has lived a quiet and well ordered life, and has struggled hard to secure a competency by honesty and persevering efforts. He is a farmer of some reputation, an owner of real estate in New York, and is recognized as a man of industry, integrity and honor. He was a member of the Methodist church twenty-five years, and has taken no interest in politics except to perform his elective duty as a citizen. His children are: Amelia, born July 23, 1842, married Robert D. Rhodes, June 14, 1865; Frances D., born September 4, 1844, married G. Gary Bush, February 22, 1867, and died November 27, 1872; John H., born October 29, 1846, married Lamoine Whitaker, October 30, 1869; Elizabeth F., born April 2, 1850, died June 12, 1861; Maria A., born April 9, 1852, married Levi N. Mogg, November 28, 1878; Sylvester, born September 6, 1855; Louis T., born April 20, 1875.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

TALCOTT, HEZEKIAH

Hezekiah Talcott, father of the families of this name who settled in this town, died March 16,1813. His children were: Phebe, born 1766, married David Hall, died January, 1826; Sally, born 1768, married 1st, Joel Coe, 2d ---- Parsons, died March 20, 185-; Elisha, born 1770, was killed May, 1807: Daniel, born 1772, died June 3, 1847; Joel, born 1774, died April 16, 1813, of the prevailing epidemic; Jesse, born 1775, died January 15, 1846; Johnson, born September 6, 1778, died February 17, 1850; Parsons, born 1780, died January 16, 1849; and Lucy, born 1782, married Ithamer Whetmore, died March, 1852. Elisha and Daniel were men with families when they settled.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

TEDMON, FERDINANDFerdinand Tedmon

FERDINAND L. TEDMON, son of Levi and Rachael (Seward) Tedmon, was born May 25, 1S46, on the homestead and in the house which his father built in 1829, and when he was but seventeen years old. He received his education in the common schools, supplemtend by a term at a select school in Martinsburgh village. April 11, 1871, he married Miss Amy A. Seymour, daughter of Degrasse and Charlotte (Crosby) Seymour, and setled where he was born. He was a successful farmer, and gave his attention to the cultivation of his farm until 1884, when he removed to the pleansant village of Lowville, where he was a dealer in live stock several years. June, 1891, he formed a co-partnership with. Eugene Arthur and engaged with him in dealing in flour, feed, grain and hay, tile, shingles, lath, etc. This firm carry a heavy stock and their transaction amount to about $80,000 per year.      

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
)

THAYER, HARRISON

HARRISON J. THAYER.
Harrison J. Thayer was born in the town of Turin, Lewis County, August 24, 1820. His ancestors came from England, about 1640, and settled in New England. His grandfather, Elisha Thayer, was born in New Hampshire, February 4, 1767, and was one of fourteen children. He married Sarah Harris, in 1787, and removed to the town of Leyden, Lewis County, in 1806. Enoch Thayer, father to Harrison J., was born in Richmond, N. H., June 30, 1788, and came with his parents to Lewis county. Enoch married Hannah Jordan, March 4, 1816, by whom he had four children, the subject of this sketch being the third.

Harrison early in life began a clerkship in the store of A. A. White, in Turin village, where he remained six years. He then engaged his services to Orrin Woolworth, a merchant in the same village, in whose employ he continued five or six years, when he purchased Mr. Woolworth's interest, and engaged in mercantile business for himself. In this he continued several years, and then became engaged in the produce and commission trade, which he pursued until his death, October 30, 1882. During his business life, as well as that of his clerkship, he was known and valued for the honesty and uprightness of all his dealings and for his strict moral principles.

On the 19th of May, 1847, he married Rebecca A. Budd, daughter of Dr. David Budd, and sister to Dr. Charles D. Budd, of Turin. She died October 8, 1867, leaving but one child, Oscar B. Thayer, who was born February 8, 1850, and who is now (1883) living.

On the 19th of October, 1870, Mr. Thayer married for his second wife, Mrs. Aurelia Perry, widow of Jerome B. Perry, and daughter of John I. Dominick, of Turin, who was born March 24, 1826, and who still survives him. No children were born to this marriage.

Mr. Thayer was a public-spirited man, and was always ready to contribute to the advancement of the interests of the village in which he lived. He was one of its first trustees, and rendered material aid in securing its incorporation, and was afterwards several times trustee and president. He manifested much interest in the cause of education, and assisted materially in the establishment of Turin Union Graded School, of which he was one of the first directors. He was a leading member of the Democratic party, and was always true to its principles. Although not a seeker for office he acceptably filled what official positions he was placed in. He served as Loan Commissioner in an entirely satisfactory manner, his commission bearing Governor Robinson's signature, and was also for a number of years Justice of the Peace. He was often solicited by his party to become a candidate for Member of Assembly, but refused, having no ambition in that direction. He loved too well the quiet of home and home life to engage in the turmoil of politics, although he never missed, up to the time of his death, voting at Both town and general elections.

He never united with any church, but was a regular attendant on the Episcopal service, and an earnest believer in a just and upright life. A kind and affectionate husband, parent, friend, and a warm sympathizer with the distress of others, his hand was always open to the needy, and his heart responded to their call for sympathy. Quick in his discrimination between right and wrong, he was universally consulted on matters of business and other subjects of moment, and his advice was always given with discretion and relied upon implicitly. He was one of those few men who do not need a eulogy of praise after death, for by his life he erected a monument to his memory which shall live in the hearts of people long after brief words of praise would be forgotten.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
THOMPSON, CHANDLER

CHANDLER E. THOMPSON.
Chandler E. Thompson, the subject of this biography, was born in Rockingham, Vt., May 26, 1808. His parents were Ebenezer Thompson and Comfort Ellis, the former of whom was killed by the fall of a building containing a large quantity of boat oars, June 6, 1843; and the latter died November 29, 1843, aged seventy-three. His earlier life was passed in the Green Mountain State, from whose rugged hills he imbibed the vigor which has characterized his life. At the age of twelve, he removed with his parents to Little Falls, N. Y., and came to Lewis county in 1821, locating in what was then Turin township, which at that time embraced West Turin, Lewis, Osceola, and High Market, and that portion now included in Constableville. Here he passed the balance of his early life, attending the common schools of those days, where he received the rudiments of an education which fitted him for the arduous duties of life. In those days, when much of Lewis county was a wilderness and the population was sparse, there was no chance to earn money, outside of agricultural pursuits, and even farming was then in a rude state and attended with many difficulties. Mr. Thompson was therefore compelled to look elsewhere for work. At the age of twenty, he took his pack upon his back and walked to Boston, where he expected to procure work. At that time there were no railroads, and having no money with which to pay stage fare, he was compelled to walk. His search for work was unfortunate, and he returned on foot to Little Falls, where a sister resided, where for two summers he worked at the trade of carpenter and joiner, returning to Constableville in the winter. For two years thereafter he engaged in trade for himself, and afterward purchased a farm, in which business he has since continued, amassing a competency through his own unaided efforts. Mr. Thompson has held various offices of trust. In 1872, he was appointed County Superintendent, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Silas Markham, and the next year was elected to that office by the Republican party, serving in all four years. He is a member of the Baptist church, having joined that denomination forty years ago.

June 3, 1830, Mr. Thompson was married to Hannah H. Markham, who was born in what is now West Turin, December 9, 1809. Their children were: —

Edmund W., born June 23, 1831, married Sarah Root, of Turin, February 7, 1855, she dying in 1861, leaving one child, Charles E., born May 15, 1856, he married Helen T. Botsford, of Martinsburgh, December 22, 1862, by whom he had three children — Sarah B., born January 6, 1864; Nellie L., born January 26, 1868; William W., born April 1, 1870.

Lucinda L., born December 6, 1834, married Clinton Woolworth, who died September 11, 1866, she died April 16, 1865, leaving three children — Albert R., born November 17, 1857; Frances M., born August 18, 1859, died July 14, 1865; Mary L., born October 21, 1863.

Ansel C, born May 26, 1837, married Lucinda Kentner, February 12, 1863, died February 20, 1869.

Phebe A., born June 7, 1839, married Madison Kentner, February 3, 1869.

Lewis L., born June 27, 1842, enlisted in the service of his country during the War of the Rebellion, and died in Maryland, November 16, 1862.

James H., born August 16, 1844, married Helen V. Gibson, of Utica, May 16, 1866. Children — Alice, born March 17, 1869; Lettie May, born June 9, 1873.

Laura Frances, born February 1847, died March 29, 1848.

Wallace C, born September 30, 1849, died October 6, 1870.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)


TURNER, HENRY

HENRY ELLIS TURNER.
Henry E. Turner was born in the town of Winchester, Cheshire county. New Hampshire, in April, 1832. His father's name is Robert Turner. He was born in Glastonbury, Connecticut, his ancestors having resided in New England for several generations, although they were of English descent, on the paternal side and Scotch on the maternal.

The parents of Judge Turner are yet living. His mother, Caroline Ellis, was born in Orange, Franklin county, Massachusetts, and her family for generations were also residents of New England, although her maternal great-grandfather was a Huguenot who fled from France to New England to escape religious persecutions. The ancestors of Mr. Turner, both paternal and maternal, served in the army during the Revolution. Henry E. Turner's parents resided in New England until 1840, when they moved to the State of New York, settling in the town of Vienna, Oneida county, and removing to the town of Stockbridge, Madison county, in 1843, where his father became the proprietor and manager of a woolen factory. Here the son was employed during the summer months and attended the district school in the winter terms. In 1849-'50-'51, he attended a select school at Munnsville, New York, and the Clinton Liberal Institute at Clinton, New York. The summers following, he worked at manual labor and taught school during the winter months, then was called to take charge of the village school in Munnsville, having the care of two departments for three successive terms; his former course there as a pupil having been observed, his services were afterwards sought for as a teacher. During the year 1853, he was employed as a clerk in the office of Captain E. B. Ward, the noted steamboat proprietor, at Detroit, Michigan. In 1854, he entered a hardware store at Lockport, New York, as clerk, and January 1, 1855, became a student in the law-office of the late Judge Hiram Gardner, at Lockport, having previously pursued law studies while teaching. The following September, he entered the Albany Law School, and at the same time became a student in the law-office of the late Otis Allen, a prominent lawyer in Albany, and pursued a course of legal studies in addition to the course at the Law School, and in December of that year he was admitted to the Bar on an examination at the general term of the Supreme Court, then sitting in Albany. He remained at the Law School and in the Albany office till the last of March, 1856, when he came to Lowville, where he has ever since resided. The young lawyer came to Lowville to reside among strangers, without means, and not even having any law books for a library. He was employed for a few months by the late Judge Brown as a clerk, and in addition to those duties, he began practice in a Justice Court. At the June term of the Lewis county Oyer and Terminer of 1856, he tried his first case in a court of record, when, with the late eminent Judge Mullin of Watertown New York, as his associate, he defended one Jacob Schoff, who was then tried on an indictment for murder, the trial resulting in an acquittal of the prisoner. This result was highly advantageous to the young man, and brought him clients and business, causing him in September of that year to open an office as an attorney - and counselor at law. During the Fremont campaign, prior to October, 1856, he had taken quite an active part in behalf of the Republican party, and in that month, was nominated at the Republican County Convention, for the office of District Attorney. This nomination, though unexpected and unsought, was accepted, and until the close of the campaign, he was constantly addressing public meetings in support of the Republican ticket. He was elected, and entered upon the performance of his duties, which were discharged faithfully, satisfactorily, and creditably for the whole term of three years.

Steadily growing in his profession, he was nominated in the autumn of 1859, for County Judge, was elected at the annual election in that year, and at the close of his official term as District Attorney, entered upon the discharge of the duties of County Judge, which office he held until January 1, 1864. Kind and courteous to all, industrious, having a strong sense of justice, and with mental gifts and qualities, peculiarly fitting him for judicial duties, he was successful on the Bench, and won the confidence and respect of the Bar, its members on his retirement from office, presenting him with flattering resolutions expressive of their regard and respect.

He then resumed the practice of his profession, and in 1870, was again elected District Attorney, the nomination having come to him unsought and contrary to his wishes. January 1, 1871, he again entered upon the performance of the duties of that office; and during that term he tried successfully, and obtained convictions in an unusually large number of indictments, many of them being for the highest crimes in law.

In 1877, he was elected to the State Senate from the 18th Senatorial District, then comprising the counties of Jefferson and Lewis; in the Senate of 1878, and '79, he served as a member of the Judiciary committee, and committee on Game Laws, and was chairman of the committees on Privileges and Elections, and Military affairs, and took a prominent and influential part in the deliberations of that body during both sessions.

The appropriation for the better equipment of the National Guard in 1879, the successful passage of the Tax commission Bill and the proposed "Biennial Sessions" amendment to the Constitution, of the same year, were mainly due to his efforts and speeches in their behalf. Every measure tending to economy in public expenditures, and in favor of reduced Legislative expenses found in him an earnest supporter. In the spring of 1879, the New York Chamber of Commerce, sent him complementary resolutions of thanks for his services in Senate in behalf of the merchants of that city, upon the question of railway discrimination on freight rates as against New York City.

He was popular with his associates in the Senate, and possessed their confidence and regard to a marked degree.  He has always manifested a warm interest in educational matters and in 1867, was elected a Trustee of Lowville Academy, and in 1881, president of its Board of Trustees. In February of the same year, he was elected by the Legislature a Regent of the University of the State in place of Charles E. Smith of Albany, who had resigned. This position he now holds, it being for life unless the incumbent moves from the State.

During all these years. Judge Turner has done much service in political campaigns as a speaker, advocating Republican principles in Lewis and other counties, always evincing candor and fairness in his treatment of political questions and differences. His marked ability in the argument of cases before a jury, his knowledge of law as exhibited before judicial tribunals, his masterly eloquence and tact in the management of important cases, especially those during his last term as District Attorney, have in later years made him prominent in his profession, and marked the high character and traits of the man, and placed him high in the esteem and favor of the people. His colleagues in the Senate were noted and able men from all parts of the State, and by them he was counselled and listened to with attention, showing the confidence they reposed in his experience, judgment and ability. The nomination and election of Mr. Vroman for Clerk of the Senate in 1878-'79, was made possible only by the action and firmness of Judge Turner in his behalf.

In 1858, he enlisted as a private in a company of the National Guard then existing in Lowville, commanded by Captain M. M. Smith, and was soon promoted to First Sergeant, and in 1860, to its command. In May 1861, on the first call for troops to serve two years, he raised a company, but the number of such organizations tendered being greatly in excess of the force authorized by law, he could not procure its acceptance by the Adjutant-General. In August, 1861, Governor Morgan authorized the raising of the 1st Regiment New York Light Artillery. First Lieutenant G. D. Bailey, 2d United States Artillery, a native of Lewis county, was appointed its Colonel and Judge Turner its Lieutenant-Colonel, the two being of the same age, and close friends. Mr. Turner took an active part in the raising of the regiment, joining it in September, 1861, as its Lieutenant-Colonel. He accompanied the regiment to Washington, and during the autumn was active and zealous in the equipment and instruction of its Batteries. Through the ensuing winter he did important duty in Maryland, Virginia, and the Shenandoah Valley, serving with credit and ability, and participated in the movements and engagements in that portion of Virginia near and around the Shenandoah Valley.

In March 1862, he was placed in command of the Reserve and Light Artillery Depot for the army of the Potomac, near Washington, and received the special commendation of Brigadier-General Barry, Chief of Artillery, Army of the Potomac, for the efficient manner in which he discharged its important duties. Prior to entering the military services in September, 1861, he sent his resignation as County Judge to Governor Morgan, to take effect December 1st following, as it was necessary for him to complete certain business in the Court then pending before him. Late in November 1861, the Adjutant-General at Washington, issued an order to disband all volunteer regiments of Light Artillery, and to muster out their field officers, retaining their companies as separate Batteries. This coming to Governor Morgan's knowledge, he declined to accept Mr. Turner's resignation as County Judge, until it should be definitely settled whether or not the regimental organization of the 1st New York Light Artillery should be retained, and the order be rescinded, so far as that regiment was concerned. In May, 1862, finding that the matter of the retention of the regimental organization was still an unsettled question, and in doubt, and his applications to the President and the Secretary of War in person, and by letters to the Chief of Artillery, to be relieved of his command and to be sent to the army on the Peninsula, or to any other point he might be ordered, having been refused, and Brigadier-General James S. Wadsworth, his immediate commander having informed him that he was retained in his command because the Chief of Artillery had recommended him as an officer peculiarly qualified for the position, and that in all probability he would be retained in that place until mustered out, as the President and Secretary of State were of the opinion that in ninety days a hundred thousand troops would be discharged, Colonel Turner at once tendered his resignation, stating that he did not enter the service for the mere rank and pay, but to aid in suppressing the Rebellion, and if he was to be of no further use elsewhere, he had important duties to attend to at home. His resignation was accepted, accompanied with commendatory words for his services, ability and character as an officer.

In December, 1864, on the recommendation of Major-General Dix, he was appointed and assigned to the command of a cavalry force, and ordered in February following, to Madison Barracks, New York, with his command, to protect the frontier against raids from Canada by bodies of armed Rebels and their sympathizers, who had already made several incursions of that character. The last of April, 1865, he was ordered by Department Headquarters to hold his command in readiness to proceed to Texas, with other forces under General Sheridan, but the surrender of the Confederate forces in that State, caused the order to be countermanded, and his command remained at the same post until mustered out of service in July, 1865. In 1867, Mr. Turner was appointed Division Inspector of the 4th Division National Guard, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, and in 1869, Assistant Adjutant-General of the 4th Division National Guard, with the rank of Colonel, which position he held until 1877, when he resigned.

He has taken an active part in the Grand Army of the Republic and is at present commander of G. D. Bailey Post No. 200, G. A. R. at Lowville.

Since his residence in Lewis county, Judge Turner has devoted considerable time to literary labors, having a genuine love for such pursuits, and has written and delivered many poems and addresses before different societies and meetings, and has used his pen in journalism on many occasions, with success and credit.

As a public speaker, he has been and is in demand on public occasions at home and in other counties: and as such he takes high rank having received at the places where he has responded, the most flattering ovations and liberal press notices, always receiving pressing invitations for future engagements.

Able, earnest and eloquent, with a high reputation for integrity and candor, he is at once pleasing and persuasive. He has received much support for the office of Supreme Court Judge, but owing to an unfortunate geographical situation, the nominations have gone to others. He is now engaged in the practice of his profession, receiving such support as only a leading lawyer can command.

In 1857, he was united in marriage with Amanda L. Hill, a daughter of the late W. W. Hill, one of the most upright and highly esteemed residents of Lowville, and who was the son of the late Ebenezer Hill, one of the first settlers of that town. Mrs. Turner is an amiable and gifted lady, and their married life has been singularly congenial and happy. She has attained a high position as an artist, her pictures showing her true conception of nature, and a hand competent to truly portray them upon canvass as they live in nature and the poet's brain.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

WADSWORTH, WILLIAM

WILLIAM R. WADSWORTH.
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Timothy Wadsworth, a native of Connecticut, emigrated from Farmington, in that State, to the Black River country, as it was then called, in the year 1797. The country was then almost an unbroken wilderness. He purchased land on what is known as Tug Hill, a mile west of Constableville, choosing that location because he deemed it healthier than the lower lands, which he could have bought for the same price. The land so purchased was afterward divided between his sons, Ebenezer and Elijah, the former taking the western half, now owned by Truman Damuth, and the latter receiving as his share, the eastern portion, now owned by Horace Clark, and the heirs of William Koughnet. His daughter, Mary, who married Seth Miller, and his daughter, Dorothy, who married Willard Allen, both settled in what is now the village of Constableville. Those pioneers had to endure the hardships and privations incident to the settlement of a new country. The roads were rude and bad, and in some cases it was difficult to draw loads a few miles in a day. Their supplies at first were brought from Rome, twenty-six miles distant. Here, in a region crude and uninviting, Timothy Wadsworth lived a life of usefulness, and died in the year 1810.

Elijah Wadsworth, his son, and the father of William R. Wadsworth, was born in Farmington, Conn., March 13, 1765. He married Hannah Rood, daughter of Captain Mariner Rood, of Canaan, Conn., who was born July 18, 1775. They came to the town of Turin, now West Turin, in the year 1797, where Elijah followed the occupation of farmer, some thirty-five years. His wife having become insane, he sold his farm and retired to the village of Constableville, where he resided until his death, Oct. 17, 1836. His wife died June 18, 1842. Their children were: — Wealthy, born in Farmington, Conn., Jan. 5, 179S, married Charles Searl, of Martinsburgh, died Dec. 31, 1827, leaving three children, who moved with their father to Ohio; William R., the subject of this sketch; Amon, born April 29, 1808, died in infancy; Eli J., born Sept. 23, 1810, died Oct. 5, 1826.

William Rood Wadsworth was born in West Turin, Feb. 17, 1806. His early life was passed upon his father's farm, and it was not until the age of eighteen that he began attendance on the common schools. He, however, improved his time at home, and worked all the sums in Daball's arithmetic without the aid of a teacher, placing the results in a book he kept for that purpose. He learned surveying, and some of the higher branches of mathematics, at Lowville Academy, and attended, for six months, the High School of Brayton & Dodge, in Rochester, N. Y. He was afterward, for several years, a successful teacher in the common schools. The education which he so patiently sought, has proved beneficial to him through life. He was a ready scribe, and has transacted a large business as a conveyancer. It is believed that he has drawn more deeds, mortgages and other kindred writings than any other man in the county. He was the only justice in this section required to take a license as a conveyancer in the time of the war. He practiced surveying extensively for over fifty years, and is considered a correct and competent surveyor.

Since the year 1830, he has held each year some town office. He was twice appointed, and thirty-five times elected town clerk; has been eleven times elected justice of the peace for the full term of four years ; was twice elected to the office of supervisor of his town, and has held the offices of commissioner of deeds, notary public, and village clerk. During this time, for some twenty years, he carried on the business of wagon making, in Constableville, and did a prosperous business. He has been a member of the Baptist church of Constableville, nine years, and was previously, for forty-seven years, a member of the Free Baptist church of Turin, and served much of this time as deacon, church clerk, and superintendent of the Sabbath school. In all the various branches of business in which he has been engaged, he has discharged his duties with fidelity, enjoyed largely the confidence of the public, and has had the reputation of being an honest man.

Mr. Wadsworth has been twice married. His first wife was Emily Higby, daughter of Solomon Higby, Esq., who was born Nov. 21, 1811, and died Jan. 15, 1869. Their children were: — Emma, born Oct. 8, 1837, married Albert W. Kidder, of Turin; Anna W., born July 8, 1843, died April 24, 1875.

May 1, 1871, Mr. Wadsworth was married to Rhoda M. Bacon, daughter of Jonathan Bacon, of Leyden.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
WATERS, V. LANSING

V. LANSING WATERS was born May 18, 1843, at Trenton Falls, Oneida county, N. Y. His father. Van Rensselaer Waters, was a native of Martinsburgh and a grandson of Zeruah Lansing WatersMartin, a sister of General Walter Martin. His ancestors were from Charlestown, Mass., and among the early settlers at Martinsburgh. His mother's, Belinda Ruth Burr, ancestors were from England and one of the original settlers in Hartford, Conn., in 1635. Her parents at the opening up of the Black River country, moved from Haddam, Conn., and settled in Leyden, where she was born.

V. Lansing Waters attended the district schools and Lowville Academy. He accepted a. position as clerk in Col. S. Miller & Son's store at Constableville, N. Y., at the age of seventeen, where he remained until the War of the Rebellion. He enlisted under President Lincoln's call for 300,000 men to serve three years, Aug. 9, 1862, in Co. K., 3d Battalion, 5th N. Y. H. Artillery; was mustered into service at Sackett's Harbor, Sept. 11, 1862, and were ordered on to Washington. Mr. Waters served in the defenses at Washington, Maryland Heights, Harper's Perry and Schenandoah Valley. He was active and zealous in his duties and was appointed sergeant and later acted as sergeant major of the battalion. He was commissioned second lieutenant by Gov. Horatio Seymour at the age of twenty, and first lieutenant by Reuben E. Fenton. He commanded the 100 pound rifle battery and mortar battery on Maryland Heights at the ineffectual seige of Gen. .Jubal Early's army, July 4, 1864, in his raid on Washington. He was appointed assistant provost marshal at Harper's Ferry, Va., and upon the close of the war he was mustered out of the service with his regiment, having served three years with credit and ability, possessing the confidence and esteem of his men.

On his return from the war he resumed mercantile pursuits at Lowville, N. Y., entering the dry goods house of the late Hon. Dewitt C. West & Co., as clerk. Later was associated as co-partner and eventually succeeded to the business in which he is still engaged and has associated with him his brother, John F. Waters.

Mr. Waters is known as one of the leading merchants in Northern New York, and his house enjoys a large and influential trade. Although closely attentive to business, he actively participates in all local improvements.

He has been for many years a member of the Grand Army Post, and one of the trustees of Lowville Masonic Chapter. He is a vestryman of Trinity church, and in 1886 was elected a trustee of Lowville Academy. Mr. Waters early entered into the project of a better and purer water supply system for Lowville and gave it his best efforts and ability. He was appointed one of the board of water commissioners of the village, elected and served as treasurer of the board in the construction of the great work, which is one of the very best in the state. Mr. Waters cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln for president while in camp at Harper's Perry, Va., and has always been an earnest Republican, though not an aspirant for political honors. He was elected delegate in 1892 from Oneida-Lewis county Congressional district to the Republican National convention held at Minneapolis, that nominated Benjamin Harrison for president.

In 1883 he was united in marriage with Sara E. Henry, an accomplished lady of Wickford, R. I., a daughter of Renaldo Henry. Their children are Ethel M. Waters and Van L. Waters.  
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.
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WATERS, VanRENSSELAER

V. R. WATERS.
VanRensselaer Waters, whose portrait appears in connection with this sketch, was born in the town of Martinsburgh, August 16, 1805. He was son of John Waters, a native of Johnstown, Montgomery county, N. Y., who was born November 18, 1778, and in company with David Waters, his brother, came to the town of Martinsburgh about 1802, where both resided until their death, which occurred in 1843, that of John, February 20th, at the age of 64 years, and that of David, March 25th, at the age of 67 years. Both were pioneer settlers and contributed their share toward the upbuilding of the town.

Early in the fall of 1804, John Waters married Mary Conkey, a niece of Walter Martin, land proprietor of the town of Martinsburgh. David married a daughter of Jonathan Collins, of Turin, now West Turin.

In early life the subject of our sketch taught school during the winter months, in Lewis and Oneida counties, and also taught in Washington county, Maryland, in the years 1831 and '32. He returned to Martinsburgh in December, 1833, married Belinda R. Burr, daughter of Benjamin Burr, a native of Haddam, Conn., who early settled in the town of Leyden. By this marriage he had four sons and two daughters, who are now living.

In the spring of 1834, he was ordained to the ministry by a council called by the Free Communion Baptist church, of Martinsburgh. In the spring of 1837, he withdrew from the fellowship of this society, and united with the regular Baptist church, and soon after removed to the village of Trenton, Oneida county, and became the pastor of the Trenton Baptist church, which he served with success until the spring of 1842. At this period, on account of bronchial difficulties induced by excessive labor in an extensive revival, in the village of Holland Patent, he was obliged to cease his ministerial labors. Consequently, in September, 1844, he removed to Constableville, Lewis county, and engaged in the hardware business, in which he continued for some years.

Subsequently, from about 1853 to 1869, he was engaged in mining at the same place, and in Houseville, in the town of Turin, to which place he removed in 1856. While a resident of West Turin, he held the office of Justice, served as Town Clerk, and held for three successive years, from 1852, the office of Supervisor of the town. As a citizen of Turin he served the town in the capacity of Justice, and twice, from 1865, as Supervisor. In 1861, he was elected Sheriff of the county, and served his term acceptably. In December, 1869, he relinquished his business in Turin and removed to Utica, where he now resides.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
WELLER, HARVEY

HARVEY WELLER.
Silas Weller, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Westfield, Mass., June 20, 1770, where he passed the early part of hi§ life. He married January 9, 1800, Nancy Bush, who was born August 22, 1779. In the next year, 1801, with their worldly goods drawn by a yoke of oxen, they moved from Westfield, Mass., to Lewis County, settling in the northern part of the town of Lowville where their lives were passed. Silas died March 24, 1848, and Nancy died March 30, 1851. There were born to them eleven children as follows : — Lester, born October 14, 1800, married Elioenai Peck, a native of Newport, N. H., March 16, 1824, died July 1, 1835; Seth, born Nov. 22, 1801, married July 2, 1826, Betsey Campbell, who was born in Suffield, Conn., May 24, 1804, and who died Sept. 12, 1879, Seth is still living (1883); David, born April 22, 1806, married Dec. 24, 1 834, Maria Knowlton, born in Madison county, Oct. 30, 1815, and died Sept. 2, 1874; Silas, Jr., born May 17, 1810, married Feb. 7, 1854, Jennie Ackerman, born in Brownville, Jefferson county, N. Y., July 29, 1829;

Henry, born Aug. 9, 1817, married Feb. 2, 1847, Eliza A. Sackett, who was born in Lowville Feb. 15, 1820, and died April 24, 1881; Ralph, born April 27, 1823, married Feb. 26, 1850, Celestia Wakefield, born in Pinckney, Lewis county, Aug. 16, 1824.

Harvey Weller, the subject of this sketch, was born in the northern portion of the town of Lowville February 9, 1815. Here he lived until he was fourteen years of age, when his father bound him out to a neighbor, William Bush, until he was of age, for a compensation of three months' schooling in the year, a suit of broadcloth clothes, and fifty dollars in money. When the time arrived when he was to start in life for himself, he very sensibly took, instead of the broadcloth, a suit of homespun and the difference in money. During his time of bondage, which was in the days of militia service, by engaging a substitute in his place and purchasing provisions and notions, which he retailed on general training days, he realized above expenses, from four to six dollars per day, which he saved to add to the meagre sum which was to accrue to him when he attained his majority. He also realized a small amount from trapping nights and mornings, after and before the hours of his labor. By these different ways, at the age of twenty-one, he found himself in possession of about one hundred dollars.

After his majority was attained, he leased of Mr. Bush his cloth mill, where for some time he was engaged in cloth dressing, and afterwards for several years leased the Bush farm. At the age of twenty-six, he married Polly W. Sackett, of Lowville, Jan. 19, 1841, who was born April 13, 1819. At about this time he purchased his first land in the northern part of the town of Lowville, where he passed his life. Polly, his wife, died April 8, 1865, and on the 6th of March, 1866, he married Mary Benedict, of Turin, who died June 24, 1882.  Harvey Weller died March 4, 1883.  His children are:— Duane, born November 28, 1842, died October 23, 1859; Josephine, (adopted,) born December 12, 1846, died in the fall of 1879; Emma V., died February 13, 1880; Amelia L., (Mrs. J. Clinton Benedict,) born January 12, 1850; Darius E., born July 28, 1858; Perry D.; born February 26, 1860.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
WEST, DeWITT

DeWitt C. West.
The father of the subject of this sketch, Hon. Eli West, M. D., who for nearly half a century was a prominent citizen of Jefferson county, was born in Hampton, Washington county, July 26, 1792. Before he reached his legal maturity, the second war with Great Britain came upon the country, and young West, just entering upon his professional studies, joined the New York contingent. During the short struggle he was an ardent soldier, and distinguished himself in the victory at Plattsburgh.

Upon the conclusion of peace, he resumed his medical course, and was in due time licensed to practice. His first experience as a physician was in a small Canadian village. In 1816, seeking a broader field and more profitable patients than he found among the thrifty French habitans, he made his way over the border again, and settled in Carthage, with which place he was identified as the leading physician — and for many years the only resident one — until his death. Growing in reputation with the development of the neighborhood, his practice extended even beyond the bounds of the county, and he was, in middle life, not only one of the most widely known practitioners, but one of the most highly respected citizens of that section of the State. Without political aspirations, though a man of pronounced opinions, his townsmen trusted him with nearly every responsible office in their gift. For fourteen years he was one of the Supervisors, being Chairman of the Board most of the time. The office of Superintendent of the Common Schools, President of the Board of Trustees of the village, Commissioner of Deeds, and School Commissioner, were filled by him for continuous terms. He was Justice of the Peace for forty years. He received his original commission from Governor Clinton, as Brigade Surgeon, and for a long period was Master of the local Lodge of Free Masons. In politics, he adhered to the Democratic school of the period, and was twice elected by that party to the Assembly, serving in 1834 and 1844, with general acceptance. When the Civil War was precipitated upon the country, he gave all his sympathy to the Union cause, taking a decided stand for the National Administration, and was Chairman of the first war meeting held in Carthage, on the 4th of May, 1861, at which he was one of the first and most liberal in subscriptions to the volunteer subsistence chest.

Dr. West was a man of broad views and generous enterprise. His intelligent appreciation of local necessities was illustrated by his active participation in all public efforts to improve or develop the resources of the section of the State in which he lived.

Dr. West died on the 23d of June, 1866, having three years previously, through the general disability of old age, given up his professional practice.

DeWitt Clinton West was born at Carthage, February 14, 1824. He was educated at Watertown Academy, then one of the best schools in Northern New York, and at a French College in Montreal. After teaching for a time as was then the custom, in the public schools of his native village, he established himself at Mobile, Alabama, with two of his early friends, in the cotton commission and forwarding business. In 1848, he returned to Carthage, and formed a partnership with William A. Peck in general merchandise. The success of this enterprise was largely due to the fine business abilities of young West, which would have won him success in any field. He had intended to enter the legal profession, but an injury to one of his eyes, received while sporting, prevented. It was an injury which troubled him all his life, and finally resulted in the removal of the eye in August, 1879, by Dr. H. D. Noyes of New York. In 1852, he was pursuaded to take part in public affairs, and was elected on the Democratic ticket as Member of Assembly. Horatio Seymour, was Governor, the late Chief-Judge Sanford E. Church was Lieutenant-Governor, William H. Ludlow was Speaker, and Ashley Davenport and Seymour Green of Lewis county, were respectively Senator and Member of Assembly. DeWitt C. Littlejohn of Oswego, and Arphaxad Loomis of Herkimer, were Members of the Lower House. The Legislature of that year was notable for the number of its able men, who subsequently became distinguished and filled important positions. The friendships that he made at this session were strong and life-long. The young member was accorded by his own party the prominence and influence his ability, integrity and force of character merited.

He was respected by his political opponents for these very qualities, and his fairness. He was made Chairman of the Canal Committee, at that time a very important position, and usually accorded to an old and experienced member. In discharging the duties of this responsible and difficult position, he won the esteem and confidence of the members of both Houses, without distinction of party — a triumph sufficient to gratify the laudable ambition of any member. As such Chairman, he advocated and carried the policy of improving, at considerable cost, the lateral canals, which included the Black River canal, in which Northern New York was greatly interested, and of which his distinguished father had been one of the original promoters, and requiring generous appropriations for its development. Mainly through his well-directed efforts and able arguments, the canal from Oswego to the Erie was brought up to its present capacity of usefulness. He ably and successfully advocated the continued patronage of the State to its internal water ways.

His excellent record led to the tender of a re-nomination the next year, in the belief that he had entered upon a long, honorable and useful career of official life. Notwithstanding he was pressed in the most urgent manner by his friends, he defined the re-nomination, and never after held a public office, except that of Elector. During the sessions of the Legislature of which he was a member, he was married to Emma H., daughter of Hon. William L. Easton, of Lowville, one of the early settlers and distinguished men of Lewis county. At the close of his Legislative term, Mr. West dissolved his business connection at Carthage, and formed a new one at Lowville, with William L. Easton and his son, James H. Easton, (now of Decorah, Iowa,) under the firm name of West & Co., in which firm he continued until 1873, when he retired, with an ample fortune, the prosperous business he had built up being continued by Waters & Easton. Though he had determined not to hold office, he continued his interest in all public questions and improvements, and in politics, and more than any other man in all Northern New York, has left marks of his influence, abilities and industry. He was a delegate from his district to all the Democratic National Conventions, after he was Member of Assembly, up to 1880, and to most of the State Conventions. He was often a member of the State Committee, and was Presidential Elector in the years 1868 and 1876. He stood high in the Councils of the Democratic party. His executive ability, sagacity, independence and determination not to take office, gave great weight to his views on questions of political policy and political principle. His influence was really much greater than that of many others, prominent through official titles and position. At the Charleston Convention he saw and appreciated the danger threatening the Union, and shortly after the nomination of Mr. Douglass, published in the "Lewis County Banner," a series of articles upon the "Impending Crisis," which, though derided by his neighbors at the time, turned out to be almost prophecy. With the first news of the assault on Fort Sumter, he proposed that a company be raised in the village for the defence of the Union. It was raised as soon as the President's proclamation was made, and was one of the earliest in the field. From this time to the close of the Rebellion, he spared neither time, labor nor money to advance the cause of the Union. In this patriotic duty he was a central figure in the northern part of his State. In 1876, he was desired by his friends to accept the Democratic nomination for Governor of New York. His prominence in the party would have easily brought him the nomination, but he declined to have his name used. Horatio Seymour was nominated without consultation and declined. The convention re-assembled at Saratoga, and Mr. West was again desired to allow his name to be used, and was pressed to consent, but refused. Lucius Robinson was nominated and elected. The Utica and Black River railroad connects Utica, on the Central and Hudson River railroads, through the Black River valley, with Sackett's Harbor, on Lake Ontario, the Thousand Islands at Clayton, and Morristown and Ogdensburg on the St. Lawrence below the Thousand Islands. Before 1868, the Utica and Black River railroad had been constructed to Boonville, a distance of thirty-five miles. The extension of the road and the accomplishment of these connections was moved. Mr. West entered into the project and gave it his best exertions and abilities. He was elected Director, and subsequently in 1873, President of the road. Money was raised by bonding towns, the road was extended to Carthage, other roads were projected and completed from that place to the points on the Lake and the St. Lawrence and leased, and the whole brought under the management of the Utica & Black River railroad, during his presidency. The credit of all this is largely due to him. It was a great work, not only providing an outlet for an important and rich section of the State and Canada too, but opening the way for the tourist and the people to the most beautiful and delightful scenery and attractive resorts on the American Continent — immense enough for all the people and beautiful enough for the most fastidious. In 1879, the failure of his health compelled his retirement from the presidency of the road, but he continued in the direction until his death. In this year he organized the Black River National Bank at Lowville, and acted as its president the remainder of his life. Mr. West's abilities were of a high order. He was a master of details, and from them made sound and wise deductions. In the perception and application of principles few excelled him. He could maintain with sound argument, the position to which his judgment led him. He spoke with clearness and elegance, and was often eloquent. A commanding figure, an expressive and pleasant countenance, and rich, sweet voice, added charm and force to his oratory. Like his intimate and life-long friend, Judge Church, "he loved to be among men," among whom he was a natural leader, and the affections and trust of men went out after him and followed him. The sudden death of Judge Church produced a profound impression upon him. He had become aware that he might be called as suddenly. But it was not the fear of death that impressed him so much as that a great and good man should fall so suddenly, while the world yet had need of him. His own death, so similar, and in so short a time after, while yet in the prime of life, and in the midst of his greatest usefulness, and foremost in his political party in his State, and on whom many hopes were centered, was an irreparable loss. His death occurred suddenly August 27, 1880, from an affection of the heart.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

WHITAKER, CLEMENCE & DANIEL

CLEMENCE AND DANIEL WHITAKER.
Clemence Whitaker was the son of William and Amy Whitaker, and was the fourth child in a family of five sons and seven daughters. He came from a long-lived family who first settled in Rehoboth, Mass., about the year 1650. His father emigrated from Rehoboth a short time prior to the Revolutionary war to Cheshire, where Clemence was born Dec. 18, 1779, and was christened with the surname of his maternal grandfather. His boyhood was one of toil, assisting his father, whose burdens were such as usually fall to the lot of pioneers with limited means and a fast increasing family. His school advantages were limited to a few months' attendance in the district school of his native town, prior to the twelfth year of his age. But he was a constant reader, and by the natural grasp of his intellect, keen perception and observation, he became self-educated, and his after life exhibited a well-stored mind, and few in any walk of life excelled him in general information.

Leaving the parental home soon after arriving at majority, he settled in Trenton, Oneida county, N. Y., in March, 1801, where he resided for thirty-four years. In April, 1835, he removed to Martinsburgh, N. Y., where he resided till his death, which occurred Feb. 28, 1872. He was married in 1805 to Alice Hall, and was the father of eight children, five of whom survived him. His second son is the present owner of the old homestead in Oneida county. He took considerable interest in politics during his whole life, and during the more active portion of it became somewhat prominent in the political affairs of his county, and the Senatorial and Congressional districts of which his county was a part. He was in no sense an office-seeker, and never held office except that of Presidential elector in 1844, when he cast his vote for the Democratic nominees, Polk and Dallas. He was content to work for the general interests of his party with occasional assistance to an aspiring personal friend. He was for a time in the service of his country in the War of 1812.

His chief characteristics were indomitable will and stern integrity. He was positive and direct in his dealings with men, yet eminently social. These traits combined with close financiering and perseverance, made him successful in life beyond the average of men. His sternness and naturally impulsive temperament gave to him at times, in the minds of those not well acquainted with him, the appearance of an unfeeling and uncharitable man. But those who knew him well, discovered beneath the apparently rough exterior, a generosity and benevolence as intense and active as his nature was positive. No one excelled him in genuine charity, or hatred of its exhibition "to be seen of men." While he had no special praise to bestow on those who simply performed their simple duty in whatever station they occupied, he was unstinted in his denunciations of corruption, dishonesty and crime, wherever found. He was a fervent, devoted friend, and a cold, unyielding and unforgiving enemy.

William Whitaker, his father, had some experience when a boy in the French and Indian war, about 1758 and '59, being at one time the bearer of a message from the commander of old Fort Stanwix (now Rome) to the commander of Fort Schuyler (now Utica), making the journey in the night, to avoid the danger of being captured by Indians in the daytime. He was also a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and took part in the battle of Bennington, under General Stark.

His mother, whose maiden name was Amy Clemence, was one of the officers of the company or "regiment" of ladies in Cheshire, who made the "big cheese" for President Jefferson, and which was formally presented to him by the noted Elder John Leland.

Alice Whitaker, wife of Clemence, was born April 16, 1777, and died May 4, 1847. Their children were: — Jerome, born May 25, 1806; Anna, born January 2, 1808, died April 6, 1852; George, born Oct. 12, 1809; Samuel, born Nov. 12, 181 1, died in June, 1813; Winfield S., born Dec. 21, 1813, died Feb. 29, 1872; William, born Dec. 10, 1815, died March 21, 1879; Daniel, born April 14, 1818; Romaine, born March 17, 1821, died March 8, 1825.

Daniel Whitaker, son of Clemence and Alice Hall Whitaker, was born in Trenton, Oneida county, N. Y., April 14, 1818. He was educated in the common schools of his vicinity, and took up the occupation of farming. He came to Martinsburgh in 1835, where he has since resided. Inheriting many of the traits and business characteristics of his father, he has been successful in his occupation, and has gained the friendship and respect of all with whom he has come in contact. He has taken more than an ordinary interest in the science of agriculture, and has been for some years President and director of the Lewis County Agricultural Society.

He was married April 10, 1849, to Ruth Ann Powell, who was born Sept. 23, 1821, and died Sept. 14, 1882. Their children were: — Daniel Fremont, born Feb. 9, 1850, died May 11, 1862; Addie Louisa, born Dec. 4, 1858, died Feb. 21, 1859; Mary Alice, born March 2, 1860.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

WHITING, HARVEY

HARVEY M. WHITING.
Abner Whiting, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in the town of Colebrook, Conn., May 24, 1779. His parents were John and Sylvia (Loomis) Whiting, and he was the oldest in a family of fourteen children.

His genealogical record is believed to be established as follows: He was the son of John Whiting, born July 24, 1758, who was the son of John Whiting, born Nov. 23, 1720, who was the son of Benjamin Whiting, the tenth and youngest child of Rev. Samuel Whiting, Jr., who was born in England in 1633, and brought to Lynn, then called Saugus, Mass., by his father. Rev. Samuel Whiting, in June, 1636.

Rev. Samuel Whiting was born at Boston, Lincolnshire, Eng., November 20, 1597. His father, John Whiting, was mayor of that city in the year 1600, and also in 1608, and his brother, John, held the same office in 1655. It appears that the names of John and Samuel have continued in the family for three or more centuries; that of the former being found to have been in every generation to the present date. Samuel Whiting, brother to Abner, who came to Lewis county in 1824, and settled in Pinckney, dying Feb. 7, 1874, was the last representative of this name in this branch of the family.

Abner Whiting came to the vicinity which is now the town of Denmark, Lewis county, — then a part of the town of Lowville and Oneida county, — in the fall of 1801, and purchased a farm, paying for it and receiving a receipt therefor, his deed not being given until the 14th of June following. He married Asenath, the daughter of John Scott Clark, in the fall of 1804. He died January 7, 1866, and his wife February 18, 1861. Their children were twelve in number, two of whom died in early infancy. The record of the others is as follows: —

Roxy, born July 13, 1805, died Dec. 13, 1839; Harvey M.; Lovina, born December 21, 1808, died December 14, 1829; Melinda, born July 31, 1812, died March 19, 1881; Sylvia, born May 11, 1814, died March 26, 1834; Arline, born May 30, 1816, died April 30, 1882; Asenath, born January 24, 1818; Susan, born February 17, 1821, died June 15, 1858; John Clark, born March 10, 1823, died July 31, 1854; Huldah, born April 14, 1828, died September 4, 1830.

Of these children, Asenath married Avery Allen, of Harrisburgh, in October, 1836, in which town she now (1883) resides, as do also her grandchildren, and only descendants, the children of Newton Stoddard.

Arline married Ira Hodge, in 1834, and in 1846, removed to Dodge county, Wisconsin, where she died, and in which State her two surviving children still live. — Charles C. M., near Oak Centre, and Sidney J., in Hartford, Washington county.

Harvey M. Whiting, the second of these children, was born in the town of Denmark, April 14, 1807, where he has passed his life. He married Louisa, daughter of John Clark, 1st., January 4, 1838. His children and descendants are as follows: —

Franklin M., born November 21, 1838; Abigail Janette, born October 1, 1840, died June 26, 1851; Mary A., born April 13, 1843; Anna E., born April 13, 1846; John H., born October 28, 1850, died January 2, 1852.

Franklin M., married Ophelia North Wemple, January 13, 1869, and had children as follows: —

John Kent, born March 4, 1870; Foster S., born April 17, 1872; Una L., born November 24, 1874.

Mary A. married Ashbel S. Humphrey, of Harrisburgh, April 22, 1863. Their children were as follows: —

Frankie J., born April 29, 1864 ; Henry G., born July 2, 1866; Harvey W., born March 12, 1871; Bessie L., born June 7, 1872.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
WHITING, JOHN

DOCTOR JOHN WHITING.
John Whiting was born in Colebrook, Connecticut, August 24, 1790. He was the fourth son and seventh child of John and Sylvia (Loomis) Whiting. His early life was passed in the vicinity of his birthplace, and in teaching for a time in the town of North East, Duchess county, N. Y., in the year 1809. In 1811, he was engaged in the study of medicine with Dr. Truman Wetmore, and afterward with Dr. Jesse Carrington, and received his medical diploma from the Connecticut Medical Society on the 8th of November, 1813, signed by Mason F. Cogswell, President, and Jesse Carrington and Warren B. Fowler, Committee for the county of Litchfield.

Late in the spring of 1815, he came on horseback from his native place to Denmark, Lewis county, where his oldest brother, Abner, had settled thirteen years before. Here he engaged in the practice of medicine, and also in school-teaching for the first six years, riding and making professional calls in the interim between school hours, and in cases of urgency, leaving his school in the care of the older pupils, while he attended to the more pressing demands of his patients.

He was never married, never actively engaged in political contests, but was for many years a prominent member of and exhorter in the M. E. church. Among the licenses given him, one is signed by John Dempster in 1834. He greatly aided the societies, both at Copenhagen and at Pinckney, where he for some time resided on a farm managed by his brother Samuel, in erecting suitable buildings for worship. He was surgeon of the regiment organized in the county, or the part of the county in which he lived.

One of his pupils wrote as follows of him: —

"He was an apt teacher, and a strict disciplinarian of which the writer has had striking evidence. He was loved by his pupils and honored by their parents. * * * His practice in medicine rapidly increased, and he often rode the white horse on which he came into the county through the whole night, over the hills and through the roads and valleys of Denmark, Harrisburgh and Pinckney, to visit his patients, returning to his school in the morning, and after its close repeating his nocturnal ride. At length the calls for a doctor became so frequent that he found it necessary to devote his entire time to the practice of his profession. He was very successful as a physician, and accumulated property rapidly. He was of a philosophical turn of mind, well versed in history and the current topics of the day, a good and interesting conversationalist, select in his language, and minute in his descriptions. * * * According to my best recollections, he continued in the active practice of his profession ten or twelve years, and for several years after that was often called as council in difficult and dangerous cases."

For the greater part of his life he was a member of the families of his brothers Abner and Samuel. In the year 1870, he went to live in the family of Franklin Whiting, the son of his nephew, Harvey M., where he remained until his death, which occurred at Clark's Corners, in the town of Denmark, Feb. 17, 1881, at the age of 90 years, 5 months and 23 days.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

WILBUR, ROYAL

ROYAL P. WILBUR.
The first of this family on the father's side of whom anything definite is known, was David Wilbur, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, who was born in 1771. He was a resident of Worthington, Mass., from which place he removed with his family to Lowville in the spring of 1801, and took up a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, in the northern part of the town, known as Stow's Square. His wife was Betsey Phillips. He was a deacon in the Congregational church at the Square, and died December 27, 1829, aged sixty years.

Gordyce Wilbur, his son, and the father of Royal P., was born in Worthington, Mass., August 9, 1799. He was married on the 4th of September, 1829, to Mary S. Phelps, daughter of the late Rev. Royal Phelps, and grand-daughter of Colonel John Spafford of Revolutionary fame. She is a descendant of George Phelps, who came to America on the vessel "Mary and John," ten years after the arrival of the Mayflower, landing at Nantucket, Mass., May 30, 1630. He came from Exeter, Devonshire, England. His first settlement in America was in Dorchester, Mass., from whence he removed in 1636, and was one of the first settlers in Windsor, Conn. He died May 8, 1687.

Gordyce Wilbur, still living (1883) was ordained an Elder in the Presbyterian church of Lowville, April 20, 1834, and has served continuously since that time. On the i6th of August, 1836, he was licensed to preach the gospel by the Black River Association, but was unable to carry out his wishes in this respect. His life has been devoted to religious work and he has held numerous offices of responsibility in the religious societies of the town and county. Of a family of ten children, but three sons now survive, all residents of the State of New York.

Royal Phelps Wilbur was born in Lowville, September 12, 1836. A portion of his early life was passed in the town, where he was educated in the Lowville Academy. In the spring of 1851, at the age of fifteen, he went to New York City and entered the employ of Maitland, Phelps & Co., foreign commission and banking-house, Hon. Royal Phelps, his uncle, being then and now, the senior member of the firm. He began his life there as a messenger boy. In the spring of 1857, for the benefit of his health, and on business for the firm, he went to the West India islands and Spanish Main, visiting the islands of St. Thomas and St. Croix. In December of that year, he returned to New York, and until January, 1870, remained connected with the firm as general clerk.  In that year he returned to Lowville, his uncle, Royal Phelps, having settled upon him a farm and a suitable income, where he has since resided.

Mr. Wilbur is of that genial and even temperament that easily wins friends. In politics a conservative Republican, he has taken no personally active interest in political issues, except to cast his vote and influence for what he has deemed the public good. He is one of the trustees of Lowville Academy, and has for ten years been Secretary of the Lewis County Bible Society. He is an honored member of the Presbyterian church, in which organization he has also been Secretary for ten years. His wife is Caroline Putnam Northrop, to whom he was married June 29, 1870.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

WILCOX, LYMAN & MARCELLUS

LYMAN AND MARCELLUS J. WILCOX.
The great-grandparents of Lyman and Marcellus Wilcox were Joseph and Rebecca, who were residents of Killing

worth, Middlesex county, Conn. Adam, their son, grandfather of the subjects of this sketch, was born April 1, 1734, and died May 22, 1828. His children were Elisha, Rebecca, Jesse and Roswell.

Roswell, his son, father of Marcellus and Lyman, was born January 22, 1778, and died Oct. 1, 1851. He married Irene Nicholson, Feb. 1, 1803, who was born at Martha's Vineyard, Mass., Oct. 15, 1784, and who died Oct. 25, 1848. Their children were:— Daniel, born Oct. 3, 1803, now (1883) in Ripon, Wis., married Huldah Williams, of Lowville, January 27, 1831; Lucy, born March 5, 1805; Irene, born Sept. 29, 1806, married Martin Conyne, and died Jan. 10, 1841; Polly, born July 23, 1808, married Ashbel Stevens, and died Jan. 7, 1846; Roswell, born May 10, 1810, died Dec. 4, 1847, married Sophia Leach, of Auburn, N.Y.; Rebecca, born Feb. 7, 1813, married Chandler Williams, of Lowville, now (1883) in Waupun, Wis.; Lydia, born Jan. 1, 1815, married Charles Putterel, of Fulton, N.Y., and died in 1866; Elizabeth, born Dec. 12, 1816, married Harrison Bohall, of Lowville, now a widow at Copenhagen; Harmon, born Oct. 15, 1819, married Martha S. Smith, of Gouverneur, May 30, 1844, died June 22, 1846 ; Moses, born Sept. 18, 1821, was drowned while bathing in Mill creek, July 18, 1835; Lyman; Esther, born Feb. 17, 1826, died May 11, 1845.

Lyman Wilcox was born June 1, 1824, in the town of Lowville, on the old homestead, now owned by his brother, Marcellus. Here his early life was passed, and here he was educated in the common schools, and in Lowville Academy, under the tuition of Professor D. P. Mayhew.

His occupation has been that of a farmer and hop raiser, in which he has been successful. He married Martha B. Weaver, daughter of Jacob Weaver, of Rutland, Jefferson county, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1849, by whom he has had one child — Ella Lovesa, born March 16, 1855. Mr. Wilcox has been prominent throughout the county as an auctioneer, and his genial manner has won for him a host of friends. He has been an active and liberal member of the Presbyterian church since the age of eighteen, and politically has been a Republican of conservative tendency.

Marcellus J. Wilcox was born in Lowville Dec. 3, 1829, on the homestead where he now resides. He, too, was educated in the common schools and Lowville Academy, under Professors Mayhew and B. F. Moore.

He has followed the business of farming, and ranks among the best farmers in Lewis county. He has a fine farm and buildings, a view of which may be seen accompanying, and has always taken a lively interest in all agricultural matters.

He has been a leading man in the Lewis County Agricultural Society, and has for years held in that body the position of director. He married Mary Jane Wilcox, daughter of Elisha Wilcox, of Leyden, March 18, 1852. His only child is Minnie Jane, born February 6, 1864.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

WILSON, RODOLPHUS

RODOLPHUS B. WILSON.
Of the ancestry of this family nothing is known back of the grandfather, John Wilson, who was of Scotch parentage, and whose father and mother dying when he was an infant placed him under the care of a guardian who came with him to America, when he was but four years of age, and located in Washington county, N. Y. He died in that county in October, 1813. His wife's name was Anna Maria Switzer. Their children were: John, George, Christopher, Peter, James, William, Elinor, Nancy, Catherine and Sarah.

Of these children, George was the father of Rodolphus B. He was born in Washington county November 6, 1793, and came to Lewis county in 1814, locating in Harrisburgh, on the farm now owned by William Rook. His life occupation was that of a farmer. His wife was Mary Ann Bush, daughter of John Bush, of Harrisburgh, who was born May 23, 1799. George Wilson died December 14, 1849. His wife died October 13, 1882.

Their children were four: —

Jane, born April 15, 1826, married Allen Snell, October 14, 1848, and died December 29, 1877; Rodolph, who died at the age of one year; Rodolphus B.; Anna Maria, born July 16, 1830, married the Rev. Willett Vary, who died, and she married his brother, John Vary.

Rodolphus Bush Wilson, the third of these children, was born in Harrisburgh, Lewis county, November 1, 1829, in which town his early life was passed on the farm. He received the education of the common schools and adopted the life of a farmer, in which business he has been more than ordinarily prosperous. In January, 1862, he removed from Harrisburgh and settled in the town of Denmark, where he has since resided. He is regarded by his fellow-townsmen as a man of honor .and integrity in all business matters, and faithful and true in his friendships.

On the 16th of January, 1857, he married Amelia A. Shultz, daughter of Solomon Shultz, of Denmark, who was born in that town, December 6, 1832. Their children are: — George Frank, born June 19, 1859; James Addison, born August 22, 1869; and Fay L., born February 28, 1874.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)
WRIGHT, LUCIUS

LUCIUS F. WRIGHT.
Charles Wright, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born Sept. 16, 1739, and married Ruth Smith, who was born May 17, 1750. He died July 13, 1820, and Ruth died March 24, 1834.

They had nine children, as follows: —
Lydia, born March 11, 1772, died in August, 1839.
Charles Wright, Jr., born July 28, 1774, died May 20, 1827.
Stephen S., born Aug. 18, 1776, died Sept. 27, 1840.
Tyrannus A., born Feb. 6, 1779, died July 21, 1863.
Ruth, born April 30, 1781, died Sept. 23, 1869.
Erastus, born May 28, 1787, died Aug. 10, 1865.
Chester, born Nov. 10, 1789, died June 25, 1835.
Nathan, born May 17, 1792, died Feb. 12, 1871.
Matthew M., born Oct. 24, 1794, died Sept. 10, 1870.

Of these children, Charles Wright, Jr., and Tyrannus A. came to the town of Denmark, Lewis county, in May, 1801, from Colebrook, Conn. They came down the Black river from the High falls on a raft, landing at the mouth of Deer river, then followed a line of marked trees through the wilderness to their future home, situated a mile west of what is now the village of Copenhagen. In the autumn of that year they went back to Connecticut, and in the following spring, with their parents and all of their brothers and sisters, returned again to Denmark. They started from Colebrook about the first of March, making the entire journey in four weeks with a sled drawn by two ox teams. The entire family lived and died in the town of Denmark, with the exception of Chester, who moved to Ohio.

Lucius F., the son of Tyrannus A. and Mary C. Wright, was born in the town of Denmark Jan. 3, 1808. He was educated in the common schools of those days, and the Lowville Academy. At the age of twenty he began teaching in the district schools of the county, which profession he followed for thirteen winters, and afterwards adopted the occupation of farmer. On the i6th of March, 1834, he married Margaret Armstrong, third daughter of James Armstrong, of Pinckney. She died Nov. 27th, in that same year, leaving one child, Margaret Amelia, who afterward married the Hon. Cyrus L. Sheldon. He was again married November 12, 1835, to Ann M. Jeffers, daughter of Benjamin Jeffers, of Pinckney.

He held the office of School Inspector for the town of Pinckney from 1829 to 1840, with the exception of one year, and was captain of the militia company of Pinckney for five years. From 1848 to 1866 he was a resident of the town of Lowville, and while residing there was three times elected as Justice of the Peace. In 1866 he removed to Copenhagen, where he still resides.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

YALE, BARNABAS

Barnabas Yale, son of Amasa Yale, was born in Rupert, Vt., April 9, 1784, and removed when a child to Salem, N. Y., where his father died, leaving him and two younger children to the care of a poor but industrious mother. He attended the Salem Academy two years, and then entered the law office of Mr. Blanchard, where he remained two and a half years. After removing with the family to Schenectady, Amsterdam, Johnstown, Minden and Little Falls, he was, in February, 1807, admitted to practice, and settled in Martinsburgh. He continued a member of the Lewis county Bar about twenty-five years, when he settled on a farm, and in 1836 removed to St. Lawrence county. He died October 11, 1854, at the residence of his son Lloyd C, in Norfolk, N. Y. While living in Martinsburgh, he held many years the office of Justice of the Peace, and in 1820, was appointed Surrogate. He was an active member of the Presbyterian church, and took a leading part in the various reform movements of the day. In 1825, he offered his name as an independent candidate for the office of County Clerk, and came within twenty-four votes of election. His brother, Paul Baxter Yale, lived many years in this town, and for a few years run a distillery. He afterwards removed to Turin, and died near Houseville, Sept. 16, 1872, aged 80 years. They had one sister, who married Allen Hills, and lived on the East road in Turin. He died Dec. 5, 1843, aged 59.

Sally Yale, mother of Barnabas and Paul B., died Oct. 13, 1842, aged 80, an early settler, but not one of the first.

(Source: History of Lewis County, New York; with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches 1805-1883.  By Franklin B. Hough.  Published by D. Mason & co., Syracuse, N.Y.)

YALE, WALTERWalter Yale

WALTER D. YALE, son of Paul B. Yale (born at Rupert, Vt., 1792) and Achsah Dewey Yale (born in Westfleld, Mass, 1795), was born In Martinsburgh in 1826. When nine years of age, he removed to the town of Turin, where he has since resided. He now resides with two sisters near Houseville, and has another sister whose home is at Pomonain, South California. He received his education from the common schools, and two terms attendance at a select school. He was then engaged in repairing the old Plank Road and teaming for some time. During the year 1855-6 he was engaged as an assistant in the census office at Albany, and in 1865 was a census enumerator of the town of Turin. For several years Mr. Yale was a conveyancer, and has served as notary public for the last twenty years, and for the last thirty-five years (except one) as clerk of his school district. He has been a teacher of a Bible class for thirty years. Mr. Yale is a man of fine native abilities, an accurate statistician and in the highest sense of the term a good citizen. 
   

(Source: Business Directory of Lewis County, N.Y. with map 1895 - 96; Compiled and Published by William Adams; Lowville, N.Y. J. P. Fralick, Printer; 99 and 100 Wieting Block; Syracuse, N.Y.)


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